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Case Based Questions Test: Nationalism in India - Class 10 MCQ


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10 Questions MCQ Test Social Studies (SST) Class 10 - Case Based Questions Test: Nationalism in India

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Case Based Questions Test: Nationalism in India - Question 1

Read the source given below and answer the questions that follows:

The movement started with middle-class participation in the cities. Thousands of students left government- controlled schools and colleges, headmasters and teachers resigned, and lawyers gave up their legal practices. The council elections were boycotted in most provinces except Madras, where the Justice Party, the party of the non- Brahmans, felt that entering the council was one way of gaining some power-something that usually only Brahmans had access to. The effects of non- cooperation on the economic front were more dramatic. Foreign goods were boycotted, liquor shops picketed, and foreign cloth burnt in huge bonfires. The import of foreign cloth halved between 1921 and 1922, its value dropping from ₹ 102 crore to ₹ 57 crore. In many places merchants and traders refused to trade in foreign goods or finance foreign trade. As the boycott movement spread, and people began discarding imported clothes and wearing only Indian ones, production of Indian textile mills and handlooms went up. But this movement in the cities gradually slowed down for a variety of reasons. Khadi cloth was often more expensive than mass produced mill cloth and poor people could not afford to buy it. How then could they boycott mill cloth for too long? Similarly the boycott of British institutions posed a problem. For the movement to be successful, alternative Indian institutions had to be set up so that they could be used in place of the British Ones. These were slow to come up. So students and teachers began trickling back to government, schools and lawyers joined back work in government courts.

Answer the following MCQs by choosing the most appropriate option

Q. What was the purpose of the Justice Party to contest Elections to the Council in Madras? Select the appropriate option:

Detailed Solution for Case Based Questions Test: Nationalism in India - Question 1
It wanted to contest elections to the council as it was one of the ways to gain some power that usually only Brahmans had access to.
Case Based Questions Test: Nationalism in India - Question 2

Read the source given below and answer the questions that follows:

The movement started with middle-class participation in the cities. Thousands of students left government- controlled schools and colleges, headmasters and teachers resigned, and lawyers gave up their legal practices. The council elections were boycotted in most provinces except Madras, where the Justice Party, the party of the non- Brahmans, felt that entering the council was one way of gaining some power-something that usually only Brahmans had access to. The effects of non- cooperation on the economic front were more dramatic. Foreign goods were boycotted, liquor shops picketed, and foreign cloth burnt in huge bonfires. The import of foreign cloth halved between 1921 and 1922, its value dropping from ₹ 102 crore to ₹ 57 crore. In many places merchants and traders refused to trade in foreign goods or finance foreign trade. As the boycott movement spread, and people began discarding imported clothes and wearing only Indian ones, production of Indian textile mills and handlooms went up. But this movement in the cities gradually slowed down for a variety of reasons. Khadi cloth was often more expensive than mass produced mill cloth and poor people could not afford to buy it. How then could they boycott mill cloth for too long? Similarly the boycott of British institutions posed a problem. For the movement to be successful, alternative Indian institutions had to be set up so that they could be used in place of the British Ones. These were slow to come up. So students and teachers began trickling back to government, schools and lawyers joined back work in government courts.

Answer the following MCQs by choosing the most appropriate option

Q. The import of foreign cloth between 1921 and 1922 saw changes because:

Detailed Solution for Case Based Questions Test: Nationalism in India - Question 2
The import value of the foreign goods between 1921 to 1922 dropped from Rs 102 crore to Rs. 57 crore. At many places, merchants and traders refused to trade foreign goods or finance foreign trade. As the boycott movement spread, and people began discarding imported clothes and wearing only Indian ones, production of Indian textile mills and handlooms went up.
Case Based Questions Test: Nationalism in India - Question 3

Read the source given below and answer the questions that follows:

The movement started with middle-class participation in the cities. Thousands of students left government- controlled schools and colleges, headmasters and teachers resigned, and lawyers gave up their legal practices. The council elections were boycotted in most provinces except Madras, where the Justice Party, the party of the non- Brahmans, felt that entering the council was one way of gaining some power-something that usually only Brahmans had access to. The effects of non- cooperation on the economic front were more dramatic. Foreign goods were boycotted, liquor shops picketed, and foreign cloth burnt in huge bonfires. The import of foreign cloth halved between 1921 and 1922, its value dropping from ₹ 102 crore to ₹ 57 crore. In many places merchants and traders refused to trade in foreign goods or finance foreign trade. As the boycott movement spread, and people began discarding imported clothes and wearing only Indian ones, production of Indian textile mills and handlooms went up. But this movement in the cities gradually slowed down for a variety of reasons. Khadi cloth was often more expensive than mass produced mill cloth and poor people could not afford to buy it. How then could they boycott mill cloth for too long? Similarly the boycott of British institutions posed a problem. For the movement to be successful, alternative Indian institutions had to be set up so that they could be used in place of the British Ones. These were slow to come up. So students and teachers began trickling back to government, schools and lawyers joined back work in government courts.

Answer the following MCQs by choosing the most appropriate option

Q. Thousands of ____________ left government controlled schools and colleges and _______ gave up their legal practices.

Detailed Solution for Case Based Questions Test: Nationalism in India - Question 3
The Non-Cooperation movement started with middle-class participation in the cities. Thousands of students left government-controlled schools and colleges, headmasters and teachers resigned, and lawyers gave up their legal practices.
Case Based Questions Test: Nationalism in India - Question 4

Read the source given below and answer the questions that follows:

The movement started with middle-class participation in the cities. Thousands of students left government- controlled schools and colleges, headmasters and teachers resigned, and lawyers gave up their legal practices. The council elections were boycotted in most provinces except Madras, where the Justice Party, the party of the non- Brahmans, felt that entering the council was one way of gaining some power-something that usually only Brahmans had access to. The effects of non- cooperation on the economic front were more dramatic. Foreign goods were boycotted, liquor shops picketed, and foreign cloth burnt in huge bonfires. The import of foreign cloth halved between 1921 and 1922, its value dropping from ₹ 102 crore to ₹ 57 crore. In many places merchants and traders refused to trade in foreign goods or finance foreign trade. As the boycott movement spread, and people began discarding imported clothes and wearing only Indian ones, production of Indian textile mills and handlooms went up. But this movement in the cities gradually slowed down for a variety of reasons. Khadi cloth was often more expensive than mass produced mill cloth and poor people could not afford to buy it. How then could they boycott mill cloth for too long? Similarly the boycott of British institutions posed a problem. For the movement to be successful, alternative Indian institutions had to be set up so that they could be used in place of the British Ones. These were slow to come up. So students and teachers began trickling back to government, schools and lawyers joined back work in government courts.

Answer the following MCQs by choosing the most appropriate option

Q. How was the effects of ‘Non- Cooperation on the economic front’ dramatic?

Detailed Solution for Case Based Questions Test: Nationalism in India - Question 4
  • The effects of non-cooperation on the economic front were more dramatic.

  • Foreign goods were prohibited, liquor shops enclosed, and foreign cloth burnt in huge bonfires.

  • The import of foreign cloth halved between 1921 and 1922, its value dropping from Rs. 102 crore to Rs. 57 crore.

  • In many places merchants and traders refused to trade in foreign goods or finance foreign trade.

  • As the boycott movement spread, and people began discarding imported clothes and wearing only Indian ones, production of Indian textile mills and handlooms went up.

Case Based Questions Test: Nationalism in India - Question 5

Read the source given below and answer the questions that follows:

The identity of the nation, as you know, is most often symbolised in a figure or image. This helps create an image with which people can identify the nation. It was in the twentieth century, with the growth of nationalism, that the identity of India came to be visually associated with the image of Bharat Mata. The image was first created by Bankim Chandra Chattopadhyay. In the 1870s he wrote ‘Vande Mataram’ as a hymn to the motherland. Later it was included in his novel Anandamath and widely sung during the Swadeshi Movement in Bengal. Moved by the Swadeshi movement, Abanindranath Tagore painted his famous image of Bharat Mata. In this painting Bharat Mata is portrayed as an ascetic figure; she is calm, composed, divine and spiritual. In subsequent years, the image of Bharat Mata acquired many different forms, as it circulated in popular prints and was painted by different artists. Devotion to this mother figure came to be seen as evidence of one’s nationalism.

Answer the following MCQs by choosing the most appropriate option

Q. Means of creating a feeling of nationalism was through:

Detailed Solution for Case Based Questions Test: Nationalism in India - Question 5
Nationalism spreads when people begin to believe that they are all part of the same nation, when they discover some unity that binds them together. Another means of creating a feeling of nationalism was through reinterpretation of history.
Case Based Questions Test: Nationalism in India - Question 6

Read the source given below and answer the questions that follows:

The identity of the nation, as you know, is most often symbolised in a figure or image. This helps create an image with which people can identify the nation. It was in the twentieth century, with the growth of nationalism, that the identity of India came to be visually associated with the image of Bharat Mata. The image was first created by Bankim Chandra Chattopadhyay. In the 1870s he wrote ‘Vande Mataram’ as a hymn to the motherland. Later it was included in his novel Anandamath and widely sung during the Swadeshi Movement in Bengal. Moved by the Swadeshi movement, Abanindranath Tagore painted his famous image of Bharat Mata. In this painting Bharat Mata is portrayed as an ascetic figure; she is calm, composed, divine and spiritual. In subsequent years, the image of Bharat Mata acquired many different forms, as it circulated in popular prints and was painted by different artists. Devotion to this mother figure came to be seen as evidence of one’s nationalism.

Answer the following MCQs by choosing the most appropriate option

Q. Bharat Mata was first created by:

Detailed Solution for Case Based Questions Test: Nationalism in India - Question 6

Bharat Mata is a work painted by the Indian painter Bankim Chandra Chattopadhyay in 1870s.

Case Based Questions Test: Nationalism in India - Question 7

Read the source given below and answer the questions that follows:

The identity of the nation, as you know, is most often symbolised in a figure or image. This helps create an image with which people can identify the nation. It was in the twentieth century, with the growth of nationalism, that the identity of India came to be visually associated with the image of Bharat Mata. The image was first created by Bankim Chandra Chattopadhyay. In the 1870s he wrote ‘Vande Mataram’ as a hymn to the motherland. Later it was included in his novel Anandamath and widely sung during the Swadeshi Movement in Bengal. Moved by the Swadeshi movement, Abanindranath Tagore painted his famous image of Bharat Mata. In this painting Bharat Mata is portrayed as an ascetic figure; she is calm, composed, divine and spiritual. In subsequent years, the image of Bharat Mata acquired many different forms, as it circulated in popular prints and was painted by different artists. Devotion to this mother figure came to be seen as evidence of one’s nationalism.

Answer the following MCQs by choosing the most appropriate option

Q. As Bharat Mata is to India, ___________, is to Italy and ____________ is to Germany.

Detailed Solution for Case Based Questions Test: Nationalism in India - Question 7

As Bharat Mata is to India, Marianne is to Grance and Germania is to Germany. Bharat Mata is the national personification of our Nation and was painted by Abanindranath Tagore in 1905. She is also called the Mother India.

Case Based Questions Test: Nationalism in India - Question 8

Read the source given below and answer the questions that follows:

In the countryside, rich peasant communities – like the Patidars of Gujarat and the Jats of Uttar Pradesh – were active in the movement. Being producers of commercial crops, they were very hard hit by the trade depression and falling prices. As their cash income disappeared, they found it impossible to pay the government’s revenue demand. And the refusal of the government to reduce the revenue demand led to widespread resentment. These rich peasants became enthusiastic supporters of the Civil Disobedience Movement, organising their communities, and at times forcing reluctant members to participate in the boycott programmes. For them the fight for swaraj was a struggle against high revenues. But they were deeply disappointed when the movement was called off in 1931 without the revenue rates being revised. So, when the movement was restarted in 1932, many of them refused to participate. The poorer peasantry were not just interested in the lowering of the revenue demand. Many of them were small tenants cultivating land they had rented from landlords. As the Depression continued and cash incomes dwindled, the small tenants found it difficult to pay their rent. They wanted the unpaid rent to the landlord to be remitted. They joined a variety of radical movements, often led by Socialists and Communists. Apprehensive of raising issues that might upset the rich peasants and landlords, the Congress was unwilling to support ‘no rent’ campaigns in most places. So, the relationship between the poor peasants and the Congress remained uncertain.

Answer the following MCQs by choosing the most appropriate option

Q. Patidars and Jats are rich Peasants of which State?

Detailed Solution for Case Based Questions Test: Nationalism in India - Question 8
The rich peasants such as Patidars of Gujarat and Jats of Uttar Pradesh were active in organizing their communities and forcing their reluctant members to participate in the programmes.
Case Based Questions Test: Nationalism in India - Question 9

Read the source given below and answer the questions that follows:

In the countryside, rich peasant communities – like the Patidars of Gujarat and the Jats of Uttar Pradesh – were active in the movement. Being producers of commercial crops, they were very hard hit by the trade depression and falling prices. As their cash income disappeared, they found it impossible to pay the government’s revenue demand. And the refusal of the government to reduce the revenue demand led to widespread resentment. These rich peasants became enthusiastic supporters of the Civil Disobedience Movement, organising their communities, and at times forcing reluctant members to participate in the boycott programmes. For them the fight for swaraj was a struggle against high revenues. But they were deeply disappointed when the movement was called off in 1931 without the revenue rates being revised. So, when the movement was restarted in 1932, many of them refused to participate. The poorer peasantry were not just interested in the lowering of the revenue demand. Many of them were small tenants cultivating land they had rented from landlords. As the Depression continued and cash incomes dwindled, the small tenants found it difficult to pay their rent. They wanted the unpaid rent to the landlord to be remitted. They joined a variety of radical movements, often led by Socialists and Communists. Apprehensive of raising issues that might upset the rich peasants and landlords, the Congress was unwilling to support ‘no rent’ campaigns in most places. So, the relationship between the poor peasants and the Congress remained uncertain.

Answer the following MCQs by choosing the most appropriate option

Q. Who led the Peasants Movement in Awadh?

Detailed Solution for Case Based Questions Test: Nationalism in India - Question 9
In Awadh, peasants were led by Baba Ramchandra, a Sanyasi, who had earlier been to Fiji as an indentured laborer. He led a peasant's movement in Awadh against Talukdars and Landlords.
Case Based Questions Test: Nationalism in India - Question 10

Read the source given below and answer the questions that follows:

In the countryside, rich peasant communities – like the Patidars of Gujarat and the Jats of Uttar Pradesh – were active in the movement. Being producers of commercial crops, they were very hard hit by the trade depression and falling prices. As their cash income disappeared, they found it impossible to pay the government’s revenue demand. And the refusal of the government to reduce the revenue demand led to widespread resentment. These rich peasants became enthusiastic supporters of the Civil Disobedience Movement, organising their communities, and at times forcing reluctant members to participate in the boycott programmes. For them the fight for swaraj was a struggle against high revenues. But they were deeply disappointed when the movement was called off in 1931 without the revenue rates being revised. So, when the movement was restarted in 1932, many of them refused to participate. The poorer peasantry were not just interested in the lowering of the revenue demand. Many of them were small tenants cultivating land they had rented from landlords. As the Depression continued and cash incomes dwindled, the small tenants found it difficult to pay their rent. They wanted the unpaid rent to the landlord to be remitted. They joined a variety of radical movements, often led by Socialists and Communists. Apprehensive of raising issues that might upset the rich peasants and landlords, the Congress was unwilling to support ‘no rent’ campaigns in most places. So, the relationship between the poor peasants and the Congress remained uncertain.

Answer the following MCQs by choosing the most appropriate option

Q. Congress was unwilling to support_________ campaigns in most places.

Detailed Solution for Case Based Questions Test: Nationalism in India - Question 10
The congress was unwilling to support no rent campaign because if they supported it, the poor cultivators would join them but this would lead to protests from the rich farmers like the Jats and Patidats. The support of the rich was very important for the Congress and so they could not take chance to support no rent campaign.
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