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CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022)


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CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 1

Direction: The passage given below is followed by a set of six questions. Choose the best answer to each question.

Who was Walter Benjamin? For highbrow city lovers, he was the Man of the 20th Century. His essays on Berlin and Paris have long been required reading in art and architecture schools around the world, and are among the seminal texts in the field of cultural studies. People read Benjamin not only (or even mainly) to learn about the particular topics he took on -- Belle Époque fashions, Art Nouveau interiors, iron construction -- but also to absorb his methods of urban analysis and extravagantly cultivated sensibility.

What became ''The Arcades Project'' started out as a newspaper article. Benjamin worked on the project, with periodic interruptions, from 1927 until his death 13 years later. A sprawling, fragmented meditation on the ethos of 19th-century Paris, ''The Arcades Project'' was left incomplete on Walter Benjamin's death in 1940. In recent decades, as portions of the book have appeared in English, the unfinished opus has acquired legendary status. It captures the relationship between a writer and a city in a form as richly developed as those presented in the great cosmopolitan novels of Proust, Joyce, Musil and Isherwood.

The arcade itself is a building type that proliferated in early 19th-century Paris. Typically sheltered beneath an iron and glass roof, the arcade was a block long pedestrian passage nestled between two masonry structures. It was lined on either side with small shops, tearooms, amusements and other commercial attractions. At one time, more than 300 arcades punctuated the Paris cityscape. Only about 30 now remain.

For Benjamin, the Parisian arcade was the most important building type of the 19th century, and represented a pivotal moment in modern history. With it, society began its transition from a culture of production to one of consumption. Beneath the arcade's greenhouse roof, the technical apparatus of the industrial society was used to furnish people's minds with images of desire.

The arcades had grown shabby long before Benjamin came to Paris, reduced to haunted ballrooms populated by the ghosts of yesterday's fashions. Places dedicated to the pursuit of novelty, the arcades were doomed by the desire they inspired. But under Benjamin's eye, the faded arcade became something new again: an intellectual reflection.

His analytic approach could be summarized as a fusion of Marxist and Freudian schools of thought. Benjamin did not read Marx until late in life, however, and he rejected the scientific claims of orthodox psychoanalysis. Perhaps because he wished to avoid the objective detachment these two ideologies claimed to represent, Benjamin chose to absorb his ideas from indirect sources. But the most important direct influence on ''The Arcades Project'' came from Surrealism. From Surrealists, Benjamin acquired the belief that social revolution and psychological analysis went hand in hand.

The arcade itself was a visual device: a spatial frame around the shop windows that inspired passers-by with the desire to purchase la vie en rose. Behind the windows, novelties continuously appeared. Benjamin used the word ''phantasmagoria'' to describe the dream state in which the social contract is rewritten.

Years after his death, the phantasmagoria has become even more gripping. Industrial production has been shipped overseas. The manipulation industries -- advertising, fashion, mass media, spin -- have extended their influence to global dimensions. The 19th-century dream has been carried over to the 21st. All of Paris is an arcade, and many American cities have remade themselves as shopping malls in order to survive. Cities are fun! Cities R Us! And the streets are safer than ever!

Why wake up? And how effective a wake-up call can a choppy, overweight, 60-year-old book possibly be?

Q. Which of the following CAN be inferred from the passage?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 1 A cannot be inferred as the passage states that the Parisian Arcades represent a shift from a culture of production to one of consumption – not that these two concepts have to be understood.

B can be inferred from the passage as it is clearly stated in the passage that ‘For Benjamin, the Parisian arcade was the most important building type of the 19th century, and represented a pivotal moment in modern history. With it, society began its transition from a culture of production to one of consumption.’

The passage mentions that Benjamin’s essays on Berlin and Paris have long been required reading in art and architecture schools around the world – but we cannot infer that all students have to read his works.

Therefore, option B is correct.

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 2

Direction: The passage given below is followed by a set of six questions. Choose the best answer to each question.

Who was Walter Benjamin? For highbrow city lovers, he was the Man of the 20th Century. His essays on Berlin and Paris have long been required reading in art and architecture schools around the world, and are among the seminal texts in the field of cultural studies. People read Benjamin not only (or even mainly) to learn about the particular topics he took on -- Belle Époque fashions, Art Nouveau interiors, iron construction -- but also to absorb his methods of urban analysis and extravagantly cultivated sensibility.

What became ''The Arcades Project'' started out as a newspaper article. Benjamin worked on the project, with periodic interruptions, from 1927 until his death 13 years later. A sprawling, fragmented meditation on the ethos of 19th-century Paris, ''The Arcades Project'' was left incomplete on Walter Benjamin's death in 1940. In recent decades, as portions of the book have appeared in English, the unfinished opus has acquired legendary status. It captures the relationship between a writer and a city in a form as richly developed as those presented in the great cosmopolitan novels of Proust, Joyce, Musil and Isherwood.

The arcade itself is a building type that proliferated in early 19th-century Paris. Typically sheltered beneath an iron and glass roof, the arcade was a block long pedestrian passage nestled between two masonry structures. It was lined on either side with small shops, tearooms, amusements and other commercial attractions. At one time, more than 300 arcades punctuated the Paris cityscape. Only about 30 now remain.

For Benjamin, the Parisian arcade was the most important building type of the 19th century, and represented a pivotal moment in modern history. With it, society began its transition from a culture of production to one of consumption. Beneath the arcade's greenhouse roof, the technical apparatus of the industrial society was used to furnish people's minds with images of desire.

The arcades had grown shabby long before Benjamin came to Paris, reduced to haunted ballrooms populated by the ghosts of yesterday's fashions. Places dedicated to the pursuit of novelty, the arcades were doomed by the desire they inspired. But under Benjamin's eye, the faded arcade became something new again: an intellectual reflection.

His analytic approach could be summarized as a fusion of Marxist and Freudian schools of thought. Benjamin did not read Marx until late in life, however, and he rejected the scientific claims of orthodox psychoanalysis. Perhaps because he wished to avoid the objective detachment these two ideologies claimed to represent, Benjamin chose to absorb his ideas from indirect sources. But the most important direct influence on ''The Arcades Project'' came from Surrealism. From Surrealists, Benjamin acquired the belief that social revolution and psychological analysis went hand in hand.

The arcade itself was a visual device: a spatial frame around the shop windows that inspired passers-by with the desire to purchase la vie en rose. Behind the windows, novelties continuously appeared. Benjamin used the word ''phantasmagoria'' to describe the dream state in which the social contract is rewritten.

Years after his death, the phantasmagoria has become even more gripping. Industrial production has been shipped overseas. The manipulation industries -- advertising, fashion, mass media, spin -- have extended their influence to global dimensions. The 19th-century dream has been carried over to the 21st. All of Paris is an arcade, and many American cities have remade themselves as shopping malls in order to survive. Cities are fun! Cities R Us! And the streets are safer than ever!

Why wake up? And how effective a wake-up call can a choppy, overweight, 60-year-old book possibly be?

Q. What is the overall tone of the passage?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 2 B is an incorrect option as the author is not positive at the end of the passage, he rather asks readers to ‘wake up’ from consumerism, and, hence, his tone is not positive and encouraging.

C is incorrect as the passage starts with an introduction to Walter Benjamin and the use of words such as ‘seminal texts’ tells us that the author admires Benjamin and his work. In the following paragraphs, the author mentions that the Arcades project has acquired ‘legendary status’ and mentions the background as well as the importance of Benjamin, and his work on Parisian arcades. This continues through the passage. Hence, his tone is both analytical and admiring.

D is incorrect because a clear opinion is expressed by the author, and hence his tone is not neutral.

Therefore, option A is correct.

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 3

Direction: The passage given below is followed by a set of six questions. Choose the best answer to each question.

Who was Walter Benjamin? For highbrow city lovers, he was the Man of the 20th Century. His essays on Berlin and Paris have long been required reading in art and architecture schools around the world, and are among the seminal texts in the field of cultural studies. People read Benjamin not only (or even mainly) to learn about the particular topics he took on -- Belle Époque fashions, Art Nouveau interiors, iron construction -- but also to absorb his methods of urban analysis and extravagantly cultivated sensibility.

What became ''The Arcades Project'' started out as a newspaper article. Benjamin worked on the project, with periodic interruptions, from 1927 until his death 13 years later. A sprawling, fragmented meditation on the ethos of 19th-century Paris, ''The Arcades Project'' was left incomplete on Walter Benjamin's death in 1940. In recent decades, as portions of the book have appeared in English, the unfinished opus has acquired legendary status. It captures the relationship between a writer and a city in a form as richly developed as those presented in the great cosmopolitan novels of Proust, Joyce, Musil and Isherwood.

The arcade itself is a building type that proliferated in early 19th-century Paris. Typically sheltered beneath an iron and glass roof, the arcade was a block long pedestrian passage nestled between two masonry structures. It was lined on either side with small shops, tearooms, amusements and other commercial attractions. At one time, more than 300 arcades punctuated the Paris cityscape. Only about 30 now remain.

For Benjamin, the Parisian arcade was the most important building type of the 19th century, and represented a pivotal moment in modern history. With it, society began its transition from a culture of production to one of consumption. Beneath the arcade's greenhouse roof, the technical apparatus of the industrial society was used to furnish people's minds with images of desire.

The arcades had grown shabby long before Benjamin came to Paris, reduced to haunted ballrooms populated by the ghosts of yesterday's fashions. Places dedicated to the pursuit of novelty, the arcades were doomed by the desire they inspired. But under Benjamin's eye, the faded arcade became something new again: an intellectual reflection.

His analytic approach could be summarized as a fusion of Marxist and Freudian schools of thought. Benjamin did not read Marx until late in life, however, and he rejected the scientific claims of orthodox psychoanalysis. Perhaps because he wished to avoid the objective detachment these two ideologies claimed to represent, Benjamin chose to absorb his ideas from indirect sources. But the most important direct influence on ''The Arcades Project'' came from Surrealism. From Surrealists, Benjamin acquired the belief that social revolution and psychological analysis went hand in hand.

The arcade itself was a visual device: a spatial frame around the shop windows that inspired passers-by with the desire to purchase la vie en rose. Behind the windows, novelties continuously appeared. Benjamin used the word ''phantasmagoria'' to describe the dream state in which the social contract is rewritten.

Years after his death, the phantasmagoria has become even more gripping. Industrial production has been shipped overseas. The manipulation industries -- advertising, fashion, mass media, spin -- have extended their influence to global dimensions. The 19th-century dream has been carried over to the 21st. All of Paris is an arcade, and many American cities have remade themselves as shopping malls in order to survive. Cities are fun! Cities R Us! And the streets are safer than ever!

Why wake up? And how effective a wake-up call can a choppy, overweight, 60-year-old book possibly be?

Q. The word ‘phantasmagoria' is closest in meaning to which of the following?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 3 The word “phantasmagoria” is used in the 6th paragraph and refers to the ‘describe the dream state in which the social contract is rewritten.’ The words ‘social contract’ support collective; ‘dream state’ supports reverie. No other answer choices refer to the term that is used by Walter Benjamin in his book.

Therefore, option A is correct.

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 4

Direction: The passage given below is followed by a set of six questions. Choose the best answer to each question.

Who was Walter Benjamin? For highbrow city lovers, he was the Man of the 20th Century. His essays on Berlin and Paris have long been required reading in art and architecture schools around the world, and are among the seminal texts in the field of cultural studies. People read Benjamin not only (or even mainly) to learn about the particular topics he took on -- Belle Époque fashions, Art Nouveau interiors, iron construction -- but also to absorb his methods of urban analysis and extravagantly cultivated sensibility.

What became ''The Arcades Project'' started out as a newspaper article. Benjamin worked on the project, with periodic interruptions, from 1927 until his death 13 years later. A sprawling, fragmented meditation on the ethos of 19th-century Paris, ''The Arcades Project'' was left incomplete on Walter Benjamin's death in 1940. In recent decades, as portions of the book have appeared in English, the unfinished opus has acquired legendary status. It captures the relationship between a writer and a city in a form as richly developed as those presented in the great cosmopolitan novels of Proust, Joyce, Musil and Isherwood.

The arcade itself is a building type that proliferated in early 19th-century Paris. Typically sheltered beneath an iron and glass roof, the arcade was a block long pedestrian passage nestled between two masonry structures. It was lined on either side with small shops, tearooms, amusements and other commercial attractions. At one time, more than 300 arcades punctuated the Paris cityscape. Only about 30 now remain.

For Benjamin, the Parisian arcade was the most important building type of the 19th century, and represented a pivotal moment in modern history. With it, society began its transition from a culture of production to one of consumption. Beneath the arcade's greenhouse roof, the technical apparatus of the industrial society was used to furnish people's minds with images of desire.

The arcades had grown shabby long before Benjamin came to Paris, reduced to haunted ballrooms populated by the ghosts of yesterday's fashions. Places dedicated to the pursuit of novelty, the arcades were doomed by the desire they inspired. But under Benjamin's eye, the faded arcade became something new again: an intellectual reflection.

His analytic approach could be summarized as a fusion of Marxist and Freudian schools of thought. Benjamin did not read Marx until late in life, however, and he rejected the scientific claims of orthodox psychoanalysis. Perhaps because he wished to avoid the objective detachment these two ideologies claimed to represent, Benjamin chose to absorb his ideas from indirect sources. But the most important direct influence on ''The Arcades Project'' came from Surrealism. From Surrealists, Benjamin acquired the belief that social revolution and psychological analysis went hand in hand.

The arcade itself was a visual device: a spatial frame around the shop windows that inspired passers-by with the desire to purchase la vie en rose. Behind the windows, novelties continuously appeared. Benjamin used the word ''phantasmagoria'' to describe the dream state in which the social contract is rewritten.

Years after his death, the phantasmagoria has become even more gripping. Industrial production has been shipped overseas. The manipulation industries -- advertising, fashion, mass media, spin -- have extended their influence to global dimensions. The 19th-century dream has been carried over to the 21st. All of Paris is an arcade, and many American cities have remade themselves as shopping malls in order to survive. Cities are fun! Cities R Us! And the streets are safer than ever!

Why wake up? And how effective a wake-up call can a choppy, overweight, 60-year-old book possibly be?

Q. Why does the author mention Proust, Joyce, Musil and Underwood?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 4 In the second paragraph, the author mentions that Benjamin’s work has acquired a ‘legendary status’ and continues to compare the Arcades project to the great ‘cosmopolitan novels of Proust, Joyce, Musil, and Isherwood.’ This emphasizes the richness of Benjamin’s writing.

B is incorrect as Man of the Century is used as an introduction.

C is incorrect as the comparison highlights Benjamin’s writing, not his relationship with Paris.

Therefore, option A is correct.

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 5

Direction: The passage given below is followed by a set of six questions. Choose the best answer to each question.

The story is told of how Harun Al Raschid, the caliph of Baghdad, would disguise himself as a beggar in order to discover what his subjects were thinking. Surrounded by the flatterers who cluster round absolute power, he could discover the truth of things only in devious ways. Harun was the caliph reputed to have condemned Scheherazade to death, who so charmed him with her stories from evening to evening for a thousand nights that he delayed her execution and eventually married her. This story is a famous image of despotism, a system of order created by conquest, resting on fear, and issuing in caprice.

In a despotic system of government, the ultimate principle of order issues from the inclinations of the despot himself. Yet, despotism is not a system in which justice is entirely meaningless: it has generally prevailed in highly traditional societies where custom is king and the prevailing terms of justice are accepted as part of the natural order of things. Each person fits into a divinely recognized scheme. Dynasties rise and fall according to what the Chinese used to call ‘the mandate of heaven’, but life for the peasant changes little. Everything depends on the wisdom of the ruler. In the eleventh century BC, the Israelites, having trouble with the Philistines, went to the prophet Samuel who ruled them and asked to have a king who would both judge them and lead them in battle. Samuel warned against this move, advising that such a king would seize their property and enslave their energies. But they insisted that they wanted to be like other nations, and a king they must have. ‘King’ in this Middle Eastern context meant a ruler who would deal despotically with them, a governor quite different from the constitutional rulers of Europe. As it happened, the Israelites were fortunate to have in Saul, David, and Solomon a line of notable rulers who gave Israel a short taste of order, and even some international glory. Solomon’s solution to the problem of two women claiming the same baby is but the most famous example of his legendary wisdom. But even these monarchs proved oppressive, and in the end the burden of paying for Solomon’s grand schemes split Israel apart.

‘Despotism’ is a catch-all category containing large variations. In one form or another, non-European civilizations have almost invariably been ruled despotically. The Western imagination, however, has generally been repelled by despots – cruel pharaohs, deranged Roman emperors like Caligula and Nero, exotic and remote emperors in India or China. In Europe, the desire for despotic power must disguise itself. Europeans have sometimes been beguiled by a despotism that comes concealed in the seductive form of an ideal – as it did in the cases of Hitler and Stalin. This fact may remind us that the possibility of despotism is remote neither in space nor in time. Many countries are still ruled in this manner, and it can threaten pain or death at any moment; it is like living in a madhouse.

Today we define despotism (along with dictatorship and totalitarianism) as a form of government. This would have horrified the classical Greeks, whose very identity (and sense of superiority to other peoples) was based on distinguishing themselves from the despotism endured by their eastern neighbours. What this contrast reveals is that politics is so central to our civilization that its meaning changes with every change of culture and circumstance. For this reason, our first move in trying to understand politics must be to free ourselves from the unreflective beliefs of the present.

Q. “Each person fits into a divinely recognized scheme.” Which of the following best captures the meaning of the ‘divinely recognized scheme’ that is referred to in the statement?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 5 Option A: The time referred to in the option is not supported by the passage.

Option B: The statement is a direct pick from the passage, and describes the “divinely recognized scheme”, but it does not explain what the author means by it.

Option C: The author states that in a despotic regime custom is king. The custom that is referred to here are the laws/customs pronounced by the king that become absolute, indisputable laws of the land as if pronounced by God. The ‘divinely recognized scheme’ is hence a metaphorical phrase intended to hint at the absoluteness of the order where each person knows what he/she is ought to do.

Option D: The phrase is only used metaphorically and doesn’t really mean that the system of order is religious or pronounced by God.

Therefore, option C is correct.

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 6

Direction: The passage given below is followed by a set of six questions. Choose the best answer to each question.

The story is told of how Harun Al Raschid, the caliph of Baghdad, would disguise himself as a beggar in order to discover what his subjects were thinking. Surrounded by the flatterers who cluster round absolute power, he could discover the truth of things only in devious ways. Harun was the caliph reputed to have condemned Scheherazade to death, who so charmed him with her stories from evening to evening for a thousand nights that he delayed her execution and eventually married her. This story is a famous image of despotism, a system of order created by conquest, resting on fear, and issuing in caprice.

In a despotic system of government, the ultimate principle of order issues from the inclinations of the despot himself. Yet, despotism is not a system in which justice is entirely meaningless: it has generally prevailed in highly traditional societies where custom is king and the prevailing terms of justice are accepted as part of the natural order of things. Each person fits into a divinely recognized scheme. Dynasties rise and fall according to what the Chinese used to call ‘the mandate of heaven’, but life for the peasant changes little. Everything depends on the wisdom of the ruler. In the eleventh century BC, the Israelites, having trouble with the Philistines, went to the prophet Samuel who ruled them and asked to have a king who would both judge them and lead them in battle. Samuel warned against this move, advising that such a king would seize their property and enslave their energies. But they insisted that they wanted to be like other nations, and a king they must have. ‘King’ in this Middle Eastern context meant a ruler who would deal despotically with them, a governor quite different from the constitutional rulers of Europe. As it happened, the Israelites were fortunate to have in Saul, David, and Solomon a line of notable rulers who gave Israel a short taste of order, and even some international glory. Solomon’s solution to the problem of two women claiming the same baby is but the most famous example of his legendary wisdom. But even these monarchs proved oppressive, and in the end the burden of paying for Solomon’s grand schemes split Israel apart.

‘Despotism’ is a catch-all category containing large variations. In one form or another, non-European civilizations have almost invariably been ruled despotically. The Western imagination, however, has generally been repelled by despots – cruel pharaohs, deranged Roman emperors like Caligula and Nero, exotic and remote emperors in India or China. In Europe, the desire for despotic power must disguise itself. Europeans have sometimes been beguiled by a despotism that comes concealed in the seductive form of an ideal – as it did in the cases of Hitler and Stalin. This fact may remind us that the possibility of despotism is remote neither in space nor in time. Many countries are still ruled in this manner, and it can threaten pain or death at any moment; it is like living in a madhouse.

Today we define despotism (along with dictatorship and totalitarianism) as a form of government. This would have horrified the classical Greeks, whose very identity (and sense of superiority to other peoples) was based on distinguishing themselves from the despotism endured by their eastern neighbours. What this contrast reveals is that politics is so central to our civilization that its meaning changes with every change of culture and circumstance. For this reason, our first move in trying to understand politics must be to free ourselves from the unreflective beliefs of the present.

Q. According to the author, which of the following is true about Harun Al Raschid?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 6 Option A: The passage only states that Raschid disguised himself to find out what his people actually thought about his rule. This cannot be construed to mean that he was kind-hearted.

Option B: The first paragraph clearly states that Raschid had to disguise himself to know what his subjects actually thought of his rule. The last sentence of the passage also states that this story serves as an example of despotism.

Option C: This option is again out of the scope of the passage, and, hence, cannot be inferred.

Option D: The passage is silent on Raschid’s efforts to get feedback from people. Hence, this option cannot be inferred.

Therefore, option B is correct.

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 7

Direction: The passage given below is followed by a set of six questions. Choose the best answer to each question.

The story is told of how Harun Al Raschid, the caliph of Baghdad, would disguise himself as a beggar in order to discover what his subjects were thinking. Surrounded by the flatterers who cluster round absolute power, he could discover the truth of things only in devious ways. Harun was the caliph reputed to have condemned Scheherazade to death, who so charmed him with her stories from evening to evening for a thousand nights that he delayed her execution and eventually married her. This story is a famous image of despotism, a system of order created by conquest, resting on fear, and issuing in caprice.

In a despotic system of government, the ultimate principle of order issues from the inclinations of the despot himself. Yet, despotism is not a system in which justice is entirely meaningless: it has generally prevailed in highly traditional societies where custom is king and the prevailing terms of justice are accepted as part of the natural order of things. Each person fits into a divinely recognized scheme. Dynasties rise and fall according to what the Chinese used to call ‘the mandate of heaven’, but life for the peasant changes little. Everything depends on the wisdom of the ruler. In the eleventh century BC, the Israelites, having trouble with the Philistines, went to the prophet Samuel who ruled them and asked to have a king who would both judge them and lead them in battle. Samuel warned against this move, advising that such a king would seize their property and enslave their energies. But they insisted that they wanted to be like other nations, and a king they must have. ‘King’ in this Middle Eastern context meant a ruler who would deal despotically with them, a governor quite different from the constitutional rulers of Europe. As it happened, the Israelites were fortunate to have in Saul, David, and Solomon a line of notable rulers who gave Israel a short taste of order, and even some international glory. Solomon’s solution to the problem of two women claiming the same baby is but the most famous example of his legendary wisdom. But even these monarchs proved oppressive, and in the end the burden of paying for Solomon’s grand schemes split Israel apart.

‘Despotism’ is a catch-all category containing large variations. In one form or another, non-European civilizations have almost invariably been ruled despotically. The Western imagination, however, has generally been repelled by despots – cruel pharaohs, deranged Roman emperors like Caligula and Nero, exotic and remote emperors in India or China. In Europe, the desire for despotic power must disguise itself. Europeans have sometimes been beguiled by a despotism that comes concealed in the seductive form of an ideal – as it did in the cases of Hitler and Stalin. This fact may remind us that the possibility of despotism is remote neither in space nor in time. Many countries are still ruled in this manner, and it can threaten pain or death at any moment; it is like living in a madhouse.

Today we define despotism (along with dictatorship and totalitarianism) as a form of government. This would have horrified the classical Greeks, whose very identity (and sense of superiority to other peoples) was based on distinguishing themselves from the despotism endured by their eastern neighbours. What this contrast reveals is that politics is so central to our civilization that its meaning changes with every change of culture and circumstance. For this reason, our first move in trying to understand politics must be to free ourselves from the unreflective beliefs of the present.

Q. According to the author, which of the following CANNOT occur in a despotic regime?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 7 Option A: The passage clearly mentions that the basis of despotism is fear and absolute power in the hands of a ruler. A state where the population doesn’t fear the ruler and also holds the power to bring down the ruler cannot, hence, be referred to as a despotic regime.

Option B: This is the basis of despotism. The king or ruler holds absolute power.

Option C: Establishing new laws by rewriting all the old ones doesn’t necessarily imply despotism. Since the question talks of such a possibility occurring in a despotic regime, it can be said that this can happen in a despotic regime.

Option D: Refer to the sentence where the author states that despotism is not a system in which justice is entirely meaningless. Hence, there could be instances where the ruler rules fairly and yet be despotic.

Therefore, option A is correct.

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 8

Direction: The passage given below is followed by a set of six questions. Choose the best answer to each question.

The story is told of how Harun Al Raschid, the caliph of Baghdad, would disguise himself as a beggar in order to discover what his subjects were thinking. Surrounded by the flatterers who cluster round absolute power, he could discover the truth of things only in devious ways. Harun was the caliph reputed to have condemned Scheherazade to death, who so charmed him with her stories from evening to evening for a thousand nights that he delayed her execution and eventually married her. This story is a famous image of despotism, a system of order created by conquest, resting on fear, and issuing in caprice.

In a despotic system of government, the ultimate principle of order issues from the inclinations of the despot himself. Yet, despotism is not a system in which justice is entirely meaningless: it has generally prevailed in highly traditional societies where custom is king and the prevailing terms of justice are accepted as part of the natural order of things. Each person fits into a divinely recognized scheme. Dynasties rise and fall according to what the Chinese used to call ‘the mandate of heaven’, but life for the peasant changes little. Everything depends on the wisdom of the ruler. In the eleventh century BC, the Israelites, having trouble with the Philistines, went to the prophet Samuel who ruled them and asked to have a king who would both judge them and lead them in battle. Samuel warned against this move, advising that such a king would seize their property and enslave their energies. But they insisted that they wanted to be like other nations, and a king they must have. ‘King’ in this Middle Eastern context meant a ruler who would deal despotically with them, a governor quite different from the constitutional rulers of Europe. As it happened, the Israelites were fortunate to have in Saul, David, and Solomon a line of notable rulers who gave Israel a short taste of order, and even some international glory. Solomon’s solution to the problem of two women claiming the same baby is but the most famous example of his legendary wisdom. But even these monarchs proved oppressive, and in the end the burden of paying for Solomon’s grand schemes split Israel apart.

‘Despotism’ is a catch-all category containing large variations. In one form or another, non-European civilizations have almost invariably been ruled despotically. The Western imagination, however, has generally been repelled by despots – cruel pharaohs, deranged Roman emperors like Caligula and Nero, exotic and remote emperors in India or China. In Europe, the desire for despotic power must disguise itself. Europeans have sometimes been beguiled by a despotism that comes concealed in the seductive form of an ideal – as it did in the cases of Hitler and Stalin. This fact may remind us that the possibility of despotism is remote neither in space nor in time. Many countries are still ruled in this manner, and it can threaten pain or death at any moment; it is like living in a madhouse.

Today we define despotism (along with dictatorship and totalitarianism) as a form of government. This would have horrified the classical Greeks, whose very identity (and sense of superiority to other peoples) was based on distinguishing themselves from the despotism endured by their eastern neighbours. What this contrast reveals is that politics is so central to our civilization that its meaning changes with every change of culture and circumstance. For this reason, our first move in trying to understand politics must be to free ourselves from the unreflective beliefs of the present.

Q. What is the contrast that the author refers to in the sentence, “what this contrast reveals is that politics is so central to our civilization that its meaning changes with every change of culture and circumstance?”

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 8 Option A: The author mentions this contrast in the context of defining despotism as a form of government, and how this would have horrified the classical Greeks. Hence, it is clear that this contrast refers to the change in the meaning of despotism over time.

Option B: The fact that the meaning of politics changes with time is evidenced by the ‘contrast’ and is not the contrast itself.

Option C: The passage mentions that there was a difference in how the Geeks and their eastern neighbors were ruled, but the contrast that is being mentioned in the following sentence alludes to the change in the meaning of despotism as perceived by the Greeks and by the author.

Option D: The passage doesn’t compare despotism with other forms of governments prevalent today and hence this option is out of the scope of the passage.

Therefore, option A is correct.

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 9

Direction: The passage given below is followed by a set of six questions. Choose the best answer to each question.

The story is told of how Harun Al Raschid, the caliph of Baghdad, would disguise himself as a beggar in order to discover what his subjects were thinking. Surrounded by the flatterers who cluster round absolute power, he could discover the truth of things only in devious ways. Harun was the caliph reputed to have condemned Scheherazade to death, who so charmed him with her stories from evening to evening for a thousand nights that he delayed her execution and eventually married her. This story is a famous image of despotism, a system of order created by conquest, resting on fear, and issuing in caprice.

In a despotic system of government, the ultimate principle of order issues from the inclinations of the despot himself. Yet, despotism is not a system in which justice is entirely meaningless: it has generally prevailed in highly traditional societies where custom is king and the prevailing terms of justice are accepted as part of the natural order of things. Each person fits into a divinely recognized scheme. Dynasties rise and fall according to what the Chinese used to call ‘the mandate of heaven’, but life for the peasant changes little. Everything depends on the wisdom of the ruler. In the eleventh century BC, the Israelites, having trouble with the Philistines, went to the prophet Samuel who ruled them and asked to have a king who would both judge them and lead them in battle. Samuel warned against this move, advising that such a king would seize their property and enslave their energies. But they insisted that they wanted to be like other nations, and a king they must have. ‘King’ in this Middle Eastern context meant a ruler who would deal despotically with them, a governor quite different from the constitutional rulers of Europe. As it happened, the Israelites were fortunate to have in Saul, David, and Solomon a line of notable rulers who gave Israel a short taste of order, and even some international glory. Solomon’s solution to the problem of two women claiming the same baby is but the most famous example of his legendary wisdom. But even these monarchs proved oppressive, and in the end the burden of paying for Solomon’s grand schemes split Israel apart.

‘Despotism’ is a catch-all category containing large variations. In one form or another, non-European civilizations have almost invariably been ruled despotically. The Western imagination, however, has generally been repelled by despots – cruel pharaohs, deranged Roman emperors like Caligula and Nero, exotic and remote emperors in India or China. In Europe, the desire for despotic power must disguise itself. Europeans have sometimes been beguiled by a despotism that comes concealed in the seductive form of an ideal – as it did in the cases of Hitler and Stalin. This fact may remind us that the possibility of despotism is remote neither in space nor in time. Many countries are still ruled in this manner, and it can threaten pain or death at any moment; it is like living in a madhouse.

Today we define despotism (along with dictatorship and totalitarianism) as a form of government. This would have horrified the classical Greeks, whose very identity (and sense of superiority to other peoples) was based on distinguishing themselves from the despotism endured by their eastern neighbours. What this contrast reveals is that politics is so central to our civilization that its meaning changes with every change of culture and circumstance. For this reason, our first move in trying to understand politics must be to free ourselves from the unreflective beliefs of the present.

Q. Why does the author remark that classifying despotism as a form of government would have horrified the classical Greeks?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 9 Option A: The option is mentioned in the passage, but is not the stated reason why the Greeks would have been horrified at defining despotism as a form of government.

Option B: This option is contrary to what is stated in the passage.

Option C: The passage states that the Greeks thought themselves to be superior to their eastern neighbors who endured despotism. There is no information to support that they were ruled by despots themselves.

Option D: The author states that classical Greeks would be horrified with him defining despotism, along with dictatorship and totalitarianism, as a form of government. It is clear that the Greeks did not consider despotism a form of government.

Therefore, option D is correct.

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 10

Directions: Identify the most appropriate summary for the paragraph.

The human race is spread all over the world, from the polar regions to the tropics. The people of whom it is made up eat different kinds of food, partly according to the climate in which they live, and partly according to the kind of food which their country produces. In hot climates, meat and fat are not much needed; but in the Arctic regions they seem to be very necessary for keeping up the heat of the body. Thus, in India, people live chiefly on different kinds of grains, eggs, milk, or sometimes fish and meat. In Europe, people eat more meat and less grain. In the Arctic regions, where no grains and fruits are produced, the Eskimo and other races live almost entirely on meat and fish.

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 10 The first thing we need to do is to identify the subject of the paragraph. That is clearly how the eating habits of people change according to produce and climate. The line which helps us identify this is: ‘The people of whom it is made up eat different kinds of food, partly according to the climate in which they live, and partly according to the kind of food which their country produces.” The balance of the paragraph is the continuation of the same by virtue of examples. It is now a child’s play to identify

Option A is only partially true. It only talks of requirements and not of what grows in those regions.

Option C talks only of products and not a requirement. The passage is not concerned with what people like or prefer but with what is locally available or required.

Option D talks of preference, something which is again absent in the paragraph.

Option B will be the correct summary.

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 11

Direction: The passage given below is followed by a set of six questions. Choose the best answer to each question.

This is strange, but on the whole a very good, time for anyone interested in history.

The strangeness comes on two very different levels. One is that there seems, in the country after country around the globe, to be ever fewer children or young adults who want – or are allowed - to study the subject at schools or universities. History departments shrink or get swallowed up; students migrate to more ‘practical’ subjects. In some countries’ school systems, history no longer exists as a separate subject. In others, teachers complain, it is ever more marginal to the schemes of curriculum planners and educational bureaucrats. The history that is studied at school often seems to be a dog’s breakfast of ill-assorted themes. In the British school system, it’s said with just a touch of exaggeration, it mostly involves repeatedly hearing about the Nazis, and not much else. It is, apparently, not at all a good time to be a teacher of history.

The other kind of bewilderment occurs on more rarefied planes. It stems from pervasive intellectual self-doubt over whether it is, or should be, possible to study history at all. Can we ever have any certain knowledge about what has happened in the past? What, if anything, can it mean to be ‘objective’, ‘unbiased’, or ‘impartial’? Is there even such a thing as historical ‘truth’? Some academic historians start to resemble the proverbial figure of the man busily sawing away at the very branch on which he is sitting. Others again worry that historical studies have become so fragmented into multiple sub-disciplines, or so preoccupied with writing about ever more arcane topics for ever smaller, more hyper-specialist readerships, that the subject no longer has any coherence or sense of purpose. It is this mental climate that makes people feel it necessary to write books with titles like In Defence of History.

Yet despite and alongside all this, history is massively popular – maybe more so than at any time in the past. History books, including ones of the utmost seriousness, based on massive research, feature regularly in the bestseller lists of almost all countries. History is the only kind of intelligent non-fiction that regularly challenges the popular novel and the lifestyle manual there. Never before has television devoted so much time to historical documentaries and dramas, including numerous digital and satellite channels entirely dedicated to the subject. Family history research is among the most prevalent and still fastest-growing of all leisure pursuits. Millions of people visit historical museums, old buildings, and other ‘heritage sites’ every weekend.

Millions more collect everything from old coins to historic militaria, or decorate and furnish their homes and themselves with different kinds of ‘retro-chic’. Re-enactment societies vie with local archaeological ones in their apparent omnipresence. All these and many more are manifestations of a genuine mass-based passion for history, however much some scholars may scorn them.

We should also, surely, be impressed by the sheer variety of interests involved. Some people, it’s true, are obsessed only with their own family’s story – or with legends about it. Most historical research, whether professional or amateur, sticks closely to the writer’s own region or country. Most of the history that is formally taught in schools and colleges, in almost every country, is still national in focus. Some commentators seem convinced that people only ever want to read or hear about ‘their own kind’: Women’s History for women only, Black History for black people. . . But the historical fascinations that are revealed in people’s spontaneous choice of reading are, encouragingly, far more diverse, less predictable than that (despite those ubiquitous Nazis). Often, it is precisely the most alien or unfamiliar which is most engaging. Clearly, ever more readers are curious about a global past, not just a local or national one.

Q. What does the sentence, “re-enactment societies vie with local archaeological ones in their apparent omnipresence” mean?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 11 Option A: There is no comparison of numbers in the passage.

Option B: Omnipresent means to be present everywhere and the phrase ‘vie with’ means to follow suit or compete with. Hence, this option is the best answer.

Option C: The passage does not talk about the societies vying for more members.

Therefore, option B is correct.

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 12

Direction: The passage given below is followed by a set of six questions. Choose the best answer to each question.

This is strange, but on the whole a very good, time for anyone interested in history.

The strangeness comes on two very different levels. One is that there seems, in the country after country around the globe, to be ever fewer children or young adults who want – or are allowed - to study the subject at schools or universities. History departments shrink or get swallowed up; students migrate to more ‘practical’ subjects. In some countries’ school systems, history no longer exists as a separate subject. In others, teachers complain, it is ever more marginal to the schemes of curriculum planners and educational bureaucrats. The history that is studied at school often seems to be a dog’s breakfast of ill-assorted themes. In the British school system, it’s said with just a touch of exaggeration, it mostly involves repeatedly hearing about the Nazis, and not much else. It is, apparently, not at all a good time to be a teacher of history.

The other kind of bewilderment occurs on more rarefied planes. It stems from pervasive intellectual self-doubt over whether it is, or should be, possible to study history at all. Can we ever have any certain knowledge about what has happened in the past? What, if anything, can it mean to be ‘objective’, ‘unbiased’, or ‘impartial’? Is there even such a thing as historical ‘truth’? Some academic historians start to resemble the proverbial figure of the man busily sawing away at the very branch on which he is sitting. Others again worry that historical studies have become so fragmented into multiple sub-disciplines, or so preoccupied with writing about ever more arcane topics for ever smaller, more hyper-specialist readerships, that the subject no longer has any coherence or sense of purpose. It is this mental climate that makes people feel it necessary to write books with titles like In Defence of History.

Yet despite and alongside all this, history is massively popular – maybe more so than at any time in the past. History books, including ones of the utmost seriousness, based on massive research, feature regularly in the bestseller lists of almost all countries. History is the only kind of intelligent non-fiction that regularly challenges the popular novel and the lifestyle manual there. Never before has television devoted so much time to historical documentaries and dramas, including numerous digital and satellite channels entirely dedicated to the subject. Family history research is among the most prevalent and still fastest-growing of all leisure pursuits. Millions of people visit historical museums, old buildings, and other ‘heritage sites’ every weekend.

Millions more collect everything from old coins to historic militaria, or decorate and furnish their homes and themselves with different kinds of ‘retro-chic’. Re-enactment societies vie with local archaeological ones in their apparent omnipresence. All these and many more are manifestations of a genuine mass-based passion for history, however much some scholars may scorn them.

We should also, surely, be impressed by the sheer variety of interests involved. Some people, it’s true, are obsessed only with their own family’s story – or with legends about it. Most historical research, whether professional or amateur, sticks closely to the writer’s own region or country. Most of the history that is formally taught in schools and colleges, in almost every country, is still national in focus. Some commentators seem convinced that people only ever want to read or hear about ‘their own kind’: Women’s History for women only, Black History for black people. . . But the historical fascinations that are revealed in people’s spontaneous choice of reading are, encouragingly, far more diverse, less predictable than that (despite those ubiquitous Nazis). Often, it is precisely the most alien or unfamiliar which is most engaging. Clearly, ever more readers are curious about a global past, not just a local or national one.

Q. Why does the author say that it is not at all a good time to be a teacher of history?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 12 Option A: The passage does comment about the British school system’s obsession with the Nazis but this is not the reason for it being a bad time for history teachers. There are more direct causes like lack of student strength and poor curriculum.

Option B: The passage doesn’t talk of any difference in pay between history and non-history teachers.

Option C: The passage begins on this note that there are very few students who want to study history. Lack of genuine, interested students is a valid cause for it being a bad time to be a history teacher.

Option D: This is a conjecture that doesn’t find enough evidence in the passage. The author doesn’t compare the possibility of other options being better for history teachers.

Therefore, option C is correct.

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 13

Direction: The passage given below is followed by a set of six questions. Choose the best answer to each question.

This is strange, but on the whole a very good, time for anyone interested in history.

The strangeness comes on two very different levels. One is that there seems, in the country after country around the globe, to be ever fewer children or young adults who want – or are allowed - to study the subject at schools or universities. History departments shrink or get swallowed up; students migrate to more ‘practical’ subjects. In some countries’ school systems, history no longer exists as a separate subject. In others, teachers complain, it is ever more marginal to the schemes of curriculum planners and educational bureaucrats. The history that is studied at school often seems to be a dog’s breakfast of ill-assorted themes. In the British school system, it’s said with just a touch of exaggeration, it mostly involves repeatedly hearing about the Nazis, and not much else. It is, apparently, not at all a good time to be a teacher of history.

The other kind of bewilderment occurs on more rarefied planes. It stems from pervasive intellectual self-doubt over whether it is, or should be, possible to study history at all. Can we ever have any certain knowledge about what has happened in the past? What, if anything, can it mean to be ‘objective’, ‘unbiased’, or ‘impartial’? Is there even such a thing as historical ‘truth’? Some academic historians start to resemble the proverbial figure of the man busily sawing away at the very branch on which he is sitting. Others again worry that historical studies have become so fragmented into multiple sub-disciplines, or so preoccupied with writing about ever more arcane topics for ever smaller, more hyper-specialist readerships, that the subject no longer has any coherence or sense of purpose. It is this mental climate that makes people feel it necessary to write books with titles like In Defence of History.

Yet despite and alongside all this, history is massively popular – maybe more so than at any time in the past. History books, including ones of the utmost seriousness, based on massive research, feature regularly in the bestseller lists of almost all countries. History is the only kind of intelligent non-fiction that regularly challenges the popular novel and the lifestyle manual there. Never before has television devoted so much time to historical documentaries and dramas, including numerous digital and satellite channels entirely dedicated to the subject. Family history research is among the most prevalent and still fastest-growing of all leisure pursuits. Millions of people visit historical museums, old buildings, and other ‘heritage sites’ every weekend.

Millions more collect everything from old coins to historic militaria, or decorate and furnish their homes and themselves with different kinds of ‘retro-chic’. Re-enactment societies vie with local archaeological ones in their apparent omnipresence. All these and many more are manifestations of a genuine mass-based passion for history, however much some scholars may scorn them.

We should also, surely, be impressed by the sheer variety of interests involved. Some people, it’s true, are obsessed only with their own family’s story – or with legends about it. Most historical research, whether professional or amateur, sticks closely to the writer’s own region or country. Most of the history that is formally taught in schools and colleges, in almost every country, is still national in focus. Some commentators seem convinced that people only ever want to read or hear about ‘their own kind’: Women’s History for women only, Black History for black people. . . But the historical fascinations that are revealed in people’s spontaneous choice of reading are, encouragingly, far more diverse, less predictable than that (despite those ubiquitous Nazis). Often, it is precisely the most alien or unfamiliar which is most engaging. Clearly, ever more readers are curious about a global past, not just a local or national one.

Q. Why does the author quote the example of the book In Defence of History?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 13 Option A: The fact that historians no longer write for the masses is correct in the context of the passage, but the option is incomplete since it doesn’t state the effect this has had on the subject.

Option B: The author states that there is a climate of apprehension in studying history. Some wonder whether it is possible to objectively study history, while others worry about the fragmented nature of the subject, making it lose its coherence. It is in this context that the author states that people have come up with books such as In Defence of History.

Option C: The option is incomplete as it takes into consideration only one part of the argument.

Option D: The passage states that though there has been a decline in the number of students wanting to study history, people in general, otherwise, do appreciate history. Hence this option is incorrect.

Therefore, option B is correct.

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 14

Direction: The passage given below is followed by a set of six questions. Choose the best answer to each question.

This is strange, but on the whole a very good, time for anyone interested in history.

The strangeness comes on two very different levels. One is that there seems, in the country after country around the globe, to be ever fewer children or young adults who want – or are allowed - to study the subject at schools or universities. History departments shrink or get swallowed up; students migrate to more ‘practical’ subjects. In some countries’ school systems, history no longer exists as a separate subject. In others, teachers complain, it is ever more marginal to the schemes of curriculum planners and educational bureaucrats. The history that is studied at school often seems to be a dog’s breakfast of ill-assorted themes. In the British school system, it’s said with just a touch of exaggeration, it mostly involves repeatedly hearing about the Nazis, and not much else. It is, apparently, not at all a good time to be a teacher of history.

The other kind of bewilderment occurs on more rarefied planes. It stems from pervasive intellectual self-doubt over whether it is, or should be, possible to study history at all. Can we ever have any certain knowledge about what has happened in the past? What, if anything, can it mean to be ‘objective’, ‘unbiased’, or ‘impartial’? Is there even such a thing as historical ‘truth’? Some academic historians start to resemble the proverbial figure of the man busily sawing away at the very branch on which he is sitting. Others again worry that historical studies have become so fragmented into multiple sub-disciplines, or so preoccupied with writing about ever more arcane topics for ever smaller, more hyper-specialist readerships, that the subject no longer has any coherence or sense of purpose. It is this mental climate that makes people feel it necessary to write books with titles like In Defence of History.

Yet despite and alongside all this, history is massively popular – maybe more so than at any time in the past. History books, including ones of the utmost seriousness, based on massive research, feature regularly in the bestseller lists of almost all countries. History is the only kind of intelligent non-fiction that regularly challenges the popular novel and the lifestyle manual there. Never before has television devoted so much time to historical documentaries and dramas, including numerous digital and satellite channels entirely dedicated to the subject. Family history research is among the most prevalent and still fastest-growing of all leisure pursuits. Millions of people visit historical museums, old buildings, and other ‘heritage sites’ every weekend.

Millions more collect everything from old coins to historic militaria, or decorate and furnish their homes and themselves with different kinds of ‘retro-chic’. Re-enactment societies vie with local archaeological ones in their apparent omnipresence. All these and many more are manifestations of a genuine mass-based passion for history, however much some scholars may scorn them.

We should also, surely, be impressed by the sheer variety of interests involved. Some people, it’s true, are obsessed only with their own family’s story – or with legends about it. Most historical research, whether professional or amateur, sticks closely to the writer’s own region or country. Most of the history that is formally taught in schools and colleges, in almost every country, is still national in focus. Some commentators seem convinced that people only ever want to read or hear about ‘their own kind’: Women’s History for women only, Black History for black people. . . But the historical fascinations that are revealed in people’s spontaneous choice of reading are, encouragingly, far more diverse, less predictable than that (despite those ubiquitous Nazis). Often, it is precisely the most alien or unfamiliar which is most engaging. Clearly, ever more readers are curious about a global past, not just a local or national one.

Q. According to the author, which of the following is NOT a reason why very few students are enrolling for history courses?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 14 Option A: The second half of the passage indeed states that history is massively popular outside schools and universities and is read voraciously by many. It is evidenced in the number of books making it to the bestsellers’ lists and popularity of history shows, etc. However, the passage nowhere correlates this aspect of the popularity of history with fewer students enrolling for history at school.

Option B: It can be inferred from the passage that the history taught at school may not interest students since the author compares it to “a dog’s breakfast of ill-assorted themes.”

Option C: The passage does talk of students not being allowed to take up the history and going for more “practical” courses instead.

Therefore, option A is correct.

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 15

Direction: The passage given below is followed by a set of six questions. Choose the best answer to each question.

This is strange, but on the whole a very good, time for anyone interested in history.

The strangeness comes on two very different levels. One is that there seems, in the country after country around the globe, to be ever fewer children or young adults who want – or are allowed - to study the subject at schools or universities. History departments shrink or get swallowed up; students migrate to more ‘practical’ subjects. In some countries’ school systems, history no longer exists as a separate subject. In others, teachers complain, it is ever more marginal to the schemes of curriculum planners and educational bureaucrats. The history that is studied at school often seems to be a dog’s breakfast of ill-assorted themes. In the British school system, it’s said with just a touch of exaggeration, it mostly involves repeatedly hearing about the Nazis, and not much else. It is, apparently, not at all a good time to be a teacher of history.

The other kind of bewilderment occurs on more rarefied planes. It stems from pervasive intellectual self-doubt over whether it is, or should be, possible to study history at all. Can we ever have any certain knowledge about what has happened in the past? What, if anything, can it mean to be ‘objective’, ‘unbiased’, or ‘impartial’? Is there even such a thing as historical ‘truth’? Some academic historians start to resemble the proverbial figure of the man busily sawing away at the very branch on which he is sitting. Others again worry that historical studies have become so fragmented into multiple sub-disciplines, or so preoccupied with writing about ever more arcane topics for ever smaller, more hyper-specialist readerships, that the subject no longer has any coherence or sense of purpose. It is this mental climate that makes people feel it necessary to write books with titles like In Defence of History.

Yet despite and alongside all this, history is massively popular – maybe more so than at any time in the past. History books, including ones of the utmost seriousness, based on massive research, feature regularly in the bestseller lists of almost all countries. History is the only kind of intelligent non-fiction that regularly challenges the popular novel and the lifestyle manual there. Never before has television devoted so much time to historical documentaries and dramas, including numerous digital and satellite channels entirely dedicated to the subject. Family history research is among the most prevalent and still fastest-growing of all leisure pursuits. Millions of people visit historical museums, old buildings, and other ‘heritage sites’ every weekend.

Millions more collect everything from old coins to historic militaria, or decorate and furnish their homes and themselves with different kinds of ‘retro-chic’. Re-enactment societies vie with local archaeological ones in their apparent omnipresence. All these and many more are manifestations of a genuine mass-based passion for history, however much some scholars may scorn them.

We should also, surely, be impressed by the sheer variety of interests involved. Some people, it’s true, are obsessed only with their own family’s story – or with legends about it. Most historical research, whether professional or amateur, sticks closely to the writer’s own region or country. Most of the history that is formally taught in schools and colleges, in almost every country, is still national in focus. Some commentators seem convinced that people only ever want to read or hear about ‘their own kind’: Women’s History for women only, Black History for black people. . . But the historical fascinations that are revealed in people’s spontaneous choice of reading are, encouragingly, far more diverse, less predictable than that (despite those ubiquitous Nazis). Often, it is precisely the most alien or unfamiliar which is most engaging. Clearly, ever more readers are curious about a global past, not just a local or national one.

Q. What does the author imply by “rarefied planes”?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 15 Option A: Rarefied means esoteric and belonging to or reserved for a select few. This option is complete and correctly expresses the meaning of the phrase.

Option B: This option is incomplete as the author doesn’t only mean it to be difficult to understand but also implies that this bewilderment is experienced by only a few others.

Option C: Rarefied means esoteric and belonging to or reserved for a select few. This option hence contradicts the meaning of the phrase.

Therefore, option A is correct.

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 16

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions based on it.

At the heart of the enormous boom in wine consumption that has taken place in the English- speaking world over the last two decades or so is a fascinating, happy paradox. In the days when wine was exclusively the preserve of a narrow cultural elite, bought either at auctions or from gentleman wine merchants in wing collars and bow-ties, to be stored in rambling cellars and decanted to order by one's butler, the ordinary drinker didn't get a look-in. The wine was considered a highly technical subject, in which anybody without the necessary ability could only fall flat on his or her face in embarrassment. It wasn't just that you needed a refined aesthetic sensibility for the stuff if it wasn't to be hopelessly wasted on you. It required an intimate knowledge of what came from where, and what it was supposed to taste like.

Those were times, however, when wine appreciation essentially meant a familiarity with the great French classics, with perhaps a smattering of other wines- like sherry and port. That was what the wine trade dealt in. These days, wine is bought daily in supermarkets and high-street chains to be consumed that evening, hardly anybody has a cellar to store it in and most don't even possess a decanter. Above all, the wines of literally dozens of countries are available on our market. When a supermarket offers its customers a couple of fruity little numbers from Brazil, we scarcely raise an eyebrow.

It seems, in other words, that the commercial jungle that wine has now become has not in the slightest deterred people from plunging adventurously into the thickets in order to taste and see. Consumers are no longer intimidated by the thought of needing to know their Pouilly-Fumé from their Pouilly-Fuissé, just at the very moment when there is more to know than ever before.

The reason for this new mood of confidence is not hard to find. It is on every wine label from Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, and the United States: the name of the grape from which the wine is made. At one time that might have sounded like a fairly technical approach in itself. Why should native English-speakers know what Cabernet Sauvignon or Chardonnay was? The answer lies in the popularity that wines made from those grape varieties now enjoy. Consumers effectively recognize them as brand names and have acquired a basic lexicon of wine that can serve them even when confronted with those Brazilian upstarts.

In the wine heartlands of France, they are scared to death of that trend– not because they think their wine isn't as good as the best from California or South Australia (what French winemaker will ever admit that?) but because they don't traditionally call their wines Cabernet Sauvignon or Chardonnay. They call them Château Ducru-Beaucaillou or Corton- Charlemagne, and they aren't about to change. Some areas, in the middle of southern France, have now produced a generation of growers using the varietal names on their labels and are tempting consumers back to French wine. It will be an uphill struggle, but there is probably no other way if France is to avoid simply becoming a specialty source of old-fashioned wines for old-fashioned connoisseurs.

Wine consumption was also given a significant boost in the early 1990s by the work of Dr. Serge Renaud, who has spent many years investigating the reasons for the uncannily low incidence of coronary heart disease in the south of France. One of his major findings is that the fat-derived cholesterol that builds up in the arteries and can eventually lead to heart trouble can be dispersed by the tannins in the wine. Tannin is derived from the skins of grapes, and is therefore present in higher levels in red wines, because they have to be infused with their skins to attain the red colour. That news caused a huge upsurge in red wine consumption in the United States. It has not been accorded the prominence it deserves in the UK, largely because the medical profession still sees all alcohol as a menace to health, and is constantly calling for it to be made prohibitively expensive. Certainly, the manufacturers of anticoagulant drugs might have something to lose if we all got the message that we would do just as well by our hearts by taking half a bottle of red wine every day!

Q. Which one of the following, if true, would provide most support for Dr. Renaud's findings about the effect of tannins?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 16 Dr. Renaud found that tannins present in wine can be useful in keeping the fat-derived cholesterol at bay that can lead to heart disease. Tannin is derived from the skin of the grapes and is high in red wines. This finding of Dr. Renaud directly takes us to the conclusion given in option B.
CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 17

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions based on it.

At the heart of the enormous boom in wine consumption that has taken place in the English- speaking world over the last two decades or so is a fascinating, happy paradox. In the days when wine was exclusively the preserve of a narrow cultural elite, bought either at auctions or from gentleman wine merchants in wing collars and bow-ties, to be stored in rambling cellars and decanted to order by one's butler, the ordinary drinker didn't get a look-in. The wine was considered a highly technical subject, in which anybody without the necessary ability could only fall flat on his or her face in embarrassment. It wasn't just that you needed a refined aesthetic sensibility for the stuff if it wasn't to be hopelessly wasted on you. It required an intimate knowledge of what came from where, and what it was supposed to taste like.

Those were times, however, when wine appreciation essentially meant a familiarity with the great French classics, with perhaps a smattering of other wines- like sherry and port. That was what the wine trade dealt in. These days, wine is bought daily in supermarkets and high-street chains to be consumed that evening, hardly anybody has a cellar to store it in and most don't even possess a decanter. Above all, the wines of literally dozens of countries are available on our market. When a supermarket offers its customers a couple of fruity little numbers from Brazil, we scarcely raise an eyebrow.

It seems, in other words, that the commercial jungle that wine has now become has not in the slightest deterred people from plunging adventurously into the thickets in order to taste and see. Consumers are no longer intimidated by the thought of needing to know their Pouilly-Fumé from their Pouilly-Fuissé, just at the very moment when there is more to know than ever before.

The reason for this new mood of confidence is not hard to find. It is on every wine label from Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, and the United States: the name of the grape from which the wine is made. At one time that might have sounded like a fairly technical approach in itself. Why should native English-speakers know what Cabernet Sauvignon or Chardonnay was? The answer lies in the popularity that wines made from those grape varieties now enjoy. Consumers effectively recognize them as brand names and have acquired a basic lexicon of wine that can serve them even when confronted with those Brazilian upstarts.

In the wine heartlands of France, they are scared to death of that trend– not because they think their wine isn't as good as the best from California or South Australia (what French winemaker will ever admit that?) but because they don't traditionally call their wines Cabernet Sauvignon or Chardonnay. They call them Château Ducru-Beaucaillou or Corton- Charlemagne, and they aren't about to change. Some areas, in the middle of southern France, have now produced a generation of growers using the varietal names on their labels and are tempting consumers back to French wine. It will be an uphill struggle, but there is probably no other way if France is to avoid simply becoming a specialty source of old-fashioned wines for old-fashioned connoisseurs.

Wine consumption was also given a significant boost in the early 1990s by the work of Dr. Serge Renaud, who has spent many years investigating the reasons for the uncannily low incidence of coronary heart disease in the south of France. One of his major findings is that the fat-derived cholesterol that builds up in the arteries and can eventually lead to heart trouble can be dispersed by the tannins in the wine. Tannin is derived from the skins of grapes, and is therefore present in higher levels in red wines, because they have to be infused with their skins to attain the red colour. That news caused a huge upsurge in red wine consumption in the United States. It has not been accorded the prominence it deserves in the UK, largely because the medical profession still sees all alcohol as a menace to health, and is constantly calling for it to be made prohibitively expensive. Certainly, the manufacturers of anticoagulant drugs might have something to lose if we all got the message that we would do just as well by our hearts by taking half a bottle of red wine every day!

Q. The development which has created fear among winemakers in the wine heartlands of France is the-

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 17 Customers are aware of the name of the grape from which the wine is made. The French are thus scared of this lexicon that the customers have acquired. And it is option A that talks about the acquired education and is the answer.
CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 18

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions based on it.

At the heart of the enormous boom in wine consumption that has taken place in the English- speaking world over the last two decades or so is a fascinating, happy paradox. In the days when wine was exclusively the preserve of a narrow cultural elite, bought either at auctions or from gentleman wine merchants in wing collars and bow-ties, to be stored in rambling cellars and decanted to order by one's butler, the ordinary drinker didn't get a look-in. The wine was considered a highly technical subject, in which anybody without the necessary ability could only fall flat on his or her face in embarrassment. It wasn't just that you needed a refined aesthetic sensibility for the stuff if it wasn't to be hopelessly wasted on you. It required an intimate knowledge of what came from where, and what it was supposed to taste like.

Those were times, however, when wine appreciation essentially meant a familiarity with the great French classics, with perhaps a smattering of other wines- like sherry and port. That was what the wine trade dealt in. These days, wine is bought daily in supermarkets and high-street chains to be consumed that evening, hardly anybody has a cellar to store it in and most don't even possess a decanter. Above all, the wines of literally dozens of countries are available on our market. When a supermarket offers its customers a couple of fruity little numbers from Brazil, we scarcely raise an eyebrow.

It seems, in other words, that the commercial jungle that wine has now become has not in the slightest deterred people from plunging adventurously into the thickets in order to taste and see. Consumers are no longer intimidated by the thought of needing to know their Pouilly-Fumé from their Pouilly-Fuissé, just at the very moment when there is more to know than ever before.

The reason for this new mood of confidence is not hard to find. It is on every wine label from Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, and the United States: the name of the grape from which the wine is made. At one time that might have sounded like a fairly technical approach in itself. Why should native English-speakers know what Cabernet Sauvignon or Chardonnay was? The answer lies in the popularity that wines made from those grape varieties now enjoy. Consumers effectively recognize them as brand names and have acquired a basic lexicon of wine that can serve them even when confronted with those Brazilian upstarts.

In the wine heartlands of France, they are scared to death of that trend– not because they think their wine isn't as good as the best from California or South Australia (what French winemaker will ever admit that?) but because they don't traditionally call their wines Cabernet Sauvignon or Chardonnay. They call them Château Ducru-Beaucaillou or Corton- Charlemagne, and they aren't about to change. Some areas, in the middle of southern France, have now produced a generation of growers using the varietal names on their labels and are tempting consumers back to French wine. It will be an uphill struggle, but there is probably no other way if France is to avoid simply becoming a specialty source of old-fashioned wines for old-fashioned connoisseurs.

Wine consumption was also given a significant boost in the early 1990s by the work of Dr. Serge Renaud, who has spent many years investigating the reasons for the uncannily low incidence of coronary heart disease in the south of France. One of his major findings is that the fat-derived cholesterol that builds up in the arteries and can eventually lead to heart trouble can be dispersed by the tannins in the wine. Tannin is derived from the skins of grapes, and is therefore present in higher levels in red wines, because they have to be infused with their skins to attain the red colour. That news caused a huge upsurge in red wine consumption in the United States. It has not been accorded the prominence it deserves in the UK, largely because the medical profession still sees all alcohol as a menace to health, and is constantly calling for it to be made prohibitively expensive. Certainly, the manufacturers of anticoagulant drugs might have something to lose if we all got the message that we would do just as well by our hearts by taking half a bottle of red wine every day!

Q. Which one of the following CANNOT be reasonably attributed to the labelling strategy followed by wine producers in English-speaking countries?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 18 All throughout the passage, the author has talked about wines with respect to their varieties and grapes that they are made of. There is no mention of any quality-related to wine.

Therefore, option B is correct.

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 19

Direction: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions based on it.

At the heart of the enormous boom in wine consumption that has taken place in the English- speaking world over the last two decades or so is a fascinating, happy paradox. In the days when wine was exclusively the preserve of a narrow cultural elite, bought either at auctions or from gentleman wine merchants in wing collars and bow-ties, to be stored in rambling cellars and decanted to order by one's butler, the ordinary drinker didn't get a look-in. The wine was considered a highly technical subject, in which anybody without the necessary ability could only fall flat on his or her face in embarrassment. It wasn't just that you needed a refined aesthetic sensibility for the stuff if it wasn't to be hopelessly wasted on you. It required an intimate knowledge of what came from where, and what it was supposed to taste like.

Those were times, however, when wine appreciation essentially meant a familiarity with the great French classics, with perhaps a smattering of other wines- like sherry and port. That was what the wine trade dealt in. These days, wine is bought daily in supermarkets and high-street chains to be consumed that evening, hardly anybody has a cellar to store it in and most don't even possess a decanter. Above all, the wines of literally dozens of countries are available on our market. When a supermarket offers its customers a couple of fruity little numbers from Brazil, we scarcely raise an eyebrow.

It seems, in other words, that the commercial jungle that wine has now become has not in the slightest deterred people from plunging adventurously into the thickets in order to taste and see. Consumers are no longer intimidated by the thought of needing to know their Pouilly-Fumé from their Pouilly-Fuissé, just at the very moment when there is more to know than ever before.

The reason for this new mood of confidence is not hard to find. It is on every wine label from Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, and the United States: the name of the grape from which the wine is made. At one time that might have sounded like a fairly technical approach in itself. Why should native English-speakers know what Cabernet Sauvignon or Chardonnay was? The answer lies in the popularity that wines made from those grape varieties now enjoy. Consumers effectively recognize them as brand names and have acquired a basic lexicon of wine that can serve them even when confronted with those Brazilian upstarts.

In the wine heartlands of France, they are scared to death of that trend– not because they think their wine isn't as good as the best from California or South Australia (what French winemaker will ever admit that?) but because they don't traditionally call their wines Cabernet Sauvignon or Chardonnay. They call them Château Ducru-Beaucaillou or Corton- Charlemagne, and they aren't about to change. Some areas, in the middle of southern France, have now produced a generation of growers using the varietal names on their labels and are tempting consumers back to French wine. It will be an uphill struggle, but there is probably no other way if France is to avoid simply becoming a specialty source of old-fashioned wines for old-fashioned connoisseurs.

Wine consumption was also given a significant boost in the early 1990s by the work of Dr. Serge Renaud, who has spent many years investigating the reasons for the uncannily low incidence of coronary heart disease in the south of France. One of his major findings is that the fat-derived cholesterol that builds up in the arteries and can eventually lead to heart trouble can be dispersed by the tannins in the wine. Tannin is derived from the skins of grapes, and is therefore present in higher levels in red wines, because they have to be infused with their skins to attain the red colour. That news caused a huge upsurge in red wine consumption in the United States. It has not been accorded the prominence it deserves in the UK, largely because the medical profession still sees all alcohol as a menace to health, and is constantly calling for it to be made prohibitively expensive. Certainly, the manufacturers of anticoagulant drugs might have something to lose if we all got the message that we would do just as well by our hearts by taking half a bottle of red wine every day!

Q. What according to the author should the French do to avoid becoming a producer of merely old- fashioned wines?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 19 The author in the fourth para is telling us that in the present times when 'wine' has reached nooks and corners of the world, their names have become brands. French on the other hand, do not call their wines by their names and thus are insecure of this cult as to how are consumers going to recognize their wines as good. This implies that the French must follow similar branding strategies and consumers will buy those wines with which they can relate to.

Therefore, option D is correct.

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 20

Which of the following will be the odd one out.

"Spoon, Sword, Knife, Fork".


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 20 All except the sword are used in the kitchen.

So, Sword will be the perfect odd one out.

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 21

Which of the following will be the odd one out.

"Dollar, Peso, Ounce, Euro".


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 21 All except Ounce are names of currencies, while Ounce is a unit of weight.

So, Ounce will be the perfect odd one out.

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 22

Direction: Rearrange the following six sentences (A), (B), (C), (D), (E) and (F) in a proper sequence to form a meaningful paragraph and then answer the questions given below.

  1. India’s public expenditure on education has ranged between 3.26 % and 3.85% from 2004-05 till 2009-10 and this needs to increase if it were to come at par with the expenditure incurred by the developed economies.

  2. With its rapidly expanding middle class, India’s private expenditure on education is set to increase manifold.

  3. Only 1 out of approximately 150 applicants gets admission into the elite Indian Institute of Management (IIMs) compared with the ratio of 1:10 for MIT.

  4. While there has been some private investment in setting up educational institutions, there remains a glaring mismatch in demand and supply, particularly in high-quality institutions.

  5. Indian society puts a premium on knowledge and its acquisition - spending on education has figured as the single largest outlay for a middle-class household after food and groceries.

  6. It is therefore not surprising that an industry chamber has recently reported that 450,000 Indian students spend over USD 13 billion each year in acquiring higher education overseas.

Q. Which of the following will be the last sentence?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 22 After referring to the sentences given above, we get that the last sentence should always be the sentences which means after that no other can be added and its the conclusion of that paragraph.

Therefore, sentence 6 will be the perfect for the last line for the paragraph.

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 23

Direction: Rearrange the following six sentences (A), (B), (C), (D), (E) and (F) in a proper sequence to form a meaningful paragraph and then answer the questions given below.

  1. India’s public expenditure on education has ranged between 3.26 % and 3.85% from 2004-05 till 2009-10 and this needs to increase if it were to come at par with the expenditure incurred by the developed economies.

  2. With its rapidly expanding middle class, India’s private expenditure on education is set to increase manifold.

  3. Only 1 out of approximately 150 applicants gets admission into the elite Indian Institute of Management (IIMs) compared with the ratio of 1:10 for MIT.

  4. While there has been some private investment in setting up educational institutions, there remains a glaring mismatch in demand and supply, particularly in high quality institutions.

  5. Indian society puts a premium on knowledge and its acquisition - spending on education has figured as the single largest outlay for a middle class household after food and groceries.

  6. It is therefore not surprising that an industry chamber has recently reported that 450,000 Indian students spend over USD 13 billion each year in acquiring higher education overseas.

Q. Which of the following will be the fourth sentence?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 23 From the sentences given above, we get that E is the starting sentence and A is the third.

Therefore, related to sentence A the next sentence that can be suited will be sentence D.

Whereas all the other remaining sentence may get little in convenient to it.

So, we can say that the 4th sentence will be 4.

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 24

Direction: Rearrange the following six sentences (A), (B), (C), (D), (E) and (F) in a proper sequence to form a meaningful paragraph and then answer the questions given below.

  1. A) India’s public expenditure on education has ranged between 3.26 % and 3.85% from 004-05 till 2009-10 and this needs to increase if it were to come at par with the expenditure incurred by the developed economies.

  2. B) With its rapidly expanding middle class, India’s private expenditure on education is set to increase manifold.

  3. Only 1 out of approximately 150 applicants gets admission into the elite Indian Institute of Management (IIMs) compared with the ratio of 1:10 for MIT.

  4. While there has been some private investment in setting up educational institutions, there remains a glaring mismatch in demand and supply, particularly in high quality institutions.

  5. Indian society puts a premium on knowledge and its acquisition - spending on education has figured as the single largest outlay for a middle class household after food and groceries.

  6. It is therefore not surprising that an industry chamber has recently reported that 450,000 Indian students spend over USD 13 billion each year in acquiring higher education overseas.

Q. Which of the following will be the First sentence?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 24 After watching all the points we get that all the points except E are dependent on some other points. Whereas sentence E clearly shows that it is an independent sentence and may take a start.

All other sentences make come before or after some other sentences because they are connected to one another, on the other hand E will take a lead to start the paragraph.

Therefore, statement 5 is the correct answer.

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 25

Directions: The following state-wise demographic information is available for the different states in North-East India. This demographic findings is conducted every 5 years, and the latest one was conducted this year in 2016.

Sex Ratio is defined as the number of females per 1000 males.

Birth Rate is the number of live births per 1000 population in a year

Literacy Rate is the percentage of the population who have the ability to read and write.

Each of these figures have been rounded off to the nearest integer.

The Government of India wants to track all these parameters and note key areas where the states have improved in the past 5 years. A higher sex ratio, higher literacy rate, and lower birth rate across this period is what the Government of India wants from these states.

Q. How many states were able to make the Government of India pleased on all three parameters?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 25 The Government of India wants a higher sex ratio, higher literacy rate, and lower birth rate across this period. Except for Manipur and Tripura, every state is satisfying all three parameters. Hence, six states satisfy the given condition.
CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 26

Directions: The following state-wise demographic information is available for the different states in North-East India. This demographic findings is conducted every 5 years, and the latest one was conducted this year in 2016.

Sex Ratio is defined as the number of females per 1000 males.

Birth Rate is the number of live births per 1000 population in a year

Literacy Rate is the percentage of the population who have the ability to read and write.

Each of these figures have been rounded off to the nearest integer.

The Government of India wants to track all these parameters and note key areas where the states have improved in the past 5 years. A higher sex ratio, higher literacy rate, and lower birth rate across this period is what the Government of India wants from these states.

Q. What is the approximate average literacy rate for the states of North-East India in 2016 if the ratio of the populations of the states listed in alphabetical order is 1 : 1 : 1 : 2 : 3 : 1 : 2 : 4?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 26 The average literacy of the states shall be the weighted average of the individual literacy of the states, where the weights are the ratio of their populations.

Hence, Average Literacy

=

= 1248/15 = 83.2

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 27

Directions: The following state-wise demographic information is available for the different states in North-East India. This demographic findings is conducted every 5 years, and the latest one was conducted this year in 2016.

Sex Ratio is defined as the number of females per 1000 males.

Birth Rate is the number of live births per 1000 population in a year

Literacy Rate is the percentage of the population who have the ability to read and write.

Each of these figures have been rounded off to the nearest integer.

The Government of India wants to track all these parameters and note key areas where the states have improved in the past 5 years. A higher sex ratio, higher literacy rate, and lower birth rate across this period is what the Government of India wants from these states.

Q. How many of these states saw an increase in the sex ratio figure by more than 3% during the 2011-2016 period?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 27 Arunachal Pradesh (4.69%), Assam (3.03%), Sikkim (3.77%) and Tripura (3.40%) saw an increase in the sex ratio figure by more than 3% during the 2011-2016 period. Hence, four states.
CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 28

Directions: The following state-wise demographic information is available for the different states in North-East India. This demographic findings is conducted every 5 years, and the latest one was conducted this year in 2016.

Sex Ratio is defined as the number of females per 1000 males.

Birth Rate is the number of live births per 1000 population in a year

Literacy Rate is the percentage of the population who have the ability to read and write.

Each of these figures have been rounded off to the nearest integer.

The Government of India wants to track all these parameters and note key areas where the states have improved in the past 5 years. A higher sex ratio, higher literacy rate, and lower birth rate across this period is what the Government of India wants from these states.

Q. If the population of Meghalaya increased by 20% during this period 2011-2016, then by how much approximate percent did the population of women increase by in that state?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 28 Let the number of males in 2011 be 1000 in Meghalaya.

Hence the number of females was 919.

Total population in 2011 was 1919.

In 2016, the total population has increased by 20% to 2302.8 or 2303.

Since the ratio of females : males in 2016 is 939:1000,

we get the count of females in 2016 as (2302.8 * 939/1939) = 1115.18.

Number of increase females in the 2011-2016 period is = (196.18×100)/919 = 21.3

Hence the percentage increase in females in the 2011-2016 period is 21.3%.

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 29

Directions: The pie charts below show the distribution of yearly expenses of a family for the years 2015-16 and 2014-15.

Total annual expense for the year 2014-15 was 19.2 lakhs and for the year 2015-16 was 25 lakhs.

Q. What is the % change in transportation cost for the family in the financial year 2015-16 compared to the previous year?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 29 Transportation cost for the year 2014-15 = 18% of 19.2 lakhs = 3.45 lakhs

Transportation cost for the year 2015-16 = 15% of 25 lakhs = 3.75 lakhs

Hence % change in transportation cost = ((3.75 - 3.45)/3.45) * 100 = 8.7

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 30

Directions: The pie charts below show the distribution of yearly expenses of a family for the years 2015-16 and 2014-15.

Total annual expense for the year 2014-15 was 19.2 lakhs and for the year 2015-16 was 25 lakhs.

Q. What is the % increase in Housing expenditure for the year 2015-16?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 30 % increase in cost for Housing sector = ((cost in 2015 -16 - cost in 2014 -15)/cost in 2014 -15) x 100

= (34% of 25 lakhs - 23% of 19.2 lakhs)/(23% of 19.2 lakhs)*100

= 93 (approx.)

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 31

Directions: The pie charts below show the distribution of yearly expenses of a family for the years 2015-16 and 2014-15.

Total annual expense for the year 2014-15 was 19.2 lakhs and for the year 2015-16 was 25 lakhs.

Q. In the year 2015-16 how much money is paid less for taxes compared to the year 2014-15?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 31 In the year 2015-16 money paid for tax = 10% of 25 lakhs = 2.5 lakhs

In the year 2014-15 money paid for tax = 13% of 19.2 lakhs = 2.5 lakhs (approx.)

So approx. no money is paid less.

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 32

Directions: The pie charts below show the distribution of yearly expenses of a family for the years 2015-16 and 2014-15.

Total annual expense for the year 2014-15 was 19.2 lakhs and for the year 2015-16 was 25 lakhs.

Q. % increase in which cost is the most for the year 2015-16 compared to the previous year?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 32

% increase in cost= (cost this year - cost previous year)/cost previous year *100

So we can see that among all the sectors, % increase in cost for Entertainment sector is highest.

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 33

Directions: Miaomi is an electronics company in India, operating out of six exclusive showrooms in India S1, S2, S3, S4, S5 and S6. Other than these six exclusive showrooms, no other outlet, or shop sells Miaomi electronic products in the country. Miaomi deals in basically five major varieties of electronic goods, in India, which are as follows - Mobiles(M), Tablets(T), Laptops(L), Electric Kettles(EK) and Adapters(A).

The following graph depict the sales by showroom(in Rs. Crores).

The following pie-chart depicts the Category-wise break-up in the sales(in Rs.) of Miaomi products across the country.

Q. If it is known that two particular categories of Miaomi electronic goods are sold in exactly four of the six showrooms, and in those four showrooms, no other category of products are sold, then which of the following must be one of those two particular categories?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 33 Since the sum of total sales across all showrooms is Rs. 300 Crores, and the percentage share of each of the 5 Product Categories is in integers, hence the sale for any Product Category will be a multiple of 3.

Thus the sum of the two Product Categories, in question will be such that the sum is a multiple of 3.

Also the sum of the sales figures for these four showrooms must be divisible by 3.

Now if we look at the individual showroom sales figures(in Rs. Crores) we see that,

S1 →27 mod 3 = 0

S2 → 49 mod 3 = 1

S3 → 19 mod 3 = 1

S4 → 31 mod 3 = 1

S5 → 102 mod 3 = 0

S6 → 72 mod 3 = 0

Thus if we want to add any four, such that sum is divisible by 3, all three of S2, S3 and S4 must be included, and any one of the remaining three

Now, thus three possible sums may be obtained,

S1 + (S2 + S3 + S4) = 27 + 49 + 19 +31 = 126

S5 + (S2 + S3 + S4) = 102 + 49 + 19 +31 = 201

S6 + (S2 + S3 + S4) = 72 + 49 + 19 +31 = 171

Now we can observe that sum of sales of Mobiles and Laptops(27 + 30)% of 300 = 171

No two other pairs of sales figures will add up to 126 or 201.

Hence, from Options, we can see that one of the categories must be Mobiles.

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 34

Directions: Miaomi is an electronics company in India, operating out of six exclusive showrooms in India S1, S2, S3, S4, S5 and S6. Other than these six exclusive showrooms, no other outlet, or shop sells Miaomi electronic products in the country. Miaomi deals in basically five major varieties of electronic goods, in India, which are as follows - Mobiles(M), Tablets(T), Laptops(L), Electric Kettles(EK) and Adapters(A).

The following graph depict the sales by showroom(in Rs. Crores).

The following pie-chart depicts the Category-wise break-up in the sales(in Rs.) of Miaomi products across the country.

Q. If the maximum possible number of Categories which were sold in equal amounts, across the six showrooms is N, then what is the value of N?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 34 The sales figures(in Rs. Crores) for each Category are as follows,

Mobiles = 81, Tablets = 51, Laptops = 90, Electric Kettle = 30, Adapters = 48

The sales figures(in Rs. Crores) for each showroom are as follows,

S1 = 27, S2 = 49, S3 = 19, S4 = 31, S5 = 102, S6 = 72.

Now since there are 6 showrooms, for equal distribution for maximum product categories across all showrooms, we start with Electric Kettle(smallest figure) and distribute Rs. 30 Crores across all showrooms (Rs. 5 Crore each)

Next we take Adapters, and distribute Rs. 48 Crores across all showrooms (Rs. 8 Crore each)

Next item is Laptops, where we have to distribute Rs. 51 Crores across all showrooms (Rs. 8.5 Crore each)

But one of the showrooms, S3 has total sales of only Rs. 19 Crores.

(5 + 8 + 8.5)>19.

Hence a maximum of only two Product Categories, can be evenly distributed across all six showrooms.

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 35

Directions: Miaomi is an electronics company in India, operating out of six exclusive showrooms in India S1, S2, S3, S4, S5 and S6. Other than these six exclusive showrooms, no other outlet, or shop sells Miaomi electronic products in the country. Miaomi deals in basically five major varieties of electronic goods, in India, which are as follows - Mobiles(M), Tablets(T), Laptops(L), Electric Kettles(EK) and Adapters(A).

The following graph depict the sales by showroom(in Rs. Crores).

The following pie-chart depicts the Category-wise break-up in the sales(in Rs.) of Miaomi products across the country.

Q. If Showrooms S1, S3 and S5 were the only three showrooms dealing in mobiles, and exactly two of the three dealt only in Mobiles, then what approximate percentage of the sales incurred by the other showroom is accounted for by products not in the 'Mobiles' category?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 35 The sum of total Sales of all showrooms combined is = (27 + 49 + 19 +31 + 102 + 72) = Rs. 300 Crores

27% of total sales is accrued from Mobile = Rs. 81 Crores.

Now S1, S3 and S5 have sales of 27, 19 and 102 respectively.

Hence S1 and S3, must be dealing only in Mobiles, and S5 sells other items as well worth (81 - 27 - 19) = Rs. 35 Crores.

Hence S5 makes (102 - 35) = Rs. 67 Crores, by selling items other than 'Mobiles'.

Hence percentage of the sales incurred by S5 for products not in the 'Mobiles' category is (67/102)*100%

= 65.7%, which is roughly 66%

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 36

Directions: Miaomi is an electronics company in India, operating out of six exclusive showrooms in India S1, S2, S3, S4, S5 and S6. Other than these six exclusive showrooms, no other outlet, or shop sells Miaomi electronic products in the country. Miaomi deals in basically five major varieties of electronic goods, in India, which are as follows - Mobiles(M), Tablets(T), Laptops(L), Electric Kettles(EK) and Adapters(A).

The following graph depict the sales by showroom(in Rs. Crores).

The following pie-chart depicts the Category-wise break-up in the sales(in Rs.) of Miaomi products across the country.

Q. Considering the information provided in question 2, which of the following are not amongst the four showrooms selling those two particular categories exclusively?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 36 From the solution to the previous question, we can see that, the four showrooms selling Mobiles and Laptops only are S2, S3, S4 and S6.

Hence from amongst the options, S1 is not amongst the four showrooms in question.

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 37

Directions: Bhiku Mahtre has suddenly taken interest in solving crossword puzzles. His aide, Satya, is reading the newspaper and which has a unique crossword puzzle in it. First, the words have to be found out using the clues given, and then the position of the words also needs to be identified. After a brainstorming session, the two stalwarts have managed to find out the following

  • There are only five words in the entire crossword, viz. EQUAL, MORALE, FERVOUR, GROTESQUE, ELITE.

  • The words are arranged inside a 9 * 8(9 columns and 8 rows) crossword grid.

  • There is only one word which lies across; all others are up-down

  • There is no row or column which remains empty, at least one letter is there in every row or column

  • The words are arranged in left to right or from top to bottom only

  • None of the five words are standalone and are connected to at least one word.

  • Row-1 Column-8 and Row-1 Column-9 are empty

  • There is at least one empty cell above and also to the right of the letter F

Q. What is the position of the first letter of the word GROTESQUE?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 37 We have the number of letters of the words as EQUAL-5, ELITE-5, MORALE-6, FERVOUR-7, GROTESQUE-9.

Let us denote Row number 'x' as R - x, and Column number 'x' as C - x.

Since it is given that there is only one across word and no column remains empty, GROTESQUE must be the across word, as there are only 9 columns, and every other word must be connected to it.

Now, the word FERVOUR, which contains 7 letters must be an up-down word, and must start in row 2, as there is at least one blank cell above F. Also, it cannot start in row 3 or below.

Let us see what can be the common letter to GROTESQUE and FERVOUR.

Suppose the common letter is R. Then, there are 2 possibilities, GROTESQUE starts at R - 4, C - 1 or R - 8 C1. But it cannot start with R - 8, C - 1 as we need an 8 letter word to occupy row 1.

Therefore, MORALE must start from R - 3, C - 3, and to ensure that row 1 is not empty, ELITE must start at R-1, C - 4. The position of EQUAL cannot be fixed.

Next, suppose, O is common to GROTESQUE AND FERVOUR. Then GROTESQUE must start at R - 6, C - 1. Therefore MORALE must start at the 1st row, as that is the only 6 letter word which ensures that Row 1 is not empty. But it cannot start at R - 1, C - 8 or R - 1, C9. Hence it must start at R - 1, C - 5.

The only place therefore equal can start is at R - 4, C - 7. The position of ELITE cannot be fixed.

Next, let us say that E is common to GROTESQUE and FERVOUR.

Obviously, the last E of GROTESQUE cannot be common as then F will not have at least one blank cell on its right. Hence GROTESQUE must start at R - 3, C - 1. Now, if we start EQUAL at R - 3, C - 9, there is no place for ELITE. Hence EQUAL must start at R - 2, C - 7. Therefore, MORALE must start at R - 1, C - 2, and ELITE at R - 3, C - 9

Lastly, U can be common to GROTESQUE and FERVOUR. But that means GROTESQUE starts at row 7, and we need another 7 letter word to have at least 1 letter in row 1. This case is ruled out.

Clearly from the above possible solutions the exact position of the first letter of the word GROTESQUE cannot be determined. Hence Option D.

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 38

Directions: Bhiku Mahtre has suddenly taken interest in solving crossword puzzles. His aide, Satya, is reading the newspaper and which has a unique crossword puzzle in it. First, the words have to be found out using the clues given, and then the position of the words also needs to be identified. After a brainstorming session, the two stalwarts have managed to find out the following

  • There are only five words in the entire crossword, viz. EQUAL, MORALE, FERVOUR, GROTESQUE, ELITE.

  • The words are arranged inside a 9*8(9 columns and 8 rows) crossword grid.

  • There is only one word which lies across; all others are up-down

  • There is no row or column which remains empty, at least one letter is there in every row or column

  • The words are arranged in left to right or from top to bottom only

  • None of the five words are standalone and are connected to at least one word.

  • Row-1 Column-8 and Row-1 Column-9 are empty

  • There is at least one empty cell above and also to the right of the letter F

Q. The word ELITE can start in which row?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 38 We have the number of letters of the words as EQUAL-5, ELITE-5, MORALE-6, FERVOUR-7, GROTESQUE-9.

Let us denote Row number 'x' as R - x, and Column number 'x' as C - x.

Since it is given that there is only one across word and no column remains empty, GROTESQUE must be the across word, as there are only 9 columns, and every other word must be connected to it.

Now, the word FERVOUR, which contains 7 letters must be an up-down word, and must start in row 2, as there is at least one blank cell above F. Also, it cannot start in row 3 or below.

Let us see what can be the common letter to GROTESQUE and FERVOUR.

Suppose the common letter is R. Then, there are 2 possibilities, GROTESQUE starts at R - 4, C - 1 or R - 8 C1. But it cannot start with R - 8, C - 1 as we need an 8 letter word to occupy row 1.

Therefore, MORALE must start from R - 3, C - 3, and to ensure that row 1 is not empty, ELITE must start at R - 1, C - 4. The position of EQUAL cannot be fixed.

Next, suppose, O is common to GROTESQUE AND FERVOUR. Then GROTESQUE must start at R - 6, C - 1. Therefore MORALE must start at the 1st row, as that is the only 6 letter word which ensures that Row 1 is not empty. But it cannot start at R - 1, C - 8 or R - 1, C9. Hence it must start at R - 1, C - 5.

The only place therefore equal can start is at R - 4, C - 7. The position of ELITE cannot be fixed.

Next, let us say that E is common to GROTESQUE and FERVOUR.

Obviously, the last E of GROTESQUE cannot be common as then F will not have at least one blank cell on its right. Hence GROTESQUE must start at R - 3, C - 1. Now, if we start EQUAL at R - 3, C - 9, there is no place for ELITE. Hence EQUAL must start at R - 2, C - 7. Therefore, MORALE must start at R - 1, C - 2, and ELITE at R - 3, C - 9

Lastly, U can be common to GROTESQUE and FERVOUR. But that means GROTESQUE starts at row 7, and we need another 7 letter word to have at least 1 letter in row 1. This case is ruled out.

The word ELITE can start in 1st, 2nd and 3rd row. Therefore, more than 1 is possible.

Hence Option D.

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 39

Directions: Bhiku Mahtre has suddenly taken interest in solving crossword puzzles. His aide, Satya, is reading the newspaper and which has a unique crossword puzzle in it. First, the words have to be found out using the clues given, and then the position of the words also needs to be identified. After a brainstorming session, the two stalwarts have managed to find out the following

  • There are only five words in the entire crossword, viz. EQUAL, MORALE, FERVOUR, GROTESQUE, ELITE.

  • The words are arranged inside a 9*8(9 columns and 8 rows) crossword grid.

  • There is only one word which lies across; all others are up-down

  • There is no row or column which remains empty, at least one letter is there in every row or column

  • The words are arranged in left to right or from top to bottom only

  • None of the five words are standalone and are connected to at least one word.

  • Row-1 Column-8 and Row-1 Column-9 are empty

  • There is at least one empty cell above and also to the right of the letter F

Q. How many blank cells are there in total?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 39 We have the number of letters of the words as EQUAL-5, ELITE-5, MORALE-6, FERVOUR-7, GROTESQUE-9.

Let us denote Row number 'x' as R - x, and Column number 'x' as C - x.

Since it is given that there is only one across word and no column remains empty, GROTESQUE must be the across word, as there are only 9 columns, and every other word must be connected to it.

Now, the word FERVOUR, which contains 7 letters must be an up-down word, and must start in row 2, as there is at least one blank cell above F. Also, it cannot start in row 3 or below.

Let us see what can be the common letter to GROTESQUE and FERVOUR.

Suppose the common letter is R. Then, there are 2 possibilities, GROTESQUE starts at R - 4, C - 1 or R - 8 C1. But it cannot start with R - 8, C - 1 as we need an 8 letter word to occupy row 1.

Therefore, MORALE must start from R - 3, C - 3, and to ensure that row 1 is not empty, ELITE must start at R - 1, C - 4. The position of EQUAL cannot be fixed.

Next, suppose, O is common to GROTESQUE AND FERVOUR. Then GROTESQUE must start at R - 6, C - 1. Therefore MORALE must start at the 1st row, as that is the only 6 letter word which ensures that Row 1 is not empty. But it cannot start at R - 1, C - 8 or R - 1, C9. Hence it must start at R - 1, C - 5.

The only place therefore equal can start is at R - 4, C - 7. The position of ELITE cannot be fixed.

Next, let us say that E is common to GROTESQUE and FERVOUR.

Obviously, the last E of GROTESQUE cannot be common as then F will not have at least one blank cell on its right. Hence GROTESQUE must start at R - 3, C - 1. Now, if we start EQUAL at R - 3, C - 9, there is no place for ELITE. Hence EQUAL must start at R - 2, C - 7. Therefore, MORALE must start at R-1, C - 2, and ELITE at R - 3, C - 9

Lastly, U can be common to GROTESQUE and FERVOUR. But that means GROTESQUE starts at row 7, and we need another 7 letter word to have at least 1 letter in row 1. This case is ruled out.

Total cells = 9 x 8 = 72. Total number of letters = 5 + 5 + 6 + 7 + 9 = 32. Out of these 4 must be common. Total blanks occupied = 32 - 4 = 28. Total blanks un-occupied = 72 - 28 = 44.

Hence Option B.

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 40

Direction: Answer the questions on the basis of information given below.

The following bar graphs give the data about various districts being affected by natural calamities in the state of Maharashtra for the period 1984 to 1993.

Note: No flood affected district is also a drought affected district.

Q. In 1987, how many districts faced only one calamity?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 40 In 1987 there are two overlapping districts. So, there distribution must be with flood and drought district,

Only flood district = 6-1= 5.

Only twister district = 6 -2= 4.

Only drought district =8-1= 7.

Therefore the total is 5+4+7 = 16.

Hence the answer is 16.

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 41

Direction: Answer the questions on the basis of information given below.

The following bar graphs give the data about various districts being affected by natural calamities in the state of Maharashtra for the period 1984 to 1993.

Note: No flood affected district is also a drought affected district.

Q. How many years none of the districts experienced more than one calamity?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 41 There are only two years 1984 and 1992

Hence answer option is 2.

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 42

Direction: Answer the questions on the basis of information given below.

The following bar graphs give the data about various districts being affected by natural calamities in the state of Maharashtra for the period 1984 to 1993.

Note: No flood affected district is also a drought affected district.

Q. What is the number of districts affected by twister only over the given 10 years?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 42 No. of districts affected by only twister= total no. of districts - (districts affected by drought + District affected by flood)

For 1993, only twister districts = 10 - (6 + 3 ) = 1.

Similarly, 1 + 5 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 1 + 4 + 4 + 2 + 4 = 30.

Hence the answer is 30.

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 43

Direction: Answer the questions on the basis of information given below.

The following bar graphs give the data about various districts being affected by natural calamities in the state of Maharashtra for the period 1984 to 1993.

Note : No flood affected district is also a drought affected district.

Q. In 1988, there were two districts which faced both flood and twister, then how many districts faced both twister and drought?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 43 Total number of districts affected by all calamities in 1988 = 9.

As no flood district is a drought district, therefore there must be at least 1 district with only twisters.

And there are 12 - 9 = 3 districts with two calamities.

Therefore districts affected by both twisters and drought = 3 - 2 =1.

Hence answer is 1.

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 44

Akshat and Akanksha were given some toffees and a bar of chocolate. They could divide the toffees among themselves equally, but each wanted the complete bar of chocolate for themselves. So they decided to play a game.

Akshat took 12 toffees and arranged them in two columns as shown.

The rules of the game are as follows:

  1. Each person will get a turn alternately. During a turn, a person has to pick up at least 1 toffee. A person can pick up any number of toffees during their turn as long as they all belong to the same column.

For example, the first person to play can pick up 7 toffees, but not 8 as the eighth would belong to the other column.

  1. The last person to pick up a toffee will win. He/She will be given the chocolate bar as well as half of the remaining toffees, which were not used in the game. The loser of the game will get the remaining half of the unused toffees. A person is allowed to keep the toffees he/she picked up during the game.

Each person plays logically and to win.

Q. Akshat went first and picked up some toffees which ensured that he wins. What is the number of toffees that he picked up in the first turn?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 44 In these types of games, one has to rely on backward induction. This means that we start from the end of the game and work towards the start.

Let (a,b) denote that there are 'a' and 'b' toffees in the two columns.

Since there is no constraint on how many toffees a person can pick up from a single column, the number of toffees left in a single column does not matter if the other column is empty. Hence to win, a player should never pick up all the toffees from a column. Since the players are playing logically and to win, they will never do this.

Hence on the second last turn, at least 1 toffee is left in each column.

If (1,1) toffees are left in each column, then the person whose turn it is next can pick up only one toffee and has to pick one up as per the rules. This leaves 1 toffee on the table, and the other person wins.

Hence if (1,1) toffees are left, the person whose turn it is next will lose.

But if a person wants to win, and leaves 1 toffee in one column and 2 or more toffees in the other, then the other player will just pick up one toffee from the column which has 2 toffees.

But if Player X leaves 2 toffees in each column after his/her turn, then no matter how many toffees are picked up next, he/she will always win:

Case 1: If Player Y person picks 1, the X has to pick 1 from the other column, leaving (1, 1) toffees, which is a winning situation for the X

Y cannot pickup 2, as explained earlier that a logical player will not empty a column, as it means immediate defeat.

Hence if (2, 2) toffees are left, the person whose turn it is next will lose.

Hence we can see the pattern that a person has to leave an equal number of toffees in each column after their turn to ensure winning. Hence a person must pickup the number of toffees which makes the toffees equal in both the columns.

Initially, the number of toffees were (7, 5). So Akshat will pick up 2 toffees to make it (5, 5).

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 45

After the division of a number successively by 3, 4 and 7, the remainders obtained are 2, 1 and 4 respectively. What will be the remainder if 84 divides the same number?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 45 Since after division of a number successively by 3, 4 and 7, the

remainders obtained are 2,1 and 4 respectively, the number is

of form ((((4 × 4) + 1) × 3) + 2)k = 53K

Let k = 1; the number becomes 53

If it is divided by 84, the remainder is 53.

Option d) is the correct answer.

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 46

Metal A costs Rs. 8.40 per gm and Metal B Rs. 0.21 per gm. In what proportion must these metals be mixed so that gram of the mixture may be worth Rs. 5.67?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 46 Using the formula of alligation,

Required ratio = 2 : 1

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 47

Convert the number 1982 from base 10 to base 12 The result is:

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 47

Quotient of 1982/12 = 165, remainder = 2

Quotient of 165/12 = 13, remainder = 9

Quotient of 13/12 = 1, remainder = 1

Remainder of 1/12 = 1

So, the required number in base 12 = 1192

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 48

Meena scores 40% in an examination and after review, even though her score is increased by 50%, she fails by 35 marks. If her post-review score is increased by 20%, she will have 7 marks more than the passing score. The percentage score needed for passing the examination is

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 48 Let the total score of the exam be 100x.

Meena's before review = 40% of 100x = 40x

Her score after review = 40x + 50% of 40x = 60x

Passing marks = 60x + 35 ...(1)

Her score after increasing it by 20% of post review score = 60x + 20% of 60x = 72x

Passing marks = 72x − 7 ...(2)

Equating (1) and (2)

72x − 7 = 60x + 35

⇒ x = 3.5

Hence, Total Marks = 100x = 350 and passing marks = 60x + 35 = 245

Therefore, passing percentage

= 245 / 350 × 100 = 70

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 49

A cow is tethered to one corner of a square field with side 20m with a rope equal to the length of a side of the field. Another cow is tethered at the diagonally opposite corner with the grazing area just touching each other. What is the total grazing area?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 49

Diagonal = 20√2

length of rope tying the 2nd cow = 20√2 − 20 = 20(√2 − 1)

grazing area of 1st cow = 14π202 = 14π400 = 100π

grazing area of 2nd cow = 14π400(√2−1)2

Total 100π[1 + (√2 − 1)2] = 100π[1 + 2 + 1 − 22]

= 200π[2 − √2]

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 50

An owner of a pizza stand sold small slices of pizza for Rs. 150 each and large slices for Rs. 250 each. One night he sold 5000 slices, for a total of Rs. 10.50 lakh. How many small slices were sold?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 50 This question is a word problem in linear equations. The problem is solved by framing two linear equations from the information given in the question and solving them.

Let 's' be the number of small slices and 'b' the number of large slices sold on that night.

Therefore, s + b = 5000… eqn (1)

Each small slice was sold for Rs.150. Therefore, 's' small slices would have fetched Rs.150s.

Each large slice was sold for Rs. 250. Therefore, 'b' large slices would have fetched Rs.250b.

Total value of sale = 150s+250b=10,50,000 (note the left hand side is in Rupees and hence we have to convert right hand also to Rupees from Lakhs of Rupees)

Or 150s + 250b = 10,50,000 ... eqn (2)

Multiplying equation (1) by 150, we get 150s + 150b = 7,50,000 ...eqn (3)

Subtracting eqn (3) from eqn ( 2 ), we get 100b = 3,00,000 Or b = 3000

We know that s + b = 5000 So,s = 5000 − b = 5000 − 3000 = 2000

2000 small slices were sold.

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 51

If m and n are integers such that then m is

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 51

Comparing the powers of same bases we get

19 / 2 + 4 + 3n = 4m + 3 / 2 ...(1)

4 + 2m = n ...(2)

Substitute the value of n from (2) in (1) and solving for m, we get m = −12

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 52

Rajesh is 10 years younger to Baskar. 10 years back, Rajesh's age was two-thirds that of Baskar's. How old is Baskar now?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 52 Let the present age of Baskar be 'b' and that of Rajesh be "r". So, r = b − 10 ...(1)

10 years back Rajesh was ( r − 10) years old. 10 years back Baskar was (b−10) years old.

The question states that 10 years back Rajesh was two thirds as old as Baskar was. i.e., (r − 10) = (2/3)×(b−10) ...(2)

Cross multiplying, we get 3(r − 10) = 2(b − 10) or 3r − 30 = 2b − 20 ..(2)

From eqn (1) we can substitute r as (b − 10) in eqn ( 2) So, 3(b − 10) − 30 = 2b − 20

or 3b − 30 − 30 = 2b − 20

or b = 40

The present age of Baskar is 40 years.

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 53

A 15 -litre mixture contains 20% alcohol and the rest water. If 3 litres of water is mixed in it, then the percentage of alcohol in the new mixture will be

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 53 Initially, the mixture contains 3 litres of alcohol and 12 litres of water. Afterwards, the mixture contains 3 litres of alcohol and 15 litres of water.

percentage of alcohol

= (3 / 18 × 100) =

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 54

ABCDEF is a regular hexagon of side 6cm. What is the area of the triangle BDF?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 54

You should know that

Actually there is a perfect symmetrically.

Therefore, Area of hexagon =

Therefore the Area of ΔBDF = 27√3cm2.

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 55

There is a vast grassy farm in which there is a rectangular building of the farmhouse whose length and breadth is 50m and 40m respectively. A horse is tethered at a corner of the house with a tether of 80m long. What is the maximum area that the horse can graze?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 55 The length of tether of the horse is 80m.

Area grazed by horse

=

=

= 5425πm2

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 56

Two men undertake to do a piece of work for Rs. 200. One alone could do it in 6 days, the other In 8 days. With the assistance of a boy they finish it in 3 clays. What Is the share of the boy?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 56 1st man's a days work = 3/6, 2nd man's 3 days work = 3/8.

The boy's 3 days' work = 1 − (3/6 + 3/8) = 1/8

Clearly Rs.200 should be divided amongst them in the proportion of 3/6:3/8:1/8 or 4:3:1

1st man's share = 4/8 of Rs. 200 = Rs. 100 .

2nd man's share = 3/8 of Rs. 200 = Rs. 75 .

The boy's share = 1/8 of Rs.200 = Rs. 25

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 57

What fraction of the area of a regular hexagon is the area of regular hexagon obtained by joining the midpoints of the sides of the first hexagon in order?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 57

Side of original hexagon = 2a

Then a side of the second hexagon =

Areas are and

Smaller hexagon is 3 / 4 of the bigger one.

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 58

A mixture of 20kg of water and spirit contains 10% water. How much water must be added to this mixture to raise the percentage of water to 25%?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 58 Water = (10 / 100 × 20) = 2kg and spirit = 18kg

In the second mixture:

75kg spirit is contained in a mixture of 100kg

18kg spirit is contained in a mixture of (100 / 75 × 18) = 24kg

So, water to be added = 24 − 20 = 4kg

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 59

The sum of an infinite G. P. with positive terms is 48 and sum of its first two terms is 36. Find the second term.


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 59 Let 'a' be the first term and 'r' be the common ratio of the G.P. We have

a /1 − r = 48 ⇒ a = 48(1 − r) ..(i)

Also it is given that a + ar = 36

⇒ a(1 + r) = 36

⇒ 48(1 − r)(1 + r) = 36 (from (i))

⇒ 1− r2 = 3/4 ⇒ r2 = 1/4 ⇒ r = ±1/2

when

r = 1/2, (i) ⇒ a = 48 × 1/2 = 24 and the second term = ar = 24 × 1/2 = 12

When

r = −1/ 2, the terms of the G.P. will become negative.

So the second term is 12.

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 60

Forty per cent of the employees of a certain company are men and 75% of the men earn more than Rs. 25,000 per year. If 45% of the company's employees earn more than Rs. 25,000 per year, what fraction of the women employed by the company earn Rs. 25,000 or less per year?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 60 Let the total number of employees in the company be x

Then the number of men and women be 0.4x and 0.6x respectively.

75% of men earn more than Rs. 25000 ⇒ 0.75 × 0.4x = 0.3x

Total number of employees earning more than Rs. 25000 = 45%x = 0.45x

Number of women earning more than Rs. 25000 =

Total employees earning more than Rs. 25000− total number of Men earning

more than Rs. 25000

= 0.45x − 0.30x = 0.15x

Number of the women earning Rs. 25000 or less = 0.60x − 0.15x = 0.45x

Fraction of the women employed by the company who earn Rs. 25000 or less

(0.45×/0.60x) = 45/60 = 3/4

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 61

Arvind Singh purchased a 40 seater bus. He started his services on route number 2 (from Mahu Naka to Dewas Naka with a route length of 50km ). His profit (P) from the bus depends upon the number of passengers over a certain minimum number of passengers 'n' and upon the distance travelled by bus. His profit is Rs. 3600 with 29 passengers in the bus for a journey of 36km and Rs.6300 with 36 passengers in the bus for a journey of 42km. What is the minimum number of passengers are required so that he will not suffer any loss.


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 61 The minimum number of passengers n, at which there is no loss and number of passengers travelling =m and let the distance travelled is d, Then

P ∝ (mn)d

or p = k(m − n)d?k is a constant.

When P = 3600,m = 29 and d = 36, then

3600 = k(29 − n) × 36 …(1)

Again, when p=6300,m = 36,d = 42, then

6300 = k(36 − n) × 42 …(2)

Dividing equation (2) by (1)

= 9/6 ⇒ 3n = 45 ⇒ n = 15

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 62

A person who has a certain amount with him goes to market. He can buy 50 oranges or 40 mangoes. He retains 10% of the amount for taxi fares and buys 20 mangoes and of the balance, he purchases oranges. Number of oranges he can purchase is:


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 62 The person can buy 50 oranges or 40 mangoes.

Let the price of one orange be Rs. x

Total amount the person has = Rs. 50x

40 mangoes cost 50x, So one mango costs 1.25x

10% of the total amount is retained for taxi fare = 10% of 50x = 5x

20 mangoes bought for 20 × 1.25x = 25x

Money left with the person = 50x − (Taxi fare) - (Mangoes cost)

= 50x − 5x − 25x = 20x

One Orange was for Rs. x, Therefore, 20 oranges can be bought with Rs. 20x

Thus, the person bought 20 oranges.

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 63

The reduction in the speed of an engine is directly proportional to the square of the number of bogies attached to it. The speed of the train is 100km/hr when there are 4 bogies and 55kmph when there are 5 bogies. What is the maximum number of bogies that can be attached to the train so that it can move?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 63 Suppose Reduction in speed is R. Speed of the engine without any bogie =k

number of bogies attached = b, proportionality constant = c, Resultant speed = s

We have R = cb2 and s = k − R = k − cb2

100 = k − c(4)2 or, 100 = k − 16c(i)

and 55 = k − c(5)2 or 55 = k − 25c(ii)

Solving (i) and (ii) we get k = 180 and c = 5. Now we have S = 180 − 5b2. If we put b = 6, S = 0

Therefore, at most we can attach 5 bogies to the engine.

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 64

By what percent should the cost price of an article be marked up such that even after allowing a discount of 50%, a profit of 50% is made?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 64 Let the Cost Price and Marked Price of the item be Rs. 'X' and 'Y' respectively.

Thus, we get, Y − 50% of Y = X + 50% of X0.5Y = 1.5X. or Y ÷ X = 1.5 ÷ 0.5 = 3

Thus, the marked price should be 3 times the cost price. Hence, required percentage is 200

CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 65

A dealer offers three successive discounts of 50%, 20% and 10% on an article. What is the single effective discount rate?


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 65 Effective discount = 100 − (0.5 × 0.8 × 0.9 × 100) = 64%
CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 66

2 trains pass through a tunnel at an equal speed of 10 m/s. The first train takes twice as much time as the second train to cross the tunnel completely. The trains can cross each other completely in 2 minutes if they are travelling in the opposite directions on parallel tracks. How much time (in seconds) will a train thrice the length of the shorter train take to cross the tunnel travelling at the same speed as these 2 trains?

(Enter 0 if the answer cannot be determined)


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 15 (16/10/2022) - Question 66 We know that the 2 trains travel with the same speed.

Let the length of the tunnel be T m.

Let the length of the shorter train be 'x' and the length of the longer train be 'y'.

The 2 trains cross each other completely in 2 minutes (120 seconds) if they are travelling on opposite tracks.

When 2 trains travel in the opposite directions, the total distance that should be traveled by the 2 trains to cross each other completely will be equal to the sum of the length of the trains.

We know that both the trains travel at 10 m/s. Since the trains are moving in the opposite directions, the relative velocity is 10 + 10 = 20 m/s.

Sum of the lengths of the trains, x + y = 120*20

⇒ x + y = 2400 m

y = 2400 - x

It has been given that the longer train takes twice as long as the shorter train to cross the tunnel.

Distance traveled by a train to completely cross a tunnel = Length of the train + length of the tunnel.

2*(T + x)/10 = (T + 2400 - x)/10

2T + 2x = T - x + 2400

T + 3x = 2400 m

We have to find out the time taken by a train thrice as longer as the shorter train to cross the tunnel at the same speed as these 2 trains. Therefore, we have to find the time taken by a train of length 3x to cross the tunnel at 10 m/s.

A train of length 3x will have to cover a distance of T+3x to cross the tunnel completely.

We know that T+ 3x = 2400 m

⇒ Time taken to cross the tunnel = 2400/10 = 240 seconds.

Therefore, 240 is the right answer.

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