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CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022)


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66 Questions MCQ Test CAT Mock Test Series | CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022)

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CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 1

Direction: Read the passage and answer the question based on it.

When did America quit bragging? When did we stop punching hardest, kicking highest, roaring loudest, beating the devil, and leaving everybody else in the dust?

We’re the richest country on earth—four and a half percent of the world’s people producing more than twenty percent of the world’s wealth. But you wouldn’t know from the cheapjack spending squabbles in Congress. We possess more military power than the rest of the planet combined. Though you couldn’t tell by the way we’re treated by everyone from the impotent Kremlin to the raggedy councils of the Taliban. The earth is ours. We have the might and means to achieve the spectacular—and no intention of doing so.

Witness our foreign policy deliberations, mired in snits about what kind of underachievement to pursue. Should we quit following North Korea’s Twitter feeds? Unfriend Iran on Facebook? Withdraw our troops from the nuclei of terrorism too soon or much too soon? Aid Bashar al-Assad or abet him? Appease China little by little or all at once?

The United States has set itself on a course of willful self-diminishment. Seventy-four years ago the perfect American was Superman, who happened to have been, like many of our forefathers, an undocumented alien. If Superman arrived today—assuming he could get past the INS and Homeland Security—he would be faster than the postal service, more powerful than a New York Times blogger, and able to ascend tall buildings in a single elevator.

But they wouldn’t be the tallest buildings, at least not if Superman stuck around Gotham. Nine out of ten of the tallest buildings in the world are now in Asia or the Middle East. Tallest is BurjKhalifa in Dubai. At 2,723 feet, it’s nearly twice as high as Chicago’s Willis Tower, formerly the Sears Tower. The last time America built the tallest building was when people were still ordering things by mail from the Sears catalog in 1974.

The biggest passenger airplane is the EU’s Airbus A380. The biggest airplane of all is the Russian Antonov An-225, now based in that hotbed of progress, Ukraine.

The fastest commercial aircraft was the Anglo-French Concorde supersonic transport, which began scheduled flights in the disco era and went out of service in 2003. And America helped kill a newer generation of longer-range, more fuel-efficient SSTs by cutting off government funding in 1971.

The US does hold the record for the fastest military aircraft, the Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird, flying at just over 2,193 mph. But that record was set while Gerald Ford was president, in an airplane built when President Obama was still in pull-ups.

The fastest passenger ship is American too, the SS United States, with a top speed of 38 knots. On July 7, 1952, it won the Atlantic crossing “Blue Riband,” beating the fourteen-year-old record held by the RMS Queen Mary by ten hours and two minutes. Today the United States sits derelict and rusting at a dock in Philadelphia.

But America has both the largest and the fastest warships, useful for getting numerous military personnel stateside quickly so that the next wars can be fought by the Afghan army, our NATO allies, African Union troops, Israel, and UN peacekeepers.

The list of our sub-marvels and un-wonders goes on. The Hoover Dam is by no means the world’s highest. It doesn’t even rank in the top twenty. Number one is the Nurek Dam in Tajikistan, a country that hardly has any water.

For fifty years, from 1931 to 1981, the US had the longest suspension bridge spans, first with the George Washington Bridge, then the Golden Gate, then the Verrazano-Narrows. Now even Hull, England, has a more spectacular place to make a bungee jump. Although we are in the lead with that. The elasticized drop from Colorado’s Royal Gorge Bridge is 1,053 feet long, showing that whatever America has lost in technological superiority we’ve made up for in sheer idiotic behavior.

Speaking of which, there’s our space program, which has basically ceased to exist. We have a NASA that might as well have been dreamed up by Alger Hiss. In order for Americans to get to the International Space Station, they have to go to Russia._________

Q. Which of the following is best in line to continue the last paragraph in the passage?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 1 Going by the sardonic tone that the author has used throughout the passage, we have no reasonable means to justify a positive or neutral continuation of the passage. That rules out Option A. Last paragraph does talk about NASA but option B is nothing new that cannot be gleaned from the information presented in the passage. Option C, seems to be the only logical continuation. Where US has to look up to Russia for any help in order to go to ISS, we have to look down the corridors of LHC at CERN, Geneva. No reference was made regarding the defence and security so that rules out the option.
CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 2

Direction: Read the passage and answer the question based on it.

When did America quit bragging? When did we stop punching hardest, kicking highest, roaring loudest, beating the devil, and leaving everybody else in the dust?

We’re the richest country on earth—four and a half percent of the world’s people producing more than twenty percent of the world’s wealth. But you wouldn’t know from the cheapjack spending squabbles in Congress. We possess more military power than the rest of the planet combined. Though you couldn’t tell by the way we’re treated by everyone from the impotent Kremlin to the raggedy councils of the Taliban. The earth is ours. We have the might and means to achieve the spectacular—and no intention of doing so.

Witness our foreign policy deliberations, mired in snits about what kind of underachievement to pursue. Should we quit following North Korea’s Twitter feeds? Unfriend Iran on Facebook? Withdraw our troops from the nuclei of terrorism too soon or much too soon? Aid Bashar al-Assad or abet him? Appease China little by little or all at once?

The United States has set itself on a course of willful self-diminishment. Seventy-four years ago the perfect American was Superman, who happened to have been, like many of our forefathers, an undocumented alien. If Superman arrived today—assuming he could get past the INS and Homeland Security—he would be faster than the postal service, more powerful than a New York Times blogger, and able to ascend tall buildings in a single elevator.

But they wouldn’t be the tallest buildings, at least not if Superman stuck around Gotham. Nine out of ten of the tallest buildings in the world are now in Asia or the Middle East. Tallest is BurjKhalifa in Dubai. At 2,723 feet, it’s nearly twice as high as Chicago’s Willis Tower, formerly the Sears Tower. The last time America built the tallest building was when people were still ordering things by mail from the Sears catalog in 1974.

The biggest passenger airplane is the EU’s Airbus A380. The biggest airplane of all is the Russian Antonov An-225, now based in that hotbed of progress, Ukraine.

The fastest commercial aircraft was the Anglo-French Concorde supersonic transport, which began scheduled flights in the disco era and went out of service in 2003. And America helped kill a newer generation of longer-range, more fuel-efficient SSTs by cutting off government funding in 1971.

The US does hold the record for the fastest military aircraft, the Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird, flying at just over 2,193 mph. But that record was set while Gerald Ford was president, in an airplane built when President Obama was still in pull-ups.

The fastest passenger ship is American too, the SS United States, with a top speed of 38 knots. On July 7, 1952, it won the Atlantic crossing “Blue Riband,” beating the fourteen-year-old record held by the RMS Queen Mary by ten hours and two minutes. Today the United States sits derelict and rusting at a dock in Philadelphia.

But America has both the largest and the fastest warships, useful for getting numerous military personnel stateside quickly so that the next wars can be fought by the Afghan army, our NATO allies, African Union troops, Israel, and UN peacekeepers.

The list of our sub-marvels and un-wonders goes on. The Hoover Dam is by no means the world’s highest. It doesn’t even rank in the top twenty. Number one is the Nurek Dam in Tajikistan, a country that hardly has any water.

For fifty years, from 1931 to 1981, the US had the longest suspension bridge spans, first with the George Washington Bridge, then the Golden Gate, then the Verrazano-Narrows. Now even Hull, England, has a more spectacular place to make a bungee jump. Although we are in the lead with that. The elasticized drop from Colorado’s Royal Gorge Bridge is 1,053 feet long, showing that whatever America has lost in technological superiority we’ve made up for in sheer idiotic behavior.

Speaking of which, there’s our space program, which has basically ceased to exist. We have a NASA that might as well have been dreamed up by Alger Hiss. In order for Americans to get to the International Space Station, they have to go to Russia._________

Q. Which of the following can be inferred on the basis of the information given in the 4th paragraph of the passage?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 2 Refer ‘If Superman arrived today—assuming he could get past the INS and Homeland Security’, where the author is making a snide reference to enhanced security measures that make it difficult for a person from foreign origin to enter the country. Option B is wrong as it assumes an extreme tone with the word ‘every’. ‘Kowtow’ means to be subservient to other someone or in front of others. There is no reference regarding the same.
CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 3

Direction: Read the passage and answer the question based on it.

When did America quit bragging? When did we stop punching hardest, kicking highest, roaring loudest, beating the devil, and leaving everybody else in the dust?

We’re the richest country on earth—four and a half percent of the world’s people producing more than twenty percent of the world’s wealth. But you wouldn’t know from the cheapjack spending squabbles in Congress. We possess more military power than the rest of the planet combined. Though you couldn’t tell by the way we’re treated by everyone from the impotent Kremlin to the raggedy councils of the Taliban. The earth is ours. We have the might and means to achieve the spectacular—and no intention of doing so.

Witness our foreign policy deliberations, mired in snits about what kind of underachievement to pursue. Should we quit following North Korea’s Twitter feeds? Unfriend Iran on Facebook? Withdraw our troops from the nuclei of terrorism too soon or much too soon? Aid Bashar al-Assad or abet him? Appease China little by little or all at once?

The United States has set itself on a course of willful self-diminishment. Seventy-four years ago the perfect American was Superman, who happened to have been, like many of our forefathers, an undocumented alien. If Superman arrived today—assuming he could get past the INS and Homeland Security—he would be faster than the postal service, more powerful than a New York Times blogger, and able to ascend tall buildings in a single elevator.

But they wouldn’t be the tallest buildings, at least not if Superman stuck around Gotham. Nine out of ten of the tallest buildings in the world are now in Asia or the Middle East. Tallest is BurjKhalifa in Dubai. At 2,723 feet, it’s nearly twice as high as Chicago’s Willis Tower, formerly the Sears Tower. The last time America built the tallest building was when people were still ordering things by mail from the Sears catalog in 1974.

The biggest passenger airplane is the EU’s Airbus A380. The biggest airplane of all is the Russian Antonov An-225, now based in that hotbed of progress, Ukraine.

The fastest commercial aircraft was the Anglo-French Concorde supersonic transport, which began scheduled flights in the disco era and went out of service in 2003. And America helped kill a newer generation of longer-range, more fuel-efficient SSTs by cutting off government funding in 1971.

The US does hold the record for the fastest military aircraft, the Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird, flying at just over 2,193 mph. But that record was set while Gerald Ford was president, in an airplane built when President Obama was still in pull-ups.

The fastest passenger ship is American too, the SS United States, with a top speed of 38 knots. On July 7, 1952, it won the Atlantic crossing “Blue Riband,” beating the fourteen-year-old record held by the RMS Queen Mary by ten hours and two minutes. Today the United States sits derelict and rusting at a dock in Philadelphia.

But America has both the largest and the fastest warships, useful for getting numerous military personnel stateside quickly so that the next wars can be fought by the Afghan army, our NATO allies, African Union troops, Israel, and UN peacekeepers.

The list of our sub-marvels and un-wonders goes on. The Hoover Dam is by no means the world’s highest. It doesn’t even rank in the top twenty. Number one is the Nurek Dam in Tajikistan, a country that hardly has any water.

For fifty years, from 1931 to 1981, the US had the longest suspension bridge spans, first with the George Washington Bridge, then the Golden Gate, then the Verrazano-Narrows. Now even Hull, England, has a more spectacular place to make a bungee jump. Although we are in the lead with that. The elasticized drop from Colorado’s Royal Gorge Bridge is 1,053 feet long, showing that whatever America has lost in technological superiority we’ve made up for in sheer idiotic behavior.

Speaking of which, there’s our space program, which has basically ceased to exist. We have a NASA that might as well have been dreamed up by Alger Hiss. In order for Americans to get to the International Space Station, they have to go to Russia._________

Q. Which of the following is/are correct as per the information given in the passage?

I. Having a powerful military in the world doesn’t necessarily guarantee ascendancy

II. America has made no technological progress in improving its fastest military aircraft

III. As per the author, the record with the longest drop off a bridge doesn’t count as an achievement

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 3 All the statements can be verified as per the information given in the passage.
CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 4

Direction: Read the passage and answer the question based on it.

When did America quit bragging? When did we stop punching hardest, kicking highest, roaring loudest, beating the devil, and leaving everybody else in the dust?

We’re the richest country on earth—four and a half percent of the world’s people producing more than twenty percent of the world’s wealth. But you wouldn’t know from the cheapjack spending squabbles in Congress. We possess more military power than the rest of the planet combined. Though you couldn’t tell by the way we’re treated by everyone from the impotent Kremlin to the raggedy councils of the Taliban. The earth is ours. We have the might and means to achieve the spectacular—and no intention of doing so.

Witness our foreign policy deliberations, mired in snits about what kind of underachievement to pursue. Should we quit following North Korea’s Twitter feeds? Unfriend Iran on Facebook? Withdraw our troops from the nuclei of terrorism too soon or much too soon? Aid Bashar al-Assad or abet him? Appease China little by little or all at once?

The United States has set itself on a course of willful self-diminishment. Seventy-four years ago the perfect American was Superman, who happened to have been, like many of our forefathers, an undocumented alien. If Superman arrived today—assuming he could get past the INS and Homeland Security—he would be faster than the postal service, more powerful than a New York Times blogger, and able to ascend tall buildings in a single elevator.

But they wouldn’t be the tallest buildings, at least not if Superman stuck around Gotham. Nine out of ten of the tallest buildings in the world are now in Asia or the Middle East. Tallest is BurjKhalifa in Dubai. At 2,723 feet, it’s nearly twice as high as Chicago’s Willis Tower, formerly the Sears Tower. The last time America built the tallest building was when people were still ordering things by mail from the Sears catalog in 1974.

The biggest passenger airplane is the EU’s Airbus A380. The biggest airplane of all is the Russian Antonov An-225, now based in that hotbed of progress, Ukraine.

The fastest commercial aircraft was the Anglo-French Concorde supersonic transport, which began scheduled flights in the disco era and went out of service in 2003. And America helped kill a newer generation of longer-range, more fuel-efficient SSTs by cutting off government funding in 1971.

The US does hold the record for the fastest military aircraft, the Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird, flying at just over 2,193 mph. But that record was set while Gerald Ford was president, in an airplane built when President Obama was still in pull-ups.

The fastest passenger ship is American too, the SS United States, with a top speed of 38 knots. On July 7, 1952, it won the Atlantic crossing “Blue Riband,” beating the fourteen-year-old record held by the RMS Queen Mary by ten hours and two minutes. Today the United States sits derelict and rusting at a dock in Philadelphia.

But America has both the largest and the fastest warships, useful for getting numerous military personnel stateside quickly so that the next wars can be fought by the Afghan army, our NATO allies, African Union troops, Israel, and UN peacekeepers.

The list of our sub-marvels and un-wonders goes on. The Hoover Dam is by no means the world’s highest. It doesn’t even rank in the top twenty. Number one is the Nurek Dam in Tajikistan, a country that hardly has any water.

For fifty years, from 1931 to 1981, the US had the longest suspension bridge spans, first with the George Washington Bridge, then the Golden Gate, then the Verrazano-Narrows. Now even Hull, England, has a more spectacular place to make a bungee jump. Although we are in the lead with that. The elasticized drop from Colorado’s Royal Gorge Bridge is 1,053 feet long, showing that whatever America has lost in technological superiority we’ve made up for in sheer idiotic behavior.

Speaking of which, there’s our space program, which has basically ceased to exist. We have a NASA that might as well have been dreamed up by Alger Hiss. In order for Americans to get to the International Space Station, they have to go to Russia._________

Q. Which of the following best captures the way in which the author starts the passage?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 4 Though used in a rhetorical manner. The questions at the very start arrest the reader’s attention and probes him to think about the factors responsible for the queries asked. ''hortatory'' means ''didactic'' or ''intended to preach''. The question in the beginning is meant to arrest the Reader’s attention but at the same time its not a meaningless rhetoric. Also B probes the reader to think about the factors responsible for the queries asked. Hence B is the best option.

C leaves out the main purpose - arresting reader’s attention, hence, is incorrect.

CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 5

Direction: Read the passage and answer the question based on it.

When did America quit bragging? When did we stop punching hardest, kicking highest, roaring loudest, beating the devil, and leaving everybody else in the dust?

We’re the richest country on earth—four and a half percent of the world’s people producing more than twenty percent of the world’s wealth. But you wouldn’t know from the cheapjack spending squabbles in Congress. We possess more military power than the rest of the planet combined. Though you couldn’t tell by the way we’re treated by everyone from the impotent Kremlin to the raggedy councils of the Taliban. The earth is ours. We have the might and means to achieve the spectacular—and no intention of doing so.

Witness our foreign policy deliberations, mired in snits about what kind of underachievement to pursue. Should we quit following North Korea’s Twitter feeds? Unfriend Iran on Facebook? Withdraw our troops from the nuclei of terrorism too soon or much too soon? Aid Bashar al-Assad or abet him? Appease China little by little or all at once?

The United States has set itself on a course of willful self-diminishment. Seventy-four years ago the perfect American was Superman, who happened to have been, like many of our forefathers, an undocumented alien. If Superman arrived today—assuming he could get past the INS and Homeland Security—he would be faster than the postal service, more powerful than a New York Times blogger, and able to ascend tall buildings in a single elevator.

But they wouldn’t be the tallest buildings, at least not if Superman stuck around Gotham. Nine out of ten of the tallest buildings in the world are now in Asia or the Middle East. Tallest is BurjKhalifa in Dubai. At 2,723 feet, it’s nearly twice as high as Chicago’s Willis Tower, formerly the Sears Tower. The last time America built the tallest building was when people were still ordering things by mail from the Sears catalog in 1974.

The biggest passenger airplane is the EU’s Airbus A380. The biggest airplane of all is the Russian Antonov An-225, now based in that hotbed of progress, Ukraine.

The fastest commercial aircraft was the Anglo-French Concorde supersonic transport, which began scheduled flights in the disco era and went out of service in 2003. And America helped kill a newer generation of longer-range, more fuel-efficient SSTs by cutting off government funding in 1971.

The US does hold the record for the fastest military aircraft, the Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird, flying at just over 2,193 mph. But that record was set while Gerald Ford was president, in an airplane built when President Obama was still in pull-ups.

The fastest passenger ship is American too, the SS United States, with a top speed of 38 knots. On July 7, 1952, it won the Atlantic crossing “Blue Riband,” beating the fourteen-year-old record held by the RMS Queen Mary by ten hours and two minutes. Today the United States sits derelict and rusting at a dock in Philadelphia.

But America has both the largest and the fastest warships, useful for getting numerous military personnel stateside quickly so that the next wars can be fought by the Afghan army, our NATO allies, African Union troops, Israel, and UN peacekeepers.

The list of our sub-marvels and un-wonders goes on. The Hoover Dam is by no means the world’s highest. It doesn’t even rank in the top twenty. Number one is the Nurek Dam in Tajikistan, a country that hardly has any water.

For fifty years, from 1931 to 1981, the US had the longest suspension bridge spans, first with the George Washington Bridge, then the Golden Gate, then the Verrazano-Narrows. Now even Hull, England, has a more spectacular place to make a bungee jump. Although we are in the lead with that. The elasticized drop from Colorado’s Royal Gorge Bridge is 1,053 feet long, showing that whatever America has lost in technological superiority we’ve made up for in sheer idiotic behavior.

Speaking of which, there’s our space program, which has basically ceased to exist. We have a NASA that might as well have been dreamed up by Alger Hiss. In order for Americans to get to the International Space Station, they have to go to Russia._________

Q. Which of the following best captures the tone of the author in the passage?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 5 Wistful: have intense yearning or desire

Fitful: marked with fits or occurring irregularly

Jestful: done or said with mockery

Virulent: Poisonous, or marked with spite

CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 6

Direction: Read the passage and answer the question based on it.

When did America quit bragging? When did we stop punching hardest, kicking highest, roaring loudest, beating the devil, and leaving everybody else in the dust?

We’re the richest country on earth—four and a half percent of the world’s people producing more than twenty percent of the world’s wealth. But you wouldn’t know from the cheapjack spending squabbles in Congress. We possess more military power than the rest of the planet combined. Though you couldn’t tell by the way we’re treated by everyone from the impotent Kremlin to the raggedy councils of the Taliban. The earth is ours. We have the might and means to achieve the spectacular—and no intention of doing so.

Witness our foreign policy deliberations, mired in snits about what kind of underachievement to pursue. Should we quit following North Korea’s Twitter feeds? Unfriend Iran on Facebook? Withdraw our troops from the nuclei of terrorism too soon or much too soon? Aid Bashar al-Assad or abet him? Appease China little by little or all at once?

The United States has set itself on a course of willful self-diminishment. Seventy-four years ago the perfect American was Superman, who happened to have been, like many of our forefathers, an undocumented alien. If Superman arrived today—assuming he could get past the INS and Homeland Security—he would be faster than the postal service, more powerful than a New York Times blogger, and able to ascend tall buildings in a single elevator.

But they wouldn’t be the tallest buildings, at least not if Superman stuck around Gotham. Nine out of ten of the tallest buildings in the world are now in Asia or the Middle East. Tallest is BurjKhalifa in Dubai. At 2,723 feet, it’s nearly twice as high as Chicago’s Willis Tower, formerly the Sears Tower. The last time America built the tallest building was when people were still ordering things by mail from the Sears catalog in 1974.

The biggest passenger airplane is the EU’s Airbus A380. The biggest airplane of all is the Russian Antonov An-225, now based in that hotbed of progress, Ukraine.

The fastest commercial aircraft was the Anglo-French Concorde supersonic transport, which began scheduled flights in the disco era and went out of service in 2003. And America helped kill a newer generation of longer-range, more fuel-efficient SSTs by cutting off government funding in 1971.

The US does hold the record for the fastest military aircraft, the Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird, flying at just over 2,193 mph. But that record was set while Gerald Ford was president, in an airplane built when President Obama was still in pull-ups.

The fastest passenger ship is American too, the SS United States, with a top speed of 38 knots. On July 7, 1952, it won the Atlantic crossing “Blue Riband,” beating the fourteen-year-old record held by the RMS Queen Mary by ten hours and two minutes. Today the United States sits derelict and rusting at a dock in Philadelphia.

But America has both the largest and the fastest warships, useful for getting numerous military personnel stateside quickly so that the next wars can be fought by the Afghan army, our NATO allies, African Union troops, Israel, and UN peacekeepers.

The list of our sub-marvels and un-wonders goes on. The Hoover Dam is by no means the world’s highest. It doesn’t even rank in the top twenty. Number one is the Nurek Dam in Tajikistan, a country that hardly has any water.

For fifty years, from 1931 to 1981, the US had the longest suspension bridge spans, first with the George Washington Bridge, then the Golden Gate, then the Verrazano-Narrows. Now even Hull, England, has a more spectacular place to make a bungee jump. Although we are in the lead with that. The elasticized drop from Colorado’s Royal Gorge Bridge is 1,053 feet long, showing that whatever America has lost in technological superiority we’ve made up for in sheer idiotic behavior.

Speaking of which, there’s our space program, which has basically ceased to exist. We have a NASA that might as well have been dreamed up by Alger Hiss. In order for Americans to get to the International Space Station, they have to go to Russia._________

Q. Which of the following best captures the meaning of the word ‘snit’?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 6 The word ‘snit’ means irritation, vexation or exasperation, or in state of agitation which in this context is used to convey that Americans are involved, in or in a state of agitation, over petty issues. So, in that context, the word Umbrage (to take offense) is the best option
CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 7

Direction: The five sentences (labelled 1,2,3,4, and 5) given in this question, when properly sequenced, form a coherent paragraph. Decide on the proper order for the sentence and key in this sequence of five numbers as your answer.

  1. If you are anxious about having someone in your home, many professionals provide support over the phone or video-conferencing and can help you become emotionally ready for in-home support.

  2. If someone makes you feel judged, stupid, or hopeless, of they make comments or use body language that feels condescending or disrespectful, do not work with them or end the relationship.

  3. Professionals include life coaches, organizing coaches, social workers, therapists, counselors, professional organizers, or psychologists who specialize in chronic disorganization.

  4. Recovery requires accurately identifying and addressing the underlying emotional needs, self-leadership, decision-making skills and cognitive habits that contribute to the behavioral manifestations of chronic disorganization.

  5. If you wish to consider working with professionals, the most important consideration is that you feel completely accepted and respected by them.


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 7 Notice carefully the words many professionals in line 1, which are taken up very well by professionals include….. in line 3, thereby giving us a logical pair 1-3. Naturally, these lines ought to be followed by line 4, which talks of what the professionals’ work is all about 1-3-4.

The pair 5-2 is an undeniable combination wherein the conditions for working with professionals are talked about. While line 5 speaks about these conditions in general, line 2 talks about these things in very specific details 13452.

CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 8

Direction: The five sentences (labelled 1,2,3,4, and 5) given in this question, when properly sequenced, form a coherent paragraph. Decide on the proper order for the sentence and key in this sequence of five numbers as your answer.

  1. The financial markets have sensed it and are preparing for disaster.

  2. Peripheral countries must abandon austerity as part of a Europe-wide programme to raise productivity, financial institutions must be taken into public ownership, and debt written off.

  3. Hidebound by neoliberal economics, they will continue with austerity, privatisation and liberalisation.

  4. After three years of festering, truly drastic action is now required.

  5. But it is unthinkable that Europe's current political leaders would embark on such changes.


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 8 This is an extremely tricky problem which can cause a lot of troubles if you do not spot the correct pairs. The one pair that is an absolute must is 53. Statement 5 refers to Europe''s current political leaders and the pronoun ''they'' in statement 3 refers to these leaders. This is the one conclusive pair in this case. The next step is identifying the opening sentence. We can see that statement 4 is the apt opening sentence in this case as it sets up the discussion for the other sentences. Hence the correct sequence is 42531.
CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 9

Direction: Read the passage and answer the question based on it.

“It’s easy predicting the future,” an old Soviet joke went. “What’s difficult is predicting the past.” There is a war going on over the interpretation of history. A search for a “correct” version of the past has been launched in a number of countries, often by embittered nationalist forces, as in Poland. But the most aggressive assault is being orchestrated by dictators like Vladimir Putin, and China’s Communist Party leadership.

There is much at stake in this revisionist enterprise. The most alarming goal is to reappraise leaders like Joseph Stalin and Mao Zedong, to whitewash their atrocities and ensure that, at least for a domestic audience, they are presented as heroic figures whose crimes were miniscule in comparison with their achievements. Another objective is to depict the country in question as both the ultimate victim and the ultimate winner.

The reassessment of Stalin dovetailed with Putin’s promotion of a narrative in which Russia is a great power that recovered from the chaos of the Boris Yeltsin era and overcame the hostility of determined enemies. According to a revised curriculum that Putin commissioned, Russia’s dark chapters—its domination of Eastern Europe, the Stalinist purges—were understandable responses to the country’s encirclement by foreign foes. Approved history texts paint a picture of an all-wise Russian state, under both Stalin and Putin.

In China, official histories continue to falsify the events of Mao Zedong’s Great Leap Forward, a collectivization campaign that serious scholars rank among the most lethal politically inspired catastrophes of all time, with an estimated 30 million people left dead from famine, forced labor, and other causes. Communist Party officials do not acknowledge anything approaching the full dimensions of the tragedy. Nor have they admitted that the party, and especially Mao, was responsible. Often, they blame the weather!

Chinese leaders may be even more concerned about presenting the “correct” interpretation of history than their Russian counterparts. An updated official version of the party history took 16 years to draft, including four extensive rewrites. In 2013, the General Office of the Communist Party Central Committee issued a secret directive prohibiting universities from permitting the discussion of the “Seven Don’t Mentions.”

The process of accounting for the crimes of earlier decades can raise a tangle of ethical and emotional challenges in any country. But resistance to a full examination of the past is especially bitter in societies where communism long prevailed. In China, Mao’s heirs still control the state, and the legitimacy of the system is built on veneration of the Great Helmsman. In Russia, the leadership praises the achievements of Stalin. In both countries, approving the acts of human monsters reinforces an overarching message that internal stability demands a rejection of liberal notions about individual freedom.

The communist system was responsible for four of the most destructive episodes of the 20th century. While few people today admire totalitarian Marxism as a governing system, there is a reluctance to reject it with the same moral clarity as in assessments of Nazism. As long as Stalin and Mao, two of history’s worst mass murderers, escape similar opprobrium in their own countries, a reckoning with historical truth and an understanding of its lessons will be postponed.

Q. Which of the following best captures the essence of the passage?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 9 Summary or essence of the passage takes into consideration that the dominant idea gets highlighted. Clearly, this passage talks about Russia and China under their respective ‘rulers’, which helps us rule out Option C, as it does not target the primary purpose. option A captures the essence. Option A is the answer as the main idea is how the rulers/governments of various countries have distorted the facts to suit their own agenda to propagate the false images of mass murders. Option B is close but incorrect as the rewriting of the history is happening in the present time, hence the use of the word history is incorrect. Option D is weak as the changes in the history have not been done to influence international policies.
CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 10

Direction: Read the passage and answer the question based on it.

“It’s easy predicting the future,” an old Soviet joke went. “What’s difficult is predicting the past.” There is a war going on over the interpretation of history. A search for a “correct” version of the past has been launched in a number of countries, often by embittered nationalist forces, as in Poland. But the most aggressive assault is being orchestrated by dictators like Vladimir Putin, and China’s Communist Party leadership.

There is much at stake in this revisionist enterprise. The most alarming goal is to reappraise leaders like Joseph Stalin and Mao Zedong, to whitewash their atrocities and ensure that, at least for a domestic audience, they are presented as heroic figures whose crimes were miniscule in comparison with their achievements. Another objective is to depict the country in question as both the ultimate victim and the ultimate winner.

The reassessment of Stalin dovetailed with Putin’s promotion of a narrative in which Russia is a great power that recovered from the chaos of the Boris Yeltsin era and overcame the hostility of determined enemies. According to a revised curriculum that Putin commissioned, Russia’s dark chapters—its domination of Eastern Europe, the Stalinist purges—were understandable responses to the country’s encirclement by foreign foes. Approved history texts paint a picture of an all-wise Russian state, under both Stalin and Putin.

In China, official histories continue to falsify the events of Mao Zedong’s Great Leap Forward, a collectivization campaign that serious scholars rank among the most lethal politically inspired catastrophes of all time, with an estimated 30 million people left dead from famine, forced labor, and other causes. Communist Party officials do not acknowledge anything approaching the full dimensions of the tragedy. Nor have they admitted that the party, and especially Mao, was responsible. Often, they blame the weather!

Chinese leaders may be even more concerned about presenting the “correct” interpretation of history than their Russian counterparts. An updated official version of the party history took 16 years to draft, including four extensive rewrites. In 2013, the General Office of the Communist Party Central Committee issued a secret directive prohibiting universities from permitting the discussion of the “Seven Don’t Mentions.”

The process of accounting for the crimes of earlier decades can raise a tangle of ethical and emotional challenges in any country. But resistance to a full examination of the past is especially bitter in societies where communism long prevailed. In China, Mao’s heirs still control the state, and the legitimacy of the system is built on veneration of the Great Helmsman. In Russia, the leadership praises the achievements of Stalin. In both countries, approving the acts of human monsters reinforces an overarching message that internal stability demands a rejection of liberal notions about individual freedom.

The communist system was responsible for four of the most destructive episodes of the 20th century. While few people today admire totalitarian Marxism as a governing system, there is a reluctance to reject it with the same moral clarity as in assessments of Nazism. As long as Stalin and Mao, two of history’s worst mass murderers, escape similar opprobrium in their own countries, a reckoning with historical truth and an understanding of its lessons will be postponed.

Q. Which of the following best captures tone of context –“Often, they blame the weather!”?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 10 The sentence ends with an exclamation mark indicating the irony and disbelief that the author experiences when he talks about the excuse given to cover the tragedies experienced during the Cultural Revolution. Hence, ‘Derision’ captures the essence of the statement. Condescension means haughtiness or patronizing behaviour. Scepticism is being doubtful. Sarcasm comes close second that captures the context, but there is no implicit taunt that could be gleaned from the option.
CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 11

Direction: Read the passage and answer the question based on it.

“It’s easy predicting the future,” an old Soviet joke went. “What’s difficult is predicting the past.” There is a war going on over the interpretation of history. A search for a “correct” version of the past has been launched in a number of countries, often by embittered nationalist forces, as in Poland. But the most aggressive assault is being orchestrated by dictators like Vladimir Putin, and China’s Communist Party leadership.

There is much at stake in this revisionist enterprise. The most alarming goal is to reappraise leaders like Joseph Stalin and Mao Zedong, to whitewash their atrocities and ensure that, at least for a domestic audience, they are presented as heroic figures whose crimes were miniscule in comparison with their achievements. Another objective is to depict the country in question as both the ultimate victim and the ultimate winner.

The reassessment of Stalin dovetailed with Putin’s promotion of a narrative in which Russia is a great power that recovered from the chaos of the Boris Yeltsin era and overcame the hostility of determined enemies. According to a revised curriculum that Putin commissioned, Russia’s dark chapters—its domination of Eastern Europe, the Stalinist purges—were understandable responses to the country’s encirclement by foreign foes. Approved history texts paint a picture of an all-wise Russian state, under both Stalin and Putin.

In China, official histories continue to falsify the events of Mao Zedong’s Great Leap Forward, a collectivization campaign that serious scholars rank among the most lethal politically inspired catastrophes of all time, with an estimated 30 million people left dead from famine, forced labor, and other causes. Communist Party officials do not acknowledge anything approaching the full dimensions of the tragedy. Nor have they admitted that the party, and especially Mao, was responsible. Often, they blame the weather!

Chinese leaders may be even more concerned about presenting the “correct” interpretation of history than their Russian counterparts. An updated official version of the party history took 16 years to draft, including four extensive rewrites. In 2013, the General Office of the Communist Party Central Committee issued a secret directive prohibiting universities from permitting the discussion of the “Seven Don’t Mentions.”

The process of accounting for the crimes of earlier decades can raise a tangle of ethical and emotional challenges in any country. But resistance to a full examination of the past is especially bitter in societies where communism long prevailed. In China, Mao’s heirs still control the state, and the legitimacy of the system is built on veneration of the Great Helmsman. In Russia, the leadership praises the achievements of Stalin. In both countries, approving the acts of human monsters reinforces an overarching message that internal stability demands a rejection of liberal notions about individual freedom.

The communist system was responsible for four of the most destructive episodes of the 20th century. While few people today admire totalitarian Marxism as a governing system, there is a reluctance to reject it with the same moral clarity as in assessments of Nazism. As long as Stalin and Mao, two of history’s worst mass murderers, escape similar opprobrium in their own countries, a reckoning with historical truth and an understanding of its lessons will be postponed.

Q. Which one of the following is most likely to be part of the “Seven Don’t Mentions”?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 11 Refer to the following excerpt- “Communist Party officials do not acknowledge ... full dimensions of the tragedy. Nor have they admitted that the party, and especially Mao, was responsible.”, which makes any denunciation of Mao a de facto impossible. All the other answer options talk about the events or situations that are too recent vis-a-vis the “Seven don’t mentions
CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 12

Direction: The five sentences (labelled 1,2,3,4, and 5) given in this question, when properly sequenced, form a coherent paragraph. Decide on the proper order for the sentence and key in this sequence of five numbers as your answer.

  1. Chemistry gave us medicine and more fresh food.

  2. Psychology is still taking baby steps, designing empirical tests of unsurprising observations.

  3. Physics gave us electricity, skyscrapers, and the Internet.

  4. It may be too much to expect science to reliably save marriages, but how desperately we need the secret to stopping people from burning others alive.

  5. Our fascination with the brain seems to come from a longing to make psychology more like a hard science and hence, we assume, more useful.


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 12 In the given case, we can clearly see that statements 3 and 1 will be placed next to each other. Also, these two statements follow statement E as these represent the examples of science being useful. So we have one set of connected statements: 5, 3 and 1. Also, between statement 5 and 4, we find that statement 5 is the more generic of the two and is the apt opening sentence for the given paragraph. Thus, we have identified our correct answer: 53124
CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 13

Direction: Read the passage and answer the question based on it.

HAINAN gibbons sing to each other every morning; but these days they do not have much to sing about. The species is endemic to a Chinese island that is not just a fruitful producer of rice and rubber but also a golfer’s paradise. Most of its forests have been destroyed to accommodate these activities, and the gibbon population is down to a couple of dozen. If the species disappears, it will be the first ape to go extinct since the beginning of the Holocene era 12,000 years ago.

Over the past few centuries mankind’s economic growth has caused many of the problems that other species face. But some argue, greater human prosperity now offers other species their best chance of hanging on.

There have been five great extinctions in the history of Earth. One killed off the dinosaurs; another wiped out up to 96% of species on Earth. All were probably caused by geological events or asteroids. Many scientists think a sixth is under way, this one caused by man.

From the time that he first sharpened a spear, technological progress and economic growth have allowed man to dominate the planet. He is reckoned to be responsible for wiping out much of the megafauna—giant elk, aurochs, marsupial lions—that once populated Earth. When he paddled across the Pacific he exterminated 50-90% of the bird life on the islands he colonised. Technology allowed him to kill creatures and chop down forests more efficiently and to produce enough food to sustain 7 billion people. As a result, over the past few centuries extinctions are thought to have been running at around 100 times the rate they would run at in his absence.

Yet when people start to reach middle-income level, other species start to benefit. That is partly because as people get richer, their interests begin to extend beyond necessities towards luxuries: for some people that mean expensive shoes, for others a day’s bird-watching. Green pressure groups start leaning on government, and governments pass laws to constrain companies from damaging the environment. In the West, a posse of pressure groups such as Greenpeace and the Environmental Defence Fund started up in the 1960s and helped bring about legislation in the 1970s and 1980s.

Growth also has indirect benefits for biodiversity. People clean up their environment in ways that help other species: through building sewage-treatment plants, for instance, and banning factories from pouring effluent into rivers. Prosperity and peace tend to go together, and conflict hurts other creatures as well as man, as the wars in the Congo have shown. Richer countries generally have better governments, and conservation cannot work without an effective state. Agricultural yields rise, allowing more food to be produced on less land. Population growth rates fall: in East Asia, fertility has dropped from 5.3 children per woman in the 1960s to 1.6 now.

One consequence is that in rich countries conditions for other species are, by and large, improving, and endangered creatures are moving away from the edge of the cliff. America’s bald eagle, for instance, was down to 412 breeding pairs in the 1960s. There are now 7,066. Whale populations are mostly recovering thanks to a moratorium on commercial whaling. More broadly, the Living Planet Index, a compilation of a wide range of indicators of biodiversity produced by the Zoological Society of London and WWF, has risen over the past 40 years in temperate (generally rich) countries and fallen in tropical (generally poor) ones. This is not just because rich countries export their growth to emerging markets. Look, for instance, at the fate of the forests on the Korean peninsula: in South Korea, one of the world’s fastest-growing countries in recent decades, forest cover is stable, whereas North Korea has lost a third of its forests in the past 20 years. _________

In emerging markets some indicators are improving as people press governments to look after the environment better. Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon, for instance, has fallen from 28,000 sq km in 2004 to 5,000 sq km last year. From a standing start in 1982, China has given over three times as much land to national parks as America has.

But the problem is by no means solved. Thousands of species are teetering on the edge of extinction. Whether or not they tip over depends in large part on two factors. One is climate change. If the temperature increase is at the medium to high end of the estimated range, then a biodiversity catastrophe is very likely. If it remains at the lower end—which the current hiatus in warming suggests is possible—then most species should not be too badly affected. The second is the demand for land. Habitat loss is the biggest threat to biodiversity. Mankind already cultivates around 40% of Earth’s land surface, and the demand for food is expected to double by 2050. If that demand is to be met without much more land being ploughed, yields will have to increase sharply. That means more fertiliser, pesticide and genetically modified (GM) seeds.

Q. Which of the following best completes the blank towards the end of 7th paragraph?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 13 For fill in the blank type Question, pay special attention to i) the context, ii) the statement(s) before the blank and iii) the statement(s) after the blank.

For this question revert to the portion stating the “Living Planet Index”; and “…rich countries export their growth to...”. This context is further corroborated by the instance of Korean Peninsula.

The sentence “This is not just because rich countries export their growth to emerging markets”, suggests that there are other causes also that affects the biodiversity and not just exports. Substantiating this fact by quoting North Korea as an example where no exports are taking place but still the forest cover is getting reduced. Also the two keywords ''exports'' and ''growth'' make option A more logical

CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 14

Direction: Read the passage and answer the question based on it.

HAINAN gibbons sing to each other every morning; but these days they do not have much to sing about. The species is endemic to a Chinese island that is not just a fruitful producer of rice and rubber but also a golfer’s paradise. Most of its forests have been destroyed to accommodate these activities, and the gibbon population is down to a couple of dozen. If the species disappears, it will be the first ape to go extinct since the beginning of the Holocene era 12,000 years ago.

Over the past few centuries mankind’s economic growth has caused many of the problems that other species face. But some argue, greater human prosperity now offers other species their best chance of hanging on.

There have been five great extinctions in the history of Earth. One killed off the dinosaurs; another wiped out up to 96% of species on Earth. All were probably caused by geological events or asteroids. Many scientists think a sixth is under way, this one caused by man.

From the time that he first sharpened a spear, technological progress and economic growth have allowed man to dominate the planet. He is reckoned to be responsible for wiping out much of the megafauna—giant elk, aurochs, marsupial lions—that once populated Earth. When he paddled across the Pacific he exterminated 50-90% of the bird life on the islands he colonised. Technology allowed him to kill creatures and chop down forests more efficiently and to produce enough food to sustain 7 billion people. As a result, over the past few centuries extinctions are thought to have been running at around 100 times the rate they would run at in his absence.

Yet when people start to reach middle-income level, other species start to benefit. That is partly because as people get richer, their interests begin to extend beyond necessities towards luxuries: for some people that mean expensive shoes, for others a day’s bird-watching. Green pressure groups start leaning on government, and governments pass laws to constrain companies from damaging the environment. In the West, a posse of pressure groups such as Greenpeace and the Environmental Defence Fund started up in the 1960s and helped bring about legislation in the 1970s and 1980s.

Growth also has indirect benefits for biodiversity. People clean up their environment in ways that help other species: through building sewage-treatment plants, for instance, and banning factories from pouring effluent into rivers. Prosperity and peace tend to go together, and conflict hurts other creatures as well as man, as the wars in the Congo have shown. Richer countries generally have better governments, and conservation cannot work without an effective state. Agricultural yields rise, allowing more food to be produced on less land. Population growth rates fall: in East Asia, fertility has dropped from 5.3 children per woman in the 1960s to 1.6 now.

One consequence is that in rich countries conditions for other species are, by and large, improving, and endangered creatures are moving away from the edge of the cliff. America’s bald eagle, for instance, was down to 412 breeding pairs in the 1960s. There are now 7,066. Whale populations are mostly recovering thanks to a moratorium on commercial whaling. More broadly, the Living Planet Index, a compilation of a wide range of indicators of biodiversity produced by the Zoological Society of London and WWF, has risen over the past 40 years in temperate (generally rich) countries and fallen in tropical (generally poor) ones. This is not just because rich countries export their growth to emerging markets. Look, for instance, at the fate of the forests on the Korean peninsula: in South Korea, one of the world’s fastest-growing countries in recent decades, forest cover is stable, whereas North Korea has lost a third of its forests in the past 20 years. _________

In emerging markets some indicators are improving as people press governments to look after the environment better. Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon, for instance, has fallen from 28,000 sq km in 2004 to 5,000 sq km last year. From a standing start in 1982, China has given over three times as much land to national parks as America has.

But the problem is by no means solved. Thousands of species are teetering on the edge of extinction. Whether or not they tip over depends in large part on two factors. One is climate change. If the temperature increase is at the medium to high end of the estimated range, then a biodiversity catastrophe is very likely. If it remains at the lower end—which the current hiatus in warming suggests is possible—then most species should not be too badly affected. The second is the demand for land. Habitat loss is the biggest threat to biodiversity. Mankind already cultivates around 40% of Earth’s land surface, and the demand for food is expected to double by 2050. If that demand is to be met without much more land being ploughed, yields will have to increase sharply. That means more fertiliser, pesticide and genetically modified (GM) seeds.

Q. What would be a suitable title for the passage above?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 14 In the passage the author has given many instances where growth has been beneficial for sustenance of endangered species. As it is because of the more growth, resources can be spared to take care of the environment Hence option 4 best captures the essence of the passage.
CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 15

Direction: Read the passage and answer the question based on it.

HAINAN gibbons sing to each other every morning; but these days they do not have much to sing about. The species is endemic to a Chinese island that is not just a fruitful producer of rice and rubber but also a golfer’s paradise. Most of its forests have been destroyed to accommodate these activities, and the gibbon population is down to a couple of dozen. If the species disappears, it will be the first ape to go extinct since the beginning of the Holocene era 12,000 years ago.

Over the past few centuries mankind’s economic growth has caused many of the problems that other species face. But some argue, greater human prosperity now offers other species their best chance of hanging on.

There have been five great extinctions in the history of Earth. One killed off the dinosaurs; another wiped out up to 96% of species on Earth. All were probably caused by geological events or asteroids. Many scientists think a sixth is under way, this one caused by man.

From the time that he first sharpened a spear, technological progress and economic growth have allowed man to dominate the planet. He is reckoned to be responsible for wiping out much of the megafauna—giant elk, aurochs, marsupial lions—that once populated Earth. When he paddled across the Pacific he exterminated 50-90% of the bird life on the islands he colonised. Technology allowed him to kill creatures and chop down forests more efficiently and to produce enough food to sustain 7 billion people. As a result, over the past few centuries extinctions are thought to have been running at around 100 times the rate they would run at in his absence.

Yet when people start to reach middle-income level, other species start to benefit. That is partly because as people get richer, their interests begin to extend beyond necessities towards luxuries: for some people that mean expensive shoes, for others a day’s bird-watching. Green pressure groups start leaning on government, and governments pass laws to constrain companies from damaging the environment. In the West, a posse of pressure groups such as Greenpeace and the Environmental Defence Fund started up in the 1960s and helped bring about legislation in the 1970s and 1980s.

Growth also has indirect benefits for biodiversity. People clean up their environment in ways that help other species: through building sewage-treatment plants, for instance, and banning factories from pouring effluent into rivers. Prosperity and peace tend to go together, and conflict hurts other creatures as well as man, as the wars in the Congo have shown. Richer countries generally have better governments, and conservation cannot work without an effective state. Agricultural yields rise, allowing more food to be produced on less land. Population growth rates fall: in East Asia, fertility has dropped from 5.3 children per woman in the 1960s to 1.6 now.

One consequence is that in rich countries conditions for other species are, by and large, improving, and endangered creatures are moving away from the edge of the cliff. America’s bald eagle, for instance, was down to 412 breeding pairs in the 1960s. There are now 7,066. Whale populations are mostly recovering thanks to a moratorium on commercial whaling. More broadly, the Living Planet Index, a compilation of a wide range of indicators of biodiversity produced by the Zoological Society of London and WWF, has risen over the past 40 years in temperate (generally rich) countries and fallen in tropical (generally poor) ones. This is not just because rich countries export their growth to emerging markets. Look, for instance, at the fate of the forests on the Korean peninsula: in South Korea, one of the world’s fastest-growing countries in recent decades, forest cover is stable, whereas North Korea has lost a third of its forests in the past 20 years. _________

In emerging markets some indicators are improving as people press governments to look after the environment better. Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon, for instance, has fallen from 28,000 sq km in 2004 to 5,000 sq km last year. From a standing start in 1982, China has given over three times as much land to national parks as America has.

But the problem is by no means solved. Thousands of species are teetering on the edge of extinction. Whether or not they tip over depends in large part on two factors. One is climate change. If the temperature increase is at the medium to high end of the estimated range, then a biodiversity catastrophe is very likely. If it remains at the lower end—which the current hiatus in warming suggests is possible—then most species should not be too badly affected. The second is the demand for land. Habitat loss is the biggest threat to biodiversity. Mankind already cultivates around 40% of Earth’s land surface, and the demand for food is expected to double by 2050. If that demand is to be met without much more land being ploughed, yields will have to increase sharply. That means more fertiliser, pesticide and genetically modified (GM) seeds.

Q. Which of the following has not been mentioned as a consequence leading to benefit to biodiversity?

I) Growth spells fruition of more environment friendly organisations, such as Green Peace, willing to fight for better environment

II) A stable government in a country brings-out environment friendly policies

III) Restrictive trade policies have a direct consequence over the environment

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 15 This statement does not find any mention in the passage.
CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 16

Direction: Read the passage and answer the question based on it.

HAINAN gibbons sing to each other every morning; but these days they do not have much to sing about. The species is endemic to a Chinese island that is not just a fruitful producer of rice and rubber but also a golfer’s paradise. Most of its forests have been destroyed to accommodate these activities, and the gibbon population is down to a couple of dozen. If the species disappears, it will be the first ape to go extinct since the beginning of the Holocene era 12,000 years ago.

Over the past few centuries mankind’s economic growth has caused many of the problems that other species face. But some argue, greater human prosperity now offers other species their best chance of hanging on.

There have been five great extinctions in the history of Earth. One killed off the dinosaurs; another wiped out up to 96% of species on Earth. All were probably caused by geological events or asteroids. Many scientists think a sixth is under way, this one caused by man.

From the time that he first sharpened a spear, technological progress and economic growth have allowed man to dominate the planet. He is reckoned to be responsible for wiping out much of the megafauna—giant elk, aurochs, marsupial lions—that once populated Earth. When he paddled across the Pacific he exterminated 50-90% of the bird life on the islands he colonised. Technology allowed him to kill creatures and chop down forests more efficiently and to produce enough food to sustain 7 billion people. As a result, over the past few centuries extinctions are thought to have been running at around 100 times the rate they would run at in his absence.

Yet when people start to reach middle-income level, other species start to benefit. That is partly because as people get richer, their interests begin to extend beyond necessities towards luxuries: for some people that mean expensive shoes, for others a day’s bird-watching. Green pressure groups start leaning on government, and governments pass laws to constrain companies from damaging the environment. In the West, a posse of pressure groups such as Greenpeace and the Environmental Defence Fund started up in the 1960s and helped bring about legislation in the 1970s and 1980s.

Growth also has indirect benefits for biodiversity. People clean up their environment in ways that help other species: through building sewage-treatment plants, for instance, and banning factories from pouring effluent into rivers. Prosperity and peace tend to go together, and conflict hurts other creatures as well as man, as the wars in the Congo have shown. Richer countries generally have better governments, and conservation cannot work without an effective state. Agricultural yields rise, allowing more food to be produced on less land. Population growth rates fall: in East Asia, fertility has dropped from 5.3 children per woman in the 1960s to 1.6 now.

One consequence is that in rich countries conditions for other species are, by and large, improving, and endangered creatures are moving away from the edge of the cliff. America’s bald eagle, for instance, was down to 412 breeding pairs in the 1960s. There are now 7,066. Whale populations are mostly recovering thanks to a moratorium on commercial whaling. More broadly, the Living Planet Index, a compilation of a wide range of indicators of biodiversity produced by the Zoological Society of London and WWF, has risen over the past 40 years in temperate (generally rich) countries and fallen in tropical (generally poor) ones. This is not just because rich countries export their growth to emerging markets. Look, for instance, at the fate of the forests on the Korean peninsula: in South Korea, one of the world’s fastest-growing countries in recent decades, forest cover is stable, whereas North Korea has lost a third of its forests in the past 20 years. _________

In emerging markets some indicators are improving as people press governments to look after the environment better. Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon, for instance, has fallen from 28,000 sq km in 2004 to 5,000 sq km last year. From a standing start in 1982, China has given over three times as much land to national parks as America has.

But the problem is by no means solved. Thousands of species are teetering on the edge of extinction. Whether or not they tip over depends in large part on two factors. One is climate change. If the temperature increase is at the medium to high end of the estimated range, then a biodiversity catastrophe is very likely. If it remains at the lower end—which the current hiatus in warming suggests is possible—then most species should not be too badly affected. The second is the demand for land. Habitat loss is the biggest threat to biodiversity. Mankind already cultivates around 40% of Earth’s land surface, and the demand for food is expected to double by 2050. If that demand is to be met without much more land being ploughed, yields will have to increase sharply. That means more fertiliser, pesticide and genetically modified (GM) seeds.

Q. Which of the following could you infer on the basis of the last statement of 7th paragraph (the one that best fits in the blank)?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 16 For fill in the blank type Question, pay special attention to i) the context, ii) the statement(s) before the blank and iii) the statement(s) after the blank.

For this question revert to the portion stating the “Living Planet Index”; and “…rich countries export their growth to...”. This context is further corroborated by the instance of Korean Peninsula.

The sentence “This is not just because rich countries export their growth to emerging markets”, suggests that there are other causes also that affects the biodiversity and not just exports. Substantiating this fact by quoting North Korea as an example where no exports are taking place but still the forest cover is getting reduced

CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 17

Direction: Read the passage and answer the question based on it.

HAINAN gibbons sing to each other every morning; but these days they do not have much to sing about. The species is endemic to a Chinese island that is not just a fruitful producer of rice and rubber but also a golfer’s paradise. Most of its forests have been destroyed to accommodate these activities, and the gibbon population is down to a couple of dozen. If the species disappears, it will be the first ape to go extinct since the beginning of the Holocene era 12,000 years ago.

Over the past few centuries mankind’s economic growth has caused many of the problems that other species face. But some argue, greater human prosperity now offers other species their best chance of hanging on.

There have been five great extinctions in the history of Earth. One killed off the dinosaurs; another wiped out up to 96% of species on Earth. All were probably caused by geological events or asteroids. Many scientists think a sixth is under way, this one caused by man.

From the time that he first sharpened a spear, technological progress and economic growth have allowed man to dominate the planet. He is reckoned to be responsible for wiping out much of the megafauna—giant elk, aurochs, marsupial lions—that once populated Earth. When he paddled across the Pacific he exterminated 50-90% of the bird life on the islands he colonised. Technology allowed him to kill creatures and chop down forests more efficiently and to produce enough food to sustain 7 billion people. As a result, over the past few centuries extinctions are thought to have been running at around 100 times the rate they would run at in his absence.

Yet when people start to reach middle-income level, other species start to benefit. That is partly because as people get richer, their interests begin to extend beyond necessities towards luxuries: for some people that mean expensive shoes, for others a day’s bird-watching. Green pressure groups start leaning on government, and governments pass laws to constrain companies from damaging the environment. In the West, a posse of pressure groups such as Greenpeace and the Environmental Defence Fund started up in the 1960s and helped bring about legislation in the 1970s and 1980s.

Growth also has indirect benefits for biodiversity. People clean up their environment in ways that help other species: through building sewage-treatment plants, for instance, and banning factories from pouring effluent into rivers. Prosperity and peace tend to go together, and conflict hurts other creatures as well as man, as the wars in the Congo have shown. Richer countries generally have better governments, and conservation cannot work without an effective state. Agricultural yields rise, allowing more food to be produced on less land. Population growth rates fall: in East Asia, fertility has dropped from 5.3 children per woman in the 1960s to 1.6 now.

One consequence is that in rich countries conditions for other species are, by and large, improving, and endangered creatures are moving away from the edge of the cliff. America’s bald eagle, for instance, was down to 412 breeding pairs in the 1960s. There are now 7,066. Whale populations are mostly recovering thanks to a moratorium on commercial whaling. More broadly, the Living Planet Index, a compilation of a wide range of indicators of biodiversity produced by the Zoological Society of London and WWF, has risen over the past 40 years in temperate (generally rich) countries and fallen in tropical (generally poor) ones. This is not just because rich countries export their growth to emerging markets. Look, for instance, at the fate of the forests on the Korean peninsula: in South Korea, one of the world’s fastest-growing countries in recent decades, forest cover is stable, whereas North Korea has lost a third of its forests in the past 20 years. _________

In emerging markets some indicators are improving as people press governments to look after the environment better. Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon, for instance, has fallen from 28,000 sq km in 2004 to 5,000 sq km last year. From a standing start in 1982, China has given over three times as much land to national parks as America has.

But the problem is by no means solved. Thousands of species are teetering on the edge of extinction. Whether or not they tip over depends in large part on two factors. One is climate change. If the temperature increase is at the medium to high end of the estimated range, then a biodiversity catastrophe is very likely. If it remains at the lower end—which the current hiatus in warming suggests is possible—then most species should not be too badly affected. The second is the demand for land. Habitat loss is the biggest threat to biodiversity. Mankind already cultivates around 40% of Earth’s land surface, and the demand for food is expected to double by 2050. If that demand is to be met without much more land being ploughed, yields will have to increase sharply. That means more fertiliser, pesticide and genetically modified (GM) seeds.

Q. The tone of the author of the passage is-

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 17 The tone of author of the passage is analytical in nature. He provides analysis of information & facts which go on to explain that growth has many indirect benefits for biodiversity. Often quoting examples to substantiate his point.
CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 18

Direction: Read the passage and answer the question based on it.

HAINAN gibbons sing to each other every morning; but these days they do not have much to sing about. The species is endemic to a Chinese island that is not just a fruitful producer of rice and rubber but also a golfer’s paradise. Most of its forests have been destroyed to accommodate these activities, and the gibbon population is down to a couple of dozen. If the species disappears, it will be the first ape to go extinct since the beginning of the Holocene era 12,000 years ago.

Over the past few centuries mankind’s economic growth has caused many of the problems that other species face. But some argue, greater human prosperity now offers other species their best chance of hanging on.

There have been five great extinctions in the history of Earth. One killed off the dinosaurs; another wiped out up to 96% of species on Earth. All were probably caused by geological events or asteroids. Many scientists think a sixth is under way, this one caused by man.

From the time that he first sharpened a spear, technological progress and economic growth have allowed man to dominate the planet. He is reckoned to be responsible for wiping out much of the megafauna—giant elk, aurochs, marsupial lions—that once populated Earth. When he paddled across the Pacific he exterminated 50-90% of the bird life on the islands he colonised. Technology allowed him to kill creatures and chop down forests more efficiently and to produce enough food to sustain 7 billion people. As a result, over the past few centuries extinctions are thought to have been running at around 100 times the rate they would run at in his absence.

Yet when people start to reach middle-income level, other species start to benefit. That is partly because as people get richer, their interests begin to extend beyond necessities towards luxuries: for some people that mean expensive shoes, for others a day’s bird-watching. Green pressure groups start leaning on government, and governments pass laws to constrain companies from damaging the environment. In the West, a posse of pressure groups such as Greenpeace and the Environmental Defence Fund started up in the 1960s and helped bring about legislation in the 1970s and 1980s.

Growth also has indirect benefits for biodiversity. People clean up their environment in ways that help other species: through building sewage-treatment plants, for instance, and banning factories from pouring effluent into rivers. Prosperity and peace tend to go together, and conflict hurts other creatures as well as man, as the wars in the Congo have shown. Richer countries generally have better governments, and conservation cannot work without an effective state. Agricultural yields rise, allowing more food to be produced on less land. Population growth rates fall: in East Asia, fertility has dropped from 5.3 children per woman in the 1960s to 1.6 now.

One consequence is that in rich countries conditions for other species are, by and large, improving, and endangered creatures are moving away from the edge of the cliff. America’s bald eagle, for instance, was down to 412 breeding pairs in the 1960s. There are now 7,066. Whale populations are mostly recovering thanks to a moratorium on commercial whaling. More broadly, the Living Planet Index, a compilation of a wide range of indicators of biodiversity produced by the Zoological Society of London and WWF, has risen over the past 40 years in temperate (generally rich) countries and fallen in tropical (generally poor) ones. This is not just because rich countries export their growth to emerging markets. Look, for instance, at the fate of the forests on the Korean peninsula: in South Korea, one of the world’s fastest-growing countries in recent decades, forest cover is stable, whereas North Korea has lost a third of its forests in the past 20 years. _________

In emerging markets some indicators are improving as people press governments to look after the environment better. Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon, for instance, has fallen from 28,000 sq km in 2004 to 5,000 sq km last year. From a standing start in 1982, China has given over three times as much land to national parks as America has.

But the problem is by no means solved. Thousands of species are teetering on the edge of extinction. Whether or not they tip over depends in large part on two factors. One is climate change. If the temperature increase is at the medium to high end of the estimated range, then a biodiversity catastrophe is very likely. If it remains at the lower end—which the current hiatus in warming suggests is possible—then most species should not be too badly affected. The second is the demand for land. Habitat loss is the biggest threat to biodiversity. Mankind already cultivates around 40% of Earth’s land surface, and the demand for food is expected to double by 2050. If that demand is to be met without much more land being ploughed, yields will have to increase sharply. That means more fertiliser, pesticide and genetically modified (GM) seeds.

Q. Which of the following options is correct as per the information given in the passage, except?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 18 C, answer option C is factually wrong as it cannot be said that when they came into existence. Refer first para, last sentence
CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 19

Direction: The five sentences (labelled 1,2,3,4, and 5) given in this question, when properly sequenced, form a coherent paragraph. Decide on the proper order for the sentence and key in this sequence of five numbers as your answer.

  1. Those exposed to particulate air pollution were more likely to die from respiratory problems, like pneumonia, emphysema and bronchitis, and also from cardiovascular problems, like heart attacks.

  2. The analysis of 368,000 British people over 38 years also showed that those living in the most polluted places have a 14% higher risk of dying than those in the least polluted areas.

  3. "There is an imperative that, because the effects are so long-lasting, we really ought to act on it. We have to think about what we are doing to the long-term health of the population."

  4. "What this study shows is that the [health] effects of air pollution persist for a very long time," said Dr Anna Hansell, at Imperial College London, who led the new study.

  5. Air pollution raises the risk of death for many decades after exposure, according to the longest-running study to date.


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 19 The correct order in this case is: 5-2-1-4-3. Statement 5 is the generic opening sentence in this case. Statement 2 follows this up by mentioning the details of the statement mentioned in statement 5. Statement 1 then provides further details. Statements 4 and 3 (in that order) form the concluding set by providing us an expert opinion on the given study.
CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 20

Direction: Read the passage and answer the question based on it.

AusAID has just joined the litany of calls for business to become more involved in development. NGOs and governments want to encourage business to deliver better quality of life in poor countries.

But it’s difficult for businesses to know how to respond to this call. Is this just one more action item to send to the folks working over in the Corporate Social Responsibility department – wherever that is? Can that tiny CSR budget be stretched beyond the existing environmental and community spending to now include development?

On the contrary, the new call is for businesses to become aware of profitable opportunities in the developing world. These opportunities will earn them a healthy profit but at the same time further development goals. This is not a CSR “add-on”.

The fastest-growing markets are in poor or middle-income countries. Companies with foresight may choose to enter a growing market in order to gain a foothold, even if initially there are too few paying customers.

This is particularly valuable when it comes to products that customers don’t switch easily, such as mobile phones or banks. These markets can prove more profitable than expected, as poor consumers see the usefulness of the product. And the development impact can be huge: PNG’s income increased by 1.4% when mobile phones were introduced, because better market information was reaching farmers.

Setting up a good supply chain can deliver low costs and high quality. Local suppliers and local workers may lack needed attributes such as standard business practices, and basic and specialized skills. They may even lack basic health, in an AIDS-ridden economy, with a huge impact on a supply chain.

A business can profit from offering training and health services, provided the subsequent competition for those better workers is not too intense. For instance, Adidas Asia worked with an NGO, Marie Stopes International, to improve the health and education of its female workers.

Information problems and bad court systems mean that many markets do not exist at all in poor countries. But this predicament represents an opening for businesses that can come up with an innovative solution to a market failure. For example, prior to microfinance, poor people in many regions could not access the legal banking sector, at any interest rate. Lending to groups was an innovation that gave them access to credit markets. Likewise, bank transfers for payments do not exist in many remote regions, where the nearest bank could be fifty miles away; thanks to Vodafone Kenya, such payments can now be made via a local mobile phone store.

Coordination failures occur when activities that affect each other positively fail to get off the ground. The impetus for Australian non-profit B4MD’s project in the PNG Highlands is a classic example: there was no regular transportation for agricultural produce because buyers were not aware that the region had enough surplus produce available to make the service worthwhile. Many women farmers wanted to sell produce, but no farmer on her own would have found it worthwhile to organize transport. Packaging company Visy came up with technological innovations that enabled transport of fragile produce such as eggs. There is now a sufficient supply from different producers to make a regular transport service worthwhile.

Making inroads into coordination problems can come about through several businesses working together, or a broker coming in to get this cooperation started. And introducing complementary industries (for example, a timber mill and furniture production) is often a part of this mix.

Where does CSR fit into all of this? Companies may be more likely to explore these options if there is an added benefit of stakeholder goodwill from achieving development goals. And achieving development goals may unlock more resources: AusAID’s decision to support an initiative for mobile phone banking in Cambodia indicates that aid agencies may be prepared to help if the business initiative will deliver enough development impact.

But these are side benefits to the main game: profitably opening new markets in the developing world, to the benefit of all.

Q. Which of the following could be an apt title for the passage above?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 20 The whole passage highlights the point that organizations can venture into development in poor or under-developed countries and still make profit.
CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 21

Direction: Read the passage and answer the question based on it.

AusAID has just joined the litany of calls for business to become more involved in development. NGOs and governments want to encourage business to deliver better quality of life in poor countries.

But it’s difficult for businesses to know how to respond to this call. Is this just one more action item to send to the folks working over in the Corporate Social Responsibility department – wherever that is? Can that tiny CSR budget be stretched beyond the existing environmental and community spending to now include development?

On the contrary, the new call is for businesses to become aware of profitable opportunities in the developing world. These opportunities will earn them a healthy profit but at the same time further development goals. This is not a CSR “add-on”.

The fastest-growing markets are in poor or middle-income countries. Companies with foresight may choose to enter a growing market in order to gain a foothold, even if initially there are too few paying customers.

This is particularly valuable when it comes to products that customers don’t switch easily, such as mobile phones or banks. These markets can prove more profitable than expected, as poor consumers see the usefulness of the product. And the development impact can be huge: PNG’s income increased by 1.4% when mobile phones were introduced, because better market information was reaching farmers.

Setting up a good supply chain can deliver low costs and high quality. Local suppliers and local workers may lack needed attributes such as standard business practices, and basic and specialized skills. They may even lack basic health, in an AIDS-ridden economy, with a huge impact on a supply chain.

A business can profit from offering training and health services, provided the subsequent competition for those better workers is not too intense. For instance, Adidas Asia worked with an NGO, Marie Stopes International, to improve the health and education of its female workers.

Information problems and bad court systems mean that many markets do not exist at all in poor countries. But this predicament represents an opening for businesses that can come up with an innovative solution to a market failure. For example, prior to microfinance, poor people in many regions could not access the legal banking sector, at any interest rate. Lending to groups was an innovation that gave them access to credit markets. Likewise, bank transfers for payments do not exist in many remote regions, where the nearest bank could be fifty miles away; thanks to Vodafone Kenya, such payments can now be made via a local mobile phone store.

Coordination failures occur when activities that affect each other positively fail to get off the ground. The impetus for Australian non-profit B4MD’s project in the PNG Highlands is a classic example: there was no regular transportation for agricultural produce because buyers were not aware that the region had enough surplus produce available to make the service worthwhile. Many women farmers wanted to sell produce, but no farmer on her own would have found it worthwhile to organize transport. Packaging company Visy came up with technological innovations that enabled transport of fragile produce such as eggs. There is now a sufficient supply from different producers to make a regular transport service worthwhile.

Making inroads into coordination problems can come about through several businesses working together, or a broker coming in to get this cooperation started. And introducing complementary industries (for example, a timber mill and furniture production) is often a part of this mix.

Where does CSR fit into all of this? Companies may be more likely to explore these options if there is an added benefit of stakeholder goodwill from achieving development goals. And achieving development goals may unlock more resources: AusAID’s decision to support an initiative for mobile phone banking in Cambodia indicates that aid agencies may be prepared to help if the business initiative will deliver enough development impact.

But these are side benefits to the main game: profitably opening new markets in the developing world, to the benefit of all.

Q. What is the intent of the author when he raised the issue of “Coordination Failure”?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 21 When coordination failure occurs, two seemingly distinct business domains fail to collaborate for the want of better opportunity as is highlighted by the example of farmers in PNG highlands. A third party steps in and bridges the gap between the two, making it viable for the two parties to transact with each other. Hence, correct answer: A Option B is the definition of the coordination failure and not the intent of the author while stating the same.
CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 22

Direction: Read the passage and answer the question based on it.

AusAID has just joined the litany of calls for business to become more involved in development. NGOs and governments want to encourage business to deliver better quality of life in poor countries.

But it’s difficult for businesses to know how to respond to this call. Is this just one more action item to send to the folks working over in the Corporate Social Responsibility department – wherever that is? Can that tiny CSR budget be stretched beyond the existing environmental and community spending to now include development?

On the contrary, the new call is for businesses to become aware of profitable opportunities in the developing world. These opportunities will earn them a healthy profit but at the same time further development goals. This is not a CSR “add-on”.

The fastest-growing markets are in poor or middle-income countries. Companies with foresight may choose to enter a growing market in order to gain a foothold, even if initially there are too few paying customers.

This is particularly valuable when it comes to products that customers don’t switch easily, such as mobile phones or banks. These markets can prove more profitable than expected, as poor consumers see the usefulness of the product. And the development impact can be huge: PNG’s income increased by 1.4% when mobile phones were introduced, because better market information was reaching farmers.

Setting up a good supply chain can deliver low costs and high quality. Local suppliers and local workers may lack needed attributes such as standard business practices, and basic and specialized skills. They may even lack basic health, in an AIDS-ridden economy, with a huge impact on a supply chain.

A business can profit from offering training and health services, provided the subsequent competition for those better workers is not too intense. For instance, Adidas Asia worked with an NGO, Marie Stopes International, to improve the health and education of its female workers.

Information problems and bad court systems mean that many markets do not exist at all in poor countries. But this predicament represents an opening for businesses that can come up with an innovative solution to a market failure. For example, prior to microfinance, poor people in many regions could not access the legal banking sector, at any interest rate. Lending to groups was an innovation that gave them access to credit markets. Likewise, bank transfers for payments do not exist in many remote regions, where the nearest bank could be fifty miles away; thanks to Vodafone Kenya, such payments can now be made via a local mobile phone store.

Coordination failures occur when activities that affect each other positively fail to get off the ground. The impetus for Australian non-profit B4MD’s project in the PNG Highlands is a classic example: there was no regular transportation for agricultural produce because buyers were not aware that the region had enough surplus produce available to make the service worthwhile. Many women farmers wanted to sell produce, but no farmer on her own would have found it worthwhile to organize transport. Packaging company Visy came up with technological innovations that enabled transport of fragile produce such as eggs. There is now a sufficient supply from different producers to make a regular transport service worthwhile.

Making inroads into coordination problems can come about through several businesses working together, or a broker coming in to get this cooperation started. And introducing complementary industries (for example, a timber mill and furniture production) is often a part of this mix.

Where does CSR fit into all of this? Companies may be more likely to explore these options if there is an added benefit of stakeholder goodwill from achieving development goals. And achieving development goals may unlock more resources: AusAID’s decision to support an initiative for mobile phone banking in Cambodia indicates that aid agencies may be prepared to help if the business initiative will deliver enough development impact.

But these are side benefits to the main game: profitably opening new markets in the developing world, to the benefit of all.

Q. Which of the following strategies has not been discussed that could help a business establish a meaningful market in the developing country

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 22 Only Option B has not been mentioned in the passage. Option A and C are clearly mentioned in 7th para and 6th para respectively. and Option D is mentioned in the last para of the passage as AusAID has supported the initiative for mobile phone banking.
CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 23

The four sentences (labelled 1, 2, 3, 4) below, when properly sequenced would yield a coherent paragraph. Decide on the proper sequencing of the order of the sentences and key in the sequence of the four numbers as your answer:

  1. But today there is an epochal challenge to rethink and reconstitute the vision and practice of development as a shared responsibility - a sharing which binds both the agent and the audience, the developed world and the developing, in a bond of shared destiny.

  2. We are at a crossroads now in our vision and practice of development.

  3. This calls for the cultivation of an appropriate ethical mode of being in our lives which enables us to realize this global and planetary situation of shared living and responsibility.

  4. Half a century ago, development began as a hope for a better human possibility, but in the last fifty years, this hope has lost itself in the dreary desert of various kinds of hegemonic applications.


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 23 A brief reading of the sentences suggests that the paragraph is about the change needed in the way we go about development. 2 introduces the topic at hand, that this is a watershed moment when it comes to the subject of development. 41 make a mandatory pair, which talks about what the purpose of development was at the beginning and how it needs to be altered to suit the needs of today. 3 then aptly ends the paragraph, suggesting the measures that could be taken to counter the same. Hence, the proper sequence would be 2413.
CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 24

Direction: Read the passage and answer the question based on it.

Apple doesn't keep secrets the way it once did. Before the company's latest product launch rumours swirled that it would depart from its practice of rolling out one new iPhone a year and launch two instead. And so it did. But at least the pricier of the new smartphones, the iPhone 5s, will make it easier for users to keep their secrets safe, thanks to a fingerprint scanner built into its "home" button. This feature, too, slipped out early, as did news of the arrival of a cheaper, plastic-backed and unusually colourful iPhone 5c.

Apple-watchers have long awaited a less fancy smartphone to compete with cheap-and-cheerful Android phones in places like China, where the company has been rapidly losing market share to smartphones running on Google's operating system. But the 5c, its innards almost identical to last year's iPhone 5, will remain nearly as distant a dream for many gadget-lovers in emerging countries as the more expensive 5s. Indeed, the 5c is set to retail for around 4,500 yuan, or $730, in China, a third higher than the $549 (or $99 with a two-year contract) it will cost in America.

At the same time, it may eat into the sales of the flagship 5s at home, where it will cost $649 (or $199 with a contract) and in Europe. The top model's panoply of nifty features—a faster processor, a dedicated chip to handle data acquired by built-in movement sensors, making it into a self-tracking device akin to FitBit or Nike's Fuel Band, and a better camera with image stabilisation and two different-coloured flashes—may struggle to endear it to increasingly cost-conscious Westerners. Other than, that is, the most ardent password-haters.

Many fans will be disappointed by what they see as incremental advances under Tim Cook, who took over as the firm's boss from its visionary late founder, Steve Jobs. They point out that even the fingerprint feature was not exactly ground-breaking. Motorola offered a similar reader in one of its models back in 2011 (though the flawed system was dropped from new models after Motorola's purchase by Google in 2012). As with previous releases, however, Apple will probably ignore the sniping—and continue to count the healthy sales of its signature product, up 20% on last year.

Q. Which of the following could be inferred on the basis of the information given in the passage?

  1. To the password-haters, the cost of new iPhone 5s, is a significant deterrent towards buying it

  2. The overwhelming popularity of the smartphones run on Google’s operating system, has made it difficult for Apple to maintain its position in china.

  3. To a cost-conscious consumer, the features of the phone don’t justify paying a sum to buy it

  4. Westerners are more cost-conscious than the consumers in China

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 24 Statement 1 goes in contradiction to the information given in the passage (refer to second-last para); Statement 2 talks about Google’s Android giving a tough fight to Apple phones in China as has been mentioned in para 2, that Apple is finding it difficult to retain its position; Statement 3 can be inferred from the last few line of second last para.Statement 4 talks about comparison between price sensitivity between a consumer in China and West-No evidence to suggest this.
CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 25

Directions: Shivani is a private employee and she earns a fixed salary every month. She also pays tax. The tax is always calculated after the deductions if there exists any kind of deductions. The deductions are as follows:

(i) Shivani donates 40,000 in an orphanage which has 100% exemption.

(ii) The standard deductions is one - third of the annual salary.

After allowing the deductions, the remaining income is taxed, which is so called tax before rebate. The rate of the tax on her taxable income is 20%. As she saves 35,000 rupees towards the contributory provident fund and 25,000 towards public provident fund, 20% of each can be deducted from the tax calculated before the rebate. This is the tax after rebate.

There is a surcharge to be imposed and it is imposed after the rebate and the total amount to be paid is calculated. The surcharge is 5% on the tax after the rebate which amounts to 5000 rupees.

Q. If the savings in the contributory provident fund and the public provident fund fetches 10% interest and the tax on the interest earned is 50/3% and the tax paid by her includes the tax due to this interest, then what will be the difference between the salary of Shivani in this case and her salary calculated before without considering the tax on the interest, assuming all the other things remain the same.

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 25 Let the annual salary of Shivani be y rupees.

So the taxable income = (y - y/3 - 40000) = (2y/3 - 40000)

Tax = 20% of (2y/3 - 40000) = 2y/15 - 8000

As he saves 60000 so rebate = 20% of 60000 = 12000

Tax after the rebate = 2y/15 - 8000 - 12000 = 2y/15 - 2000

Surcharge = 5% of (2y/15 - 20000) = 5000

Or, y = 900000

Income from savings = 10% of 60000 = 6000

Tax on the interest =50/3%of 6000 = 1000

As the total amount paid as tax remained the same, her salary was actually less than that was computed before. As the tax rate = 20% and 1000 is the decrease in tax on her salary, so her salary was less by 100 x 1000/20 = 5000

CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 26

Directions: Shivani is a private employee and she earns a fixed salary every month. She also pays tax. The tax is always calculated after the deductions if there exists any kind of deductions. The deductions are as follows:

(i) Shivani donates 40,000 in an orphanage which has 100% exemption.

(ii) The standard deductions is one - third of the annual salary.

After allowing the deductions, the remaining income is taxed, which is so called tax before rebate. The rate of the tax on her taxable income is 20%. As she saves 35,000 rupees towards the contributory provident fund and 25,000 towards public provident fund, 20% of each can be deducted from the tax calculated before the rebate. This is the tax after rebate.

There is a surcharge to be imposed and it is imposed after the rebate and the total amount to be paid is calculated. The surcharge is 5% on the tax after the rebate which amounts to 5000 rupees.

Q. The monthly income of Shivani in rupees?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 26 Let the annual salary of Shivani be y rupees.

So the taxable income = (y - y/3 - 40000) = (2y/3 - 40000)

Tax = 20% of (2y/3 - 40000) = 2y/15 - 8000

As he saves 60000 so rebate = 20% of 60000 = 12000

Tax after the rebate = 2y/15 - 8000 - 12000 = 2y/15 - 2000

Surcharge = 5% of (2y/15 - 20000) = 5000

Or, y = 900000

The monthly salary of Shivani = 900000/12 = 75000

CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 27

Directions: Shivani is a private employee and she earns a fixed salary every month. She also pays tax. The tax is always calculated after the deductions if there exists any kind of deductions. The deductions are as follows:

(i) Shivani donates 40,000 in an orphanage which has 100% exemption.

(ii) The standard deductions is one - third of the annual salary.

After allowing the deductions, the remaining income is taxed, which is so called tax before rebate. The rate of the tax on her taxable income is 20%. As she saves 35,000 rupees towards the contributory provident fund and 25,000 towards public provident fund, 20% of each can be deducted from the tax calculated before the rebate. This is the tax after rebate.

There is a surcharge to be imposed and it is imposed after the rebate and the total amount to be paid is calculated. The surcharge is 5% on the tax after the rebate which amounts to 5000 rupees.

Q. If Shivani is a senior citizen and she is eligible for an additional rebate of 20,000 which can be deducted from the tax before the rebate, then what will be the annual salary of Shivani in rupees if all the other things remained the same?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 27 Let the annual salary of Shivani be y rupees.

So the taxable income = (y - y/3 - 40000) = (2y/3 - 40000)

Tax = 20% of (2y/3 - 40000) = 2y/15 - 8000

As he saves 60000 so rebate = 20% of 60000 = 12000

Tax after the rebate = 2y/15 - 8000 - 12000 = 2y/15 - 2000

Surcharge = 5% of (2y/15 - 20000) = 5000

Or, y = 900000

As Shivani is a senior citizen, she gets an additional rebate of 20,000 which can be deducted from her tax.

So the tax after the rebate = (2y/15 - 8000 - 12000 - 20000) = (2y/15 - 40000)

Surcharge = 5% of (2y/15 - 40000)

So y =1050000

So the annual salary = 1050000

CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 28

Directions: Shivani is a private employee and she earns a fixed salary every month. She also pays tax. The tax is always calculated after the deductions if there exists any kind of deductions. The deductions are as follows:

(i) Shivani donates 40,000 in an orphanage which has 100% exemption.

(ii) The standard deductions is one - third of the annual salary.

After allowing the deductions, the remaining income is taxed, which is so called tax before rebate. The rate of the tax on her taxable income is 20%. As she saves 35,000 rupees towards the contributory provident fund and 25,000 towards public provident fund, 20% of each can be deducted from the tax calculated before the rebate. This is the tax after rebate.

There is a surcharge to be imposed and it is imposed after the rebate and the total amount to be paid is calculated. The surcharge is 5% on the tax after the rebate which amounts to 5000 rupees.

Q. If the boss of the Shivani deducts 8000 rupees per month during the first eleven month of the financial year as taxes, then find the amount paid by her in the last month of the financial year as a percentage of her monthly income.

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 28 Let the annual salary of Shivani be y rupees.

So the taxable income = (y - y/3 - 40000) = (2y/3 - 40000)

Tax = 20% of (2y/3 - 40000) = 2y/15 - 8000

As he saves 60000 so rebate = 20% of 60000 = 12000

Tax after the rebate = 2y/15 - 8000 - 12000 = 2y/15 - 20000

Surcharge = 5% of (2y/15 - 20000) = 5000

Or, y = 900000

Total amount to be paid = Tax + Surcharge

= (2y/15 - 20000) + 5000 = 105000 or y = 900000

So the amount to be paid in the last year of the financial year = (105000 - 11 x 8000) = 17000

The percentage required = 100 x 17000/75000 = 22.6%

CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 29

Directions: Read the following information and answer the questions that follow.

A school of management conducts its own test for its entrance procedure which is of 200 marks. However, academics and work experience details are considered with the marks obtained in group discussion and personal interview. After considering a candidate in all of these areas, a selection of a set of students is supposed to be made. The marking system is as follows:

The evaluation scale works as follows: A student scoring 200 marks in aptitude test will be given 80 marks on evaluation scale and an 80% in 10th exam will give a student 8 marks on evaluation scale.

Q. If Amit scores 8 marks in PI and is behind Raj, Tapesh and Sumit in total scores, then what can be the minimum total marks Sumit can have if these three students scored same marks in personal interview? (marks obtained in PI are integral).

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 29 The given table has been redrawn with new fields for scale mark calculation.

We obtain the ranks of various candidates as shown in the table.

If Amit scores 8 marks in PI, then his total score will be 97.5.

Now out of Raj, Tapesh and Sumit, Tapesh has the least marks. So the minimum marks in PI would be defined by him since he has to score more than Amit.

So, minimum marks in PI would be (97.5 - 86.8) = 11.

Hence the minimum score of Sumit would be (94 + 11) = 105.

Hence the correct option is (4).

CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 30

Directions: Read the following information and answer the questions that follow.

A school of management conducts its own test for its entrance procedure which is of 200 marks. However, academics and work experience details are considered with the marks obtained in group discussion and personal interview. After considering a candidate in all of these areas, a selection of a set of students is supposed to be made. The marking system is as follows:

The evaluation scale works as follows: A student scoring 200 marks in aptitude test will be given 80 marks on evaluation scale and an 80% in 10th exam will give a student 8 marks on evaluation scale.

Q. Another institute uses the same exam scores and selects candidates after elimination. Every time the least scorer in written test, then in Graduation, then in 12th, then in 10th, then Work Experience and then GD is eliminated. Then how many would not make it to PI, if all of them are in one group?(Also, if there is a tie for the least score, then both are eliminated)

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 30 The given table has been redrawn with new fields for scale mark calculation.

We obtain the ranks of various candidates as shown in the table.

The following table highlights the candidates who get rejected. As can be clearly seen that only Ashwini is left so 9 candidates are eliminated.

Hence answer option is (1).

CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 31

Directions: Read the following information and answer the questions that follow.

A school of management conducts its own test for its entrance procedure which is of 200 marks. However, academics and work experience details are considered with the marks obtained in group discussion and personal interview. After considering a candidate in all of these areas, a selection of a set of students is supposed to be made. The marking system is as follows:

The evaluation scale works as follows: A student scoring 200 marks in aptitude test will be given 80 marks on evaluation scale and an 80% in 10th exam will give a student 8 marks on evaluation scale.

Q. Among these 10 people, Sumit ranks the third by scoring 10 marks in PI, then how many combinations of total scores is possible for first 3 ranks? (Marks obtained in PI are integral).

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 31 The given table has been redrawn with new fields for scale mark calculation.

We obtain the ranks of various candidates as shown in the table.

Now if Sumit ranks 3 by scoring 10 marks in PI that his total marks become 104.

Now, the first two ranks will surely have 105 and 106 marks or greater.

But maximum marks that can he obtained in PI is 15.

So a candidate should have at least a score of 90 for second rank and 91 for first rank. Observing the table, we see that only two candidates Amit and Raj are capable of beating Sumit.

Now the best Amit can do is gel 15 in PI that too will take his total to 104.5.

That means he can never come 1st. So always Raj will be 1st.

Now Raj can get either 10, 11, 12, 13, 14 or 15.

Hence, in all, 6 combinations are possible for top 3 ranks.

Hence the correct option is (4).

CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 32

Directions: Read the following information and answer the questions that follow.

A school of management conducts its own test for its entrance procedure which is of 200 marks. However, academics and work experience details are considered with the marks obtained in group discussion and personal interview. After considering a candidate in all of these areas, a selection of a set of students is supposed to be made. The marking system is as follows:

The evaluation scale works as follows: A student scoring 200 marks in aptitude test will be given 80 marks on evaluation scale and an 80% in 10th exam will give a student 8 marks on evaluation scale.

Q. If the top three candidates (total score) amongst every group of 10 are able to make it to PI round, then who among the given candidates will be selected to the PI round?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 32 The given table has been redrawn with new fields for scale mark calculation.

We obtain the ranks of various candidates as shown in the table.

As can be seen from the above figure that the top three are Raj, Sumit and Amit. Hence the correct option is (2).

CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 33

Direction: The following graph gives the ratio of medals won by India and Pakistan in the last 5 Olympics and the total number of medals given at the Olympics. The Olympics are arranged in chronological order, with Montreal being the first. (Data used in each individual question is independent from other)

Q. Consider India and Pakistan together won same percentage of Medals in every Olympic. What is least percentage value of Medals won by India and Pakistan together such that they have to win integer number of medals in each Olympic?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 33

Ratio of Medals won by India and Pakistan in montreal is 1: 3.

So, number of Medals won by India and Pakistan together should be multiple of 4.

To get values multiple of 4, percentage value of medals won India and Pakistan together should also multiple of 4.

Ratio of Medals won by India and Pakistan in Sydney is 1: 4.

So, number of Medals won by India and Pakistan together should be multiple of 5.

To get values multiple of 5, percentage value of medals won India and Pakistan together should be multiple of 10.

Ratio of Medals won by India and Pakistan in Seoul is 1: 2.

So, number of Medals won by India and Pakistan together should be multiple of 3.

To get values multiple of 3, percentage value of medals won India and Pakistan together in Seoul should be multiple of 6.

Similarly, for Atlanta and Athens percentage value of medals won by India and Pakistan together should be multiple of 5 and 1 respectively.

LCM of 4, 10, 6, 5 and 1 is 60.

So, India and Pakistan should win at-least 60 percentage of medals in each Olympic.

CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 34

Direction: The following graph gives the ratio of medals won by India and Pakistan in the last 5 Olympics and the total number of medals given at the Olympics. The Olympics are arranged in chronological order, with Montreal being the first. (Data used in each individual question is independent from other)

Q. If number of medals won by India in Seoul Olympics if India and Pakistan together won 6% of total medals is ___


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 34

Total number of medal won by India and Pakistan together in seoul is 6% of total medals = 6 x 850/100 = 51

Ratio of medals won by India to Pakistan in Seoul = 1: 2

Medals won by India in Seoul = 1/3 x 51 = 17

CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 35

Direction: The following graph gives the ratio of medals won by India and Pakistan in the last 5 Olympics and the total number of medals given at the Olympics. The Olympics are arranged in chronological order, with Montreal being the first. (Data used in each individual question is independent from other)

Q. If India and Pakistan won 10% of the medals in Sydney, then how many more medals did Pakistan win at Sydney when compared to India?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 35

Ratio of the medals in Sydney = 1 : 4

Let number medals secured by India be x. Then number medals secured by Pakistan is 4x.Then 5x = 65.

x = 13. The difference between the medals = 3x = 39

CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 36

Direction: The following graph gives the ratio of medals won by India and Pakistan in the last 5 Olympics and the total number of medals given at the Olympics. The Olympics are arranged in chronological order, with Montreal being the first. (Data used in each individual question is independent from other)

Q. Consider India won 1 medal in Montreal and increased it by 1 in each Olympics thereafter, and increased it to 6 each in Atlanta and Athens. Then the total number of medals won by Pakistan from the five Olympics is _____


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 36

India won 1 medal in Montreal and increased its medal tally by 1 in each olympic thereafter. In Atlanta and Athens India won 6 medals each.

Number of Medals won by Pakistan = 3 + 8 + 6 + 4 + 3 = 24

CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 37

Directions: The following graph captures the demand and supply situation of barrels of oil in the country Utopia over the years 1999 - 2004.

Q. If the data of demand and supply were to be drawn as line graphs on the same graph with the year along the X axis and the demand and supply along the Y axis, at how many points would the two lines intersect?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 37 The data of demand and supply drawn as line graphs on the same graph with the year along x-axis and the demand and supply along y-axis can be drawn as follows

Thus the lines intersect at two points.

CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 38

Directions: Ramesh has some amount with him in the form of Rs1000 notes. He distributed one third of the amount with him among his 5 friends. He has 5 friends Peeyush, Qamar, Rita, Shubham, Teena such that the eldest one gets the highest amount, the second eldest friend gets second highest amount and so on. The amount received by Peeyush is equal to the sum of the amount received by Teena and Rita. The amount received by Teena is equal to the sum of the amounts received by Qamar and Rita. The amount received by Shubham is equal to the sum of the amounts received by Peeyush and Rita. He gave three Fourth of the remaining amount to his girlfriend Geeta. Finally Ramesh is left with Rs7500.

Q. Who among the following is the eldest?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 38 Let the amount with Ramesh be x

Amount distributed among his friends = x/3

Amount given to Geeta = 3 (x - x/3)/ 4 = x/2

Amount left with Ramesh = (x - x/2 - x/3) = x/6 = 7500

Or, x = 45000

Let the amount with Peeyush, Qamar, Rita, Shubham and Teena be p, q, r, s, t respectively

Given p + q + r + s + t = 45000/3 = 15000 (i)

And p = t + r (ii)

Also t = q +r (iii)

And s = p + r (iv)

(ii) + (iii) + (iv)

The above arithmetic operation will give s = 3r + q (v)

From (i) and (v) r can take only a value = 1000(as notes are multiples of 1000)

Form (ii), (iii), and (iv) Shubham received the maximum amount that is 5000

So q = s - 3r = 5000 - 3(1000) = 2000

And t = q + r = 2000 + 1000 = 3000

And p = t + r = 3000 + 1000 = 4000

Shubham received the highest amount.

CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 39

Directions: Ramesh has some amount with him in the form of Rs1000 notes. He distributed one third of the amount with him among his 5 friends. He has 5 friends Peeyush, Qamar, Rita, Shubham, Teena such that the eldest one gets the highest amount, the second eldest friend gets second highest amount and so on. The amount received by Peeyush is equal to the sum of the amount received by Teena and Rita. The amount received by Teena is equal to the sum of the amounts received by Qamar and Rita. The amount received by Shubham is equal to the sum of the amounts received by Peeyush and Rita. He gave three Fourth of the remaining amount to his girlfriend Geeta. Finally Ramesh is left with Rs7500.

Q. What is the difference between the amounts received by his eldest friend and that received by his youngest friend?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 39 Let the amount with Ramesh be x

Amount distributed among his friends = x/3

Amount given to Geeta = 3 (x - x/3)/ 4 = x/2

Amount left with Ramesh = (x - x/2 - x/3) = x/6 = 7500

Or, x = 45000

Let the amount with Peeyush, Qamar, Rita, Shubham and Teena be p, q, r, s, t respectively

Given p + q + r + s + t = 45000/3 = 15000 (i)

And p = t + r (ii)

Also t = q +r (iii)

And s = p + r (iv)

(ii) + (iii) + (iv)

The above arithmetic operation will give s = 3r + q (v)

From (i) and (v) r can take only a value = 1000(as notes are multiples of 1000)

Form (ii), (iii), and (iv) Shubham received the maximum amount that is 5000

So q = s - 3r = 5000 - 3(1000) = 2000

And t = q + r = 2000 + 1000 = 3000

And p = t + r = 3000 + 1000 = 4000

The required difference = 5000 - 1000 = 4000

CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 40

Directions: Ramesh has some amount with him in the form of Rs1000 notes. He distributed one third of the amount with him among his 5 friends. He has 5 friends Peeyush, Qamar, Rita, Shubham, Teena such that the eldest one gets the highest amount, the second eldest friend gets second highest amount and so on. The amount received by Peeyush is equal to the sum of the amount received by Teena and Rita. The amount received by Teena is equal to the sum of the amounts received by Qamar and Rita. The amount received by Shubham is equal to the sum of the amounts received by Peeyush and Rita. He gave three Fourth of the remaining amount to his girlfriend Geeta. Finally Ramesh is left with Rs7500.

Q. What is the amount received by Geeta (in rupees)?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 40 Let the amount with Ramesh be x

Amount distributed among his friends = x/3

Amount given to Geeta = 3 (x - x/3)/ 4 = x/2

Amount left with Ramesh = (x - x/2 - x/3) = x/6 = 7500

Or, x = 45000

Let the amount with Peeyush, Qamar, Rita, Shubham and Teena be p, q, r, s, t respectively

Given p + q + r + s + t = 45000/3 = 15000 (i)

And p = t + r (ii)

Also t = q +r (iii)

And s = p + r (iv)

(ii) + (iii) + (iv)

The above arithmetic operation will give s = 3r + q (v)

From (i) and (v) r can take only a value = 1000(as notes are multiples of 1000)

Form (ii), (iii), and (iv) Shubham received the maximum amount that is 5000

So q = s - 3r = 5000 - 3(1000) = 2000

And t = q + r = 2000 + 1000 = 3000

And p = t + r = 3000 + 1000 = 4000

The amount received by Geeta = 45000/2 = 22500

CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 41

Directions: Ramesh has some amount with him in the form of Rs1000 notes. He distributed one third of the amount with him among his 5 friends. He has 5 friends Peeyush, Qamar, Rita, Shubham, Teena such that the eldest one gets the highest amount, the second eldest friend gets second highest amount and so on. The amount received by Peeyush is equal to the sum of the amount received by Teena and Rita. The amount received by Teena is equal to the sum of the amounts received by Qamar and Rita. The amount received by Shubham is equal to the sum of the amounts received by Peeyush and Rita. He gave three Fourth of the remaining amount to his girlfriend Geeta. Finally Ramesh is left with Rs7500.

Q. If Peeyush gives Rs1000 to Qamar, then how many given persons will have same amount?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 41 Let the amount with Ramesh be x

Amount distributed among his friends = x/3

Amount given to Geeta = 3 (x - x/3)/ 4 = x/2

Amount left with Ramesh = (x - x/2 - x/3) = x/6 = 7500

Or, x = 45000

Let the amount with Peeyush, Qamar, Rita, Shubham and Teena be p, q, r, s, t respectively

Given p + q + r + s + t = 45000/3 = 15000 (i)

And p = t + r (ii)

Also t = q +r (iii)

And s = p + r (iv)

(ii) + (iii) + (iv)

The above arithmetic operation will give s = 3r + q (v)

From (i) and (v) r can take only a value = 1000(as notes are multiples of 1000)

Form (ii), (iii), and (iv) Shubham received the maximum amount that is 5000

So q = s - 3r = 5000 - 3(1000) = 2000

And t = q + r = 2000 + 1000 = 3000

And p = t + r = 3000 + 1000 = 4000

If Peeyush gives 1000 to Qamar then p = q = t = 3000

CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 42

Directions: Five office colleagues, Anwesha, Sid, Wasif, Pamela and Naba, were instructed by their common supervisor to bond better between themselves, as they all were new to the organization and each other. Hence each of them decided to take some personal time out with every other colleague and choose a common place where the two of them would go on an outing. Each of them were given five choices - Long Drive, Movie, Cafe, Art Exhibition and Pub. Also, each of them had to ensure that the place mutually chosen by him and the other four, were all distinct. Pamela and Sid decide to go to 'Barista', which is a Café on Park Row, while Wasif and Anwesha decide to go to 'CCD', which too is a Cafe. Wasif and Naba decided to go out together neither to a Pub, nor to a Movie, even though they had no such restriction with anybody else. Pamela got into an agreement with the other four into going to all the places except for a Pub. Naba and Sid had always longed to go for a Long Drive, and it was their obvious choice as well.

Q. Anwesha did not go on an outing to which of these places?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 42 Based on the given information we can directly construct the table as follows:-

Now, Wasif and Naba are both against going out together to a Pub or for a Movie. Also Long Drive and Cafe are out of the question for them, as seen in the table, no two rows or columns can have a repetition, since each of them had to ensure that the place mutually chosen by him and the other four, were all distinct. Hence Wasif and Naba must have decided to go to an Art Exhibition. Pamela got into an agreement with the other four into going to all the places except for Pub. Hence Pamela and Naba must have gone for Movie, as Cafe, Long Drive and Art Exhibition are not possible. Hence completing the Pamela row/column, we get; Pamela must have decided to go with Wasif for a Long Drive, and must have decided to go with Anwesha to an Art Exhibition.

Filling up the remaining table, we get that Anwesha and Naba decide to go to a Pub, Anwesha and Sid to a Movie and Wasif and Sid to a Pub.

Anwesha did not go on a Long Drive outing with any of the other four.

CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 43

Directions: Five office colleagues, Anwesha, Sid, Wasif, Pamela and Naba, were instructed by their common supervisor to bond better between themselves, as they all were new to the organization and each other. Hence each of them decided to take some personal time out with every other colleague and choose a common place where the two of them would go on an outing. Each of them were given five choices - Long Drive, Movie, Cafe, Art Exhibition and Pub. Also, each of them had to ensure that the place mutually chosen by him and the other four, were all distinct. Pamela and Sid decide to go to 'Barista', which is a Café on Park Row, while Wasif and Anwesha decide to go to 'CCD', which too is a Cafe. Wasif and Naba decided to go out together neither to a Pub, nor to a Movie, even though they had no such restriction with anybody else. Pamela got into an agreement with the other four into going to all the places except for a Pub. Naba and Sid had always longed to go for a Long Drive, and it was their obvious choice as well.

Q. Which of the following statements is TRUE?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 43 Based on the given information we can directly construct the table as follows:-

Now, Wasif and Naba are both against going out together to a Pub or for a Movie. Also Long Drive and Cafe are out of the question for them, as seen in the table, no two rows or columns can have a repetition, since each of them had to ensure that the place mutually chosen by him and the other four, were all distinct. Hence Wasif and Naba must have decided to go to an Art Exhibition. Pamela got into an agreement with the other four into going to all the places except for Pub. Hence Pamela and Naba must have gone for Movie, as Cafe, Long Drive and Art Exhibition are not possible. Hence completing the Pamela row/column, we get; Pamela must have decided to go with Wasif for a Long Drive, and must have decided to go with Anwesha to an Art Exhibition.

Filling up the remaining table, we get that Anwesha and Naba decide to go to a Pub, Anwesha and Sid to a Movie and Wasif and Sid to a Pub.

Wasif and Pamela went out for Movie.

CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 44

Directions: Five office colleagues, Anwesha, Sid, Wasif, Pamela and Naba, were instructed by their common supervisor to bond better between themselves, as they all were new to the organization and each other. Hence each of them decided to take some personal time out with every other colleague and choose a common place where the two of them would go on an outing. Each of them were given five choices - Long Drive, Movie, Cafe, Art Exhibition and Pub. Also, each of them had to ensure that the place mutually chosen by him and the other four, were all distinct. Pamela and Sid decide to go to 'Barista', which is a Café on Park Row, while Wasif and Anwesha decide to go to 'CCD', which too is a Cafe. Wasif and Naba decided to go out together neither to a Pub, nor to a Movie, even though they had no such restriction with anybody else. Pamela got into an agreement with the other four into going to all the places except for a Pub. Naba and Sid had always longed to go for a Long Drive, and it was their obvious choice as well.

Q. For how many pairs, can we say where they intend to plan their outing?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 44 Based on the given information we can directly construct the table as follows:-

Now, Wasif and Naba are both against going out together to a Pub or for a Movie. Also Long Drive and Cafe are out of the question for them, as seen in the table, no two rows or columns can have a repetition, since each of them had to ensure that the place mutually chosen by him and the other four, were all distinct. Hence Wasif and Naba must have decided to go to an Art Exhibition. Pamela got into an agreement with the other four into going to all the places except for Pub. Hence Pamela and Naba must have gone for Movie, as Cafe, Long Drive and Art Exhibition are not possible. Hence completing the Pamela row/column, we get; Pamela must have decided to go with Wasif for a Long Drive, and must have decided to go with Anwesha to an Art Exhibition.

Filling up the remaining table, we get that Anwesha and Naba decide to go to a Pub, Anwesha and Sid to a Movie and Wasif and Sid to a Pub.

From the final table we can see that we have information on the outing destination for all possible pairs.

CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 45

A vessel is full of a mixture of methanol and ethanol in which there is 20% ethanol. 10 litres of mixture are drawn off and filled with methanol. If the ethanol is now 15%, what is the capacity of the vessel?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 45

Therefore, Mixture: Methanol = 3:1

So, for 10 litres of methanol, 30 I of Mixture is needed. So, total capacity = (30 + 10)l = 40l

CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 46

How many factors of 24 × 53 × 74 are odd numbers?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 46 Any factor of this number should be of the form 2a × 5b × 7c

For the factor to be an odd number,

a should be 0 .

b can take values 0,1,2,3 .

and c can take values 0,1,2,3,4

Total number of odd factors = 4 × 5 = 20.

CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 47

In Kaziranga national park, the residents are either Hippopotamus or Peacocks. When the heads are counted, it comes out to be 96 and when the legs are counted it is 336 in number. Find the number of peacocks in the park.


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 47 Number of residents = Number of heads = 96

Average number of legs = 336/96 = 72

Therefore,

Therefore,

Hippopotamus: Peacock = 3/2 : 1/2 = 3 : 1

So, number of peacocks

CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 48

For what values of m is y = 0, if y = x2 + (2m + 1)x + m2 − 1 ? is a real number.

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 48 When x is real, then the discriminant of a quadratic equation (ax2 + bx + c = 0) ≥ 0

i.e. D = b2 − 4ac > 0

In this case, (2m + 1)2 ≥ 4(m2 − 1) 4m2 + 4m + 1 ≥ 4(m2 − 1)

Solving for m, we get m ≥ -1.25

CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 49

If a, b are integers such that x = a, and x = b satisfy this in equation, find the maximum possible value of a - b


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 49

Therefore max (a − b) will be when a = 242 and b = 28.

Therefore, max (a - b) = 214

CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 50

If log2⁡x + log4⁡x = log0.25⁡√6 and x > 0, then x is

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 50

We can rewrite the equation as:

The question is "If log2⁡X + log4⁡X = log0.25√⁡6 and x > 0, then x is "

Hence, the answer is 6-1/6

CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 51

Find the remainder when the polynomial x4 − 3x2 + 7x−10 is divided by x - 2

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 51 By remainder theorem: If a polynomial in one variable x is divided by (x−a), where 'a' is any real number, then the remainder is the value of the polynomial at x=a.

Therefore, remainder

CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 52

A group of 20 people has the oldest person with 90 years of age. The average of the group is reduced by 4, if the oldest person is reduced by someone new, Find the age of the new person.


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 52 Difference between the age of the oldest and the newest member =20×4 (because by this number the sum of ages of all the persons in the group has

reduced) = 80 years

So, age of the new person = 90 − 80 = 10 years

CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 53

If 22x+4 − 17 × 2x+1 = −4, then which of the following is true?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 53

CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 54

For what value of m will the quadratic equation x2 + mx + 4 = 0 have real and equal roots?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 54 The question states that the roots of the equation are real and equal.

The roots of a quadratic equation of the form ax2 + bx + c = 0 will be real and equal if its discriminant D

= b2 − 4ac = 0

In this case, b = m, a = 4 and c = 4

Therefore, m2 − 4 × 4 × 1 = 0

Or m2 = 16

Orr m = +4 or m = -4

CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 55

In the adjoining figure, points A, B, C and D lie on the circle. AD = 24 and BC = 12. What is the ratio of the area of CBE to that of ADE?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 55 As we know angles of same sectors are equal

Hence angle B and angle D will be equal. Angle BCE and angle EAD will be equal.

So triangles BCE and EAD will be similar triangles with sides ratio as 12 : 24 or 1 : 2.

Area will be in ratio of 1 : 4

CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 56

log9⁡(3log2⁡(1 + log3⁡(1 + 2log2⁡x))) = 1/2. Find x

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 56 log9⁡(3log2⁡(1 + log3⁡(1 + 2log2⁡x)) = ½

3log2⁡(1 + log3⁡(1 + 2log2⁡x)) = 91/2 = 3

log2⁡(1 + log3⁡(1 + 2log2x) = 1

1 + log3⁡(1 + 2log2⁡x) = 2

log3⁡(1 + 2log2⁡x) = 1

1 + 2log2⁡x = 3

2log2⁡x = 2

log2⁡x = 1

x = 2

CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 57

How many factors of 25 × 36 × 52 are perfect squares?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 57 Any factor of this number should be of the form 2a × 3b × 5c

For the factor to be a perfect square a, b, c have to be even.

a can take values 0, 2, 4

b can take values 0, 2, 4, 6

and c can take values 0, 2

Total number of perfect squares = 3 × 4 × 2 = 24

CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 58

The sum of the areas of two circles, which touch each other externally, is 153π. If the sum of their radii is 15, find the ratio of the larger to the smaller radius.

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 58 Given

π((r1)2 + (r2)2) = 153π

So (r1)2 + (r2)2 = 153

Or ((r1) + (r2))2 − 2(r1)(r2) = 153

Or (r1)(r2) = 36 and (r1) + (r2) = 15

r1 = 12

r2 = 3

Ratio = 4

CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 59

How many factors of 1080 are perfect squares?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 59

1080 = 23 × 33 × 5. For any perfect square, all the powers of the primes have to be even numbers. So, if the factor is of the form 2a × 3b × 5c

The values a can take are 0 and 2, b can take are 0 and 2, and c can take the value 0.

Totally there are 4 possibilities. 1,4,9, and 36.

CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 60

If log12⁡27 = a, log9⁡16 = b, find log8 108

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 60

log8⁡108 = log8⁡(4 × 27)

log8⁡108 = log8⁡4 + log8⁡27

⇒ log8 4 = 2/3

CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 61

A wooden box of thickness 0.5cm, length 21cm, width 11cm and height 6cm is painted on the inside. The expenses of painting are Rs. 70. What is the rate of painting per square centimetres?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 61 Inside dimensions of cube are as follows

Length = 20 −2 × (0.5) = 20

Width = 11 − 2 × (0.5) =1 0

Height = 6 − 0.5 = 5.5 (As top surface is open) So total area painted

= 2(20 × 5.5) + 2(10 × 5.5) + (10 × 20)

= 220 + 110 + 200

= 530sq⋅cm

cost of painting 530 sq. cm. is 70

So cost per sq. cm. = 705/30 = 0.1 (nearly)

CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 62

Number N = 26 × 55 × 76 × 107 how many factors of N are even numbers?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 62 The prime factorization of 26 × 55 × 76 × 107 is 213 × 512 × 76

The total number of factors of N = 14 × 13 × 7 We need to find the total number of even factors. For this, let us find the total number of odd factors and then subtract this from the total number of factors. Any odd factor will have to be a combination of powers of only 5 and 7

Total number of odd factors of 213 × 512 × 76 = (12 + 1) × (6 + 1) = 13 × 7

Total number of factors = (13 + 1) × (12 + 1) × (6 + 1)

Total number of even factors =14 × 13 × 7 − 13 × 7

Number of even factors =13 × 13 × 7 = 1183

CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 63

If n is a positive integer such that , then the smallest value of n is


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 63

For minimum value of n,

1 + 2 + ... + n = 21

We can see that if n = 6, 1 + 2 + 3 + ... + 6 = 21.

CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 64

Rajesh is 10 years younger to Baskar. 10 years back, Rajesh's age was two-thirds that of Baskar's. How old is Baskar now?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 64 Let the present age of Baskar be 'b' and that of Rajesh be 'r'.

So, r = b − 10 ...(1)

10 years back Rajesh was (r − 10) years old. 10 years back Baskar was (b − 10) years old.

The question states that 10 years back Rajesh was two thirds as old as Baskar was.

i.e.,

(r − 10) = (2/3) × (b − 10) ...(2)

Cross multiplying, we get 3(r − 10) = 2(b − 10)

or 3r − 30 = 2b − 20 ...(2)

From eqn (1) we can substitute r as (b−10) in eqn (2)

So ,3(b − 10) − 30 = 2b − 20

or 3b − 30 − 30 = 2b − 20

or b = 40

The present age of Baskar is 40 years.

CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 65

If one of the roots of the quadratic equation x2 + mx + 24 = 0 is 1.5, then what is the value of m?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 65 We know that the product of the roots of a quadratic equation ax2 + bx + c = 0 is

c/a

In the given equation, x2 + mx + 24 = 0, the product of the roots = 24/1 = 24

The question states that one of the roots of this equation =1.5.

If x1 and x2 are the roots of the given quadratic equation and let x1 = 1.5

Therefore,

x2 = 24/15 = 16

In the given equation, m is the co-efficient of the x term. We know that the sum of the roots of the quadratic equation ax2 + bx + c = 0 is

−b/a = −m/1 = −m

Sum of the roots = 16 +1.5 = 17 = −17.5 Therefore, the value of m = -17.5

CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 66

If p and q are the roots of the equation x2 − bx + c = 0, what is the equation if the roots are (pq + p + q) and (pq − p − q)?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 11 (18/09/2022) - Question 66 In the given quadratic equation x2 − bx + c = 0,

The sum of the roots p + q = b ...(1)

And the product of the roots pq = c ...(2)

We have to formulate a quadratic equation whose roots are (pq + p + q) and (pq − p − q).

The sum of the two roots = pq + p + q + pq − p − q = 2pq

But from eqn (2), we know that pq = c

Therefore, the sum of the roots = 2c

The product of the roots = (pq + p + q)(pq − p − q) = (pq)2 − (p + q)2

From equation (1) and (2), we know that pq=c and p+q=b Therefore, the product of the roots = c2 − b2

We know the sum of the roots and the product of the roots. Therefore, the quadratic equation is x2 − (sum of the roots))x + product of the roots = 0

In the given quadratic equation x2 − bx + c = 0

⇒ x2 − 2cx + (c2 − b2) = 0

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