IBPS Bank PO Prelims - Mock Test 4


100 Questions MCQ Test Mock Tests for 2018 Banking Exam and Past Year Papers | IBPS Bank PO Prelims - Mock Test 4


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This mock test of IBPS Bank PO Prelims - Mock Test 4 for Banking Exams helps you for every Banking Exams entrance exam. This contains 100 Multiple Choice Questions for Banking Exams IBPS Bank PO Prelims - Mock Test 4 (mcq) to study with solutions a complete question bank. The solved questions answers in this IBPS Bank PO Prelims - Mock Test 4 quiz give you a good mix of easy questions and tough questions. Banking Exams students definitely take this IBPS Bank PO Prelims - Mock Test 4 exercise for a better result in the exam. You can find other IBPS Bank PO Prelims - Mock Test 4 extra questions, long questions & short questions for Banking Exams on EduRev as well by searching above.
QUESTION: 1

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

The gloom over economic growth appears to have dissipated a bit after the new numbers on National Income were released at the end of January 2015. However, there is continued scepticism about the numbers as several analysts feel that they are not in accord with the ground realities. According to the advanced estimates for 2014-15, the growth rate is projected at 7.4 per cent. What are the prospects for 2015-16? We do not have the data for past years reworked on the new base and the new methodology, and without such a time series it becomes hard to forecast. Perhaps, 2015-16 will be a shade better than 2014-15, if all the positive factors mentioned later come together. However, it will fall short of the Budget expectations of eight per cent.

        What are the favourable factors that can contribute to a better performance of the economy in 2015-16? First and foremost, there is the advantage of low crude oil prices. This will not only reduce the oil import bill and impact favourably on the current account balance, but will also moderate the price increase in general because petroleum products are used in the production of almost every commodity and service. Second, the credit rating agency, Moody’s decision to upgrade the outlook to “positive” may facilitate the inflow of capital. Though the recovery of the advanced economies is still tepid, the external environment as far as India is concerned may be benign. On the domestic front, there are signs of a gradual improvement in the investment “sentiment”. Still, there are several unfavourable or uncertain factors, chief among them being the uncertainty about the monsoon. We have not yet seen the full impact of the unseasonal rains of the last few months. The damage to crops has been extensive in several States and the natural consequence will be some pick up in food prices. Initial reports indicate that rainfall this time will be below normal. The impact on production will depend not only on the quantum of rainfall but also on its distribution over time and across States. Even though agriculture contributes only about 15 per cent to the GDP, any shortfall in agricultural production has serious implications. It fuels inflation and human distress is high as more than 50 per cent of the population depends on agriculture. Second, the several initiatives promised in the Budget will have the desired impact only if they are implemented speedily and effectively. For example, take the increased allocation of funds for railways and roads. Are these ministries adequately prepared to utilise these funds? Some of the initiatives such as the National Investment and Infrastructure Fund and Mudra Bank will take time to be set up and for their impact to be felt.

        The Economic Survey has persuasively argued for larger public investment at a time when private investment is yet to pick up. The same point was made by the Report of the Economic Advisory Council to the Prime Minister in September 2013, that said: “The focused attention that is being given to achieving the production and capacity creation targets in coal, power, road and railways should generate higher growth. In effect, the public sector would act as the driver of growth and crowd in private sector activities”. It is to be noted that capital expenditures of the Central government in the Budget are not significant. Capital expenditures are also not synonymous with investment. While capital expenditures in 2015-16 show an increase over the revised estimates of 2014-15, as a proportion of GDP, they remain the same as in the Budget estimate of 2014-15, i.e. at 1.7 per cent of GDP. In fact, the bulk of the investment has to come from public sector institutions such as Coal India and the Indian Railways. What is needed is for the government to come out with a statement regarding the quantum of investment that will be made by the various public sector institutions. This should be monitored every quarter and the actual investments made should be made public. Apart from making the government accountable, this will inspire confidence in investors.

        For raising the growth rate, the government relies on many of the initiatives announced in the Budget. Several of them need clarification and refinement. For example, how will the National Investment in Infrastructure Fund operate? Will it take the form of a trust or a non-banking financial company (NBFC)? The word “trust” was used in the Budget speech. The sooner the details are spelled out, the better it will be. Take another idea, of the Mudra Bank. To call the institution a “bank” will be incorrect if it is only to be a refinancing institution. Which are the last mile finance institutions which will be refinanced by this institution? Apparently, this institution will have to rely totally on Budget allocation. The idea of a refinancing institution is good but, once again, the details need to be spelled out. In fact, in this context, perhaps the best way to promote investment in the large-, medium- and small-scale sector is to go back to the days when we had development banks which provided long-term finance to large, medium and small industries. At the national level, the IDBI (Industrial Development Bank of India of that time) played a major role. At the State level, State finance corporations operated to provide long-term finance to medium and small enterprises. The development banks became universal banks and in that process we have lost out on long-term finance. Even the new initiative of allowing commercial banks to raise infrastructure bonds may not be adequate. Very soon, they will reach the limits of exposure with respect to industries and groups. And, it is also difficult to have firewalls separating short term from long-term credit. While the new ideas promoted in the Budget are welcome, it is time to think in terms of creating long-term finance institutions to provide equity and long-term loans to large and medium industries. 

Q. Choose an appropriate title for the passage.

Solution:
QUESTION: 2

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

The gloom over economic growth appears to have dissipated a bit after the new numbers on National Income were released at the end of January 2015. However, there is continued scepticism about the numbers as several analysts feel that they are not in accord with the ground realities. According to the advanced estimates for 2014-15, the growth rate is projected at 7.4 per cent. What are the prospects for 2015-16? We do not have the data for past years reworked on the new base and the new methodology, and without such a time series it becomes hard to forecast. Perhaps, 2015-16 will be a shade better than 2014-15, if all the positive factors mentioned later come together. However, it will fall short of the Budget expectations of eight per cent.

        What are the favourable factors that can contribute to a better performance of the economy in 2015-16? First and foremost, there is the advantage of low crude oil prices. This will not only reduce the oil import bill and impact favourably on the current account balance, but will also moderate the price increase in general because petroleum products are used in the production of almost every commodity and service. Second, the credit rating agency, Moody’s decision to upgrade the outlook to “positive” may facilitate the inflow of capital. Though the recovery of the advanced economies is still tepid, the external environment as far as India is concerned may be benign. On the domestic front, there are signs of a gradual improvement in the investment “sentiment”. Still, there are several unfavourable or uncertain factors, chief among them being the uncertainty about the monsoon. We have not yet seen the full impact of the unseasonal rains of the last few months. The damage to crops has been extensive in several States and the natural consequence will be some pick up in food prices. Initial reports indicate that rainfall this time will be below normal. The impact on production will depend not only on the quantum of rainfall but also on its distribution over time and across States. Even though agriculture contributes only about 15 per cent to the GDP, any shortfall in agricultural production has serious implications. It fuels inflation and human distress is high as more than 50 per cent of the population depends on agriculture. Second, the several initiatives promised in the Budget will have the desired impact only if they are implemented speedily and effectively. For example, take the increased allocation of funds for railways and roads. Are these ministries adequately prepared to utilise these funds? Some of the initiatives such as the National Investment and Infrastructure Fund and Mudra Bank will take time to be set up and for their impact to be felt.

        The Economic Survey has persuasively argued for larger public investment at a time when private investment is yet to pick up. The same point was made by the Report of the Economic Advisory Council to the Prime Minister in September 2013, that said: “The focused attention that is being given to achieving the production and capacity creation targets in coal, power, road and railways should generate higher growth. In effect, the public sector would act as the driver of growth and crowd in private sector activities”. It is to be noted that capital expenditures of the Central government in the Budget are not significant. Capital expenditures are also not synonymous with investment. While capital expenditures in 2015-16 show an increase over the revised estimates of 2014-15, as a proportion of GDP, they remain the same as in the Budget estimate of 2014-15, i.e. at 1.7 per cent of GDP. In fact, the bulk of the investment has to come from public sector institutions such as Coal India and the Indian Railways. What is needed is for the government to come out with a statement regarding the quantum of investment that will be made by the various public sector institutions. This should be monitored every quarter and the actual investments made should be made public. Apart from making the government accountable, this will inspire confidence in investors.

        For raising the growth rate, the government relies on many of the initiatives announced in the Budget. Several of them need clarification and refinement. For example, how will the National Investment in Infrastructure Fund operate? Will it take the form of a trust or a non-banking financial company (NBFC)? The word “trust” was used in the Budget speech. The sooner the details are spelled out, the better it will be. Take another idea, of the Mudra Bank. To call the institution a “bank” will be incorrect if it is only to be a refinancing institution. Which are the last mile finance institutions which will be refinanced by this institution? Apparently, this institution will have to rely totally on Budget allocation. The idea of a refinancing institution is good but, once again, the details need to be spelled out. In fact, in this context, perhaps the best way to promote investment in the large-, medium- and small-scale sector is to go back to the days when we had development banks which provided long-term finance to large, medium and small industries. At the national level, the IDBI (Industrial Development Bank of India of that time) played a major role. At the State level, State finance corporations operated to provide long-term finance to medium and small enterprises. The development banks became universal banks and in that process we have lost out on long-term finance. Even the new initiative of allowing commercial banks to raise infrastructure bonds may not be adequate. Very soon, they will reach the limits of exposure with respect to industries and groups. And, it is also difficult to have firewalls separating short term from long-term credit. While the new ideas promoted in the Budget are welcome, it is time to think in terms of creating long-term finance institutions to provide equity and long-term loans to large and medium industries. 

Q. What is the synonym of the word “Persuasively”?

Solution:
QUESTION: 3

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

The gloom over economic growth appears to have dissipated a bit after the new numbers on National Income were released at the end of January 2015. However, there is continued scepticism about the numbers as several analysts feel that they are not in accord with the ground realities. According to the advanced estimates for 2014-15, the growth rate is projected at 7.4 per cent. What are the prospects for 2015-16? We do not have the data for past years reworked on the new base and the new methodology, and without such a time series it becomes hard to forecast. Perhaps, 2015-16 will be a shade better than 2014-15, if all the positive factors mentioned later come together. However, it will fall short of the Budget expectations of eight per cent.

        What are the favourable factors that can contribute to a better performance of the economy in 2015-16? First and foremost, there is the advantage of low crude oil prices. This will not only reduce the oil import bill and impact favourably on the current account balance, but will also moderate the price increase in general because petroleum products are used in the production of almost every commodity and service. Second, the credit rating agency, Moody’s decision to upgrade the outlook to “positive” may facilitate the inflow of capital. Though the recovery of the advanced economies is still tepid, the external environment as far as India is concerned may be benign. On the domestic front, there are signs of a gradual improvement in the investment “sentiment”. Still, there are several unfavourable or uncertain factors, chief among them being the uncertainty about the monsoon. We have not yet seen the full impact of the unseasonal rains of the last few months. The damage to crops has been extensive in several States and the natural consequence will be some pick up in food prices. Initial reports indicate that rainfall this time will be below normal. The impact on production will depend not only on the quantum of rainfall but also on its distribution over time and across States. Even though agriculture contributes only about 15 per cent to the GDP, any shortfall in agricultural production has serious implications. It fuels inflation and human distress is high as more than 50 per cent of the population depends on agriculture. Second, the several initiatives promised in the Budget will have the desired impact only if they are implemented speedily and effectively. For example, take the increased allocation of funds for railways and roads. Are these ministries adequately prepared to utilise these funds? Some of the initiatives such as the National Investment and Infrastructure Fund and Mudra Bank will take time to be set up and for their impact to be felt.

        The Economic Survey has persuasively argued for larger public investment at a time when private investment is yet to pick up. The same point was made by the Report of the Economic Advisory Council to the Prime Minister in September 2013, that said: “The focused attention that is being given to achieving the production and capacity creation targets in coal, power, road and railways should generate higher growth. In effect, the public sector would act as the driver of growth and crowd in private sector activities”. It is to be noted that capital expenditures of the Central government in the Budget are not significant. Capital expenditures are also not synonymous with investment. While capital expenditures in 2015-16 show an increase over the revised estimates of 2014-15, as a proportion of GDP, they remain the same as in the Budget estimate of 2014-15, i.e. at 1.7 per cent of GDP. In fact, the bulk of the investment has to come from public sector institutions such as Coal India and the Indian Railways. What is needed is for the government to come out with a statement regarding the quantum of investment that will be made by the various public sector institutions. This should be monitored every quarter and the actual investments made should be made public. Apart from making the government accountable, this will inspire confidence in investors.

        For raising the growth rate, the government relies on many of the initiatives announced in the Budget. Several of them need clarification and refinement. For example, how will the National Investment in Infrastructure Fund operate? Will it take the form of a trust or a non-banking financial company (NBFC)? The word “trust” was used in the Budget speech. The sooner the details are spelled out, the better it will be. Take another idea, of the Mudra Bank. To call the institution a “bank” will be incorrect if it is only to be a refinancing institution. Which are the last mile finance institutions which will be refinanced by this institution? Apparently, this institution will have to rely totally on Budget allocation. The idea of a refinancing institution is good but, once again, the details need to be spelled out. In fact, in this context, perhaps the best way to promote investment in the large-, medium- and small-scale sector is to go back to the days when we had development banks which provided long-term finance to large, medium and small industries. At the national level, the IDBI (Industrial Development Bank of India of that time) played a major role. At the State level, State finance corporations operated to provide long-term finance to medium and small enterprises. The development banks became universal banks and in that process we have lost out on long-term finance. Even the new initiative of allowing commercial banks to raise infrastructure bonds may not be adequate. Very soon, they will reach the limits of exposure with respect to industries and groups. And, it is also difficult to have firewalls separating short term from long-term credit. While the new ideas promoted in the Budget are welcome, it is time to think in terms of creating long-term finance institutions to provide equity and long-term loans to large and medium industries. 

Q. What does the author mean by the phrase “any shortfall in agricultural production has serious implications.”?

Solution:
QUESTION: 4

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

The gloom over economic growth appears to have dissipated a bit after the new numbers on National Income were released at the end of January 2015. However, there is continued scepticism about the numbers as several analysts feel that they are not in accord with the ground realities. According to the advanced estimates for 2014-15, the growth rate is projected at 7.4 per cent. What are the prospects for 2015-16? We do not have the data for past years reworked on the new base and the new methodology, and without such a time series it becomes hard to forecast. Perhaps, 2015-16 will be a shade better than 2014-15, if all the positive factors mentioned later come together. However, it will fall short of the Budget expectations of eight per cent.

        What are the favourable factors that can contribute to a better performance of the economy in 2015-16? First and foremost, there is the advantage of low crude oil prices. This will not only reduce the oil import bill and impact favourably on the current account balance, but will also moderate the price increase in general because petroleum products are used in the production of almost every commodity and service. Second, the credit rating agency, Moody’s decision to upgrade the outlook to “positive” may facilitate the inflow of capital. Though the recovery of the advanced economies is still tepid, the external environment as far as India is concerned may be benign. On the domestic front, there are signs of a gradual improvement in the investment “sentiment”. Still, there are several unfavourable or uncertain factors, chief among them being the uncertainty about the monsoon. We have not yet seen the full impact of the unseasonal rains of the last few months. The damage to crops has been extensive in several States and the natural consequence will be some pick up in food prices. Initial reports indicate that rainfall this time will be below normal. The impact on production will depend not only on the quantum of rainfall but also on its distribution over time and across States. Even though agriculture contributes only about 15 per cent to the GDP, any shortfall in agricultural production has serious implications. It fuels inflation and human distress is high as more than 50 per cent of the population depends on agriculture. Second, the several initiatives promised in the Budget will have the desired impact only if they are implemented speedily and effectively. For example, take the increased allocation of funds for railways and roads. Are these ministries adequately prepared to utilise these funds? Some of the initiatives such as the National Investment and Infrastructure Fund and Mudra Bank will take time to be set up and for their impact to be felt.

        The Economic Survey has persuasively argued for larger public investment at a time when private investment is yet to pick up. The same point was made by the Report of the Economic Advisory Council to the Prime Minister in September 2013, that said: “The focused attention that is being given to achieving the production and capacity creation targets in coal, power, road and railways should generate higher growth. In effect, the public sector would act as the driver of growth and crowd in private sector activities”. It is to be noted that capital expenditures of the Central government in the Budget are not significant. Capital expenditures are also not synonymous with investment. While capital expenditures in 2015-16 show an increase over the revised estimates of 2014-15, as a proportion of GDP, they remain the same as in the Budget estimate of 2014-15, i.e. at 1.7 per cent of GDP. In fact, the bulk of the investment has to come from public sector institutions such as Coal India and the Indian Railways. What is needed is for the government to come out with a statement regarding the quantum of investment that will be made by the various public sector institutions. This should be monitored every quarter and the actual investments made should be made public. Apart from making the government accountable, this will inspire confidence in investors.

        For raising the growth rate, the government relies on many of the initiatives announced in the Budget. Several of them need clarification and refinement. For example, how will the National Investment in Infrastructure Fund operate? Will it take the form of a trust or a non-banking financial company (NBFC)? The word “trust” was used in the Budget speech. The sooner the details are spelled out, the better it will be. Take another idea, of the Mudra Bank. To call the institution a “bank” will be incorrect if it is only to be a refinancing institution. Which are the last mile finance institutions which will be refinanced by this institution? Apparently, this institution will have to rely totally on Budget allocation. The idea of a refinancing institution is good but, once again, the details need to be spelled out. In fact, in this context, perhaps the best way to promote investment in the large-, medium- and small-scale sector is to go back to the days when we had development banks which provided long-term finance to large, medium and small industries. At the national level, the IDBI (Industrial Development Bank of India of that time) played a major role. At the State level, State finance corporations operated to provide long-term finance to medium and small enterprises. The development banks became universal banks and in that process we have lost out on long-term finance. Even the new initiative of allowing commercial banks to raise infrastructure bonds may not be adequate. Very soon, they will reach the limits of exposure with respect to industries and groups. And, it is also difficult to have firewalls separating short term from long-term credit. While the new ideas promoted in the Budget are welcome, it is time to think in terms of creating long-term finance institutions to provide equity and long-term loans to large and medium industries. 

Q. Which of the following is not true according to the passage.

Solution:
QUESTION: 5

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

The gloom over economic growth appears to have dissipated a bit after the new numbers on National Income were released at the end of January 2015. However, there is continued scepticism about the numbers as several analysts feel that they are not in accord with the ground realities. According to the advanced estimates for 2014-15, the growth rate is projected at 7.4 per cent. What are the prospects for 2015-16? We do not have the data for past years reworked on the new base and the new methodology, and without such a time series it becomes hard to forecast. Perhaps, 2015-16 will be a shade better than 2014-15, if all the positive factors mentioned later come together. However, it will fall short of the Budget expectations of eight per cent.

        What are the favourable factors that can contribute to a better performance of the economy in 2015-16? First and foremost, there is the advantage of low crude oil prices. This will not only reduce the oil import bill and impact favourably on the current account balance, but will also moderate the price increase in general because petroleum products are used in the production of almost every commodity and service. Second, the credit rating agency, Moody’s decision to upgrade the outlook to “positive” may facilitate the inflow of capital. Though the recovery of the advanced economies is still tepid, the external environment as far as India is concerned may be benign. On the domestic front, there are signs of a gradual improvement in the investment “sentiment”. Still, there are several unfavourable or uncertain factors, chief among them being the uncertainty about the monsoon. We have not yet seen the full impact of the unseasonal rains of the last few months. The damage to crops has been extensive in several States and the natural consequence will be some pick up in food prices. Initial reports indicate that rainfall this time will be below normal. The impact on production will depend not only on the quantum of rainfall but also on its distribution over time and across States. Even though agriculture contributes only about 15 per cent to the GDP, any shortfall in agricultural production has serious implications. It fuels inflation and human distress is high as more than 50 per cent of the population depends on agriculture. Second, the several initiatives promised in the Budget will have the desired impact only if they are implemented speedily and effectively. For example, take the increased allocation of funds for railways and roads. Are these ministries adequately prepared to utilise these funds? Some of the initiatives such as the National Investment and Infrastructure Fund and Mudra Bank will take time to be set up and for their impact to be felt.

        The Economic Survey has persuasively argued for larger public investment at a time when private investment is yet to pick up. The same point was made by the Report of the Economic Advisory Council to the Prime Minister in September 2013, that said: “The focused attention that is being given to achieving the production and capacity creation targets in coal, power, road and railways should generate higher growth. In effect, the public sector would act as the driver of growth and crowd in private sector activities”. It is to be noted that capital expenditures of the Central government in the Budget are not significant. Capital expenditures are also not synonymous with investment. While capital expenditures in 2015-16 show an increase over the revised estimates of 2014-15, as a proportion of GDP, they remain the same as in the Budget estimate of 2014-15, i.e. at 1.7 per cent of GDP. In fact, the bulk of the investment has to come from public sector institutions such as Coal India and the Indian Railways. What is needed is for the government to come out with a statement regarding the quantum of investment that will be made by the various public sector institutions. This should be monitored every quarter and the actual investments made should be made public. Apart from making the government accountable, this will inspire confidence in investors.

        For raising the growth rate, the government relies on many of the initiatives announced in the Budget. Several of them need clarification and refinement. For example, how will the National Investment in Infrastructure Fund operate? Will it take the form of a trust or a non-banking financial company (NBFC)? The word “trust” was used in the Budget speech. The sooner the details are spelled out, the better it will be. Take another idea, of the Mudra Bank. To call the institution a “bank” will be incorrect if it is only to be a refinancing institution. Which are the last mile finance institutions which will be refinanced by this institution? Apparently, this institution will have to rely totally on Budget allocation. The idea of a refinancing institution is good but, once again, the details need to be spelled out. In fact, in this context, perhaps the best way to promote investment in the large-, medium- and small-scale sector is to go back to the days when we had development banks which provided long-term finance to large, medium and small industries. At the national level, the IDBI (Industrial Development Bank of India of that time) played a major role. At the State level, State finance corporations operated to provide long-term finance to medium and small enterprises. The development banks became universal banks and in that process we have lost out on long-term finance. Even the new initiative of allowing commercial banks to raise infrastructure bonds may not be adequate. Very soon, they will reach the limits of exposure with respect to industries and groups. And, it is also difficult to have firewalls separating short term from long-term credit. While the new ideas promoted in the Budget are welcome, it is time to think in terms of creating long-term finance institutions to provide equity and long-term loans to large and medium industries. 

Q. What is the intention of the author behind this passage?

Solution:
QUESTION: 6

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

The gloom over economic growth appears to have dissipated a bit after the new numbers on National Income were released at the end of January 2015. However, there is continued scepticism about the numbers as several analysts feel that they are not in accord with the ground realities. According to the advanced estimates for 2014-15, the growth rate is projected at 7.4 per cent. What are the prospects for 2015-16? We do not have the data for past years reworked on the new base and the new methodology, and without such a time series it becomes hard to forecast. Perhaps, 2015-16 will be a shade better than 2014-15, if all the positive factors mentioned later come together. However, it will fall short of the Budget expectations of eight per cent.

        What are the favourable factors that can contribute to a better performance of the economy in 2015-16? First and foremost, there is the advantage of low crude oil prices. This will not only reduce the oil import bill and impact favourably on the current account balance, but will also moderate the price increase in general because petroleum products are used in the production of almost every commodity and service. Second, the credit rating agency, Moody’s decision to upgrade the outlook to “positive” may facilitate the inflow of capital. Though the recovery of the advanced economies is still tepid, the external environment as far as India is concerned may be benign. On the domestic front, there are signs of a gradual improvement in the investment “sentiment”. Still, there are several unfavourable or uncertain factors, chief among them being the uncertainty about the monsoon. We have not yet seen the full impact of the unseasonal rains of the last few months. The damage to crops has been extensive in several States and the natural consequence will be some pick up in food prices. Initial reports indicate that rainfall this time will be below normal. The impact on production will depend not only on the quantum of rainfall but also on its distribution over time and across States. Even though agriculture contributes only about 15 per cent to the GDP, any shortfall in agricultural production has serious implications. It fuels inflation and human distress is high as more than 50 per cent of the population depends on agriculture. Second, the several initiatives promised in the Budget will have the desired impact only if they are implemented speedily and effectively. For example, take the increased allocation of funds for railways and roads. Are these ministries adequately prepared to utilise these funds? Some of the initiatives such as the National Investment and Infrastructure Fund and Mudra Bank will take time to be set up and for their impact to be felt.

        The Economic Survey has persuasively argued for larger public investment at a time when private investment is yet to pick up. The same point was made by the Report of the Economic Advisory Council to the Prime Minister in September 2013, that said: “The focused attention that is being given to achieving the production and capacity creation targets in coal, power, road and railways should generate higher growth. In effect, the public sector would act as the driver of growth and crowd in private sector activities”. It is to be noted that capital expenditures of the Central government in the Budget are not significant. Capital expenditures are also not synonymous with investment. While capital expenditures in 2015-16 show an increase over the revised estimates of 2014-15, as a proportion of GDP, they remain the same as in the Budget estimate of 2014-15, i.e. at 1.7 per cent of GDP. In fact, the bulk of the investment has to come from public sector institutions such as Coal India and the Indian Railways. What is needed is for the government to come out with a statement regarding the quantum of investment that will be made by the various public sector institutions. This should be monitored every quarter and the actual investments made should be made public. Apart from making the government accountable, this will inspire confidence in investors.

        For raising the growth rate, the government relies on many of the initiatives announced in the Budget. Several of them need clarification and refinement. For example, how will the National Investment in Infrastructure Fund operate? Will it take the form of a trust or a non-banking financial company (NBFC)? The word “trust” was used in the Budget speech. The sooner the details are spelled out, the better it will be. Take another idea, of the Mudra Bank. To call the institution a “bank” will be incorrect if it is only to be a refinancing institution. Which are the last mile finance institutions which will be refinanced by this institution? Apparently, this institution will have to rely totally on Budget allocation. The idea of a refinancing institution is good but, once again, the details need to be spelled out. In fact, in this context, perhaps the best way to promote investment in the large-, medium- and small-scale sector is to go back to the days when we had development banks which provided long-term finance to large, medium and small industries. At the national level, the IDBI (Industrial Development Bank of India of that time) played a major role. At the State level, State finance corporations operated to provide long-term finance to medium and small enterprises. The development banks became universal banks and in that process we have lost out on long-term finance. Even the new initiative of allowing commercial banks to raise infrastructure bonds may not be adequate. Very soon, they will reach the limits of exposure with respect to industries and groups. And, it is also difficult to have firewalls separating short term from long-term credit. While the new ideas promoted in the Budget are welcome, it is time to think in terms of creating long-term finance institutions to provide equity and long-term loans to large and medium industries. 

Q. Which of the following can be inferred from the passage.

A) The author wants Public Sector to come forward and invest more in the economy.

B) The functioning of Mudra bank will have to be clarified.

C) There is no need for any financial institution to look after the functioning of refinancing.

Solution:
QUESTION: 7

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

The gloom over economic growth appears to have dissipated a bit after the new numbers on National Income were released at the end of January 2015. However, there is continued scepticism about the numbers as several analysts feel that they are not in accord with the ground realities. According to the advanced estimates for 2014-15, the growth rate is projected at 7.4 per cent. What are the prospects for 2015-16? We do not have the data for past years reworked on the new base and the new methodology, and without such a time series it becomes hard to forecast. Perhaps, 2015-16 will be a shade better than 2014-15, if all the positive factors mentioned later come together. However, it will fall short of the Budget expectations of eight per cent.

        What are the favourable factors that can contribute to a better performance of the economy in 2015-16? First and foremost, there is the advantage of low crude oil prices. This will not only reduce the oil import bill and impact favourably on the current account balance, but will also moderate the price increase in general because petroleum products are used in the production of almost every commodity and service. Second, the credit rating agency, Moody’s decision to upgrade the outlook to “positive” may facilitate the inflow of capital. Though the recovery of the advanced economies is still tepid, the external environment as far as India is concerned may be benign. On the domestic front, there are signs of a gradual improvement in the investment “sentiment”. Still, there are several unfavourable or uncertain factors, chief among them being the uncertainty about the monsoon. We have not yet seen the full impact of the unseasonal rains of the last few months. The damage to crops has been extensive in several States and the natural consequence will be some pick up in food prices. Initial reports indicate that rainfall this time will be below normal. The impact on production will depend not only on the quantum of rainfall but also on its distribution over time and across States. Even though agriculture contributes only about 15 per cent to the GDP, any shortfall in agricultural production has serious implications. It fuels inflation and human distress is high as more than 50 per cent of the population depends on agriculture. Second, the several initiatives promised in the Budget will have the desired impact only if they are implemented speedily and effectively. For example, take the increased allocation of funds for railways and roads. Are these ministries adequately prepared to utilise these funds? Some of the initiatives such as the National Investment and Infrastructure Fund and Mudra Bank will take time to be set up and for their impact to be felt.

        The Economic Survey has persuasively argued for larger public investment at a time when private investment is yet to pick up. The same point was made by the Report of the Economic Advisory Council to the Prime Minister in September 2013, that said: “The focused attention that is being given to achieving the production and capacity creation targets in coal, power, road and railways should generate higher growth. In effect, the public sector would act as the driver of growth and crowd in private sector activities”. It is to be noted that capital expenditures of the Central government in the Budget are not significant. Capital expenditures are also not synonymous with investment. While capital expenditures in 2015-16 show an increase over the revised estimates of 2014-15, as a proportion of GDP, they remain the same as in the Budget estimate of 2014-15, i.e. at 1.7 per cent of GDP. In fact, the bulk of the investment has to come from public sector institutions such as Coal India and the Indian Railways. What is needed is for the government to come out with a statement regarding the quantum of investment that will be made by the various public sector institutions. This should be monitored every quarter and the actual investments made should be made public. Apart from making the government accountable, this will inspire confidence in investors.

        For raising the growth rate, the government relies on many of the initiatives announced in the Budget. Several of them need clarification and refinement. For example, how will the National Investment in Infrastructure Fund operate? Will it take the form of a trust or a non-banking financial company (NBFC)? The word “trust” was used in the Budget speech. The sooner the details are spelled out, the better it will be. Take another idea, of the Mudra Bank. To call the institution a “bank” will be incorrect if it is only to be a refinancing institution. Which are the last mile finance institutions which will be refinanced by this institution? Apparently, this institution will have to rely totally on Budget allocation. The idea of a refinancing institution is good but, once again, the details need to be spelled out. In fact, in this context, perhaps the best way to promote investment in the large-, medium- and small-scale sector is to go back to the days when we had development banks which provided long-term finance to large, medium and small industries. At the national level, the IDBI (Industrial Development Bank of India of that time) played a major role. At the State level, State finance corporations operated to provide long-term finance to medium and small enterprises. The development banks became universal banks and in that process we have lost out on long-term finance. Even the new initiative of allowing commercial banks to raise infrastructure bonds may not be adequate. Very soon, they will reach the limits of exposure with respect to industries and groups. And, it is also difficult to have firewalls separating short term from long-term credit. While the new ideas promoted in the Budget are welcome, it is time to think in terms of creating long-term finance institutions to provide equity and long-term loans to large and medium industries. 

Q. What is the synonym of the word “tepid”?

Solution:
QUESTION: 8

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

The gloom over economic growth appears to have dissipated a bit after the new numbers on National Income were released at the end of January 2015. However, there is continued scepticism about the numbers as several analysts feel that they are not in accord with the ground realities. According to the advanced estimates for 2014-15, the growth rate is projected at 7.4 per cent. What are the prospects for 2015-16? We do not have the data for past years reworked on the new base and the new methodology, and without such a time series it becomes hard to forecast. Perhaps, 2015-16 will be a shade better than 2014-15, if all the positive factors mentioned later come together. However, it will fall short of the Budget expectations of eight per cent.

        What are the favourable factors that can contribute to a better performance of the economy in 2015-16? First and foremost, there is the advantage of low crude oil prices. This will not only reduce the oil import bill and impact favourably on the current account balance, but will also moderate the price increase in general because petroleum products are used in the production of almost every commodity and service. Second, the credit rating agency, Moody’s decision to upgrade the outlook to “positive” may facilitate the inflow of capital. Though the recovery of the advanced economies is still tepid, the external environment as far as India is concerned may be benign. On the domestic front, there are signs of a gradual improvement in the investment “sentiment”. Still, there are several unfavourable or uncertain factors, chief among them being the uncertainty about the monsoon. We have not yet seen the full impact of the unseasonal rains of the last few months. The damage to crops has been extensive in several States and the natural consequence will be some pick up in food prices. Initial reports indicate that rainfall this time will be below normal. The impact on production will depend not only on the quantum of rainfall but also on its distribution over time and across States. Even though agriculture contributes only about 15 per cent to the GDP, any shortfall in agricultural production has serious implications. It fuels inflation and human distress is high as more than 50 per cent of the population depends on agriculture. Second, the several initiatives promised in the Budget will have the desired impact only if they are implemented speedily and effectively. For example, take the increased allocation of funds for railways and roads. Are these ministries adequately prepared to utilise these funds? Some of the initiatives such as the National Investment and Infrastructure Fund and Mudra Bank will take time to be set up and for their impact to be felt.

        The Economic Survey has persuasively argued for larger public investment at a time when private investment is yet to pick up. The same point was made by the Report of the Economic Advisory Council to the Prime Minister in September 2013, that said: “The focused attention that is being given to achieving the production and capacity creation targets in coal, power, road and railways should generate higher growth. In effect, the public sector would act as the driver of growth and crowd in private sector activities”. It is to be noted that capital expenditures of the Central government in the Budget are not significant. Capital expenditures are also not synonymous with investment. While capital expenditures in 2015-16 show an increase over the revised estimates of 2014-15, as a proportion of GDP, they remain the same as in the Budget estimate of 2014-15, i.e. at 1.7 per cent of GDP. In fact, the bulk of the investment has to come from public sector institutions such as Coal India and the Indian Railways. What is needed is for the government to come out with a statement regarding the quantum of investment that will be made by the various public sector institutions. This should be monitored every quarter and the actual investments made should be made public. Apart from making the government accountable, this will inspire confidence in investors.

        For raising the growth rate, the government relies on many of the initiatives announced in the Budget. Several of them need clarification and refinement. For example, how will the National Investment in Infrastructure Fund operate? Will it take the form of a trust or a non-banking financial company (NBFC)? The word “trust” was used in the Budget speech. The sooner the details are spelled out, the better it will be. Take another idea, of the Mudra Bank. To call the institution a “bank” will be incorrect if it is only to be a refinancing institution. Which are the last mile finance institutions which will be refinanced by this institution? Apparently, this institution will have to rely totally on Budget allocation. The idea of a refinancing institution is good but, once again, the details need to be spelled out. In fact, in this context, perhaps the best way to promote investment in the large-, medium- and small-scale sector is to go back to the days when we had development banks which provided long-term finance to large, medium and small industries. At the national level, the IDBI (Industrial Development Bank of India of that time) played a major role. At the State level, State finance corporations operated to provide long-term finance to medium and small enterprises. The development banks became universal banks and in that process we have lost out on long-term finance. Even the new initiative of allowing commercial banks to raise infrastructure bonds may not be adequate. Very soon, they will reach the limits of exposure with respect to industries and groups. And, it is also difficult to have firewalls separating short term from long-term credit. While the new ideas promoted in the Budget are welcome, it is time to think in terms of creating long-term finance institutions to provide equity and long-term loans to large and medium industries. 

Q. What is the meaning of the word “benign”?

Solution:
QUESTION: 9

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

The gloom over economic growth appears to have dissipated a bit after the new numbers on National Income were released at the end of January 2015. However, there is continued scepticism about the numbers as several analysts feel that they are not in accord with the ground realities. According to the advanced estimates for 2014-15, the growth rate is projected at 7.4 per cent. What are the prospects for 2015-16? We do not have the data for past years reworked on the new base and the new methodology, and without such a time series it becomes hard to forecast. Perhaps, 2015-16 will be a shade better than 2014-15, if all the positive factors mentioned later come together. However, it will fall short of the Budget expectations of eight per cent.

        What are the favourable factors that can contribute to a better performance of the economy in 2015-16? First and foremost, there is the advantage of low crude oil prices. This will not only reduce the oil import bill and impact favourably on the current account balance, but will also moderate the price increase in general because petroleum products are used in the production of almost every commodity and service. Second, the credit rating agency, Moody’s decision to upgrade the outlook to “positive” may facilitate the inflow of capital. Though the recovery of the advanced economies is still tepid, the external environment as far as India is concerned may be benign. On the domestic front, there are signs of a gradual improvement in the investment “sentiment”. Still, there are several unfavourable or uncertain factors, chief among them being the uncertainty about the monsoon. We have not yet seen the full impact of the unseasonal rains of the last few months. The damage to crops has been extensive in several States and the natural consequence will be some pick up in food prices. Initial reports indicate that rainfall this time will be below normal. The impact on production will depend not only on the quantum of rainfall but also on its distribution over time and across States. Even though agriculture contributes only about 15 per cent to the GDP, any shortfall in agricultural production has serious implications. It fuels inflation and human distress is high as more than 50 per cent of the population depends on agriculture. Second, the several initiatives promised in the Budget will have the desired impact only if they are implemented speedily and effectively. For example, take the increased allocation of funds for railways and roads. Are these ministries adequately prepared to utilise these funds? Some of the initiatives such as the National Investment and Infrastructure Fund and Mudra Bank will take time to be set up and for their impact to be felt.

        The Economic Survey has persuasively argued for larger public investment at a time when private investment is yet to pick up. The same point was made by the Report of the Economic Advisory Council to the Prime Minister in September 2013, that said: “The focused attention that is being given to achieving the production and capacity creation targets in coal, power, road and railways should generate higher growth. In effect, the public sector would act as the driver of growth and crowd in private sector activities”. It is to be noted that capital expenditures of the Central government in the Budget are not significant. Capital expenditures are also not synonymous with investment. While capital expenditures in 2015-16 show an increase over the revised estimates of 2014-15, as a proportion of GDP, they remain the same as in the Budget estimate of 2014-15, i.e. at 1.7 per cent of GDP. In fact, the bulk of the investment has to come from public sector institutions such as Coal India and the Indian Railways. What is needed is for the government to come out with a statement regarding the quantum of investment that will be made by the various public sector institutions. This should be monitored every quarter and the actual investments made should be made public. Apart from making the government accountable, this will inspire confidence in investors.

        For raising the growth rate, the government relies on many of the initiatives announced in the Budget. Several of them need clarification and refinement. For example, how will the National Investment in Infrastructure Fund operate? Will it take the form of a trust or a non-banking financial company (NBFC)? The word “trust” was used in the Budget speech. The sooner the details are spelled out, the better it will be. Take another idea, of the Mudra Bank. To call the institution a “bank” will be incorrect if it is only to be a refinancing institution. Which are the last mile finance institutions which will be refinanced by this institution? Apparently, this institution will have to rely totally on Budget allocation. The idea of a refinancing institution is good but, once again, the details need to be spelled out. In fact, in this context, perhaps the best way to promote investment in the large-, medium- and small-scale sector is to go back to the days when we had development banks which provided long-term finance to large, medium and small industries. At the national level, the IDBI (Industrial Development Bank of India of that time) played a major role. At the State level, State finance corporations operated to provide long-term finance to medium and small enterprises. The development banks became universal banks and in that process we have lost out on long-term finance. Even the new initiative of allowing commercial banks to raise infrastructure bonds may not be adequate. Very soon, they will reach the limits of exposure with respect to industries and groups. And, it is also difficult to have firewalls separating short term from long-term credit. While the new ideas promoted in the Budget are welcome, it is time to think in terms of creating long-term finance institutions to provide equity and long-term loans to large and medium industries. 

Q. Which of the following is not the synonym of "moderate"?

Solution:
QUESTION: 10

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

The gloom over economic growth appears to have dissipated a bit after the new numbers on National Income were released at the end of January 2015. However, there is continued scepticism about the numbers as several analysts feel that they are not in accord with the ground realities. According to the advanced estimates for 2014-15, the growth rate is projected at 7.4 per cent. What are the prospects for 2015-16? We do not have the data for past years reworked on the new base and the new methodology, and without such a time series it becomes hard to forecast. Perhaps, 2015-16 will be a shade better than 2014-15, if all the positive factors mentioned later come together. However, it will fall short of the Budget expectations of eight per cent.

        What are the favourable factors that can contribute to a better performance of the economy in 2015-16? First and foremost, there is the advantage of low crude oil prices. This will not only reduce the oil import bill and impact favourably on the current account balance, but will also moderate the price increase in general because petroleum products are used in the production of almost every commodity and service. Second, the credit rating agency, Moody’s decision to upgrade the outlook to “positive” may facilitate the inflow of capital. Though the recovery of the advanced economies is still tepid, the external environment as far as India is concerned may be benign. On the domestic front, there are signs of a gradual improvement in the investment “sentiment”. Still, there are several unfavourable or uncertain factors, chief among them being the uncertainty about the monsoon. We have not yet seen the full impact of the unseasonal rains of the last few months. The damage to crops has been extensive in several States and the natural consequence will be some pick up in food prices. Initial reports indicate that rainfall this time will be below normal. The impact on production will depend not only on the quantum of rainfall but also on its distribution over time and across States. Even though agriculture contributes only about 15 per cent to the GDP, any shortfall in agricultural production has serious implications. It fuels inflation and human distress is high as more than 50 per cent of the population depends on agriculture. Second, the several initiatives promised in the Budget will have the desired impact only if they are implemented speedily and effectively. For example, take the increased allocation of funds for railways and roads. Are these ministries adequately prepared to utilise these funds? Some of the initiatives such as the National Investment and Infrastructure Fund and Mudra Bank will take time to be set up and for their impact to be felt.

        The Economic Survey has persuasively argued for larger public investment at a time when private investment is yet to pick up. The same point was made by the Report of the Economic Advisory Council to the Prime Minister in September 2013, that said: “The focused attention that is being given to achieving the production and capacity creation targets in coal, power, road and railways should generate higher growth. In effect, the public sector would act as the driver of growth and crowd in private sector activities”. It is to be noted that capital expenditures of the Central government in the Budget are not significant. Capital expenditures are also not synonymous with investment. While capital expenditures in 2015-16 show an increase over the revised estimates of 2014-15, as a proportion of GDP, they remain the same as in the Budget estimate of 2014-15, i.e. at 1.7 per cent of GDP. In fact, the bulk of the investment has to come from public sector institutions such as Coal India and the Indian Railways. What is needed is for the government to come out with a statement regarding the quantum of investment that will be made by the various public sector institutions. This should be monitored every quarter and the actual investments made should be made public. Apart from making the government accountable, this will inspire confidence in investors.

        For raising the growth rate, the government relies on many of the initiatives announced in the Budget. Several of them need clarification and refinement. For example, how will the National Investment in Infrastructure Fund operate? Will it take the form of a trust or a non-banking financial company (NBFC)? The word “trust” was used in the Budget speech. The sooner the details are spelled out, the better it will be. Take another idea, of the Mudra Bank. To call the institution a “bank” will be incorrect if it is only to be a refinancing institution. Which are the last mile finance institutions which will be refinanced by this institution? Apparently, this institution will have to rely totally on Budget allocation. The idea of a refinancing institution is good but, once again, the details need to be spelled out. In fact, in this context, perhaps the best way to promote investment in the large-, medium- and small-scale sector is to go back to the days when we had development banks which provided long-term finance to large, medium and small industries. At the national level, the IDBI (Industrial Development Bank of India of that time) played a major role. At the State level, State finance corporations operated to provide long-term finance to medium and small enterprises. The development banks became universal banks and in that process we have lost out on long-term finance. Even the new initiative of allowing commercial banks to raise infrastructure bonds may not be adequate. Very soon, they will reach the limits of exposure with respect to industries and groups. And, it is also difficult to have firewalls separating short term from long-term credit. While the new ideas promoted in the Budget are welcome, it is time to think in terms of creating long-term finance institutions to provide equity and long-term loans to large and medium industries. 

Q. What is the synonym of the word “accord”?

Solution:
QUESTION: 11

Directions: Rearrange the following six sentences (A), (B), (C), (D), (E), and (F) in the proper sequence to form a meaningful paragraph and then answer the questions given below.

A) Depression is possible and if they don't get enough exercise, obesity is also on the cards.

B) A lot of people keep dogs tied all day.

C) They could exhibit other behavioural disorders such as chewing on their own leg or licking themselves constantly out of boredom, causing skin problems.

D) The other major risk is exposure to the elements for example, when they are tied in direct sunlight; they are at risk of dehydration and heat stroke.

E) Habitual tying is never a good thing.

F) This causes behavioural issues – they might start to become excessively vociferous or aggressive.

Q. Which of the following would be the FOURTH sentence after rearrangement ?

Solution:

E B F C A D

QUESTION: 12

Directions: Rearrange the following six sentences (A), (B), (C), (D), (E), and (F) in the proper sequence to form a meaningful paragraph and then answer the questions given below.

A) Depression is possible and if they don't get enough exercise, obesity is also on the cards.

B) A lot of people keep dogs tied all day.

C) They could exhibit other behavioural disorders such as chewing on their own leg or licking themselves constantly out of boredom, causing skin problems.

D) The other major risk is exposure to the elements for example, when they are tied in direct sunlight; they are at risk of dehydration and heat stroke.

E) Habitual tying is never a good thing.

F) This causes behavioural issues – they might start to become excessively vociferous or aggressive.

Q. Which of the following would be the FIRST sentence after rearrangement ?

Solution:

E B F C A D

QUESTION: 13

Directions: Rearrange the following six sentences (A), (B), (C), (D), (E), and (F) in the proper sequence to form a meaningful paragraph and then answer the questions given below.

A) Depression is possible and if they don't get enough exercise, obesity is also on the cards.

B) A lot of people keep dogs tied all day.

C) They could exhibit other behavioural disorders such as chewing on their own leg or licking themselves constantly out of boredom, causing skin problems.

D) The other major risk is exposure to the elements for example, when they are tied in direct sunlight; they are at risk of dehydration and heat stroke.

E) Habitual tying is never a good thing.

F) This causes behavioural issues – they might start to become excessively vociferous or aggressive.

Q. Which of the following would be the THIRD sentence after rearrangement ?

Solution:

E B F C A D

QUESTION: 14

Directions: Rearrange the following six sentences (A), (B), (C), (D), (E), and (F) in the proper sequence to form a meaningful paragraph and then answer the questions given below.

A) Depression is possible and if they don't get enough exercise, obesity is also on the cards.

B) A lot of people keep dogs tied all day.

C) They could exhibit other behavioural disorders such as chewing on their own leg or licking themselves constantly out of boredom, causing skin problems.

D) The other major risk is exposure to the elements for example, when they are tied in direct sunlight; they are at risk of dehydration and heat stroke.

E) Habitual tying is never a good thing.

F) This causes behavioural issues – they might start to become excessively vociferous or aggressive.

Q. Which of the following would be the FIFTH sentence after rearrangement ?

Solution:

E B F C A D

QUESTION: 15

Directions: Rearrange the following six sentences (A), (B), (C), (D), (E), and (F) in the proper sequence to form a meaningful paragraph and then answer the questions given below.

A) Depression is possible and if they don't get enough exercise, obesity is also on the cards.

B) A lot of people keep dogs tied all day.

C) They could exhibit other behavioural disorders such as chewing on their own leg or licking themselves constantly out of boredom, causing skin problems.

D) The other major risk is exposure to the elements for example, when they are tied in direct sunlight; they are at risk of dehydration and heat stroke.

E) Habitual tying is never a good thing.

F) This causes behavioural issues – they might start to become excessively vociferous or aggressive.

Q. Which of the following would be the SECOND sentence after rearrangement ?

Solution:

E B F C A D

QUESTION: 16

Directions: In the following passage, some of the words have been left out, each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraph meaningful.

After ten years of (16) inflation, prices have hiked 7.5% in the third week of July. This looks scary—after all, Indians had got used to prices crawling up by 2% in the last two years, and a 10-year average inflation rate of about 5%——but you shouldn't worry. This burst of inflation is the result of three factors that have come together unexpectedly, are unlikely to [17] for  long and are unlikely to [18] up together again: a[n] [19] rise in global oil prices, a monsoon that arrived late and a spike in global metal prices. North Sea crude has crossed $42 per barrel, driven up by low petroleum [20] and soaring demand in the US as war production heats up. Oil markets are also spooked by the [21] of Russian oil supplies falling on the back of the Yukos— Sibneft probe. There’s little that the government can do to [22] users from soaring oil prices—indeed, it shouldn't, if it wants to [23efficiency. Higher transport costs have pushed up rates of vegetables and fruits. Farm produce could also get affected by rains that arrived too late for kharif sowing. China is [24] up steel and other metals from all over the world to [25] a construction boom ahead of the 2008 Olympics, making metal prices soar all over the world, and sparking inflation in India.

Solution:
QUESTION: 17

Directions: In the following passage, some of the words have been left out, each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraph meaningful.

After ten years of (16) inflation, prices have hiked 7.5% in the third week of July. This looks scary—after all, Indians had got used to prices crawling up by 2% in the last two years, and a 10-year average inflation rate of about 5%——but you shouldn't worry. This burst of inflation is the result of three factors that have come together unexpectedly, are unlikely to [17] for  long and are unlikely to [18] up together again: a[n] [19] rise in global oil prices, a monsoon that arrived late and a spike in global metal prices. North Sea crude has crossed $42 per barrel, driven up by low petroleum [20] and soaring demand in the US as war production heats up. Oil markets are also spooked by the [21] of Russian oil supplies falling on the back of the Yukos— Sibneft probe. There’s little that the government can do to [22] users from soaring oil prices—indeed, it shouldn't, if it wants to [23efficiency. Higher transport costs have pushed up rates of vegetables and fruits. Farm produce could also get affected by rains that arrived too late for kharif sowing. China is [24] up steel and other metals from all over the world to [25] a construction boom ahead of the 2008 Olympics, making metal prices soar all over the world, and sparking inflation in India.

Solution:
QUESTION: 18

Directions: In the following passage, some of the words have been left out, each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraph meaningful.

After ten years of (16) inflation, prices have hiked 7.5% in the third week of July. This looks scary—after all, Indians had got used to prices crawling up by 2% in the last two years, and a 10-year average inflation rate of about 5%——but you shouldn't worry. This burst of inflation is the result of three factors that have come together unexpectedly, are unlikely to [17] for  long and are unlikely to [18] up together again: a[n] [19] rise in global oil prices, a monsoon that arrived late and a spike in global metal prices. North Sea crude has crossed $42 per barrel, driven up by low petroleum [20] and soaring demand in the US as war production heats up. Oil markets are also spooked by the [21] of Russian oil supplies falling on the back of the Yukos— Sibneft probe. There’s little that the government can do to [22] users from soaring oil prices—indeed, it shouldn't, if it wants to [23efficiency. Higher transport costs have pushed up rates of vegetables and fruits. Farm produce could also get affected by rains that arrived too late for kharif sowing. China is [24] up steel and other metals from all over the world to [25] a construction boom ahead of the 2008 Olympics, making metal prices soar all over the world, and sparking inflation in India.

Solution:
QUESTION: 19

Directions: In the following passage, some of the words have been left out, each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraph meaningful.

After ten years of (16) inflation, prices have hiked 7.5% in the third week of July. This looks scary—after all, Indians had got used to prices crawling up by 2% in the last two years, and a 10-year average inflation rate of about 5%——but you shouldn't worry. This burst of inflation is the result of three factors that have come together unexpectedly, are unlikely to [17] for  long and are unlikely to [18] up together again: a[n] [19] rise in global oil prices, a monsoon that arrived late and a spike in global metal prices. North Sea crude has crossed $42 per barrel, driven up by low petroleum [20] and soaring demand in the US as war production heats up. Oil markets are also spooked by the [21] of Russian oil supplies falling on the back of the Yukos— Sibneft probe. There’s little that the government can do to [22] users from soaring oil prices—indeed, it shouldn't, if it wants to [23efficiency. Higher transport costs have pushed up rates of vegetables and fruits. Farm produce could also get affected by rains that arrived too late for kharif sowing. China is [24] up steel and other metals from all over the world to [25] a construction boom ahead of the 2008 Olympics, making metal prices soar all over the world, and sparking inflation in India.

Solution:
QUESTION: 20

Directions: In the following passage, some of the words have been left out, each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraph meaningful.

After ten years of (16) inflation, prices have hiked 7.5% in the third week of July. This looks scary—after all, Indians had got used to prices crawling up by 2% in the last two years, and a 10-year average inflation rate of about 5%——but you shouldn't worry. This burst of inflation is the result of three factors that have come together unexpectedly, are unlikely to [17] for  long and are unlikely to [18] up together again: a[n] [19] rise in global oil prices, a monsoon that arrived late and a spike in global metal prices. North Sea crude has crossed $42 per barrel, driven up by low petroleum [20] and soaring demand in the US as war production heats up. Oil markets are also spooked by the [21] of Russian oil supplies falling on the back of the Yukos— Sibneft probe. There’s little that the government can do to [22] users from soaring oil prices—indeed, it shouldn't, if it wants to [23efficiency. Higher transport costs have pushed up rates of vegetables and fruits. Farm produce could also get affected by rains that arrived too late for kharif sowing. China is [24] up steel and other metals from all over the world to [25] a construction boom ahead of the 2008 Olympics, making metal prices soar all over the world, and sparking inflation in India.

Solution:
QUESTION: 21

Directions: In the following passage, some of the words have been left out, each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraph meaningful.

After ten years of (16) inflation, prices have hiked 7.5% in the third week of July. This looks scary—after all, Indians had got used to prices crawling up by 2% in the last two years, and a 10-year average inflation rate of about 5%——but you shouldn't worry. This burst of inflation is the result of three factors that have come together unexpectedly, are unlikely to [17] for  long and are unlikely to [18] up together again: a[n] [19] rise in global oil prices, a monsoon that arrived late and a spike in global metal prices. North Sea crude has crossed $42 per barrel, driven up by low petroleum [20] and soaring demand in the US as war production heats up. Oil markets are also spooked by the [21] of Russian oil supplies falling on the back of the Yukos— Sibneft probe. There’s little that the government can do to [22] users from soaring oil prices—indeed, it shouldn't, if it wants to [23efficiency. Higher transport costs have pushed up rates of vegetables and fruits. Farm produce could also get affected by rains that arrived too late for kharif sowing. China is [24] up steel and other metals from all over the world to [25] a construction boom ahead of the 2008 Olympics, making metal prices soar all over the world, and sparking inflation in India.

Solution:
QUESTION: 22

Directions: In the following passage, some of the words have been left out, each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraph meaningful.

After ten years of (16) inflation, prices have hiked 7.5% in the third week of July. This looks scary—after all, Indians had got used to prices crawling up by 2% in the last two years, and a 10-year average inflation rate of about 5%——but you shouldn't worry. This burst of inflation is the result of three factors that have come together unexpectedly, are unlikely to [17] for  long and are unlikely to [18] up together again: a[n] [19] rise in global oil prices, a monsoon that arrived late and a spike in global metal prices. North Sea crude has crossed $42 per barrel, driven up by low petroleum [20] and soaring demand in the US as war production heats up. Oil markets are also spooked by the [21] of Russian oil supplies falling on the back of the Yukos— Sibneft probe. There’s little that the government can do to [22] users from soaring oil prices—indeed, it shouldn't, if it wants to [23efficiency. Higher transport costs have pushed up rates of vegetables and fruits. Farm produce could also get affected by rains that arrived too late for kharif sowing. China is [24] up steel and other metals from all over the world to [25] a construction boom ahead of the 2008 Olympics, making metal prices soar all over the world, and sparking inflation in India.

Solution:
QUESTION: 23

Directions: In the following passage, some of the words have been left out, each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraph meaningful.

After ten years of (16) inflation, prices have hiked 7.5% in the third week of July. This looks scary—after all, Indians had got used to prices crawling up by 2% in the last two years, and a 10-year average inflation rate of about 5%——but you shouldn't worry. This burst of inflation is the result of three factors that have come together unexpectedly, are unlikely to [17] for  long and are unlikely to [18] up together again: a[n] [19] rise in global oil prices, a monsoon that arrived late and a spike in global metal prices. North Sea crude has crossed $42 per barrel, driven up by low petroleum [20] and soaring demand in the US as war production heats up. Oil markets are also spooked by the [21] of Russian oil supplies falling on the back of the Yukos— Sibneft probe. There’s little that the government can do to [22] users from soaring oil prices—indeed, it shouldn't, if it wants to [23efficiency. Higher transport costs have pushed up rates of vegetables and fruits. Farm produce could also get affected by rains that arrived too late for kharif sowing. China is [24] up steel and other metals from all over the world to [25] a construction boom ahead of the 2008 Olympics, making metal prices soar all over the world, and sparking inflation in India.

Solution:
QUESTION: 24

Directions: In the following passage, some of the words have been left out, each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraph meaningful.

After ten years of (16) inflation, prices have hiked 7.5% in the third week of July. This looks scary—after all, Indians had got used to prices crawling up by 2% in the last two years, and a 10-year average inflation rate of about 5%——but you shouldn't worry. This burst of inflation is the result of three factors that have come together unexpectedly, are unlikely to [17] for  long and are unlikely to [18] up together again: a[n] [19] rise in global oil prices, a monsoon that arrived late and a spike in global metal prices. North Sea crude has crossed $42 per barrel, driven up by low petroleum [20] and soaring demand in the US as war production heats up. Oil markets are also spooked by the [21] of Russian oil supplies falling on the back of the Yukos— Sibneft probe. There’s little that the government can do to [22] users from soaring oil prices—indeed, it shouldn't, if it wants to [23efficiency. Higher transport costs have pushed up rates of vegetables and fruits. Farm produce could also get affected by rains that arrived too late for kharif sowing. China is [24] up steel and other metals from all over the world to [25] a construction boom ahead of the 2008 Olympics, making metal prices soar all over the world, and sparking inflation in India.

Solution:
QUESTION: 25

Directions: In the following passage, some of the words have been left out, each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraph meaningful.

After ten years of (16) inflation, prices have hiked 7.5% in the third week of July. This looks scary—after all, Indians had got used to prices crawling up by 2% in the last two years, and a 10-year average inflation rate of about 5%——but you shouldn't worry. This burst of inflation is the result of three factors that have come together unexpectedly, are unlikely to [17] for  long and are unlikely to [18] up together again: a[n] [19] rise in global oil prices, a monsoon that arrived late and a spike in global metal prices. North Sea crude has crossed $42 per barrel, driven up by low petroleum [20] and soaring demand in the US as war production heats up. Oil markets are also spooked by the [21] of Russian oil supplies falling on the back of the Yukos— Sibneft probe. There’s little that the government can do to [22] users from soaring oil prices—indeed, it shouldn't, if it wants to [23efficiency. Higher transport costs have pushed up rates of vegetables and fruits. Farm produce could also get affected by rains that arrived too late for kharif sowing. China is [24] up steel and other metals from all over the world to [25] a construction boom ahead of the 2008 Olympics, making metal prices soar all over the world, and sparking inflation in India.

Solution:
QUESTION: 26

Directions: In each sentence below four words have been printed in bold which are numbered 1), 2), 3) and 4). One of these words may be misspelt or inappropriate in the context of the sentence. Find out the wrongly spelt or inappropriate words. The number of that word is the answer. If all four words are correctly spelt and appropriate the answer is 5), ie 'All correct.'

You will find their homes adourned 1)/ with pictures of Hindu deities 2)/ and their immense respect for Hindu gods and goddesses even 3)/ when their religious practices are Islamic 4)/. All correct 5).

Solution:

 The correct spelling is adorned.

QUESTION: 27

Directions: In each sentence below four words have been printed in bold which are numbered 1), 2), 3) and 4). One of these words may be misspelt or inappropriate in the context of the sentence. Find out the wrongly spelt or inappropriate words. The number of that word is the answer. If all four words are correctly spelt and appropriate the answer is 5), ie 'All correct.'

 

Oppressive working conditions have 1)/ steadily improved in the last 6 months 2)/, but more must be done to reduce 3)/ the amount of overtime that employees work. 4)/ All correct 5).

Solution:
QUESTION: 28

Directions: In each sentence below four words have been printed in bold which are numbered 1), 2), 3) and 4). One of these words may be misspelt or inappropriate in the context of the sentence. Find out the wrongly spelt or inappropriate words. The number of that word is the answer. If all four words are correctly spelt and appropriate the answer is 5), ie 'All correct.'

 

If Shreya could seen 1)/ the powerful women 2)/ in her party now 3)/, she would probably be tickled 4)/. All correct 5).

Solution:

Replace 'seen' with 'see'

QUESTION: 29

Directions: In each sentence below four words have been printed in bold which are numbered 1), 2), 3) and 4). One of these words may be misspelt or inappropriate in the context of the sentence. Find out the wrongly spelt or inappropriate words. The number of that word is the answer. If all four words are correctly spelt and appropriate the answer is 5), ie 'All correct.'

Obviously, this goes way 1)/, way deeper than 2)/ social awkwordness 3)/ or inept phraseology. 4)/ All correct 5).

Solution:

The correct spelling is awkwardness.

QUESTION: 30

Directions: In each sentence below four words have been printed in bold which are numbered 1), 2), 3) and 4). One of these words may be misspelt or inappropriate in the context of the sentence. Find out the wrongly spelt or inappropriate words. The number of that word is the answer. If all four words are correctly spelt and appropriate the answer is 5), ie 'All correct.'

The musical faternity 1)/ at large does not feel it necessary to give karnatik music, 2)/ especially its compositional forms, 3)/ a purely aesthetic thought. 4)/ All correct 5).

Solution:

The correct spelling is fraternity.

QUESTION: 31

Directions: Study the following graph carefully to answer these questions :

A cosmetic company provides five different products. The sales of these five products (in thousand number of packs) during 2006 and 2011 are shown in the following bar graph.

Q. The sales of lipsticks in 2011 was by what percent more than the sales of nail enamels in 2011? (rounded off to nearest integer)

Solution:

Required percentage  =​

QUESTION: 32

Directions: Study the following graph carefully to answer these questions :

A cosmetic company provides five different products. The sales of these five products (in thousand number of packs) during 2006 and 2011 are shown in the following bar graph.

Q. During the period 2006-2011, the minimum rate of increase in sales is in the case of?

Solution:

 

QUESTION: 33

Directions: Study the following graph carefully to answer these questions :

A cosmetic company provides five different products. The sales of these five products (in thousand number of packs) during 2006 and 2011 are shown in the following bar graph.

Q. What is the approximate ratio of the sales of nail enamels in 2011 to the sales of Talcum powders in 2006?

Solution:

QUESTION: 34

Directions: Study the following graph carefully to answer these questions :

A cosmetic company provides five different products. The sales of these five products (in thousand number of packs) during 2006 and 2011 are shown in the following bar graph.

Q. The sales have increased by nearly 55% from 2006 to 2011 in the case of?

Solution:

QUESTION: 35

Directions: Study the following graph carefully to answer these questions :

A cosmetic company provides five different products. The sales of these five products (in thousand number of packs) during 2006 and 2011 are shown in the following bar graph.

Q. The sales of conditioners in 2006 was by what percent less than the sales of shampoos in 2006? (rounded off to nearest integer).

Solution:

Required percentage = 

QUESTION: 36

Study the following line graph and answer the questions based on it.
Number of Vehicles Manufactured by Two companies ove the Years (Number in Thousands)

Q. What is the difference between the number of vehicles manufactured by Company Y in 2000 and 2001 ?

Solution:

 Required difference = (128000 - 107000) = 21000.

QUESTION: 37

Study the following line graph and answer the questions based on it.
Number of Vehicles Manufactured by Two companies ove the Years (Number in Thousands)

Q. What is the difference between the total productions of the two Companies in the given years ?

Solution:

From the line-graph it is clear that the productions of Company X in the   years 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001 and 2002 are 119000, 99000, 141000, 78000, 120000 and 159000 and those of Company Y are 139000, 120000,100000, 128000, 107000 and 148000 respectively.Total production of Company X from 1997 to 2002

= 119000 + 99000 + 141000 + 78000 + 120000 + 159000

= 716000.

and total production of Company Y from 1997 to 2002

= 139000 + 120000 + 100000 + 128000 + 107000 + 148000

= 742000.

Difference = (742000 - 716000) = 26000.

QUESTION: 38

Study the following line graph and answer the questions based on it.
Number of Vehicles Manufactured by Two companies ove the Years (Number in Thousands)

Q. What is the average numbers of vehicles manufactured by Company X over the given period ? (rounded off to nearest integer)

Solution:

Average number of vehicles manufactured by Company X

= 119333.

QUESTION: 39

Study the following line graph and answer the questions based on it.
Number of Vehicles Manufactured by Two companies ove the Years (Number in Thousands)

Q. In which of the following years, the difference between the productions of Companies X and Y was the maximum among the given years ?

Solution:

The difference between the productions of Companies X and Y in various years are:

For 1997 (139000 - 119000)  = 20000.

For 1998 (120000 - 99000)  = 21000.

For 1999 (141000 - 100000)  = 41000.

For 2000 (128000 - 78000) = 50000.

For 2001 (120000 - 107000) = 13000.

For 2002 (159000 - 148000) = 11000.

Clearly, maximum difference was in 2000.

QUESTION: 40

Study the following line graph and answer the questions based on it.
Number of Vehicles Manufactured by Two companies ove the Years (Number in Thousands)

Q. The production of Company Y in 2000 was approximately what percent of the production of Company X in the same year ?

Solution:

Explanation  - Required percentage=  128/78 * 100 = 164%  = 164%

QUESTION: 41

Directions : In the following questions two equations numbered (I) and (II) are given. You have to solve both the equations and give answer:

Solution:

QUESTION: 42

Directions : In the following questions two equations numbered (I) and (II) are given. You have to solve both the equations and give answer:

Solution:

QUESTION: 43

Directions : In the following questions two equations numbered (I) and (II) are given. You have to solve both the equations and give answer:

Solution:

QUESTION: 44

Directions : In the following questions two equations numbered (I) and (II) are given. You have to solve both the equations and give answer:

Solution:

QUESTION: 45

Directions : In the following questions two equations numbered (I) and (II) are given. You have to solve both the equations and give answer:

Solution:

QUESTION: 46

The average weight of four boys A, B, C, and D is 75 kg. The fifth boy E is included and the average weight decreases by 4 kg. A is replaced by F. The weight of F is 6 kg more than E. Average weight decreases because of the replacement of A and now the average weight is 72 kg. Find the weight of A.

Solution:

Sum of the weight of A, B, C and D = 75 × 4 = 300 kg
and average weight of A, B, C, D and E = 71 kg
sum of the weight of A, B, C, D and E
= 71 × 5 = 355 kg
weight of E = 355 – 300 = 55 kg
weight of F = 55 + 6 = 61 kg
Now, average weight of F, B, C, D and E = 72 kg
Sum of the weight of F, B, C, D and E = 72 × 5 = 360 kg
B + C + D = 360 – 55 – 61 = 244 kg.
Weight of A = 300 – 244 = 56 kg.

QUESTION: 47

If a discount of 16% is given on the marked price of a book, the publisher gains 20%. If the discount is increased to 20% the gain percent is

Solution:

Let the marked price be Rs. 100 and the cost price be Rs. x
(84 - x)/x * 100 = 20
x = Rs. 70
Gain% when discount is 20 % = (80 - 70)/70 * 100 = 14 2/7%

QUESTION: 48

In 165 litres of mixtures of milk and water, water is only 28%. The milkman sold 40 litres of this mixture and then he added 30 litres of pure milk and 13 litres of pure water in the remaining mixture. What is the percentage of water in the final mixture?

Solution:

Now, milkman sold 40 litre of mixture
So, remaining mixture = 165 – 40 = 125 litre
Quantity of water = 125 × 28/100 = 35 litre
Quantity of milk = 90 litre.
Now, milkman made new mixture in which
water = 35 + 13 = 48 litre
milk = 90 + 30 = 120 litre
Percentage of water in the new mixture
= 48/(48 + 120) * 100 = 28.57%

QUESTION: 49

A rectangular plot has a concrete path running inner side of the plot is used as a lawn, which has an area of 432 sq.m. If the width of the path is 4 m and the length of the plot is greater than its breadth by 2m, what is the area of the rectangular plot?

Solution:

Let the breadth of the rectangle plot be x m.
Given, width of the path = 4 m
Area of the path = 432 m2
and length of rectangular plot = (x + 2) m
2 × [4 (x + 2) + 4x – 2 × 4 × 4] = 432 m2
8 (x + 2 + x – 8) = 432 m2
8 (2x – 6) = 432
16 (x – 3) = 432

x = 30 m
Area of plot = x × (x + 2) = 30 × 32 = 960 m2

QUESTION: 50

Difference between the compound interest and the simple interest accrued on an amount of Rs. 18000 in two year is Rs. 405. What was the rate of interest?

Solution:

Let the rate be R% p.a. Then,

Rate = 15%.

QUESTION: 51

12 men can complete any work in 36 days. 18 women can complete the same piece of work in 60 days. 8 men and 20 women work together for 20 days. If only the women were to complete the remaining work in 4 days, then how many women would be required?

Solution:

12 men × 36 days = 18 women × 60 days
2m = 5w
8m = 20w
(8m + 20w) × 20 days + xw × 4 days = 18w × 60 days
40 × 20 + x × 4 = 18 × 60  4x = 1080 – 800
x = 280/4
= 70 women

QUESTION: 52

Out of 5 women and 4 men, a committee of three members is to be formed in such a way that at least one member is woman. In how many different ways can this be done?

Solution:

Total number of ways
= 5C1 × 4C2 + 5C2 × 4C1 +5C3
5*4*3/2 + 5*4/2 + 5*4*3/3*2
= 30 + 40 + 10 = 80 ways

QUESTION: 53

A box contains 2 black, 3 orange and 4 pink ribbons. If two ribbons are drawn at random. What is the probability that both are orange?

Solution:

Required Probability = 3C2/9C2 = 1/12

QUESTION: 54

Pradeep invested 20% more than Mohit. Mohit invested 10% less than Raghu. If the total sum of their investment is Rs. 17880, how much amount did Raghu invested?

Solution:

Let the investment by Raghu be x
Mohit = x * 90/100 = 9x/10
Pradeep = 9x/10 * 120/100 = 108x/100
x + 9x/10 + 108x/100 = 17880
x = Rs. 6000

QUESTION: 55

Excluding the stoppages, the speed of a bus is 64 km/hr and including the stoppages the speed of the bus is 48km/hr. For how many minutes does the bus stop per hour?

Solution:

Let distance be LCM of speeds = 192 km
Time taken by bus without stoppage = 192/64 = 3hr
Time taken by bus with stoppage = 192/48 = 4hr
Bus stops in 4 hours for 60 min
Bus stops in 1 hr for 60/4
= 15 min

QUESTION: 56

The following number series follows a pattern, identify the pattern and guess the next number which should continue the series:

1170 1001 880 799 750 ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 57

The following number series follows a pattern, identify the pattern and guess the next number which should continue the series

990 981 997 972 1008 ?

Solution:

– (3)2 ,+ (4)2, – (5)2, + (6)2, – (7)2

QUESTION: 58

The following number series follows a pattern, identify the pattern and guess the next number which should continue the series

12 32 273 1602 8035 ?

Solution:

– 8 × 8, + 7 × 7, – 6 × 6, + 5 × 5

QUESTION: 59

The following number series follows a pattern, identify the pattern and guess the next number which should continue the series

18 14 12 4 2 ?

Solution:

– 1 – 3, + 2 – 4, – 3 – 5, + 4 – 6, – 5– 7

QUESTION: 60

The following number series follows a pattern, identify the pattern and guess the next number which should continue the series

10 12 30 102 428 ?

Solution:

(+2) × 1, (+3) × 2, (+ 4) × 3, (+ 5) × 4, (+6)× 5

QUESTION: 61

999 × 1001 = ? + 26

Solution:
QUESTION: 62

23.82 × 7.5 – 24.72 = ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 63

(7921)1/2 + (14641)1/4 = (?)2

Solution:
QUESTION: 64

√(2116) + ∛(19683)/13.5 = ? × 6

Solution:
QUESTION: 65

? ÷ 26 × 28 = 728

Solution:
QUESTION: 66

Directions : Study the following information answers the questions that follow.

Seven institutes P, Q, R, S, T, U and V provide coaching for seven different competitive exams, viz. Engineering, NET, CAT,“ SSC, Banking, Medical and TET, but not necessarily in the same order. There is one day weekly, off in each institute from Monday to Sunday but not necessarily in the same order. No two institutes have the same weekly off day.

Institute R provides coaching for NET and is neither closed on Friday nor on Wednesday.

Institute S provides coaching for Engineering, and Thursday is its weekly off day.

Institute T and U do not provide coaching for Banking and neither of these has Wednesday as weekly off day

Institute Q provides coaching for SSC and remains closed on Sunday.

The one which provides coaching for Medical has Tuesday as weekly off day.

Institute V provides coaching for TET and remains closed on Monday.

Institute T does not provide coaching for CAT.

Q. Institute R remains closed on which of the following days?

Solution:

QUESTION: 67

Directions : Study the following information answers the questions that follow.

Seven institutes P, Q, R, S, T, U and V provide coaching for seven different competitive exams, viz. Engineering, NET, CAT,“ SSC, Banking, Medical and TET, but not necessarily in the same order. There is one day weekly, off in each institute from Monday to Sunday but not necessarily in the same order. No two institutes have the same weekly off day.

Institute R provides coaching for NET and is neither closed on Friday nor on Wednesday.

Institute S provides coaching for Engineering, and Thursday is its weekly off day.

Institute T and U do not provide coaching for Banking and neither of these has Wednesday as weekly off day

Institute Q provides coaching for SSC and remains closed on Sunday.

The one which provides coaching for Medical has Tuesday as weekly off day.

Institute V provides coaching for TET and remains closed on Monday.

Institute T does not provide coaching for CAT.

Q. Which of the following institutes provides coaching forBanking?

Solution:

QUESTION: 68

Directions : Study the following information answers the questions that follow.

Seven institutes P, Q, R, S, T, U and V provide coaching for seven different competitive exams, viz. Engineering, NET, CAT,“ SSC, Banking, Medical and TET, but not necessarily in the same order. There is one day weekly, off in each institute from Monday to Sunday but not necessarily in the same order. No two institutes have the same weekly off day.

Institute R provides coaching for NET and is neither closed on Friday nor on Wednesday.

Institute S provides coaching for Engineering, and Thursday is its weekly off day.

Institute T and U do not provide coaching for Banking and neither of these has Wednesday as weekly off day

Institute Q provides coaching for SSC and remains closed on Sunday.

The one which provides coaching for Medical has Tuesday as weekly off day.

Institute V provides coaching for TET and remains closed on Monday.

Institute T does not provide coaching for CAT.

Q. Which of the following combinations is correct?

Solution:

QUESTION: 69

Directions : Study the following information answers the questions that follow.

Seven institutes P, Q, R, S, T, U and V provide coaching for seven different competitive exams, viz. Engineering, NET, CAT,“ SSC, Banking, Medical and TET, but not necessarily in the same order. There is one day weekly, off in each institute from Monday to Sunday but not necessarily in the same order. No two institutes have the same weekly off day.

Institute R provides coaching for NET and is neither closed on Friday nor on Wednesday.

Institute S provides coaching for Engineering, and Thursday is its weekly off day.

Institute T and U do not provide coaching for Banking and neither of these has Wednesday as weekly off day

Institute Q provides coaching for SSC and remains closed on Sunday.

The one which provides coaching for Medical has Tuesday as weekly off day.

Institute V provides coaching for TET and remains closed on Monday.

Institute T does not provide coaching for CAT.

Q. Which institute provides coaching for Medical?

Solution:

QUESTION: 70

Directions : Study the following information answers the questions that follow.

Seven institutes P, Q, R, S, T, U and V provide coaching for seven different competitive exams, viz. Engineering, NET, CAT,“ SSC, Banking, Medical and TET, but not necessarily in the same order. There is one day weekly, off in each institute from Monday to Sunday but not necessarily in the same order. No two institutes have the same weekly off day.

Institute R provides coaching for NET and is neither closed on Friday nor on Wednesday.

Institute S provides coaching for Engineering, and Thursday is its weekly off day.

Institute T and U do not provide coaching for Banking and neither of these has Wednesday as weekly off day

Institute Q provides coaching for SSC and remains closed on Sunday.

The one which provides coaching for Medical has Tuesday as weekly off day.

Institute V provides coaching for TET and remains closed on Monday.

Institute T does not provide coaching for CAT.

Q. On which of the following days does Institute U remain closed?

Solution:

QUESTION: 71

Direction : Study the following information carefully and answer the given questions: 

Eight persons Monu, Sonu, Pinku, Mintu, Bantu, Chiru, Kalu and Sintu are sitting around a circular table but not necessarily in the same order. Three of them are facing towards opposite to center  while other five are facing towards the centre of the table.
Bantusits third to the right of Pinku. Chiru is sitting third to the left of Bantu. Three persons are sitting between Chiru and Sonu. Kalu is sitting third to the right of Chiru  who is not facing the centre. Mintu is sitting third to the right of Monu, who is not facing the centre. 

Q. Who sits between Chiru and Monu ? 

Solution:

QUESTION: 72

Direction: Study the following information carefully and answer the given questions: 

Eight persons Monu, Sonu, Pinku, Mintu, Bantu, Chiru, Kalu and Sintu are sitting around a circular table but not necessarily in the same order. Three of them are facing towards opposite to center  while other five are facing towards the centre of the table.
Bantusits third to the right of Pinku. Chiru is sitting third to the left of Bantu. Three persons are sitting between Chiru and Sonu. Kalu is sitting third to the right of Chiru  who is not facing the centre. Mintu is sitting third to the right of Monu, who is not facing the centre. 

Q. Who among the following is second to the right of Sonu? 

Solution:

QUESTION: 73

Direction: Study the following information carefully and answer the given questions: 

Eight persons Monu, Sonu, Pinku, Mintu, Bantu, Chiru, Kalu and Sintu are sitting around a circular table but not necessarily in the same order. Three of them are facing towards opposite to center  while other five are facing towards the centre of the table.
Bantusits third to the right of Pinku. Chiru is sitting third to the left of Bantu. Three persons are sitting between Chiru and Sonu. Kalu is sitting third to the right of Chiru  who is not facing the centre. Mintu is sitting third to the right of Monu, who is not facing the centre. 

Q. Which of the following statements is/are true with respect to Sintu? 

Solution:

QUESTION: 74

Direction: Study the following information carefully and answer the given questions: 

Eight persons Monu, Sonu, Pinku, Mintu, Bantu, Chiru, Kalu and Sintu are sitting around a circular table but not necessarily in the same order. Three of them are facing towards opposite to center  while other five are facing towards the centre of the table.
Bantusits third to the right of Pinku. Chiru is sitting third to the left of Bantu. Three persons are sitting between Chiru and Sonu. Kalu is sitting third to the right of Chiru  who is not facing the centre. Mintu is sitting third to the right of Monu, who is not facing the centre. 

Q. Which of the following groups represents the group, of those facing away from the centre ? 

Solution:

QUESTION: 75

Direction: Study the following information carefully and answer the given questions: 

Eight persons Monu, Sonu, Pinku, Mintu, Bantu, Chiru, Kalu and Sintu are sitting around a circular table but not necessarily in the same order. Three of them are facing towards opposite to center  while other five are facing towards the centre of the table.
Bantusits third to the right of Pinku. Chiru is sitting third to the left of Bantu. Three persons are sitting between Chiru and Sonu. Kalu is sitting third to the right of Chiru  who is not facing the centre. Mintu is sitting third to the right of Monu, who is not facing the centre. 

Q. Which is the position of Pinku with respect of Sintu ? 

Solution:

QUESTION: 76

Directions: Study the information and answer the following questions:

In a certain code language

"asked how the court" is coded as " 18#D 8#U 15#I 5#B " 

"legal rights and other" is coded as " 5#P 14#B 20@S 1#M " 

"will hear logical issue" is coded as " 21#J 1#M 1@I 12@X " 

Q. What is the code for ‘argument’ in the given code language?

Solution:

These are the latest pattern of coding-decoding questions. In these questions we are applying following concept:-

QUESTION: 77

Directions: Study the information and answer the following questions:

In a certain code language

"asked how the court" is coded as " 18#D 8#U 15#I 5#B " 

"legal rights and other" is coded as " 5#P 14#B 20@S 1#M " 

"will hear logical issue" is coded as " 21#J 1#M 1@I 12@X " 

Q. What is the code for ‘somewhere’ in the given code language?

Solution:

These are the latest pattern of coding-decoding questions. In these questions we are applying following concept:-

QUESTION: 78

Directions: Study the information and answer the following questions:

In a certain code language

"asked how the court" is coded as " 18#D 8#U 15#I 5#B " 

"legal rights and other" is coded as " 5#P 14#B 20@S 1#M " 

"will hear logical issue" is coded as " 21#J 1#M 1@I 12@X " 

Q. What is the code for ‘additional’ in the given code language?

Solution:

These are the latest pattern of coding-decoding questions. In these questions we are applying following concept:-

QUESTION: 79

Directions: Study the information and answer the following questions:

In a certain code language

"asked how the court" is coded as " 18#D 8#U 15#I 5#B " 

"legal rights and other" is coded as " 5#P 14#B 20@S 1#M " 

"will hear logical issue" is coded as " 21#J 1#M 1@I 12@X " 

Q. What is the code for ‘solicitor’ in the given code language?

Solution:

These are the latest pattern of coding-decoding questions. In these questions we are applying following concept:-

QUESTION: 80

Directions: Study the information and answer the following questions:

In a certain code language

"asked how the court" is coded as " 18#D 8#U 15#I 5#B " 

"legal rights and other" is coded as " 5#P 14#B 20@S 1#M " 

"will hear logical issue" is coded as " 21#J 1#M 1@I 12@X " 

Q. What is the code for ‘countered’ in the given code language?

Solution:

These are the latest pattern of coding-decoding questions. In these questions we are applying following concept:-

QUESTION: 81

Directions: In each question below are given two/three statements followed by two conclusions numbered I and II. You have to take the given statements to be true even if they seem to be at variance with commonly known facts. Read all the conclusions and then decide which of the given conclusions logically follows from the given statements, disregarding commonly known facts. Give answer

Statements:

All plates are glasses.

Some cups are glasses.

Conclusions:

I. At least some cups are plates.

II. Some glasses are cups.

Solution:

QUESTION: 82

Directions: In each question below are given two/three statements followed by two conclusions numbered I and II. You have to take the given statements to be true even if they seem to be at variance with commonly known facts. Read all the conclusions and then decide which of the given conclusions logically follows from the given statements, disregarding commonly known facts. Give answer

Statements:

All trolleys are lamps.

No lamp is a chair.

Conclusions:

I. At least some trolleys are chairs.

II. Some chairs are definitely not trolleys.

Solution:

QUESTION: 83

Directions: In each question below are given two/three statements followed by two conclusions numbered I and II. You have to take the given statements to be true even if they seem to be at variance with commonly known facts. Read all the conclusions and then decide which of the given conclusions logically follows from the given statements, disregarding commonly known facts. Give answer

Statements:

Some clothes are shirts.

All shirts are paints.

Conclusions:

I. All paints being clothes is a possibility.

II. Some shirts are clothes.

Solution:

QUESTION: 84

Directions: In each question below are given two/three statements followed by two conclusions numbered I and II. You have to take the given statements to be true even if they seem to be at variance with commonly known facts. Read all the conclusions and then decide which of the given conclusions logically follows from the given statements, disregarding commonly known facts. Give answer

Statements:

No sand is a stone

No sand is a tree.

Conclusions:

I. No stone is sand.

II. No tree is a stone

Solution:

QUESTION: 85

Directions: In each question below are given two/three statements followed by two conclusions numbered I and II. You have to take the given statements to be true even if they seem to be at variance with commonly known facts. Read all the conclusions and then decide which of the given conclusions logically follows from the given statements, disregarding commonly known facts. Give answer

Statements:

Some teachers are doctors.

No doctor is a lawyer.

Conclusions:

I. Some teachers are not lawyers.

II. Some lawyers are doctors.

Solution:

QUESTION: 86

If it is possible to form a three digit number which is the perfect square of a two-digit odd number with the third, the fifth and the eighth digits of the number 532784691, which of the following will be the second digit of that two-digit odd number? If more than one such number can be formed, give @ as the answer and if no such number can be formed, given © as the answer.

Solution:

The three digit number is = 289
This is perfect square of 17. So second digit is 7.

QUESTION: 87

How many such letters are there in the word CATEGORY each of which is as far away from the beginning of the word as when they are arranged in alphabetical order?

Solution:

QUESTION: 88

Directions: In the following questions, the symbols @, ©, $ % and δ are used with the following meanings as illustrated below.

‘P $ Q’ means ‘P is not greater than Q’.

‘P @ Q’ means ‘P is neither smaller than nor equal to Q’.

‘P δ Q’ means ‘P is neither greater than nor equal to Q’.

‘P © Q’ means ‘P is neither greater than nor smaller than Q’.

‘P % Q’ means ‘P is not smaller than Q’.

In each of the following questions assuming the given statements to be true, find out which of the two conclusions I and II given below them is/are definitely true.

Give answer

Statements: M δ R, R $ T, T © N

Conclusions: 

I. N @ M

II. T @ M

 

 

Solution:

Conclusions:
I. N @ M ( True)
II. T @ M(  True)

QUESTION: 89

Directions : In the following questions, the symbols @, ©, $ % and δ are used with the following meanings as illustrated below.

‘P $ Q’ means ‘P is not greater than Q’.

‘P @ Q’ means ‘P is neither smaller than nor equal to Q’.

‘P δ Q’ means ‘P is neither greater than nor equal to Q’.

‘P © Q’ means ‘P is neither greater than nor smaller than Q’.

‘P % Q’ means ‘P is not smaller than Q’.

In each of the following questions assuming the given statements to be true, find out which of the two conclusions I and II given below them is/are definitely true.

Give answer

Statements: B % H, H $ W, W @ M

Conclusions

I. B @ W

II. M δ H

Solution:

Conclusions:
I. B @ W( Not True)
II. M δ H( Not True)

QUESTION: 90

Directions: In the following questions, the symbols @, ©, $ % and δ are used with the following meanings as illustrated below.

‘P $ Q’ means ‘P is not greater than Q’.

‘P @ Q’ means ‘P is neither smaller than nor equal to Q’.

‘P δ Q’ means ‘P is neither greater than nor equal to Q’.

‘P © Q’ means ‘P is neither greater than nor smaller than Q’.

‘P % Q’ means ‘P is not smaller than Q’.

In each of the following questions assuming the given statements to be true, find out which of the two conclusions I and II given below them is/are definitely true.

Give answer

Statements: K δ M, M % A, A @ T

Conclusions

I. K δ A

II. T δ M

Solution:

Conclusions:
I. K δ A ( Not True)
II. T δ M(  True)

QUESTION: 91

Directions : These questions are based on the following information.

‘P@Q’ means ‘P is the mother of Q’

‘P$Q’ means ‘P is the husband of Q’

‘P#Q’ means ‘P is the sister of Q’

‘P*Q’ means ‘P is the son of Q’.

Q. If F#J*T$R@L, then which of the following is definitely true?

Solution:

QUESTION: 92

Directions : These questions are based on the following information.

‘P@Q’ means ‘P is the mother of Q’

‘P$Q’ means ‘P is the husband of Q’

‘P#Q’ means ‘P is the sister of Q’

‘P*Q’ means ‘P is the son of Q’.

Q. Which of the following indicates the relationship ‘R’ is the father of B’?

Solution:

QUESTION: 93

Directions : These questions are based on the following information.

‘P@Q’ means ‘P is the mother of Q’

‘P$Q’ means ‘P is the husband of Q’

‘P#Q’ means ‘P is the sister of Q’

‘P*Q’ means ‘P is the son of Q’.

Q. M*H@D*K, represents what relation of H with D?

Solution:

QUESTION: 94

Directions: Study the following information and answer the questions given:

Sulabh walked 5m towards north from point A and reached point B . He took a right turn from point B and walked 7m and reached point C. He took another right turn from point C and walked 6m to reach point D. Sulabh took a right turn from point D and walked 3m to reach point E. From point E he took another right turn and walk 6m and reached point F

Q. How far and in which direction is point F from point A?

Solution:

QUESTION: 95

Directions: Study the following information and answer the questions given:Sulabh walked 5m towards north from point A and reached point B . He took a right turn from point B and walked 7m and reached point C. He took another right turn from point C and walked 6m to reach point D. Sulabh took a right turn from point D and walked 3m to reach point E. From point E he took another right turn and walk 6m and reached point F

Q. Point D is in which direction with respect to point to B?

Solution:

QUESTION: 96

Directions : Study the set of numbers given below and answer the questions which follow.

427  581  839  275  589

Q. If in each number, the first and the second digits are interchanged, which will be the second lowest number?

Solution:

427  581  839  275  589
247   851  389  725  859

QUESTION: 97

Directions : Study the set of numbers given below and answer the questions which follow.

427  581  839  275  589

Q. If in each number, first and the last digits are interchanged, which of the following will be the third highest number?

Solution:

427  581  839  275  589
724  185  938   572 985

QUESTION: 98

Directions : Study the set of numbers given below and answer the questions which follow.

427  581  839  275  589

Q. If in each number, the second and the third digits are interchanged, which will be the second highest number?

Solution:

427  581  839  275  589
472  518  893  257  598

QUESTION: 99

Directions : Study the set of numbers given below and answer the questions which follow.

427  581  839  275  589

Q. If two is subtracted from the first digit of each of the numbers and then the first and the third digits are interchanged, which of the following will be the lowest?

Solution:

427  581  839  275  589
227  381   639 075  389
722  183  936  570  983

QUESTION: 100

Directions : Study the set of numbers given below and answer the questions which follow.

427  581  839  275  589

Q. If in each number, all the three digits are arranged in ascending order, which of the following will be the third lowest number?

Solution:

427  581  839  275  589

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