IBPS PO Mock Test - 1


200 Questions MCQ Test IBPS PO - Mock Tests for 2020 Exam and Past Year Papers | IBPS PO Mock Test - 1


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This mock test of IBPS PO Mock Test - 1 for Banking Exams helps you for every Banking Exams entrance exam. This contains 200 Multiple Choice Questions for Banking Exams IBPS PO Mock Test - 1 (mcq) to study with solutions a complete question bank. The solved questions answers in this IBPS PO Mock Test - 1 quiz give you a good mix of easy questions and tough questions. Banking Exams students definitely take this IBPS PO Mock Test - 1 exercise for a better result in the exam. You can find other IBPS PO Mock Test - 1 extra questions, long questions & short questions for Banking Exams on EduRev as well by searching above.
QUESTION: 1

A computer professional who writes and tests software are called a

Solution:
QUESTION: 2

Directions (Q. 1-5) In the following number series one number is wrong. Find out the wrong number.

39, 42, 48, 59, 84, 132

Solution:

The series is

Hence, there should be 60 in place of 59.

QUESTION: 3

In the following number series one number is wrong. Find out the wrong number.

11, 18, 30, 40, 59, 86 

Solution:

The series is

Hence, there should be 27 in place of 30.

QUESTION: 4

In the following number series one number is wrong. Find out the wrong number.

5, 30, 59, 119, 209, 335  

Solution:

The series is 2³ - 3 = 5, 3³ - 4 = 23, 4³-5 = 59 5³-6 = 119, 6³ - 7 = 209, 7³ - 8 = 335 Hence, there should be 23 in place of 30.

QUESTION: 5

In the following number series one number is wrong. Find out the wrong number.

353, 385, 316, 441, 225, 568   

Solution:

The series is

QUESTION: 6

In the following number series one number is wrong. Find out the wrong number.

21, 29, 84, 756, 12096, 302400   

Solution:

The series is

Hence, there should be 21 in place of 29.

QUESTION: 7

Directions (Q.6-10) In these questions a relationship between different elements is shown in the statements. The statements are followed by two conclusions. Give your answer accordingly

 

Statements:

C>E>N=T, L<W=N

 

Conclusions:

I) N=W

II) E>L   

Solution:

Combining both statements we get
C>E>N=T=W>L Thus N=W is true, again E>L is true, so both conclusions (I) and (II) are true .

QUESTION: 8

Statements:

R=E<S>P, Q>M>E

 

Conclusions:

I) P>Q

II) M>R

Solution:

Combining both statements we get
Q>M>E=R<S>P No Relation Can’t be established between P & Q, but M>R is true, so conclusion (II) is true.

QUESTION: 9

Statements:

X>W>D>B,G=T>W

 

Conclusions:

I) G>D

II) T>B

Solution:

Combining both statement we get
X>W<T=G and G=T>W>D>B
Hence G>D is right again T>B is true. Hence both the conclusions are true.

QUESTION: 10

Statements:

N<R=K<L,F<U<L

 

Conclusions:

I) R>F

II) N>U

Solution:

d) Combining both statement we get
N<R=K<L>U>F No Relation can establish between R & F and N&U. So, conclusion (I) nor (II) is true.

QUESTION: 11

Statements:

C>R>T=M<P<N

 

Conclusions:

I) C>M

II) T<N

Solution:

Combining both statements we get
C>R>T=M<P<N Thus C>M is true, again T<N is true, so both conclusions (I) and (II) are true .

QUESTION: 12

Each Student of a class collected some money for the trip. The total money collected by each student was equal to the cube of the total number of students. If the total amount collected was Rs. 29791. find the total number of students.

Solution:

Total number of students 

QUESTION: 13

A dealer buys an article marked at Rs. 50,000 at 25% and 10% successive discount. He spends Rs. 5000 on its repair and sells it for Rs. 50,000. What is his loss or gain percentage? 

Solution:

QUESTION: 14

Five years ago the average age of four boys was 9 years. On including a new boy, the present average age of all the five is 15 years. The present age of the new boy is:

Solution:

Sum of the present ages of four boys = 9 x 4 + (5 x 4) = 56 years
Sum of the present ages of five boys = 15 x 5 = 75 years
∴ Present age of new boy = 75 - 56 = 19 years

QUESTION: 15

P, Q and R can do a piece of work in 18, 24 and 36 days on the second day and P on the third day, again R on the fourth day and so on. Then in how, many days will the work be completed? 

Solution:

Units of work done in 3 days = (2 + 3 + 4) = 9 ∴ 72 units of work will be done in = 3 x 8 = 24 days

QUESTION: 16

Harshika wants to purchase a mobile handset. The shopkeepers told her to pay 30% tax if she asked for the actual sale price (without tax) of the mobile and paid to the shopkeeper Rs. 16150. In the doing so, she managed to avoid to pay the 30% tax. What is the amount of discount that she received on the selling price (inclusive of tax)? 

Solution:

SP = 100, SP (with tax) = 130 New SP = 100 - 5 = 95 Effective discount = 130 - 95 = 35 So, when SP of 95, discount = 35 And when SP of Rs. 16,150, discount = 35/95x16150 = Rs. 5950

QUESTION: 17

Directions (Q. 16-21)  Study the table carefully and answer the questions given below: Details of employees deployed at different levels by a company in different departments.

 

 

Q. The total number of female employees (Managers and Officers) in Procurement department is approximately by what per cent more than their male counterparts?

Solution:

Procuremet Department:

Total female employees = 1200 + 1300 = 2500 Total male employees = 1500 + 900 = 2400  ∴ Required percentage more 

QUESTION: 18

Details of employees deployed at different levels by a company in different departments.

 

Q.The number of female managers in Finance department is what per cent of the total number of male managers in Sales department? 

Solution:

Female managers in Finance department  

QUESTION: 19

Details of employees deployed at different levels by a company in different departments.

 

Q.What is the ratio of the total number of female managers in Operations and Finance departments to that of male officers in these two departments? 

Solution:

Female managers in Operation and Finance departments together

 

QUESTION: 20

Details of employees deployed at different levels by a company in different departments.

 

Q. The total number of male officers in Advertising and Sales departments is approximately what per cent the total number of officers in these two department? 

Solution:

Male officers in Advertising and Sales departments

QUESTION: 21

Details of employees deployed at different levels by a company in different departments.

 

Q.What is the different between the total number of female officers in Advertising and Public Relations department and the total number of female managers in these two department? 

Solution:

Female officers in Advertising and Public relation

QUESTION: 22

Details of employees deployed at different levels by a company in different departments.

 

Q. What is the ratio of the total number of managers in Public relations, Finance, Sales and Operations department to the total number of officers in Finance, Advertising, Sales and procurement department? 

Solution:

Required Ratio = (1800 + 2500 + 2400 + 2200) : (3200 + 1600 + 2600 + 2200) = 8900 : 9600 = 89:96

QUESTION: 23

Directions (Q. 22-26) Study the following pie - charts carefully and answer the questions given below:

Percentage break up of the number of children in five different villages and break up of children Attending school from those villages

 

 

 

 

Q. What is the total number of children not attending school from village V2 and V3 together? 

Solution:

Required answer 

= 1392 - 1008 + 638 - 504 = 384 + 134 = 518

QUESTION: 24

Percentage break up of the number of children in five different villages and break up of children Attending school from those villages

 

 

 

 

 

 Q.The number of children attending school from village V1 is approximate, what percent of the number of children from that village? 

Solution:

QUESTION: 25

Percentage break up of the number of children in five different villages and break up of children Attending school from those villages

 

 

 

 

Q. What is the approximate average number of children not attending school from village V2, V3 and V4 together?

Solution:

Required average 

QUESTION: 26

Percentage break up of the number of children in five different villages and break up of children Attending school from those villages

 

 

 

 

 Q. The number of children not attending school from village V4 and V5 is approximately what percent of the total number of children from village V4 and V5 together? 

Solution:

QUESTION: 27

Percentage break up of the number of children in five different villages and break up of children Attending school from those villages

 

 

 

 

Q.What is the ratio of the total number of children from village V4 to the number fo children attending school from the same village? 

Solution:

Required ratio = 18 x 58 : 21 x 36 = 58 : 42 = 29 : 21

QUESTION: 28

Directions (Q. 27-31)  Study the following pie- charts and table carefully and answer the questions given below:

Details of students who scored from six schools of Delhi in Class XII the result:

 

 

 

 Ratio of Girls to Boys

 

Q. What is the difference between the no. of boys who scored 95 percent and above from schools S5 and the no. of boys who scored between 90-95 percent from school S5

Solution:

QUESTION: 29

Details of students who scored from six schools of Delhi in Class XII the result:

 

 

 

 Ratio of Girls to Boys

 

Q.The number of girls of school S2 who scored between 90-95 percent is approximately what percent of the no. of girls of school S4 who scored 95 percent and above? 

Solution:

QUESTION: 30

Details of students who scored from six schools of Delhi in Class XII the result:

 

 

 

 Ratio of Girls to Boys

 

Q. The number of boys of school S5 and S6 together who scored 95 percent and above is approximately what percent more or less than the number of girls of school S2 and S5 together who scored between 90-95 percent?  

Solution:

QUESTION: 31

Details of students who scored from six schools of Delhi in Class XII the result:

 

 

 

 Ratio of Girls to Boys

 

Q. The average number of girls who scored 95 percent and above from all the schools together is 

Solution:

Required average 

QUESTION: 32

Details of students who scored from six schools of Delhi in Class XII the result:

 

 

 

 Ratio of Girls to Boys

 

Q. What was the ratio of the number of boys of school S3 who scored between 90-95 percent to the number of boys, who scored 95 percent and above in the same school?  

Solution:

Required ratio

QUESTION: 33

Directions (Q. 32-35) Study the following graph carefully and answer the questions given below:

The line graph represents the percentage candidates qualifies in a competitive examination from 6 states during the given two years.

 

The table given below represents the total number of candidates appeared, percentage of candidates qualified in all the six states together in the year 2013 and 2014.

 

 

Ratio of male to the female candidates qualified from different states in both the years.

 

Q. The number of female candidates qualified from state S2 in 2013 is approximately what percent of the male candidates qualified from S1 in 2014? 

Solution:

Number of candidates qualified in the year 2013 = 45 x 1420 = 63900 2014 = 52 x 1800 = 93600

 

QUESTION: 34

The line graph represents the percentage candidates qualifies in a competitive examination from 6 states during the given two years.

 

The table given below represents the total number of candidates appeared, percentage of candidates qualified in all the six states together in the year 2013 and 2014.

 

 

Ratio of male to the female candidates qualified from different states in both the years.

 

Q. If in 2014 in state S1 four female candidates qualified are not eligible then what is the average number of female candidates qualified from all the states together in the year 2014? 

Solution:

Number of candidates qualified in the year 2013 = 45 x 1420 = 63900 2014 = 52 x 1800 = 93600

 

QUESTION: 35

The line graph represents the percentage candidates qualifies in a competitive examination from 6 states during the given two years.

 

The table given below represents the total number of candidates appeared, percentage of candidates qualified in all the six states together in the year 2013 and 2014.

 

 

Ratio of male to the female candidates qualified from different states in both the years.

 

Q. What is the ratio of the number of female candidates qualified from states S1 and S3 together in 2013 to the number of male candidates qualified from the same states in the year 2014?

Solution:

Number of candidates qualified in the year 2013 = 45 x 1420 = 63900 2014 = 52 x 1800 = 93600

Required ratio = 5112 + 3195 : 11648 + 10296 = 8307 : 21944

QUESTION: 36

The line graph represents the percentage candidates qualifies in a competitive examination from 6 states during the given two years.

 

The table given below represents the total number of candidates appeared, percentage of candidates qualified in all the six states together in the year 2013 and 2014.

 

 

Ratio of male to the female candidates qualified from different states in both the years.

 

Q. What is the average number of candidates qualified from states S2, S3, S4 and S6 together in the year 2013?

Solution:

Number of candidates qualified in the year 2013 = 45 x 1420 = 63900 2014 = 52 x 1800 = 93600

 

QUESTION: 37

A number when divided by 169 leaves 78 as remainder. What would be the remainder when the same number is divided by 13 ?

Solution:

Given number = 169q + 78 = 13 ( 13 q + 6) => The number is completely divisible by 13.

QUESTION: 38

Two trains start from stations A and B travel towards each other at speeds of 50 km/hour and 60 km/hour respectively . At the time of their meeting , the second train has travelled 120 km more than the first. The distance between A and B is

Solution:

Let the distance travelled by the first train be x km. . . Distance travelled by the second train = x + 120 km Now, x/50 = x + 120/60 . . x = 600 km Distance between A and B = x + x + 120 = 1200 + 120 = 1320 km

QUESTION: 39

P takes 10 days more than Q to complete a piece of work. If both of them can complete the work in  days, in how many days can P alone complete the work? 

Solution:

Q takes x days and P takes x+10 days Both are completed the work = (1/x)+(1/x+10) = 20/3 ==> 3x2-10x-200=0 ==> x = 10, -20/3 Days cant be negative sign . so X = 10 P alone completed = 10+10=20 days

QUESTION: 40

What approximate value should come in place of the question mark (?) in the following questions.    

25.675% of 1321 + 64.328% of 4001= ?

Solution:

==> 25/100 x 1320 + 64/100 x 4000 ==> 330+2560 = 2890

QUESTION: 41

The difference between the simple interest received from two different sources on Rs. 1500 for 3 years is Rs. 13.50. The difference between their rate of interest is 

Solution:

[1500 x R1 x 3] /100 – [1500 x R2 x 3] /100 =13.5 ==>4500 (R1 – R2) = 1350 ==>R1 – R2 =1350/4500=0.30%

QUESTION: 42

The ratio between the present ages of P and Q is 6:7. If Q is 4 years old than P. What will be the ratio of the ages of P and Q after 4 years?

Solution:

Present age Ratio = 6:7 Difference = 7-6 = 1 1 unit ----- 4 years 6 units ---- 24years 7 units ---- 28 years after 4 years P and Q age = 28 years and 32 years Ratio = 28:32= 7:8

QUESTION: 43

The average score of 11 matches is 50. If the average score of first 6 matches is 49 and that of last 6 is 52, find the sixth match score?

Solution:

Total score in 11 matches = 11*50 =550 First 6 matches total score = 6*49= 294 Last 6 matches total score = 6*52 = 312 6th match score = (294+312)-550=56

QUESTION: 44

The Simple interest on a certain sum for 2 years at 10% per annum is Rs. 90. The corresponding compound interest is?

Solution:

P = 90*100/(2*10) = 450 C.I = 450(1+(10/100))^2 - 450= 450 * 121/100 - 450 = 94.5

QUESTION: 45

A box contain 10 Black balls, 7 White balls and 12 Red balls. A ball is drawn at random. What is the probability that the ball drawn is either Black or White ?

Solution:

Total no of balls =10+7+12 = 29 Probability of Black balls =10/29 Probability of White balls = 7/29 Probability of Either Black or White = 10/29 + 7/29 = 17/29

QUESTION: 46

The salaries of P,Q and R are in the ratio 5:3:2. If the increments of 20% ,10% and 20% are allowed in their salaries, then what will be the new ratio of their salaries ?

Solution:

P,Q and R salaries Ratio = 5:3:2 = 500:300:200 If P Salary Increases 20% = 500×(20/100) = 100 => 500+100 = 600 If Q Salary Increases 10% = 300×(10/100) = 30 => 300+33 = 330 If R Salary Increases 20% = 200×(20/100) = 40 => 200+40 = 240 New Ratios = 600:330:240 = 20:11:8

QUESTION: 47

The cost of fencing a circular plot at the rate of Rs. 15 per m is Rs 6600. What will be the cost of flooring the plot at the rate of Rs 50 per sq m?

Solution:

==> 2 x pi x r = 6600/15 =440m ==> r = 70m Area = pi x r2 = 22/7 x 70 x 70 = 15,400 Total cost = 15,400 x 50=7,70,000

QUESTION: 48

Average weight of 20 men is 72 kgs, and the average weight of 34 women is 62.5 kgs. What is the average weight (rounded off to the nearest integer) of all the men and the women together?   

Solution:

Total Weight of men = 20 x 72= 1440 Total Weight of women = 34 x 62.5 = 2125 Average weight of all men and women = (1440+2125)/(20+34) = 66.01~ = 66 kgs

QUESTION: 49

Steve is older than Mark by 4 years. If the ratio of their current ages is 7:9, what will be the corresponding new ratio of their ages when Mark is twice as old as he is now?

Solution:

Ratio difference = 9-7=2 units Age difference = 4 2 units ---------- 4 7 units --------- ? Mark age = 14 years Similarly Steve age = 18 years Mark is twice as old as he is age = 14 +14 =28 At the same time Steve age = 18+14 = 32 New ratio = 7:8

QUESTION: 50

A, B and C can do a work in 20, 30 and 60 days respectively. How many days does it need to complete the work if A does the work and he is assisted by B and C on every third day?

Solution:

L.C.M of 20,30 and 60 = 60 = Total work A efficiency = 60/20 =3 B efficiency = 60/30 = 2   C efficiency = 60/60 = 1 A working 2 days and third day they all working together So total efficiency = A efficiency + A efficiency + A , B and C efficiency ( for 3days ) ==> 3+3+6=12 Work completed = 60/12 = 5 Total days = 5*3 = 15 days

QUESTION: 51

A train has a length of 150 meters . It is passing a man who is moving at 2 km/hr in the same direction of the train, in 3 seconds. Find out the speed of the train.

Solution:

Speed x 10 --------- 36 sec ( its gives how many meters travelled in 36 sec) Train speed = x kmph Man speed = 2 kmph Relative Speed = x-2 (X-2) x 10 ----------- 36 sec 150. ----------- 3 sec ==> 30(x-2) = 5400 ==> x = 182kmph

QUESTION: 52

Directions (Q. 51 –60) Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it.

 

India’s tourism industry is experiencing a strong period of growth, driven by the burgeoning Indian middle class, growth in high spending foreign tourists, and coordinated government campaigns to promote ‘Incredible India’. The tourism industry in India is substantial and vibrant, and the country is fast becoming a major global destination. India’s travel and tourism industry is one of them most profitable industries in the country, and also credited with contributing a substantial amount of foreign exchange. This is illustrated by the fact that during 2006, four million tourists visited India and spent US $8.9 billion. Several reasons are cited for the growth and prosperity of India’s travel and tourism industry. Economic growth has added millions annually to the ranks of India’s middle class, a group that is driving domestic tourism growth. Disposable income in India has grown by 10.11% annually from 2001-2006, and much of that is being spent on travel. Thanks in part to its booming IT and outsourcing industry a growing number of business trips are made by foreigners to India, who will often add a weekend break or longer holiday to their trip. Foreign tourists spend more in India than almost any other country worldwide. Tourist arrivals are projected to increase by over 22% per year through till 2010, with a 33% increase in foreign exchange earnings recorded in 2004.

The Tourism Ministry has also played an important role in the development of the industry, initiating advertising campaigns such as the ‘Incredible India’ campaign, which promoted India’s culture and tourist attractions in a fresh and memorable way. The campaign helped create a colorful image of India in the minds of consumers all over the world, and has directly led to an increase in the interest among tourists. The tourism industry has helped growth in other sectors as diverse as horticulture, handicrafts, agriculture, construction and even poultry. Both directly and indirectly, increased tourism in India has created jobs in a variety of related sectors. The numbers tell the story: almost 20 million people are now working in the India’s tourism industry. India’s governmental bodies have also made a significant impact in tourism by requiring that each and every state of India have a corporation to administer support issues related to tourism. A new growth sector is medical tourism. It is currently growing at around 30% per annum.

Medical tourist arrivals are expected to reach one million soon. Medical tourism in Asia has grown rapidly. Medical tourism is approaching fever pitch at the tune of $4 billion US, fuelled largely by the cosmetic surgery market. One of the problems India has, despite having some world-class hospitals, is sanitation. The tourism industry of India is based on certain core nationalistic ideals and standards which are: Swaagat or welcome, Sahyog or cooperation, Soochanaa or information, Sanrachanaa or infrastructure, Suvidha or facilitation, Safaai or cleanliness and Surakshaa or security.

 

Q. Choose the word which is MOST OPPOSITE in meaning of the word burgeoning as used in the passage?

Solution:
QUESTION: 53

India’s tourism industry is experiencing a strong period of growth, driven by the burgeoning Indian middle class, growth in high spending foreign tourists, and coordinated government campaigns to promote ‘Incredible India’. The tourism industry in India is substantial and vibrant, and the country is fast becoming a major global destination. India’s travel and tourism industry is one of them most profitable industries in the country, and also credited with contributing a substantial amount of foreign exchange. This is illustrated by the fact that during 2006, four million tourists visited India and spent US $8.9 billion. Several reasons are cited for the growth and prosperity of India’s travel and tourism industry. Economic growth has added millions annually to the ranks of India’s middle class, a group that is driving domestic tourism growth. Disposable income in India has grown by 10.11% annually from 2001-2006, and much of that is being spent on travel. Thanks in part to its booming IT and outsourcing industry a growing number of business trips are made by foreigners to India, who will often add a weekend break or longer holiday to their trip. Foreign tourists spend more in India than almost any other country worldwide. Tourist arrivals are projected to increase by over 22% per year through till 2010, with a 33% increase in foreign exchange earnings recorded in 2004.

The Tourism Ministry has also played an important role in the development of the industry, initiating advertising campaigns such as the ‘Incredible India’ campaign, which promoted India’s culture and tourist attractions in a fresh and memorable way. The campaign helped create a colorful image of India in the minds of consumers all over the world, and has directly led to an increase in the interest among tourists. The tourism industry has helped growth in other sectors as diverse as horticulture, handicrafts, agriculture, construction and even poultry. Both directly and indirectly, increased tourism in India has created jobs in a variety of related sectors. The numbers tell the story: almost 20 million people are now working in the India’s tourism industry. India’s governmental bodies have also made a significant impact in tourism by requiring that each and every state of India have a corporation to administer support issues related to tourism. A new growth sector is medical tourism. It is currently growing at around 30% per annum.

Medical tourist arrivals are expected to reach one million soon. Medical tourism in Asia has grown rapidly. Medical tourism is approaching fever pitch at the tune of $4 billion US, fuelled largely by the cosmetic surgery market. One of the problems India has, despite having some world-class hospitals, is sanitation. The tourism industry of India is based on certain core nationalistic ideals and standards which are: Swaagat or welcome, Sahyog or cooperation, Soochanaa or information, Sanrachanaa or infrastructure, Suvidha or facilitation, Safaai or cleanliness and Surakshaa or security.

 

Q. Find the correct statement on the basis of the given passage.  

(A) The tourism industry in our country manages to attract the world tourist.

(B) India has continued to represent a place much sought after for its diversity.

(C) India has potential to emerge as one of the world's tourist hot spots. 

Solution:
QUESTION: 54

India’s tourism industry is experiencing a strong period of growth, driven by the burgeoning Indian middle class, growth in high spending foreign tourists, and coordinated government campaigns to promote ‘Incredible India’. The tourism industry in India is substantial and vibrant, and the country is fast becoming a major global destination. India’s travel and tourism industry is one of them most profitable industries in the country, and also credited with contributing a substantial amount of foreign exchange. This is illustrated by the fact that during 2006, four million tourists visited India and spent US $8.9 billion. Several reasons are cited for the growth and prosperity of India’s travel and tourism industry. Economic growth has added millions annually to the ranks of India’s middle class, a group that is driving domestic tourism growth. Disposable income in India has grown by 10.11% annually from 2001-2006, and much of that is being spent on travel. Thanks in part to its booming IT and outsourcing industry a growing number of business trips are made by foreigners to India, who will often add a weekend break or longer holiday to their trip. Foreign tourists spend more in India than almost any other country worldwide. Tourist arrivals are projected to increase by over 22% per year through till 2010, with a 33% increase in foreign exchange earnings recorded in 2004.

The Tourism Ministry has also played an important role in the development of the industry, initiating advertising campaigns such as the ‘Incredible India’ campaign, which promoted India’s culture and tourist attractions in a fresh and memorable way. The campaign helped create a colorful image of India in the minds of consumers all over the world, and has directly led to an increase in the interest among tourists. The tourism industry has helped growth in other sectors as diverse as horticulture, handicrafts, agriculture, construction and even poultry. Both directly and indirectly, increased tourism in India has created jobs in a variety of related sectors. The numbers tell the story: almost 20 million people are now working in the India’s tourism industry. India’s governmental bodies have also made a significant impact in tourism by requiring that each and every state of India have a corporation to administer support issues related to tourism. A new growth sector is medical tourism. It is currently growing at around 30% per annum.

Medical tourist arrivals are expected to reach one million soon. Medical tourism in Asia has grown rapidly. Medical tourism is approaching fever pitch at the tune of $4 billion US, fuelled largely by the cosmetic surgery market. One of the problems India has, despite having some world-class hospitals, is sanitation. The tourism industry of India is based on certain core nationalistic ideals and standards which are: Swaagat or welcome, Sahyog or cooperation, Soochanaa or information, Sanrachanaa or infrastructure, Suvidha or facilitation, Safaai or cleanliness and Surakshaa or security.

 

Q. Choose the word which is MOST SIMILAR in meaning to the word "cited" as used in the passage?

Solution:
QUESTION: 55

India’s tourism industry is experiencing a strong period of growth, driven by the burgeoning Indian middle class, growth in high spending foreign tourists, and coordinated government campaigns to promote ‘Incredible India’. The tourism industry in India is substantial and vibrant, and the country is fast becoming a major global destination. India’s travel and tourism industry is one of them most profitable industries in the country, and also credited with contributing a substantial amount of foreign exchange. This is illustrated by the fact that during 2006, four million tourists visited India and spent US $8.9 billion. Several reasons are cited for the growth and prosperity of India’s travel and tourism industry. Economic growth has added millions annually to the ranks of India’s middle class, a group that is driving domestic tourism growth. Disposable income in India has grown by 10.11% annually from 2001-2006, and much of that is being spent on travel. Thanks in part to its booming IT and outsourcing industry a growing number of business trips are made by foreigners to India, who will often add a weekend break or longer holiday to their trip. Foreign tourists spend more in India than almost any other country worldwide. Tourist arrivals are projected to increase by over 22% per year through till 2010, with a 33% increase in foreign exchange earnings recorded in 2004.

The Tourism Ministry has also played an important role in the development of the industry, initiating advertising campaigns such as the ‘Incredible India’ campaign, which promoted India’s culture and tourist attractions in a fresh and memorable way. The campaign helped create a colorful image of India in the minds of consumers all over the world, and has directly led to an increase in the interest among tourists. The tourism industry has helped growth in other sectors as diverse as horticulture, handicrafts, agriculture, construction and even poultry. Both directly and indirectly, increased tourism in India has created jobs in a variety of related sectors. The numbers tell the story: almost 20 million people are now working in the India’s tourism industry. India’s governmental bodies have also made a significant impact in tourism by requiring that each and every state of India have a corporation to administer support issues related to tourism. A new growth sector is medical tourism. It is currently growing at around 30% per annum.

Medical tourist arrivals are expected to reach one million soon. Medical tourism in Asia has grown rapidly. Medical tourism is approaching fever pitch at the tune of $4 billion US, fuelled largely by the cosmetic surgery market. One of the problems India has, despite having some world-class hospitals, is sanitation. The tourism industry of India is based on certain core nationalistic ideals and standards which are: Swaagat or welcome, Sahyog or cooperation, Soochanaa or information, Sanrachanaa or infrastructure, Suvidha or facilitation, Safaai or cleanliness and Surakshaa or security.

 

Q. Which of the following statements correctly represent (s) the reason behind the expansion of India's travel and tourism Industry?

Solution:
QUESTION: 56

India’s tourism industry is experiencing a strong period of growth, driven by the burgeoning Indian middle class, growth in high spending foreign tourists, and coordinated government campaigns to promote ‘Incredible India’. The tourism industry in India is substantial and vibrant, and the country is fast becoming a major global destination. India’s travel and tourism industry is one of them most profitable industries in the country, and also credited with contributing a substantial amount of foreign exchange. This is illustrated by the fact that during 2006, four million tourists visited India and spent US $8.9 billion. Several reasons are cited for the growth and prosperity of India’s travel and tourism industry. Economic growth has added millions annually to the ranks of India’s middle class, a group that is driving domestic tourism growth. Disposable income in India has grown by 10.11% annually from 2001-2006, and much of that is being spent on travel. Thanks in part to its booming IT and outsourcing industry a growing number of business trips are made by foreigners to India, who will often add a weekend break or longer holiday to their trip. Foreign tourists spend more in India than almost any other country worldwide. Tourist arrivals are projected to increase by over 22% per year through till 2010, with a 33% increase in foreign exchange earnings recorded in 2004.

The Tourism Ministry has also played an important role in the development of the industry, initiating advertising campaigns such as the ‘Incredible India’ campaign, which promoted India’s culture and tourist attractions in a fresh and memorable way. The campaign helped create a colorful image of India in the minds of consumers all over the world, and has directly led to an increase in the interest among tourists. The tourism industry has helped growth in other sectors as diverse as horticulture, handicrafts, agriculture, construction and even poultry. Both directly and indirectly, increased tourism in India has created jobs in a variety of related sectors. The numbers tell the story: almost 20 million people are now working in the India’s tourism industry. India’s governmental bodies have also made a significant impact in tourism by requiring that each and every state of India have a corporation to administer support issues related to tourism. A new growth sector is medical tourism. It is currently growing at around 30% per annum.

Medical tourist arrivals are expected to reach one million soon. Medical tourism in Asia has grown rapidly. Medical tourism is approaching fever pitch at the tune of $4 billion US, fuelled largely by the cosmetic surgery market. One of the problems India has, despite having some world-class hospitals, is sanitation. The tourism industry of India is based on certain core nationalistic ideals and standards which are: Swaagat or welcome, Sahyog or cooperation, Soochanaa or information, Sanrachanaa or infrastructure, Suvidha or facilitation, Safaai or cleanliness and Surakshaa or security.

 

Q. What is the meaning of the phrase "fever pitch" as used in the passage?

Solution:
QUESTION: 57

India’s tourism industry is experiencing a strong period of growth, driven by the burgeoning Indian middle class, growth in high spending foreign tourists, and coordinated government campaigns to promote ‘Incredible India’. The tourism industry in India is substantial and vibrant, and the country is fast becoming a major global destination. India’s travel and tourism industry is one of them most profitable industries in the country, and also credited with contributing a substantial amount of foreign exchange. This is illustrated by the fact that during 2006, four million tourists visited India and spent US $8.9 billion. Several reasons are cited for the growth and prosperity of India’s travel and tourism industry. Economic growth has added millions annually to the ranks of India’s middle class, a group that is driving domestic tourism growth. Disposable income in India has grown by 10.11% annually from 2001-2006, and much of that is being spent on travel. Thanks in part to its booming IT and outsourcing industry a growing number of business trips are made by foreigners to India, who will often add a weekend break or longer holiday to their trip. Foreign tourists spend more in India than almost any other country worldwide. Tourist arrivals are projected to increase by over 22% per year through till 2010, with a 33% increase in foreign exchange earnings recorded in 2004.

The Tourism Ministry has also played an important role in the development of the industry, initiating advertising campaigns such as the ‘Incredible India’ campaign, which promoted India’s culture and tourist attractions in a fresh and memorable way. The campaign helped create a colorful image of India in the minds of consumers all over the world, and has directly led to an increase in the interest among tourists. The tourism industry has helped growth in other sectors as diverse as horticulture, handicrafts, agriculture, construction and even poultry. Both directly and indirectly, increased tourism in India has created jobs in a variety of related sectors. The numbers tell the story: almost 20 million people are now working in the India’s tourism industry. India’s governmental bodies have also made a significant impact in tourism by requiring that each and every state of India have a corporation to administer support issues related to tourism. A new growth sector is medical tourism. It is currently growing at around 30% per annum.

Medical tourist arrivals are expected to reach one million soon. Medical tourism in Asia has grown rapidly. Medical tourism is approaching fever pitch at the tune of $4 billion US, fuelled largely by the cosmetic surgery market. One of the problems India has, despite having some world-class hospitals, is sanitation. The tourism industry of India is based on certain core nationalistic ideals and standards which are: Swaagat or welcome, Sahyog or cooperation, Soochanaa or information, Sanrachanaa or infrastructure, Suvidha or facilitation, Safaai or cleanliness and Surakshaa or security.

 

Q. Which of the following is false in respect of India's medical tourism?

Solution:
QUESTION: 58

India’s tourism industry is experiencing a strong period of growth, driven by the burgeoning Indian middle class, growth in high spending foreign tourists, and coordinated government campaigns to promote ‘Incredible India’. The tourism industry in India is substantial and vibrant, and the country is fast becoming a major global destination. India’s travel and tourism industry is one of them most profitable industries in the country, and also credited with contributing a substantial amount of foreign exchange. This is illustrated by the fact that during 2006, four million tourists visited India and spent US $8.9 billion. Several reasons are cited for the growth and prosperity of India’s travel and tourism industry. Economic growth has added millions annually to the ranks of India’s middle class, a group that is driving domestic tourism growth. Disposable income in India has grown by 10.11% annually from 2001-2006, and much of that is being spent on travel. Thanks in part to its booming IT and outsourcing industry a growing number of business trips are made by foreigners to India, who will often add a weekend break or longer holiday to their trip. Foreign tourists spend more in India than almost any other country worldwide. Tourist arrivals are projected to increase by over 22% per year through till 2010, with a 33% increase in foreign exchange earnings recorded in 2004.

The Tourism Ministry has also played an important role in the development of the industry, initiating advertising campaigns such as the ‘Incredible India’ campaign, which promoted India’s culture and tourist attractions in a fresh and memorable way. The campaign helped create a colorful image of India in the minds of consumers all over the world, and has directly led to an increase in the interest among tourists. The tourism industry has helped growth in other sectors as diverse as horticulture, handicrafts, agriculture, construction and even poultry. Both directly and indirectly, increased tourism in India has created jobs in a variety of related sectors. The numbers tell the story: almost 20 million people are now working in the India’s tourism industry. India’s governmental bodies have also made a significant impact in tourism by requiring that each and every state of India have a corporation to administer support issues related to tourism. A new growth sector is medical tourism. It is currently growing at around 30% per annum.

Medical tourist arrivals are expected to reach one million soon. Medical tourism in Asia has grown rapidly. Medical tourism is approaching fever pitch at the tune of $4 billion US, fuelled largely by the cosmetic surgery market. One of the problems India has, despite having some world-class hospitals, is sanitation. The tourism industry of India is based on certain core nationalistic ideals and standards which are: Swaagat or welcome, Sahyog or cooperation, Soochanaa or information, Sanrachanaa or infrastructure, Suvidha or facilitation, Safaai or cleanliness and Surakshaa or security.

 

Q. Give a suitable title to the given passage.

Solution:
QUESTION: 59

India’s tourism industry is experiencing a strong period of growth, driven by the burgeoning Indian middle class, growth in high spending foreign tourists, and coordinated government campaigns to promote ‘Incredible India’. The tourism industry in India is substantial and vibrant, and the country is fast becoming a major global destination. India’s travel and tourism industry is one of them most profitable industries in the country, and also credited with contributing a substantial amount of foreign exchange. This is illustrated by the fact that during 2006, four million tourists visited India and spent US $8.9 billion. Several reasons are cited for the growth and prosperity of India’s travel and tourism industry. Economic growth has added millions annually to the ranks of India’s middle class, a group that is driving domestic tourism growth. Disposable income in India has grown by 10.11% annually from 2001-2006, and much of that is being spent on travel. Thanks in part to its booming IT and outsourcing industry a growing number of business trips are made by foreigners to India, who will often add a weekend break or longer holiday to their trip. Foreign tourists spend more in India than almost any other country worldwide. Tourist arrivals are projected to increase by over 22% per year through till 2010, with a 33% increase in foreign exchange earnings recorded in 2004.

The Tourism Ministry has also played an important role in the development of the industry, initiating advertising campaigns such as the ‘Incredible India’ campaign, which promoted India’s culture and tourist attractions in a fresh and memorable way. The campaign helped create a colorful image of India in the minds of consumers all over the world, and has directly led to an increase in the interest among tourists. The tourism industry has helped growth in other sectors as diverse as horticulture, handicrafts, agriculture, construction and even poultry. Both directly and indirectly, increased tourism in India has created jobs in a variety of related sectors. The numbers tell the story: almost 20 million people are now working in the India’s tourism industry. India’s governmental bodies have also made a significant impact in tourism by requiring that each and every state of India have a corporation to administer support issues related to tourism. A new growth sector is medical tourism. It is currently growing at around 30% per annum.

Medical tourist arrivals are expected to reach one million soon. Medical tourism in Asia has grown rapidly. Medical tourism is approaching fever pitch at the tune of $4 billion US, fuelled largely by the cosmetic surgery market. One of the problems India has, despite having some world-class hospitals, is sanitation. The tourism industry of India is based on certain core nationalistic ideals and standards which are: Swaagat or welcome, Sahyog or cooperation, Soochanaa or information, Sanrachanaa or infrastructure, Suvidha or facilitation, Safaai or cleanliness and Surakshaa or security.

 

Q. The author in the given passage is

A) skeptical about the growth of India's medical tourism

B) of the view that lots of efforts can bring about significant changes in India's tour and travel industry.

C) not in favour of investing on various ads 

Solution:
QUESTION: 60

India’s tourism industry is experiencing a strong period of growth, driven by the burgeoning Indian middle class, growth in high spending foreign tourists, and coordinated government campaigns to promote ‘Incredible India’. The tourism industry in India is substantial and vibrant, and the country is fast becoming a major global destination. India’s travel and tourism industry is one of them most profitable industries in the country, and also credited with contributing a substantial amount of foreign exchange. This is illustrated by the fact that during 2006, four million tourists visited India and spent US $8.9 billion. Several reasons are cited for the growth and prosperity of India’s travel and tourism industry. Economic growth has added millions annually to the ranks of India’s middle class, a group that is driving domestic tourism growth. Disposable income in India has grown by 10.11% annually from 2001-2006, and much of that is being spent on travel. Thanks in part to its booming IT and outsourcing industry a growing number of business trips are made by foreigners to India, who will often add a weekend break or longer holiday to their trip. Foreign tourists spend more in India than almost any other country worldwide. Tourist arrivals are projected to increase by over 22% per year through till 2010, with a 33% increase in foreign exchange earnings recorded in 2004.

The Tourism Ministry has also played an important role in the development of the industry, initiating advertising campaigns such as the ‘Incredible India’ campaign, which promoted India’s culture and tourist attractions in a fresh and memorable way. The campaign helped create a colorful image of India in the minds of consumers all over the world, and has directly led to an increase in the interest among tourists. The tourism industry has helped growth in other sectors as diverse as horticulture, handicrafts, agriculture, construction and even poultry. Both directly and indirectly, increased tourism in India has created jobs in a variety of related sectors. The numbers tell the story: almost 20 million people are now working in the India’s tourism industry. India’s governmental bodies have also made a significant impact in tourism by requiring that each and every state of India have a corporation to administer support issues related to tourism. A new growth sector is medical tourism. It is currently growing at around 30% per annum.

Medical tourist arrivals are expected to reach one million soon. Medical tourism in Asia has grown rapidly. Medical tourism is approaching fever pitch at the tune of $4 billion US, fuelled largely by the cosmetic surgery market. One of the problems India has, despite having some world-class hospitals, is sanitation. The tourism industry of India is based on certain core nationalistic ideals and standards which are: Swaagat or welcome, Sahyog or cooperation, Soochanaa or information, Sanrachanaa or infrastructure, Suvidha or facilitation, Safaai or cleanliness and Surakshaa or security.

 

Q. As mentioned in this passage, in order to developing the tourism industry the role of the tourism ministry is

Solution:
QUESTION: 61

India’s tourism industry is experiencing a strong period of growth, driven by the burgeoning Indian middle class, growth in high spending foreign tourists, and coordinated government campaigns to promote ‘Incredible India’. The tourism industry in India is substantial and vibrant, and the country is fast becoming a major global destination. India’s travel and tourism industry is one of them most profitable industries in the country, and also credited with contributing a substantial amount of foreign exchange. This is illustrated by the fact that during 2006, four million tourists visited India and spent US $8.9 billion. Several reasons are cited for the growth and prosperity of India’s travel and tourism industry. Economic growth has added millions annually to the ranks of India’s middle class, a group that is driving domestic tourism growth. Disposable income in India has grown by 10.11% annually from 2001-2006, and much of that is being spent on travel. Thanks in part to its booming IT and outsourcing industry a growing number of business trips are made by foreigners to India, who will often add a weekend break or longer holiday to their trip. Foreign tourists spend more in India than almost any other country worldwide. Tourist arrivals are projected to increase by over 22% per year through till 2010, with a 33% increase in foreign exchange earnings recorded in 2004.

The Tourism Ministry has also played an important role in the development of the industry, initiating advertising campaigns such as the ‘Incredible India’ campaign, which promoted India’s culture and tourist attractions in a fresh and memorable way. The campaign helped create a colorful image of India in the minds of consumers all over the world, and has directly led to an increase in the interest among tourists. The tourism industry has helped growth in other sectors as diverse as horticulture, handicrafts, agriculture, construction and even poultry. Both directly and indirectly, increased tourism in India has created jobs in a variety of related sectors. The numbers tell the story: almost 20 million people are now working in the India’s tourism industry. India’s governmental bodies have also made a significant impact in tourism by requiring that each and every state of India have a corporation to administer support issues related to tourism. A new growth sector is medical tourism. It is currently growing at around 30% per annum.

Medical tourist arrivals are expected to reach one million soon. Medical tourism in Asia has grown rapidly. Medical tourism is approaching fever pitch at the tune of $4 billion US, fuelled largely by the cosmetic surgery market. One of the problems India has, despite having some world-class hospitals, is sanitation. The tourism industry of India is based on certain core nationalistic ideals and standards which are: Swaagat or welcome, Sahyog or cooperation, Soochanaa or information, Sanrachanaa or infrastructure, Suvidha or facilitation, Safaai or cleanliness and Surakshaa or security.

 

Q. Which of the following statement is true about "Incredible India" campaign?

Solution:
QUESTION: 62

Directions (Q. 61–70)  Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it.

 

The last 10 years have seen an extraordinary quantum of interest and debate on the benefits and dangers of modernisation of India’s retail sector, though never has this debate been shriller and more contentious than what has been seen in the past. Unfortunately, no discussion has taken place even once in these years on the importance of the retail sector to India (not only just the 15+ million independent retailers and street hawkers), the need to make the producer to the consumer distribution system more efficient and less wasteful, and how to make these millions of independent retailers not only relevant for tomorrow but actually increase their numbers and enhance the economic and social vibrancy of their vocation. Sadly, much more attention has been misguidedly focused on just one single dimension of modernisation of the distribution and retail infrastructure namely “foreign direct investment”. And most of the rhetoric of recent years has largely been on emotional and sometimes incorrect factual positions.

Private consumption has long been the larger constituent of India’s economy and even today, it accounts for almost 60% of India’s GDP. Of this private consumption, more than 60% is what would constitute what we typically route through retail channels.

The fact is India’s retail story is not a zero sum gain i.e. growth of new, modern, and sometimes larger in scale retail businesses has to come at the expense of decimation of the traditional, independent retail business owners. Even at a real growth of 6% per year and inflation of about 5% for the next 15 years, India’s nominal GDP will be about $8,000 billion in 2026. The size of India’s retail market would have also moved up from about $500 billion in 2011 to about $2,500 billion in 2026.

Traditional retail currently accounts for as much as about $475 billion of this market. Even if modern retail attracts as much as $150 billion in fresh direct and indirect investment (from within India and overseas) over the next 15 years (i.e., $10 billion per year), the size of modern retail business in India is not likely to cross $300-350 billion by 2026, implying that traditional retail will account for as much as $2,150-2,200 billion in revenues (or more than four times of their current size).

Accounting for inflation and some increase in productivity of traditional retailers, it can be very confidently assumed that in the most optimistic of all scenarios as far as investment in modern retail is concerned, the numbers of independent retail outlets in India will more than double by 2026 rather than show any decline whatsoever. If these facts are understood , then what should India be doing to facilitate this retail consumption taking place in a planned, organised manner rather than seeing millions of illegal retail establishments sprouting all over ?

First, our politicians, our bureaucrats, and our urban planners must realise the need and relevance of providing for retail spaces in an integrated, holistic planned way. At the very least, about 10-12 square feet of retail space is needed for every urban inhabitant. Urban agglomerations such as NCR, Greater Mumbai, and Kolkata therefore require at least 200 million square feet each of legalised retail space .

 

Q. Which of the following is/ are the major concern for India's retail sector ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 63

The last 10 years have seen an extraordinary quantum of interest and debate on the benefits and dangers of modernisation of India’s retail sector, though never has this debate been shriller and more contentious than what has been seen in the past. Unfortunately, no discussion has taken place even once in these years on the importance of the retail sector to India (not only just the 15+ million independent retailers and street hawkers), the need to make the producer to the consumer distribution system more efficient and less wasteful, and how to make these millions of independent retailers not only relevant for tomorrow but actually increase their numbers and enhance the economic and social vibrancy of their vocation. Sadly, much more attention has been misguidedly focused on just one single dimension of modernisation of the distribution and retail infrastructure namely “foreign direct investment”. And most of the rhetoric of recent years has largely been on emotional and sometimes incorrect factual positions.

Private consumption has long been the larger constituent of India’s economy and even today, it accounts for almost 60% of India’s GDP. Of this private consumption, more than 60% is what would constitute what we typically route through retail channels.

The fact is India’s retail story is not a zero sum gain i.e. growth of new, modern, and sometimes larger in scale retail businesses has to come at the expense of decimation of the traditional, independent retail business owners. Even at a real growth of 6% per year and inflation of about 5% for the next 15 years, India’s nominal GDP will be about $8,000 billion in 2026. The size of India’s retail market would have also moved up from about $500 billion in 2011 to about $2,500 billion in 2026.

Traditional retail currently accounts for as much as about $475 billion of this market. Even if modern retail attracts as much as $150 billion in fresh direct and indirect investment (from within India and overseas) over the next 15 years (i.e., $10 billion per year), the size of modern retail business in India is not likely to cross $300-350 billion by 2026, implying that traditional retail will account for as much as $2,150-2,200 billion in revenues (or more than four times of their current size).

Accounting for inflation and some increase in productivity of traditional retailers, it can be very confidently assumed that in the most optimistic of all scenarios as far as investment in modern retail is concerned, the numbers of independent retail outlets in India will more than double by 2026 rather than show any decline whatsoever. If these facts are understood , then what should India be doing to facilitate this retail consumption taking place in a planned, organised manner rather than seeing millions of illegal retail establishments sprouting all over ?

First, our politicians, our bureaucrats, and our urban planners must realise the need and relevance of providing for retail spaces in an integrated, holistic planned way. At the very least, about 10-12 square feet of retail space is needed for every urban inhabitant. Urban agglomerations such as NCR, Greater Mumbai, and Kolkata therefore require at least 200 million square feet each of legalised retail space .

 

Q. What has/have been suggested by the author? Answer in the context of the passage.

(A) FDI should allowed only in a few restricted sectors.

(B) New players should not be allowed to invest funds.

(C) There should be proper planning for the developing of retail sectors. 

Solution:
QUESTION: 64

The last 10 years have seen an extraordinary quantum of interest and debate on the benefits and dangers of modernisation of India’s retail sector, though never has this debate been shriller and more contentious than what has been seen in the past. Unfortunately, no discussion has taken place even once in these years on the importance of the retail sector to India (not only just the 15+ million independent retailers and street hawkers), the need to make the producer to the consumer distribution system more efficient and less wasteful, and how to make these millions of independent retailers not only relevant for tomorrow but actually increase their numbers and enhance the economic and social vibrancy of their vocation. Sadly, much more attention has been misguidedly focused on just one single dimension of modernisation of the distribution and retail infrastructure namely “foreign direct investment”. And most of the rhetoric of recent years has largely been on emotional and sometimes incorrect factual positions.

Private consumption has long been the larger constituent of India’s economy and even today, it accounts for almost 60% of India’s GDP. Of this private consumption, more than 60% is what would constitute what we typically route through retail channels.

The fact is India’s retail story is not a zero sum gain i.e. growth of new, modern, and sometimes larger in scale retail businesses has to come at the expense of decimation of the traditional, independent retail business owners. Even at a real growth of 6% per year and inflation of about 5% for the next 15 years, India’s nominal GDP will be about $8,000 billion in 2026. The size of India’s retail market would have also moved up from about $500 billion in 2011 to about $2,500 billion in 2026.

Traditional retail currently accounts for as much as about $475 billion of this market. Even if modern retail attracts as much as $150 billion in fresh direct and indirect investment (from within India and overseas) over the next 15 years (i.e., $10 billion per year), the size of modern retail business in India is not likely to cross $300-350 billion by 2026, implying that traditional retail will account for as much as $2,150-2,200 billion in revenues (or more than four times of their current size).

Accounting for inflation and some increase in productivity of traditional retailers, it can be very confidently assumed that in the most optimistic of all scenarios as far as investment in modern retail is concerned, the numbers of independent retail outlets in India will more than double by 2026 rather than show any decline whatsoever. If these facts are understood , then what should India be doing to facilitate this retail consumption taking place in a planned, organised manner rather than seeing millions of illegal retail establishments sprouting all over ?

First, our politicians, our bureaucrats, and our urban planners must realise the need and relevance of providing for retail spaces in an integrated, holistic planned way. At the very least, about 10-12 square feet of retail space is needed for every urban inhabitant. Urban agglomerations such as NCR, Greater Mumbai, and Kolkata therefore require at least 200 million square feet each of legalised retail space .

 

Q. What does the author mean by 'zero sum gain'?

Solution:
QUESTION: 65

The last 10 years have seen an extraordinary quantum of interest and debate on the benefits and dangers of modernisation of India’s retail sector, though never has this debate been shriller and more contentious than what has been seen in the past. Unfortunately, no discussion has taken place even once in these years on the importance of the retail sector to India (not only just the 15+ million independent retailers and street hawkers), the need to make the producer to the consumer distribution system more efficient and less wasteful, and how to make these millions of independent retailers not only relevant for tomorrow but actually increase their numbers and enhance the economic and social vibrancy of their vocation. Sadly, much more attention has been misguidedly focused on just one single dimension of modernisation of the distribution and retail infrastructure namely “foreign direct investment”. And most of the rhetoric of recent years has largely been on emotional and sometimes incorrect factual positions.

Private consumption has long been the larger constituent of India’s economy and even today, it accounts for almost 60% of India’s GDP. Of this private consumption, more than 60% is what would constitute what we typically route through retail channels.

The fact is India’s retail story is not a zero sum gain i.e. growth of new, modern, and sometimes larger in scale retail businesses has to come at the expense of decimation of the traditional, independent retail business owners. Even at a real growth of 6% per year and inflation of about 5% for the next 15 years, India’s nominal GDP will be about $8,000 billion in 2026. The size of India’s retail market would have also moved up from about $500 billion in 2011 to about $2,500 billion in 2026.

Traditional retail currently accounts for as much as about $475 billion of this market. Even if modern retail attracts as much as $150 billion in fresh direct and indirect investment (from within India and overseas) over the next 15 years (i.e., $10 billion per year), the size of modern retail business in India is not likely to cross $300-350 billion by 2026, implying that traditional retail will account for as much as $2,150-2,200 billion in revenues (or more than four times of their current size).

Accounting for inflation and some increase in productivity of traditional retailers, it can be very confidently assumed that in the most optimistic of all scenarios as far as investment in modern retail is concerned, the numbers of independent retail outlets in India will more than double by 2026 rather than show any decline whatsoever. If these facts are understood , then what should India be doing to facilitate this retail consumption taking place in a planned, organised manner rather than seeing millions of illegal retail establishments sprouting all over ?

First, our politicians, our bureaucrats, and our urban planners must realise the need and relevance of providing for retail spaces in an integrated, holistic planned way. At the very least, about 10-12 square feet of retail space is needed for every urban inhabitant. Urban agglomerations such as NCR, Greater Mumbai, and Kolkata therefore require at least 200 million square feet each of legalised retail space .

 

Q. Which of the following is not contextual according to the passage ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 66

The last 10 years have seen an extraordinary quantum of interest and debate on the benefits and dangers of modernisation of India’s retail sector, though never has this debate been shriller and more contentious than what has been seen in the past. Unfortunately, no discussion has taken place even once in these years on the importance of the retail sector to India (not only just the 15+ million independent retailers and street hawkers), the need to make the producer to the consumer distribution system more efficient and less wasteful, and how to make these millions of independent retailers not only relevant for tomorrow but actually increase their numbers and enhance the economic and social vibrancy of their vocation. Sadly, much more attention has been misguidedly focused on just one single dimension of modernisation of the distribution and retail infrastructure namely “foreign direct investment”. And most of the rhetoric of recent years has largely been on emotional and sometimes incorrect factual positions.

Private consumption has long been the larger constituent of India’s economy and even today, it accounts for almost 60% of India’s GDP. Of this private consumption, more than 60% is what would constitute what we typically route through retail channels.

The fact is India’s retail story is not a zero sum gain i.e. growth of new, modern, and sometimes larger in scale retail businesses has to come at the expense of decimation of the traditional, independent retail business owners. Even at a real growth of 6% per year and inflation of about 5% for the next 15 years, India’s nominal GDP will be about $8,000 billion in 2026. The size of India’s retail market would have also moved up from about $500 billion in 2011 to about $2,500 billion in 2026.

Traditional retail currently accounts for as much as about $475 billion of this market. Even if modern retail attracts as much as $150 billion in fresh direct and indirect investment (from within India and overseas) over the next 15 years (i.e., $10 billion per year), the size of modern retail business in India is not likely to cross $300-350 billion by 2026, implying that traditional retail will account for as much as $2,150-2,200 billion in revenues (or more than four times of their current size).

Accounting for inflation and some increase in productivity of traditional retailers, it can be very confidently assumed that in the most optimistic of all scenarios as far as investment in modern retail is concerned, the numbers of independent retail outlets in India will more than double by 2026 rather than show any decline whatsoever. If these facts are understood , then what should India be doing to facilitate this retail consumption taking place in a planned, organised manner rather than seeing millions of illegal retail establishments sprouting all over ?

First, our politicians, our bureaucrats, and our urban planners must realise the need and relevance of providing for retail spaces in an integrated, holistic planned way. At the very least, about 10-12 square feet of retail space is needed for every urban inhabitant. Urban agglomerations such as NCR, Greater Mumbai, and Kolkata therefore require at least 200 million square feet each of legalised retail space .

 

Q. Choose the word which is MOST OPPOSITE in meaning to the word 'decimation' as used in the passage?

Solution:
QUESTION: 67

The last 10 years have seen an extraordinary quantum of interest and debate on the benefits and dangers of modernisation of India’s retail sector, though never has this debate been shriller and more contentious than what has been seen in the past. Unfortunately, no discussion has taken place even once in these years on the importance of the retail sector to India (not only just the 15+ million independent retailers and street hawkers), the need to make the producer to the consumer distribution system more efficient and less wasteful, and how to make these millions of independent retailers not only relevant for tomorrow but actually increase their numbers and enhance the economic and social vibrancy of their vocation. Sadly, much more attention has been misguidedly focused on just one single dimension of modernisation of the distribution and retail infrastructure namely “foreign direct investment”. And most of the rhetoric of recent years has largely been on emotional and sometimes incorrect factual positions.

Private consumption has long been the larger constituent of India’s economy and even today, it accounts for almost 60% of India’s GDP. Of this private consumption, more than 60% is what would constitute what we typically route through retail channels.

The fact is India’s retail story is not a zero sum gain i.e. growth of new, modern, and sometimes larger in scale retail businesses has to come at the expense of decimation of the traditional, independent retail business owners. Even at a real growth of 6% per year and inflation of about 5% for the next 15 years, India’s nominal GDP will be about $8,000 billion in 2026. The size of India’s retail market would have also moved up from about $500 billion in 2011 to about $2,500 billion in 2026.

Traditional retail currently accounts for as much as about $475 billion of this market. Even if modern retail attracts as much as $150 billion in fresh direct and indirect investment (from within India and overseas) over the next 15 years (i.e., $10 billion per year), the size of modern retail business in India is not likely to cross $300-350 billion by 2026, implying that traditional retail will account for as much as $2,150-2,200 billion in revenues (or more than four times of their current size).

Accounting for inflation and some increase in productivity of traditional retailers, it can be very confidently assumed that in the most optimistic of all scenarios as far as investment in modern retail is concerned, the numbers of independent retail outlets in India will more than double by 2026 rather than show any decline whatsoever. If these facts are understood , then what should India be doing to facilitate this retail consumption taking place in a planned, organised manner rather than seeing millions of illegal retail establishments sprouting all over ?

First, our politicians, our bureaucrats, and our urban planners must realise the need and relevance of providing for retail spaces in an integrated, holistic planned way. At the very least, about 10-12 square feet of retail space is needed for every urban inhabitant. Urban agglomerations such as NCR, Greater Mumbai, and Kolkata therefore require at least 200 million square feet each of legalised retail space .

 

Q. Which of the following is true according to the passage ? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 68

The last 10 years have seen an extraordinary quantum of interest and debate on the benefits and dangers of modernisation of India’s retail sector, though never has this debate been shriller and more contentious than what has been seen in the past. Unfortunately, no discussion has taken place even once in these years on the importance of the retail sector to India (not only just the 15+ million independent retailers and street hawkers), the need to make the producer to the consumer distribution system more efficient and less wasteful, and how to make these millions of independent retailers not only relevant for tomorrow but actually increase their numbers and enhance the economic and social vibrancy of their vocation. Sadly, much more attention has been misguidedly focused on just one single dimension of modernisation of the distribution and retail infrastructure namely “foreign direct investment”. And most of the rhetoric of recent years has largely been on emotional and sometimes incorrect factual positions.

Private consumption has long been the larger constituent of India’s economy and even today, it accounts for almost 60% of India’s GDP. Of this private consumption, more than 60% is what would constitute what we typically route through retail channels.

The fact is India’s retail story is not a zero sum gain i.e. growth of new, modern, and sometimes larger in scale retail businesses has to come at the expense of decimation of the traditional, independent retail business owners. Even at a real growth of 6% per year and inflation of about 5% for the next 15 years, India’s nominal GDP will be about $8,000 billion in 2026. The size of India’s retail market would have also moved up from about $500 billion in 2011 to about $2,500 billion in 2026.

Traditional retail currently accounts for as much as about $475 billion of this market. Even if modern retail attracts as much as $150 billion in fresh direct and indirect investment (from within India and overseas) over the next 15 years (i.e., $10 billion per year), the size of modern retail business in India is not likely to cross $300-350 billion by 2026, implying that traditional retail will account for as much as $2,150-2,200 billion in revenues (or more than four times of their current size).

Accounting for inflation and some increase in productivity of traditional retailers, it can be very confidently assumed that in the most optimistic of all scenarios as far as investment in modern retail is concerned, the numbers of independent retail outlets in India will more than double by 2026 rather than show any decline whatsoever. If these facts are understood , then what should India be doing to facilitate this retail consumption taking place in a planned, organised manner rather than seeing millions of illegal retail establishments sprouting all over ?

First, our politicians, our bureaucrats, and our urban planners must realise the need and relevance of providing for retail spaces in an integrated, holistic planned way. At the very least, about 10-12 square feet of retail space is needed for every urban inhabitant. Urban agglomerations such as NCR, Greater Mumbai, and Kolkata therefore require at least 200 million square feet each of legalised retail space .

 

Q. Choose the word which is MOST OPPOSITE in meaning of the word 'sprouting' as used in the passage?

Solution:
QUESTION: 69

The last 10 years have seen an extraordinary quantum of interest and debate on the benefits and dangers of modernisation of India’s retail sector, though never has this debate been shriller and more contentious than what has been seen in the past. Unfortunately, no discussion has taken place even once in these years on the importance of the retail sector to India (not only just the 15+ million independent retailers and street hawkers), the need to make the producer to the consumer distribution system more efficient and less wasteful, and how to make these millions of independent retailers not only relevant for tomorrow but actually increase their numbers and enhance the economic and social vibrancy of their vocation. Sadly, much more attention has been misguidedly focused on just one single dimension of modernisation of the distribution and retail infrastructure namely “foreign direct investment”. And most of the rhetoric of recent years has largely been on emotional and sometimes incorrect factual positions.

Private consumption has long been the larger constituent of India’s economy and even today, it accounts for almost 60% of India’s GDP. Of this private consumption, more than 60% is what would constitute what we typically route through retail channels.

The fact is India’s retail story is not a zero sum gain i.e. growth of new, modern, and sometimes larger in scale retail businesses has to come at the expense of decimation of the traditional, independent retail business owners. Even at a real growth of 6% per year and inflation of about 5% for the next 15 years, India’s nominal GDP will be about $8,000 billion in 2026. The size of India’s retail market would have also moved up from about $500 billion in 2011 to about $2,500 billion in 2026.

Traditional retail currently accounts for as much as about $475 billion of this market. Even if modern retail attracts as much as $150 billion in fresh direct and indirect investment (from within India and overseas) over the next 15 years (i.e., $10 billion per year), the size of modern retail business in India is not likely to cross $300-350 billion by 2026, implying that traditional retail will account for as much as $2,150-2,200 billion in revenues (or more than four times of their current size).

Accounting for inflation and some increase in productivity of traditional retailers, it can be very confidently assumed that in the most optimistic of all scenarios as far as investment in modern retail is concerned, the numbers of independent retail outlets in India will more than double by 2026 rather than show any decline whatsoever. If these facts are understood , then what should India be doing to facilitate this retail consumption taking place in a planned, organised manner rather than seeing millions of illegal retail establishments sprouting all over ?

First, our politicians, our bureaucrats, and our urban planners must realise the need and relevance of providing for retail spaces in an integrated, holistic planned way. At the very least, about 10-12 square feet of retail space is needed for every urban inhabitant. Urban agglomerations such as NCR, Greater Mumbai, and Kolkata therefore require at least 200 million square feet each of legalised retail space .

 

Q. What is the central idea of the given passage ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 70

The last 10 years have seen an extraordinary quantum of interest and debate on the benefits and dangers of modernisation of India’s retail sector, though never has this debate been shriller and more contentious than what has been seen in the past. Unfortunately, no discussion has taken place even once in these years on the importance of the retail sector to India (not only just the 15+ million independent retailers and street hawkers), the need to make the producer to the consumer distribution system more efficient and less wasteful, and how to make these millions of independent retailers not only relevant for tomorrow but actually increase their numbers and enhance the economic and social vibrancy of their vocation. Sadly, much more attention has been misguidedly focused on just one single dimension of modernisation of the distribution and retail infrastructure namely “foreign direct investment”. And most of the rhetoric of recent years has largely been on emotional and sometimes incorrect factual positions.

Private consumption has long been the larger constituent of India’s economy and even today, it accounts for almost 60% of India’s GDP. Of this private consumption, more than 60% is what would constitute what we typically route through retail channels.

The fact is India’s retail story is not a zero sum gain i.e. growth of new, modern, and sometimes larger in scale retail businesses has to come at the expense of decimation of the traditional, independent retail business owners. Even at a real growth of 6% per year and inflation of about 5% for the next 15 years, India’s nominal GDP will be about $8,000 billion in 2026. The size of India’s retail market would have also moved up from about $500 billion in 2011 to about $2,500 billion in 2026.

Traditional retail currently accounts for as much as about $475 billion of this market. Even if modern retail attracts as much as $150 billion in fresh direct and indirect investment (from within India and overseas) over the next 15 years (i.e., $10 billion per year), the size of modern retail business in India is not likely to cross $300-350 billion by 2026, implying that traditional retail will account for as much as $2,150-2,200 billion in revenues (or more than four times of their current size).

Accounting for inflation and some increase in productivity of traditional retailers, it can be very confidently assumed that in the most optimistic of all scenarios as far as investment in modern retail is concerned, the numbers of independent retail outlets in India will more than double by 2026 rather than show any decline whatsoever. If these facts are understood , then what should India be doing to facilitate this retail consumption taking place in a planned, organised manner rather than seeing millions of illegal retail establishments sprouting all over ?

First, our politicians, our bureaucrats, and our urban planners must realise the need and relevance of providing for retail spaces in an integrated, holistic planned way. At the very least, about 10-12 square feet of retail space is needed for every urban inhabitant. Urban agglomerations such as NCR, Greater Mumbai, and Kolkata therefore require at least 200 million square feet each of legalised retail space .

 

Q. Give a suitable title to the above passage ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 71

The last 10 years have seen an extraordinary quantum of interest and debate on the benefits and dangers of modernisation of India’s retail sector, though never has this debate been shriller and more contentious than what has been seen in the past. Unfortunately, no discussion has taken place even once in these years on the importance of the retail sector to India (not only just the 15+ million independent retailers and street hawkers), the need to make the producer to the consumer distribution system more efficient and less wasteful, and how to make these millions of independent retailers not only relevant for tomorrow but actually increase their numbers and enhance the economic and social vibrancy of their vocation. Sadly, much more attention has been misguidedly focused on just one single dimension of modernisation of the distribution and retail infrastructure namely “foreign direct investment”. And most of the rhetoric of recent years has largely been on emotional and sometimes incorrect factual positions.

Private consumption has long been the larger constituent of India’s economy and even today, it accounts for almost 60% of India’s GDP. Of this private consumption, more than 60% is what would constitute what we typically route through retail channels.

The fact is India’s retail story is not a zero sum gain i.e. growth of new, modern, and sometimes larger in scale retail businesses has to come at the expense of decimation of the traditional, independent retail business owners. Even at a real growth of 6% per year and inflation of about 5% for the next 15 years, India’s nominal GDP will be about $8,000 billion in 2026. The size of India’s retail market would have also moved up from about $500 billion in 2011 to about $2,500 billion in 2026.

Traditional retail currently accounts for as much as about $475 billion of this market. Even if modern retail attracts as much as $150 billion in fresh direct and indirect investment (from within India and overseas) over the next 15 years (i.e., $10 billion per year), the size of modern retail business in India is not likely to cross $300-350 billion by 2026, implying that traditional retail will account for as much as $2,150-2,200 billion in revenues (or more than four times of their current size).

Accounting for inflation and some increase in productivity of traditional retailers, it can be very confidently assumed that in the most optimistic of all scenarios as far as investment in modern retail is concerned, the numbers of independent retail outlets in India will more than double by 2026 rather than show any decline whatsoever. If these facts are understood , then what should India be doing to facilitate this retail consumption taking place in a planned, organised manner rather than seeing millions of illegal retail establishments sprouting all over ?

First, our politicians, our bureaucrats, and our urban planners must realise the need and relevance of providing for retail spaces in an integrated, holistic planned way. At the very least, about 10-12 square feet of retail space is needed for every urban inhabitant. Urban agglomerations such as NCR, Greater Mumbai, and Kolkata therefore require at least 200 million square feet each of legalised retail space .

 

Q. Choose the word which is MOST SIMILAR in meaning to the word 'contentious' as used in the passage?

Solution:
QUESTION: 72

Directions (Q. 71-75) The sentence has two blanks. Choose the words that best fit the meaning of the sentence as a whole.

Roads in rural India___________ built _________ millions of crores of rupees. 

Solution:
QUESTION: 73

____ bad weather conditions in the final match, the batsman ____ the match alive.

Solution:
QUESTION: 74

There is certainty ______ the corporation is coming with a preference ______ higher quality.

Solution:
QUESTION: 75

The Pharma industry in Asia ___ flourished __ the last three decades.

Solution:
QUESTION: 76

Women from poor households ____ included ____ management group.

Solution:
QUESTION: 77

Directions (Q. 76-80) In the following questions, a sentence , split into four parts, has been given. But the parts are in the wrong order. Choose the best order which produces the original sentence out of four alternatives.

 

to dispose off the waste matter (1) / the modernisation would reduce (2) / provide better sanitary facilities (3) / manual labour considerably and would also (4)  

Solution:
QUESTION: 78

In the following questions, a sentence , split into four parts, has been given. But the parts are in the wrong order. Choose the best order which produces the original sentence out of four alternatives.

 

With the sole motive (1) / are engaged in doing home tuitions (2) / of clearing more money (3) / people cutting across professional lines (4)

Solution:
QUESTION: 79

In the following questions, a sentence , split into four parts, has been given. But the parts are in the wrong order. Choose the best order which produces the original sentence out of four alternatives.

 

Sustained and patient effort (1) / takes months or years of (2) / building a community (3) / participation (4).

Solution:
QUESTION: 80

In the following questions, a sentence , split into four parts, has been given. But the parts are in the wrong order. Choose the best order which produces the original sentence out of four alternatives.

 

offer much scope for discussion (1) / when an Indian writer (2) / the problems that arise (3) / uses English as his medium (4)

Solution:
QUESTION: 81

In the following questions, a sentence , split into four parts, has been given. But the parts are in the wrong order. Choose the best order which produces the original sentence out of four alternatives.

 

But it must be realised that (1) / it is true that (2) / this is not because all is well with them (3) / many Delhites do not complain about water shortage (4).

Solution:
QUESTION: 82

Directions (Q. 81-85)  In the following exercise, a sentence is divided into various parts with (/) sign. You have to identify which part of the sentence contains the error. If the sentence is error free, then choose NO Error option.

 

Langar said the work / showed that endothelial cells / could line veins, arteries and lymph tissues.

Solution:
QUESTION: 83

In the following exercise, a sentence is divided into various parts with (/) sign. You have to identify which part of the sentence contains the error. If the sentence is error free, then choose NO Error option.

 

Technical innovations and experiments / with alternative ways of providing infrastructure / indicates the different principals.

Solution:
QUESTION: 84

In the following exercise, a sentence is divided into various parts with (/) sign. You have to identify which part of the sentence contains the error. If the sentence is error free, then choose NO Error option.

 

The aim of Baconian / philosophy was to provide / man with what he required / while he continued to be a man.

Solution:
QUESTION: 85

In the following exercise, a sentence is divided into various parts with (/) sign. You have to identify which part of the sentence contains the error. If the sentence is error free, then choose NO Error option.

 

Bacon fixed his eye / on a mark which was placed / on the earth and hits it in the white.

Solution:
QUESTION: 86

In the following exercise, a sentence is divided into various parts with (/) sign. You have to identify which part of the sentence contains the error. If the sentence is error free, then choose NO Error option.

 

The martyrs who laid down their life / for the freedom of our country /,had a lofty vision of the future.

Solution:
QUESTION: 87

Directions (Q. 86-88) Choose the word which is MOST SIMILAR in meaning ( SYNONYM) from the given options.

Perched

Solution:
QUESTION: 88

Choose the word which is MOST SIMILAR in meaning ( SYNONYM) from the given options.

Derives

Solution:
QUESTION: 89

Choose the word which is MOST SIMILAR in meaning ( SYNONYM) from the given options.

Mendicant

Solution:
QUESTION: 90

Directions (Q. 89-90) Choose the word which is MOST OPPOSITE in meaning (ANTONYM) from the given options.

Steadfastness

Solution:
QUESTION: 91

Choose the word which is MOST OPPOSITE in meaning (ANTONYM) from the given options.

Picturesque

Solution:
QUESTION: 92

Directions (Q. 91-95)  In each of the following questions below are given some statements followed by some conclusions. You have to take the given statements to be true if they seem to be at variance with commonly known facts. Read all the conclusions and then decide which one of the given conclusions logically definitely does not follow:

 

Statements:

All soils are stones.

Some stones are hills.

All mountains are not clouds.

 

Conclusions:

1) Some soils being clouds is a possibility.

2) Some soils are hills is a possibility.

3) No stone is cloud.

4) All mountains being stones is a possibility.

5) No stone is a soil.

Solution:

There is no definite relation between soil and cloud. But the possibility in 1) exists. Hence conclusion l) conclusion 1) follow. Again, All soil are stones (A) + some stones are hills (I) = A + I = No conclusion. But the possibility in 2) exists and the possibility between mountains and stone also exists. Hence conclusion 4) follows Now, All mountains are not clouds (O) some mountains are not clouds (O). So, we can't say no stone is cloud. Hence 3) may follows. Again, All soils are stone (A) — conversion some stones are soils (I). Hence 5) does not follow.

QUESTION: 93

In each of the following questions below are given some statements followed by some conclusions. You have to take the given statements to be true if they seem to be at variance with commonly known facts. Read all the conclusions and then decide which one of the given conclusions logically definitely does not follow:

 

Statements:

Some waters are streams.

All streams are canals. All canals are rivers, Some streams are ponds.

 

Conclusions:

1) All ponds are canals.

2) All canals are pond is a possibility

3) All streams are rivers.

4) All canals are waters is a possibility.

5) All streams are not canals.

Solution:

Some streams are pounds (I) conversion Some pounds are streams (I) + All streams are canals (A) =I+A Some pounds are canals. Thus conclusion l) may follows and possibility in 2) exist. Hence But the conclusion 1) and 2) follow. Again, All streams are canals (A) + All canals are rivers (A) = A + A = A = All stream are rivers (A). Hence 3) follows. Now, Some waters are streams (I) + All streams are canals (A) = I + A = I = Some waters are canals (I). Thus, possibility in 4) exists. Hence 4) follows. From statements second conclusion 5) does not follow.

QUESTION: 94

In each of the following questions below are given some statements followed by some conclusions. You have to take the given statements to be true if they seem to be at variance with commonly known facts. Read all the conclusions and then decide which one of the given conclusions logically definitely does not follow:

 

Statements:

Some trees are forests.

Some forests are animals.

All herbivores are pets.

All animals are not herbivores.

 

Conclusions:

1) Some trees are animals.

2) No pet is a herbivore.

3) Some trees are animals is a possibility.

4) All herbivores being trees is a possibility.

5) All forest being animals is a possibility.

Solution:

From statements first and second. Some trees are forest (I)+ Some forests are animals (I)=I+I = No conclusion. But 1) may follows and possibility in 3) exists. Hence conclusion 1) and 3) follow. Again, all herbivores are pets (A) – conversion – Some pets are herbivores (I). Hence conclusion 2) does not follow. From statements second possibility in 5) exist. Hence 5) follows. And possibility in 4) also follows.

QUESTION: 95

In each of the following questions below are given some statements followed by some conclusions. You have to take the given statements to be true if they seem to be at variance with commonly known facts. Read all the conclusions and then decide which one of the given conclusions logically definitely does not follow:

 

Statements:

Some buses are trains.

Some trains are metroes.

Some metroes are smarts.

All smarts are electronic vans.

 

Conclusions:

1) No electronic van is a smart.

2) Some metroes are electronic vans.

3) Some trains being electronic vans is a possibility.

4) Some electronic vans are buses is a possibility

5) Some trains are buses.

Solution:

Some metroes are Smart (I)+ All smart are electronic vans (A)= I+A=I= Some metroes are electronic vans (I). Hence conclusion 2) follows. But from statement four conclusion 2) follows. But from statement four conclusion 1) does not follow. There is no negative statements. So possibility in 3) and 4) exist. Hence conclusion 3) and 4) follow. Again, conclusion 5) follows from statement first.

QUESTION: 96

In each of the following questions below are given some statements followed by some conclusions. You have to take the given statements to be true if they seem to be at variance with commonly known facts. Read all the conclusions and then decide which one of the given conclusions logically definitely does not follow:

 

Statements:

All apples are oranges.

All apples are not papayas.

Some papayas are guavas.

Some oranges are sweets.

 

Conclusions:

l) All apples being sweets is a possibility.

2) All guavas are sweets

3) All sweets being guavas is a possibility.

4) Some papayas are not apples.

5) No orange is sweet.

Solution:

All apples are oranges (A)-conversion – some oranges are apples (I)+ All apples are not papayas (O)-conversion – some apples are not papayas (O)=I+O= No conclusion. So, the possibilities in 1) and 3)exist. And conclusion 2) and 4) may follow. Again, conclusion 5) does not follow from statement four.

QUESTION: 97

Directions (Q. 96 -100) Study the following information carefully and answer the given questions.

 

Eight Friends Parkash, Qartar, Ram, Sooraj, Takshay, Vanketesh, Wasir and Zubaid out of whom one is a pilot, professor, businessman, doctor, lawyer, banker, cricketer or an architect (but not necessarily in the same order) are sitting around a circular table facing the center. Sooraj who is a banker sits third to right of Zubaid.

The professor and the architect are immediate neighbors of each other. Neither the professor nor the architect is an immediate neighbor of either Zubaid or Sooraj.Cricketer and the pilot are immediate neighbors of each other. Neither Zubaid nor Wasir is a pilot. The one who is a professor sits second to the right of Takshay who is a lawyer. Vanketesh who is a cricketer is not an immediate neighbor of the banker. Only Ram sits between the professor and the doctor. Parkash sits third to the right of the pilot.

 

Q. Which of the following pairs represents the immediate neighbors of the doctor?

Solution:

QUESTION: 98

Eight Friends Parkash, Qartar, Ram, Sooraj, Takshay, Vanketesh, Wasir and Zubaid out of whom one is a pilot, professor, businessman, doctor, lawyer, banker, cricketer or an architect (but not necessarily in the same order) are sitting around a circular table facing the center. Sooraj who is a banker sits third to right of Zubaid.

The professor and the architect are immediate neighbors of each other. Neither the professor nor the architect is an immediate neighbor of either Zubaid or Sooraj.Cricketer and the pilot are immediate neighbors of each other. Neither Zubaid nor Wasir is a pilot. The one who is a professor sits second to the right of Takshay who is a lawyer. Vanketesh who is a cricketer is not an immediate neighbor of the banker. Only Ram sits between the professor and the doctor. Parkash sits third to the right of the pilot.

 

 Q. What is the position of the businessman with respect to the pilot?   

Solution:

QUESTION: 99

Eight Friends Parkash, Qartar, Ram, Sooraj, Takshay, Vanketesh, Wasir and Zubaid out of whom one is a pilot, professor, businessman, doctor, lawyer, banker, cricketer or an architect (but not necessarily in the same order) are sitting around a circular table facing the center. Sooraj who is a banker sits third to right of Zubaid.

The professor and the architect are immediate neighbors of each other. Neither the professor nor the architect is an immediate neighbor of either Zubaid or Sooraj.Cricketer and the pilot are immediate neighbors of each other. Neither Zubaid nor Wasir is a pilot. The one who is a professor sits second to the right of Takshay who is a lawyer. Vanketesh who is a cricketer is not an immediate neighbor of the banker. Only Ram sits between the professor and the doctor. Parkash sits third to the right of the pilot.

 

 Q. Who sits third to the right of the professor?  

Solution:
QUESTION: 100

Eight Friends Parkash, Qartar, Ram, Sooraj, Takshay, Vanketesh, Wasir and Zubaid out of whom one is a pilot, professor, businessman, doctor, lawyer, banker, cricketer or an architect (but not necessarily in the same order) are sitting around a circular table facing the center. Sooraj who is a banker sits third to right of Zubaid.

The professor and the architect are immediate neighbors of each other. Neither the professor nor the architect is an immediate neighbor of either Zubaid or Sooraj.Cricketer and the pilot are immediate neighbors of each other. Neither Zubaid nor Wasir is a pilot. The one who is a professor sits second to the right of Takshay who is a lawyer. Vanketesh who is a cricketer is not an immediate neighbor of the banker. Only Ram sits between the professor and the doctor. Parkash sits third to the right of the pilot.

 

Q. Which of the following is true regarding Ram?

Solution:

QUESTION: 101

Eight Friends Parkash, Qartar, Ram, Sooraj, Takshay, Vanketesh, Wasir and Zubaid out of whom one is a pilot, professor, businessman, doctor, lawyer, banker, cricketer or an architect (but not necessarily in the same order) are sitting around a circular table facing the center. Sooraj who is a banker sits third to right of Zubaid.

The professor and the architect are immediate neighbors of each other. Neither the professor nor the architect is an immediate neighbor of either Zubaid or Sooraj.Cricketer and the pilot are immediate neighbors of each other. Neither Zubaid nor Wasir is a pilot. The one who is a professor sits second to the right of Takshay who is a lawyer. Vanketesh who is a cricketer is not an immediate neighbor of the banker. Only Ram sits between the professor and the doctor. Parkash sits third to the right of the pilot.

 

Q. How many people sit between the Banker and Wasir when counted in anti - clockwise direction from the banker?

Solution:

QUESTION: 102

Directions (Q. 101 -105) Read the following information carefully to answer the given questions

 

(i) Akram, Bakhtawar, Changez, Dayud, Ekam, Farah, Gulrejr and Humayun are seated in straight line facing north.

(ii) Changez sits fourth to the left of Gulrej. Dayud sits second to right of Gulrej.

(iii) Only two people sit between Dayud and Akram. Bakhtawar and Farah sits adjacent to each other.

(iv) Humayun is not an immediate neighbor of Dayud.

 

Q. Who among the following sits exactly in the middle of the persons who sit fifth from the left and the person who sits sixth from the right?

Solution:

QUESTION: 103

(i) Akram, Bakhtawar, Changez, Dayud, Ekam, Farah, Gulrejr and Humayun are seated in straight line facing north.

(ii) Changez sits fourth to the left of Gulrej. Dayud sits second to right of Gulrej.

(iii) Only two people sit between Dayud and Akram. Bakhtawar and Farah sits adjacent to each other.

(iv) Humayun is not an immediate neighbor of Dayud.

 

Q. Who among the following sits third to the right of Changez?

Solution:

QUESTION: 104

(i) Akram, Bakhtawar, Changez, Dayud, Ekam, Farah, Gulrejr and Humayun are seated in straight line facing north.

(ii) Changez sits fourth to the left of Gulrej. Dayud sits second to right of Gulrej.

(iii) Only two people sit between Dayud and Akram. Bakhtawar and Farah sits adjacent to each other.

(iv) Humayun is not an immediate neighbor of Dayud.

 

Q. Which of the following represents persons seated at the two extreme ends of the line?

Solution:

QUESTION: 105

(i) Akram, Bakhtawar, Changez, Dayud, Ekam, Farah, Gulrejr and Humayun are seated in straight line facing north.

(ii) Changez sits fourth to the left of Gulrej. Dayud sits second to right of Gulrej.

(iii) Only two people sit between Dayud and Akram. Bakhtawar and Farah sits adjacent to each other.

(iv) Humayun is not an immediate neighbor of Dayud.

 

Q. What is the position of Humayun with respect to Farah?

Solution:

QUESTION: 106

(i) Akram, Bakhtawar, Changez, Dayud, Ekam, Farah, Gulrejr and Humayun are seated in straight line facing north.

(ii) Changez sits fourth to the left of Gulrej. Dayud sits second to right of Gulrej.

(iii) Only two people sit between Dayud and Akram. Bakhtawar and Farah sits adjacent to each other.

(iv) Humayun is not an immediate neighbor of Dayud.

 

Q. How many persons are seated between Akram and Ekam?

Solution:

QUESTION: 107

Directions (Q. 106- 110) Read the following information carefully to answer the given questions.

 

Seven persons namely Paramjit, Tarun, Morya, Jeeva, Vaani, Ram and Waqar are good friends and are studying in M.Com, M.A. and M.Sc courses. Three are doing M.Com, two are in M.A. and another two are in M.Sc. Each of them has a very distinct and favorite color choice ranging from blue, red, yellow, white, black, pink and brown but not necessarily in the same order. None doing M.Com like either red or black. Morya is doing M.A. and he likes blue. Ram is doing M.Sc and likes brown. Jeeva is doing M.Com and likes yellow. Paramjit who does not like red is in the same discipline of Ram. Tarun is in the same discipline of Morya. Vaani does not like pink.

 

Q. Which among the following groups is doing M. Com?

Solution:
QUESTION: 108

Seven persons namely Paramjit, Tarun, Morya, Jeeva, Vaani, Ram and Waqar are good friends and are studying in M.Com, M.A. and M.Sc courses. Three are doing M.Com, two are in M.A. and another two are in M.Sc. Each of them has a very distinct and favorite color choice ranging from blue, red, yellow, white, black, pink and brown but not necessarily in the same order. None doing M.Com like either red or black. Morya is doing M.A. and he likes blue. Ram is doing M.Sc and likes brown. Jeeva is doing M.Com and likes yellow. Paramjit who does not like red is in the same discipline of Ram. Tarun is in the same discipline of Morya. Vaani does not like pink.

 

Q. What is the color combination choice of those who are in M.Sc discipline?

Solution:
QUESTION: 109

Seven persons namely Paramjit, Tarun, Morya, Jeeva, Vaani, Ram and Waqar are good friends and are studying in M.Com, M.A. and M.Sc courses. Three are doing M.Com, two are in M.A. and another two are in M.Sc. Each of them has a very distinct and favorite color choice ranging from blue, red, yellow, white, black, pink and brown but not necessarily in the same order. None doing M.Com like either red or black. Morya is doing M.A. and he likes blue. Ram is doing M.Sc and likes brown. Jeeva is doing M.Com and likes yellow. Paramjit who does not like red is in the same discipline of Ram. Tarun is in the same discipline of Morya. Vaani does not like pink.

 

 Q. Which color does Vaani like?

Solution:
QUESTION: 110

Seven persons namely Paramjit, Tarun, Morya, Jeeva, Vaani, Ram and Waqar are good friends and are studying in M.Com, M.A. and M.Sc courses. Three are doing M.Com, two are in M.A. and another two are in M.Sc. Each of them has a very distinct and favorite color choice ranging from blue, red, yellow, white, black, pink and brown but not necessarily in the same order. None doing M.Com like either red or black. Morya is doing M.A. and he likes blue. Ram is doing M.Sc and likes brown. Jeeva is doing M.Com and likes yellow. Paramjit who does not like red is in the same discipline of Ram. Tarun is in the same discipline of Morya. Vaani does not like pink.

 

 Q. What is the color combination choice of those who are in M.A. discipline?

Solution:
QUESTION: 111

Seven persons namely Paramjit, Tarun, Morya, Jeeva, Vaani, Ram and Waqar are good friends and are studying in M.Com, M.A. and M.Sc courses. Three are doing M.Com, two are in M.A. and another two are in M.Sc. Each of them has a very distinct and favorite color choice ranging from blue, red, yellow, white, black, pink and brown but not necessarily in the same order. None doing M.Com like either red or black. Morya is doing M.A. and he likes blue. Ram is doing M.Sc and likes brown. Jeeva is doing M.Com and likes yellow. Paramjit who does not like red is in the same discipline of Ram. Tarun is in the same discipline of Morya. Vaani does not like pink.

 

Q. Morya is related with which discipline?

Solution:
QUESTION: 112

Anita is 24. She is twice as old Bala was, when she was as old as Bala is now. What is Bala's present age?

Solution:

Let x = Anita's age now. = Difference between their ages NOW is 24-x. 24 - x years ago, Bala was a years old, while Anita was x-(24-x) = 2x - 24. During that time, x = 2(2x-24), or x = 4x - 48, or 3x = 48, or x = 16. Thus Anita is 16 years old now.

QUESTION: 113

Today is Saurabh's birthday. One year from today he will be twice as old as he was 10 years ago. How old is Saurabh today?

Solution:

21 years. One year from today he will be 22, and twice as old as he was 10 years ago, i.e. when he was 11.

QUESTION: 114

Chinku is twice as old as Guddu and four years older than kittu. kittu is eight. How old is Guddu?

Solution:

6 years

QUESTION: 115

The ages of Mohani, Rohani and Sohani total 47 years. what was the total of their ages three years ago?

Solution:

38 years

QUESTION: 116

Three years ago, Rashmi was 5 years older than Diwan. what is the difference between their ages today?

Solution:

5 years. The difference in their ages will always remain the same.

QUESTION: 117

Directions (Q. 116-120)  A number arrangement machine when given an input line of numbers rearranges them following a particular rule in each step. The following is an illustration of input and rearrangement.

Input : where age 42 earn 17 Money in daddy 7 9

 

Step I : age when 42 earn 17 Money in daddy 7 9

Step II : age 42 we earn 17 Money in daddy 7 9

Step III : age 42 earn we 17 Money in daddy 7 9

Step IV : age 42 earn 7 we 17 Money in daddy 9

Step V : age 42 earn 7 in we 17 Money daddy 9

Step VI : age 42 earn 7 in daddy we 17 Money 9

Step VII : age 42 earn 7 in 17 daddy we Money 9

Step VIII : age 42 earn 7 in 17 daddy 9 we Money

Step IX : age 42 earn 7 in 17 daddy 9 Money we

 

Step IX is the last step.

 

Q. If the following is the II nd step of an input what will be Vth step?

Step II : After 89 she 38 wins 11 Olympic 22 the 7

Solution:
QUESTION: 118

Input : where age 42 earn 17 Money in daddy 7 9

 

Step I : age when 42 earn 17 Money in daddy 7 9

Step II : age 42 we earn 17 Money in daddy 7 9

Step III : age 42 earn we 17 Money in daddy 7 9

Step IV : age 42 earn 7 we 17 Money in daddy 9

Step V : age 42 earn 7 in we 17 Money daddy 9

Step VI : age 42 earn 7 in daddy we 17 Money 9

Step VII : age 42 earn 7 in 17 daddy we Money 9

Step VIII : age 42 earn 7 in 17 daddy 9 we Money

Step IX : age 42 earn 7 in 17 daddy 9 Money we

 

Step IX is the last step.

 

Q. Which of the following is the last step for the Input ‘eat 9 fast icecream 22 3 umbrella cat 5’?

Solution:
QUESTION: 119

Input : where age 42 earn 17 Money in daddy 7 9

 

Step I : age when 42 earn 17 Money in daddy 7 9

Step II : age 42 we earn 17 Money in daddy 7 9

Step III : age 42 earn we 17 Money in daddy 7 9

Step IV : age 42 earn 7 we 17 Money in daddy 9

Step V : age 42 earn 7 in we 17 Money daddy 9

Step VI : age 42 earn 7 in daddy we 17 Money 9

Step VII : age 42 earn 7 in 17 daddy we Money 9

Step VIII : age 42 earn 7 in 17 daddy 9 we Money

Step IX : age 42 earn 7 in 17 daddy 9 Money we

 

Step IX is the last step.

 

Q. Which step will be the last step for the Input ‘elephant 17 free open 41 27 danger 15’?

Solution:
QUESTION: 120

Input : where age 42 earn 17 Money in daddy 7 9

 

Step I : age when 42 earn 17 Money in daddy 7 9

Step II : age 42 we earn 17 Money in daddy 7 9

Step III : age 42 earn we 17 Money in daddy 7 9

Step IV : age 42 earn 7 we 17 Money in daddy 9

Step V : age 42 earn 7 in we 17 Money daddy 9

Step VI : age 42 earn 7 in daddy we 17 Money 9

Step VII : age 42 earn 7 in 17 daddy we Money 9

Step VIII : age 42 earn 7 in 17 daddy 9 we Money

Step IX : age 42 earn 7 in 17 daddy 9 Money we

 

Step IX is the last step.

 

Q. Which word/number will be at 4th from the left in step V for the given input in above question? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 121

Input : where age 42 earn 17 Money in daddy 7 9

 

Step I : age when 42 earn 17 Money in daddy 7 9

Step II : age 42 we earn 17 Money in daddy 7 9

Step III : age 42 earn we 17 Money in daddy 7 9

Step IV : age 42 earn 7 we 17 Money in daddy 9

Step V : age 42 earn 7 in we 17 Money daddy 9

Step VI : age 42 earn 7 in daddy we 17 Money 9

Step VII : age 42 earn 7 in 17 daddy we Money 9

Step VIII : age 42 earn 7 in 17 daddy 9 we Money

Step IX : age 42 earn 7 in 17 daddy 9 Money we

 

Step IX is the last step.

 

Q. Which word/number will be 3rd to the right of ‘41’ in step IV for the given input in Q. 3?

Solution:
QUESTION: 122

P's father is Q's son .M is the paternal uncle of P and N is the brother of Q. How is N related to M?

Solution:

None of the above

QUESTION: 123

B is the husband of P. Q is the only grandson of E, Who is wife of D and mother-in-law of P. How is B related to D?

Solution:

QUESTION: 124

A retiring President was asked who would succeed him as head of the firm , and he replied ,"The father of my successor is my father's son, but I have no brothers or sons". Who will succeed him ?

Solution:

His Daughter

QUESTION: 125

Looking at a portrait, a man said ,"That man's father is my father's son. Brothers and Sisters I have none." At whose portrait was the man looking ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 126

Pointing to the lady in the photograph , Seema said, "Her son's father is the son-in-law of my mother." How is Seema related to the lady?

Solution:
QUESTION: 127

Directions(Q. 126 – 130)  In the following questions two statements (A) and (B) are given. These statements may be either independent causes or may be effects of independent causes or a common cause. One of these statements may be the effect of the other statement. Read both the statements and decide which of the following answer choice correctly depicts the relationship between these two statements.

 

A. The local administration announces to block many roads of the town for one day owing to influx of many pilgrims.

B. Many schools of the town declared holiday on the day. Pilgrims came to the town.

Solution:

Both the statements (A) and (B) are effect of some common causes.

QUESTION: 128

In the following questions two statements (A) and (B) are given. These statements may be either independent causes or may be effects of independent causes or a common cause. One of these statements may be the effect of the other statement. Read both the statements and decide which of the following answer choice correctly depicts the relationship between these two statements.

 

A. The prices of vegetables have reduced considerably during the past two weeks.

B. The prices of foodgrains have reduced considerably during the past two weeks.

Solution:
QUESTION: 129

In the following questions two statements (A) and (B) are given. These statements may be either independent causes or may be effects of independent causes or a common cause. One of these statements may be the effect of the other statement. Read both the statements and decide which of the following answer choice correctly depicts the relationship between these two statements.

 

A. The employees of an union of an organizations have appealed to its members to give their best to boost production in the coming months.

B. The management of an organization has announced productivity linked bonus for its employees.

Solution:
QUESTION: 130

In the following questions two statements (A) and (B) are given. These statements may be either independent causes or may be effects of independent causes or a common cause. One of these statements may be the effect of the other statement. Read both the statements and decide which of the following answer choice correctly depicts the relationship between these two statements.

 

A. The production of wheat during the current year breaks all the past records.

B. The production of wheat in last year was much less than the production in the previous year.

Solution:
QUESTION: 131

In the following questions two statements (A) and (B) are given. These statements may be either independent causes or may be effects of independent causes or a common cause. One of these statements may be the effect of the other statement. Read both the statements and decide which of the following answer choice correctly depicts the relationship between these two statements.

 

A. The large shareholders of the company decided to buy the share of small shareholders.

B. The company is suffering loss for the last three quarters.

Solution:
QUESTION: 132

Directions(Q. 131 – 135)  Each of the following questions below consists of a question and two statements numbered I and II given below it. You have to decide whether the data provided in the statements are sufficient to answer the question.

 

Q. What is the difference in the age of Paarth and Keshav?

I. Paarth is 20 years older than Mohan

II. Mohan is 2 years younger than Zorawar

Solution:

Relation between Paarth and Keshav can not be established with the help of both Statements I and II. So, both the statements are not sufficient to answer the question.

QUESTION: 133

The sum of ages of Manak, Neesha and Opendar is 50 years. What is Neesha's age?

I. Neesha is 10 year older than Manak

II. Opendar is 30 year old

Solution:

As given in the Question, M + N + O = 50 yr N = M + 10 So, Now solve the equation M + N + O = 50 M + (M + 10) + 30 = 50 2 M + 40 = 50

2M = 50 - 40

2M = 10

M = 10/2

M = 5

N = M + 10 N = 5 + 10 N = 15 So, both statements are required to answer the question.

QUESTION: 134

How many students are there in the class?

I. There are more than 20 but less than that 27 students in the class.

II. There are more than 24 but less than 31 students in the class. The number of students in the class can be divided into groups such that each group contains 5 students.

Solution:

From Statement I Number of Students in class = 21 or 22 or 23 or 24 or 25 or 26 From Statement II Number of Students in class = 25 or 26 or 27 or 28 or 29 or 30 Since, number of students can be divided into groups of 5 students, therefore number of students must be multiple of 5. Number of students in the class = 25 or 30 On combining Statements I and II Number of students in the class = 25 Hence, the data in both the Statement I and II together are necessary to answer the question.

QUESTION: 135

Among five friends - Jatin, Kalu, Lucky, Manish and Naresh each of a different height, who is the second tallest?

I. Naresh is taller than Manish and Kalu. Kalu is shorter than Manish.

II. Lucky is taller than Naresh. Jatin is not the tallest.

Solution:

From Statement I Naresh > Manish > Kalu From Statement II Lucky > Naresh From both the Statements Lucky > Naresh > Manish > Kalu But height of Jatin is not clear. Thus, second tallest friend can't be determined. Hence, data neither in Statement I nor in Statement II are sufficient to answer the question.

QUESTION: 136

How is 'call' written in a code language?

I. 'call me back' is written as '531' in that code language.

II. 'you can call me any time' is written as '94163' in that code language

Solution:

Both the statements are not sufficient.

QUESTION: 137

Directions (Q.136-140)  Study the information carefully and answer the questions given below:

In a certain code language 'jo bi la de’ stands for ‘top school produces winner’; ‘cr la tu fy’ stands for ‘winner in every form’; ‘fy cr hr ek’ stands for ‘every college in area’; ‘mu de cr ek’ stands for ‘every school area secured’.

 

Q. Which of the following word stands for 'college'?

Solution:

School-de

Every-cr

Area-ek 

Secured-mu

In-fy

College-hr

Winner-la

Form-tu

Top/Produces-jo/bi

 

QUESTION: 138

In a certain code language 'jo bi la de’ stands for ‘top school produces winner’; ‘cr la tu fy’ stands for ‘winner in every form’; ‘fy cr hr ek’ stands for ‘every college in area’; ‘mu de cr ek’ stands for ‘every school area secured’.

 

Q. What does 'fy' stands for?

Solution:

School-de

Every-cr

Area-ek 

Secured-mu

In-fy

College-hr

Winner-la

Form-tu

Top/Produces-jo/bi

QUESTION: 139

In a certain code language 'jo bi la de’ stands for ‘top school produces winner’; ‘cr la tu fy’ stands for ‘winner in every form’; ‘fy cr hr ek’ stands for ‘every college in area’; ‘mu de cr ek’ stands for ‘every school area secured’.

 

Q. What is the code for "winner form university"?