IBPS PO Mock Test - 2


200 Questions MCQ Test IBPS PO - Mock Tests for Exam and Past Year Papers | IBPS PO Mock Test - 2


Description
This mock test of IBPS PO Mock Test - 2 for Banking Exams helps you for every Banking Exams entrance exam. This contains 200 Multiple Choice Questions for Banking Exams IBPS PO Mock Test - 2 (mcq) to study with solutions a complete question bank. The solved questions answers in this IBPS PO Mock Test - 2 quiz give you a good mix of easy questions and tough questions. Banking Exams students definitely take this IBPS PO Mock Test - 2 exercise for a better result in the exam. You can find other IBPS PO Mock Test - 2 extra questions, long questions & short questions for Banking Exams on EduRev as well by searching above.
QUESTION: 1

What will come in place of question mark ‘?’

Solution:

Apply BODMAS Rule

QUESTION: 2

Solution:

('of' is equivalent to 'X')

QUESTION: 3

 then find the value of x

Solution:

Simplifying both sides

X=13/22

QUESTION: 4

Solution:

=

QUESTION: 5

Solution:

Factorizing 74088 = 7 × 7 × 7 × 3 × 3 × 3 × 2 × 2 × 2

 

7 x 3 x 2 = 42

QUESTION: 6

Solution:

QUESTION: 7

Simplify

Solution:

QUESTION: 8

Solution:

Given expression is in the form    where a = 137, b = 133

QUESTION: 9

Solution:

QUESTION: 10

Solution:

This is of the form  

QUESTION: 11

Directions (Questions.11-15)Answer the questions based on the line graph given below.

Q.

In how many of the given years were the exports more than the imports for company A?

Solution:

export is more than import => export to import ratio is greater than 1.From the graph it is clear that for company A, in the years 1995,1996 and 1997 export is more than import.

QUESTION: 12

Answer the question based on the line graph given below.

Q.

In which year(s) was the difference between import and export of the company B is maximum?

Solution:

Only ratio is given. For getting the difference amount of export or import is needed. So ,difference cannot be determined.

QUESTION: 13

Answer the question based on the line graph given below.

Q.

If the export of the company A in 1998 were Rs.237 crores, what was the amount of import in that year?

Solution:

Let the amount of A imports of Company A in 1998 be Rs.x crores  Then, (237/x )= 0.75 => x = 316.

QUESTION: 14

Answer the question based on the line graph given below.

Q.

If the import of company A in 1997 were increased by 40%,what would be the ratio of export to the increased import?

Solution:

In 1997 for Company A we have :E/I= 1.75 => E=1.75I(read E=Export and I=Import) Now required import I’=I+I *40/100 =1.4I New ratio E/I’ = 1.75I / 1.4I =1.25

QUESTION: 15

Answer the question based on the line graph given below.

Q.

In 1995, the export of company A was double that of company B. If the import of company A during the year was Rs.180 crores, what was the approximate imports of the company B during that year?

Solution:

In 1995 for company !,E!/I!=1.75………..(i)

For company B, EB/IB=0.75………….(ii) Given EA=2EB.............................................(iii) Substitute IA=Rs.180 crores in  (i) we get EA= Rs.315 crores.

Substituting value of EA  in (iii) we get

EB=Rs. 315/2 crores

IB= EB/ 0.75 = Rs.210 crores.

QUESTION: 16

If x:y=5:2,then (8x+9y): (8x+2y) is:

Solution:

x/y=5/2 => x=(5/2)y, substitute value of x in  (8x+9y): (8x+2y) we get y(20+9): y(20+2)=29:22

QUESTION: 17

A and B are two alloys of gold and copper prepared by melting metals in the ratio7:2 and 7:11 respectively. If the equal quantities of alloys are melted to form a third alloy C, what is the ratio of gold and copper in C?

Solution:

Gold in C=( 7/9 + 7/18) units=7/6 units.
Copper in C= ( 2/9 + 11/18) units=5/6 units.
Gold: Copper=7/6:5/6=7:5

QUESTION: 18

A bag contains 2 red,  3 green and 2 blue balls. Two balls are drawn at random. What is the probability that none of the drawn ball is blue?

Solution:

Possible out comes(E) or Favourable outcomes are

E1.2 red ball             or

E2.2 green ball            or

E3.1 red and 1 green

Number of selecting 2 balls from two red balls n(E)=2C2=1

Number of ways of selecting 2 balls from 3 green balls n(E2)= 3C2=3

Number of ways of selecting 1 red ball and 1 green ball n(E3)= 2C1*3C1=2*3=6

Sample space S=Number of ways of selecting 2 balls from 7(2+3+2) balls n(S)=7C2=21

n(E)=n(E1)+ n(E2)+ n(E3)=1+3+6=10

Required probability P(E)=n(E)/n(S)=10/21

QUESTION: 19

Two cards are drawn at random from a pack of 52 cards.What is the probability that either both are black or both are queens?

Solution:

Total number of possible ways selecting 2 card from 52 cards is 

n(S)=52C2=(52*51)/(2*1)=1326

Let A be event of getting both black card.

B be event of getting both queens.

Event of getting two black queens A∩B

There are 26 black cards in a pack and 4 queens. Two queens are black

n(A)=Number of ways of selecting  2 blacks from 26 cards=26C2=325

n(B)=Number of ways of selecting 2 queens from 4 cards =4C2=6

n(A∩B)=Chances of getting 2 black queens=2C2=1

P(A)=325/1326
P(B)=6/1326
P(A∩B)=1/1326
P(A∪B)=P(A)+P(B)-P(A∩B)

=(325/1326)+(6/1326)-(1/1326) = 330/1326 =55/221

QUESTION: 20

How many word can be formed using all the letters of the word DAUGHTER so that vowels always come together?

Solution:

There are 8 different letters in the given word, but it is given that vowels should come together.

Treat vowels as a single entity ‘AUE’ So total number of letters is 5 different letters+ vowel entity=6

Total arrangement possible using 6 letters=6P6=6!=720

Vowels can be arranged in 3P3 ways. 3P3=6

Total number of arrangement=720*6=4320

QUESTION: 21

The Bar graph provided below gives the sales of books from six branches of a publishing company during two consecutive years 2000 and 2001.Answer the question based on this graph.

Q.

Total sales of branches B1, B3 and B5 together for both the years (in thousand numbers)is

Solution:

Total sales of branches B1, B3 and B5 for both the years (in thousand numbers) = (80 + 105) + (95 + 110) + (75+ 95) = 560.

QUESTION: 22

The Bar graph provided below gives the sales of books from six branches of a publishing company during two consecutive years 2000 and 2001.Answer the question based on this graph.

Q.

Total sales of branch B6 for both the years is what percent of the total sales of branch B3 for both-the years ?

Solution:

 Required Percentage =  [{(70+80)/(95+110)} *100]% = 73.17%.

QUESTION: 23

The Bar graph provided below gives the sales of books from six branches of a publishing company during two consecutive years 2000 and 2001.Answer the question based on this graph.

Q.

What is the average sale of all the branches (in thousand numbers) for the year 2000 ?

Solution:

Average sales of all the ,six branches (in thousand numbers) for the year 2000 = (1/6)*[80+ 75 +95 + 85+ 75 + 70] = 80.

QUESTION: 24

The Bar graph provided below gives the sales of books from six branches of a publishing company during two consecutive years 2000 and 2001.Answer the question based on this graph.

Q.

What  is the ratio of the total sales of’ branch B2 for -both years to the total sales of branch B4 for both years ?

Solution:

Required [(75+65)/(85+95)]=7/9

QUESTION: 25

The Bar graph provided below gives the sales of books from six branches of a publishing company during two consecutive years 2000 and 2001.Answer the question based on this graph.

Q.

What percent of the average sales of branches Bl, B2 and B3 in 2001 is the average sales of branches B1, B3 and B6 in 2000 ?

Solution:

Average sales (in thousand numbers) of branches B1, B3 and B6 in 2000 =(1/3)*(8O+95+7O)=245/3

Average sales (in thousand numbers) of branches B1, B2 and B3 in 2001 (1/3)*(105+65+110) =280/3

Required Percentage =[(245/3)/(280/3)]*100% = 87.5%

QUESTION: 26

A person travels from P to Q by train at 32m/hr. But before reaching Q he returns, from R to P by car at 72km/hr. If the  time taken for whole journey is 13 hrs, find the distance from R to P?

Solution:

Let distance from R to P be x km.

Then x/32 + x/72 = 13 Solving x we get x=288

QUESTION: 27

Two pipes can fill a cistern in 14 and 16 hours respectively. The pipes are opened simultaneously and found that due to leakage in bottom, extra 32 minutes are taken for filling the cistern. If the cistern is full, in what time leakage will empty it?

Solution:

Work done by first pipe in 1 hr= 1/14

Work done by second pipe in 1 hr= 1/16

Work done by both pipes in 1 hr= 1/14 + 1/16 =15/112

Time taken by the pipes to fill the cistern(without leakage)= 112/15 = 7 hr 28 mts.

Actual time taken by the pipes to fill the cistern(including leakage)= 7 hr 28 mts+ 32 mts = 8 hrs.

 Work done by 2 pipes and leakage in 1 hr = 1/8

Work done by leak in 1 hr = 15/112 – 1/8 = 1/112

Time taken by the leak to empty cistern = 112 hrs

QUESTION: 28

A and B enter into a business in which A invest money four times than that of B.After a year A withdraws Rs.2000 while B doubles his money .They earn profits at 5% per annum of their capitals.At the end of the second year B gets Rs.600 as profit. Find the profit obtained by A.

Solution:

Profit of Rs.600 at 5% per annum will be on investment= 600*(100/5)= 12000.

Therefore total investment of B for both years= Rs.12000.

Let investment of B in first year is x ,then x + 2x =12000 => x=4000

Investment of B for first year = 4000 and that of second year=8000.

Investment of A for first year= 4 * investment of b for first year= 4*4000=16000.

Investment of B for second year= 16000-2000=14000.

Total investment of A for two years= 16000+14000=30000.

So, profit of A= 30000*(5/100)=1500.

QUESTION: 29

A tradesman bought 500 meters of electric wire at 75 paise per meter. He sold 60% of it at a profit of 8%.At what gain percent should he sell the remaining wire so as to gain 12% on the whole business.?

Solution:

C.P of wire= 500(75/100)= Rs.375

C.P of 60 % wire = 375*(60/100)=Rs.225

Profit made on 60% wire= (8/100) *225=Rs.18

S.P of 60% of wire= Rs.225+Rs.18= Rs.243

Required gain on whole business=12%

Therefore ,S.P of whole wire = (12/100)*375=Rs.420

So S.P of  remaining 40% wire = Rs.420-Rs.243=Rs.177

C.P of 40% = (40/100)*375 = Rs.150

So ,required gain percentage on 40% wire = [(177-150)/150]*100 =18%

QUESTION: 30

Due to fall of 10% in rate of sugar,500gm more sugar can purchased for Rs.140.Find the original rate ?

Solution:

Let x be the original rate

Sugar that can be purchased for Rs.140 at rate Rs.x = 140/x  gm

Reduced rate =90x/100

Sugar that can be purchased for Rs.140 at rate Rs.(90x/100) = 140/(90x/100) gm 140/(90x/100)- 140/x   = 500

x= Rs.0.031111 per gm= Rs.(1000*0.031111) per kg= Rs. 31.11

QUESTION: 31

The difference between the compound interest an d compound interest on a sum at 10% per annum for 2 years is Rs.60.Find the sum

Solution:

Let the sum be P

S.I for 2 years= PNR/100 =( P*2*10)/100= P/5

C.I for 2 years = P[(1+R/100)2 -1]=P[ (1+10/100)2-1]=21P/100

C.I-S.I=(21P/100 )-(P/5)=60

Solving for P we get P=Rs.6000.

QUESTION: 32

The average age of 34 boys in a class is 14.If teachers age is included then new average is 15.
What is the teacher’s age?

Solution:

Total age of 34 boys =34*14=476

Total age of 34 boys +teacher = 35*15=525

Age of teacher = 525-476=49 years.

QUESTION: 33

The age of the father 4 years ago was 8 times the age of his son. !t present the father’s age is 4 times that of his son. Find the present age of his son?

Solution:

Let the age of son be x, and that of father be y. y-4=8(x-4)……..(1)

y=4x………………(2)

Solving eqn (1) and (2)

x= 7

y=28

QUESTION: 34

Vinu purchased  a radio at 9/10 of its selling price and sold it at 8% more than its original selling price. His gain percentage is:

Solution:

C.P of Vinu= (9/10)S.P S.P of vinu =

% profit= {[(9/50) S.P ]/[ (9/10)S.P] } * 100 = 20%

QUESTION: 35

20 men can cut 30 trees 4 hours. If 4 men leaves, how many trees will be cut in 6 hours.

Solution:

No of tree cut by 1 man in 1 hour = 30/(20*4)

No of tree cut by (20-4) men in 6 hours= [30/(20*4) ] * 16*6 = 36 trees

QUESTION: 36

Find the missing term in the following series

7, 26, 63, 124, 215, 342, ___

Solution:

Series is (23-1),(33-1),(43-1)……. etc so next number is (83-1)=512-1=511

QUESTION: 37

Find the missing term in the following series

71, 76, 69, 74, 67, 72, ___

Solution:

subtract  2 from second left term or add 5 and subtract 7 alternately.

QUESTION: 38

Find the missing term in the following series

5, 9, 19, 37 , ___

Solution:

9=5+2*2, 19=9+5*2,37=19+9*2 so next number is 37+19*2=75

QUESTION: 39

Find the odd man out:

39.1, 5, 14, 30, 50, 55, 91

Solution:

12,12+22, 12+22+32… and so on.50 is the odd one

QUESTION: 40

Find the odd man out:

835, 734, 642, 751, 853, 981,532

Solution:

in each number except 751, the difference between third and first digit is the middle one.

QUESTION: 41

Study the following pie charts given below and answer the question that follow.

Q.

What is the cost of gearbox?

Solution:
QUESTION: 42

Study the following pie charts given below and answer the question that follow.

Q.

What percentage of cost is contributed by brake?

Solution:
QUESTION: 43

Study the following pie charts given below and answer the question that follow.

Q.

If the price of the tyre goes up by 25%, by what amount should be the sale price be increased to maintain the amount of profit?

Solution:
QUESTION: 44

Study the following pie charts given below and answer the question that follow.

Q.

If transmission cost is increased by 20%, by what amount is the profit reduced(total price of the car remains the same)? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 45

Study the following pie charts given below and answer the question that follow.

Q.

What % of sale price is contributed by clutch?

Solution:
QUESTION: 46

In the following the question two equations are given. You have to solve them and give answer accordingly. 

Q.

i. 2X2+5X+1= X2+2X-1

ii. 2Y2-8Y+1= -1

Solution:
QUESTION: 47

In the following question two equations are given. You have to solve them and give answer accordingly.

Q.

i. X/2 +X- ½ =1

ii. 3Y2-10Y+8= Y2+2Y-10

Solution:
QUESTION: 48

In the following question two equations are given. You have to solve them and give answer accordingly.

Q.

i. 4X2-20X+19= 4X-1

ii. 2Y2=26Y+84 

Solution:
QUESTION: 49

In the following question two equations are given. You have to solve them and give answer accordingly.

Q.

i. Y2+Y-1=4- Y2 -2Y

ii.X2/2 -3X/2 =X-3

Solution:
QUESTION: 50

In the following question two equations are given. You have to solve them and give answer accordingly.

Q.

i. 6X2+13X= 12-X

ii. 1+2Y2=2Y+ 5Y/60

Solution:
QUESTION: 51

In a code NOBLE is denoted by QREOH ,then coded form of PLATE is –

Solution:

QUESTION: 52

In a code TOGETHER is denoted as RQEGRJCT ,then PAROLE is denoted in the same code by—

Solution:

Method of solving is similar to 1.Add 2 and subtract 2 to/from alternate alphabets.

QUESTION: 53

In a code

i. ‘Rip Lub Ja Pit’ means ‘Kindly Let me speak’

ii. ‘Sa Tik Lub’ means ‘Kindly go forward’

iii. ‘Pit Sun Ki’ means ‘Speak with example’

iv. ‘Ja Ha Tik’ means ‘Let others go’

Q.

What is the code for ‘example’?

Solution:

’with’ and ‘example’ is not used in other sentences.

QUESTION: 54

In a code

i. ‘Rip Lub Ja Pit’ means ‘Kindly Let me speak’

ii. ‘Sa Tik Lub’ means ‘Kindly go forward’

iii. ‘Pit Sun Ki’ means ‘Speak with example’

iv. ‘Ja Ha Tik’ means ‘Let others go’

Q.

In the code, what is meant by ‘Ha’?

Solution:

From (i) and (iv) Ja=Let

From (ii) and (iv) tik=go, so Ha=others

QUESTION: 55

In a code

i. ‘Rip Lub Ja Pit’ means ‘Kindly Let me speak’

ii. ‘Sa Tik Lub’ means ‘Kindly go forward’

iii. ‘Pit Sun Ki’ means ‘Speak with example’

iv. ‘Ja Ha Tik’ means ‘Let others go’

Q.

To find the code for ‘me’ which of the following statements are necessary?

Solution:
QUESTION: 56

In the question below are given four statements followed by three conclusions numbered I, II and III. You have to take the given statements to be true even if they seem to be at variance from commonly known facts. Read all the conclusions and then decide which of the given conclusions logically follows from the given statements disregarding commonly known facts. '

Q.

Statements: All petals are flowers. Some flowers are buds.Some buds are leaves. All leaves are plants.

Conclusions: I. Some petals are not buds.
II. Some flowers are plants.

lll. No flower is plant.

Solution:

According to question

or

Conclusion I.false ,II.false ,III.false ,but either II or III is true

QUESTION: 57

In the question below are given four statements followed by three conclusions numbered I, II and III. You have to take the given statements to be true even if they seem to be at variance from commonly known facts. Read all the conclusions and then decide which of the given conclusions logically follows from the given statements disregarding commonly known facts. '

Q.

Statements: Some pens are keys. Some keys are locks. All locks are cards. No card is paper

Conclusions:I. No lock is paper.
II. Some cards are keys.
III. Some keys are not paper. 

Solution:

According to question

or

Conclusions:I.True, II.True, III.True Hence all conclusions follow.

QUESTION: 58

In the question below are given four statements followed by three conclusions numbered I, II and III. You have to take the given statements to be true even if they seem to be at variance from commonly known facts. Read all the conclusions and then decide which of the given conclusions logically follows from the given statements disregarding commonly known facts. '

Q.

Statements: Some pearls are gems. All gems are diamonds.  No diamond is stone. Some stones are corals.

Conclusions:

I. Some stones are pearls.

ll. Some corals being diamond is a possibility.
III. No stone is pearl.

Solution:

Conclusions I.False,II.True,III.False

Either I or III follows. Hence,only conclusions II and either I or III follow

QUESTION: 59

In the question below are given four statements followed by three conclusions numbered I, II and III. You have to take the given statements to be true even if they seem to be at variance from commonly known facts. Read all the conclusions and then decide which of the given conclusions logically follows from the given statements disregarding commonly known facts. '

Q.

Statements: Some apartments are flats. Some flats are buildings. !ll buildings are bungalows. !ll bungalows are gardens.
Conclusions:

I. All apartments being building is a possibility

II. All bungalows are not buildings.
III. No flat is garden.

Solution:

Only conclusion I is true.

QUESTION: 60

In the question below are given four statements followed by three conclusions numbered I, II and III. You have to take the given statements to be true even if they seem to be at variance from commonly known facts. Read all the conclusions and then decide which of the given conclusions logically follows from the given statements disregarding commonly known facts. '

Q.

Statements: All chairs are tables. All tables are bottles. Some bottles are jars. No jar is bucket.
Conclusions:I. Some tables being jar is a possibility.
II. Some bottles are chairs.
III. Some bottles are not bucket.

Solution:

All three conclusions are true.

QUESTION: 61

Study the following information answer the question that follow.-

Twelve people A, B, C, D, E, F,G, H, I, J, K and L are sitting around a rectangular table. The following information is known-The table has 12 chairs numbered from 1 to 12. 6 seats on one side of the table and 6 on the opposite side. The chairs are arranged in such a way that chair number 1 is  just opposite to 12, 6 is opposite to 7 and so on. A is sitting opposite to K who is the only person sitting between C and J. E is sitting opposite to I who is the only person sitting between B and L.F, sitting at chair number 1, is diagonally opposite to C who is sitting opposite to D.

Q.

If G is sitting opposite to F then who is sitting opposite to H?  

Solution:

“F, sitting at chair number 1, is diagonally opposite to C who is sitting opposite to D.”, from this question it is clear that C and D are at seat numbers 7 and 6 respectively. And K is the only person between C and J while A is opposite to K. Hence A,K and J must be at seat numbers 5,8 and 9 respectively.
Then there are two possibilities.

Possibility 1.

Possibility 2.

From the above two cases , it follows possibility 1 .Opposite to F is either L or B.

QUESTION: 62

Study the following information answer the question that follow.-

Twelve people A, B, C, D, E, F,G, H, I, J, K and L are sitting around a rectangular table. The following information is known-The table has 12 chairs numbered from 1 to 12. 6 seats on one side of the table and 6 on the opposite side. The chairs are arranged in such a way that chair number 1 is  just opposite to 12, 6 is opposite to 7 and so on. A is sitting opposite to K who is the only person sitting between C and J. E is sitting opposite to I who is the only person sitting between B and L.F, sitting at chair number 1, is diagonally opposite to C who is sitting opposite to D.

Q.

If L is sitting opposite to H, then who is sitting opposite to G ‘?  

Solution:

“F, sitting at chair number 1, is diagonally opposite to C who is sitting opposite to D.”, from this question it is clear that C and D are at seat numbers 7 and 6 respectively. And K is the only person between C and J while A is opposite to K. Hence A,K and J must be at seat numbers 5,8 and 9 respectively.
Then there are two possibilities.

Possibility 1.

Possibility 2.

from the above two possibilities ,In possibility 1 if L is sitting opposite to H then F is sitting opposite to G. In possibility 2 if L is sitting opposite to H then J is sitting opposite to G.

QUESTION: 63

Study the following information answer the question that follow.-

Twelve people A, B, C, D, E, F,G, H, I, J, K and L are sitting around a rectangular table. The following information is known-The table has 12 chairs numbered from 1 to 12. 6 seats on one side of the table and 6 on the opposite side. The chairs are arranged in such a way that chair number 1 is  just opposite to 12, 6 is opposite to 7 and so on. A is sitting opposite to K who is the only person sitting between C and J. E is sitting opposite to I who is the only person sitting between B and L.F, sitting at chair number 1, is diagonally opposite to C who is sitting opposite to D.

Q.

How many persons are sitting between B and D,if they are on the same side of the table?

Solution:

“F, sitting at chair number 1, is diagonally opposite to C who is sitting opposite to D.”, from this question it is clear that C and D are at seat numbers 7 and 6 respectively. And K is the only person between C and J while A is opposite to K. Hence A,K and J must be at seat numbers 5,8 and 9 respectively.
Then there are two possibilities.

Possibility 1.

Possibility 2.

From the 2 possibilities, it follows possibility 1 and number of persons sitting between B and D is ether 1 or 3.

QUESTION: 64

Study the following information answer the question that follow.-

Twelve people A, B, C, D, E, F,G, H, I, J, K and L are sitting around a rectangular table. The following information is known-The table has 12 chairs numbered from 1 to 12. 6 seats on one side of the table and 6 on the opposite side. The chairs are arranged in such a way that chair number 1 is  just opposite to 12, 6 is opposite to 7 and so on. A is sitting opposite to K who is the only person sitting between C and J. E is sitting opposite to I who is the only person sitting between B and L.F, sitting at chair number 1, is diagonally opposite to C who is sitting opposite to D.

Q.

Which one of the following is correct?

Solution:
QUESTION: 65

Study the following information answer the question that follow.-

Twelve people A, B, C, D, E, F,G, H, I, J, K and L are sitting around a rectangular table. The following information is known-The table has 12 chairs numbered from 1 to 12. 6 seats on one side of the table and 6 on the opposite side. The chairs are arranged in such a way that chair number 1 is  just opposite to 12, 6 is opposite to 7 and so on. A is sitting opposite to K who is the only person sitting between C and J. E is sitting opposite to I who is the only person sitting between B and L.F, sitting at chair number 1, is diagonally opposite to C who is sitting opposite to D.

Q.

Which one of the following is not correct?

Solution:
QUESTION: 66

dumy Question

Solution:
QUESTION: 67

dumy question

Solution:
QUESTION: 68

 2, 5, 9, 19, 37, ?

Solution:

In this series, we have,

2 * 2 + 1 = 5
5 * 2 - 1 = 9
9 * 2 + 1 = 19
19 * 2 - 1 = 37

So, the next term is 
37 * 2 + 1 = 75

QUESTION: 69

 1, 4, 8, 13, ?, 26

Solution:

The pattern in the given series is - 
+3 +4 +5 +6 +7 ……
The next term should be: 13 + 6 = 19

QUESTION: 70

dumy Question

Solution:
QUESTION: 71

In a line of girls, Shweta’s position from right is 25th and Manju is 13th from left. They both interchange their places. Now ,Manju is on 23rd position from left. What will be the position of Shweta from right?

Solution:

Second place of Shweta =[Difference of two places of Manju ]+[Shweta’s first position]=(23-13)+25=35

QUESTION: 72

Read the following information carefully to answer the questions that follow.

There are six teachers A, B, C, D, E and F in a school. Each of the teachers teaches two subjects, one compulsory subject and the other optional subject. D’s optional subject is History while three others have it as compulsory subject. E and F have Physics as one of their subjects. F ’s compulsory subject is Mathematics which is an optional subject of both C and E. History and English are !’s subjects but in terms of compulsory and optional subjects, they are reverse of those of D’s. Chemistry is an optional subject of any one of them. There is only one female teacher in the school who has English as her compulsory subject. 

Q.

What is C’s compulsory subject ?

Solution:

Information given in the questions can be tabulated as follows

History is the compulsory subject of C.

QUESTION: 73

Read the following information carefully to answer the question that follow.

There are six teachers A, B, C, D, E and F in a school. Each of the teachers teaches two subjects, one compulsory subject and the other optional subject. D’s optional subject is History while three others have it as compulsory subject. E and F have Physics as one of their subjects. F ’s compulsory subject is Mathematics which is an optional subject of both C and E. History and English are !’s subjects but in terms of compulsory and optional subjects, they are reverse of those of D’s. Chemistry is an optional subject of any one of them. There is only one female teacher in the school who has English as her compulsory subject. 

Q.

Who is a female member in the group ?

Solution:

D is a female member in the group.

QUESTION: 74

Who among the following has same optional subjects as that of the compulsory subject of F?

Solution:

Information given in the question can be tabulated as follows

The compulsory subject of F (mathematics) is the optional subject of C.

QUESTION: 75

Read the following information carefully to answer the questions that follow.

There are six teachers A, B, C, D, E and F in a school. Each of the teachers teaches two subjects, one compulsory subject and the other optional subject. D’s optional subject is History while three others have it as compulsory subject. E and F have Physics as one of their subjects. F ’s compulsory subject is Mathematics which is an optional subject of both C and E. History and English are !’s subjects but in terms of compulsory and optional subjects, they are reverse of those of D’s. Chemistry is an optional subject of any one of them. There is only one female teacher in the school who has English as her compulsory subject. 

Q.

Disregarding which is compulsory and which is the optional  who has the same two subjects combination as F ?

Solution:

Information given in the question can be tabulated as follows.

E has physics and mathematics as his two subjects.

QUESTION: 76

Read the following information carefully to answer the questions that follow.

There are six teachers A, B, C, D, E and F in a school. Each of the teachers teaches two subjects, one compulsory subject and the other optional subject. D’s optional subject is History while three others have it as compulsory subject. E and F have Physics as one of their subjects. F ’s compulsory subject is Mathematics which is an optional subject of both C and E. History and English are !’s subjects but in terms of compulsory and optional subjects, they are reverse of those of D’s. Chemistry is an optional subject of any one of them. There is only one female teacher in the school who has English as her compulsory subject. 

Q.

Which of the following groups of teachers has History as  the compulsory subject?

Solution:

Information given in the questions can be tabulated as follows.

A, B and C all have history as the compulsory subjects.

QUESTION: 77

Study the following information and answer the question that follow.
 

A word and number arrangement machine when given an input line of words and numbers rearranges them in following a particular rule in each step following is an illustration of input and rearrangement.
 

Input:exam 81 56 over down up 16 64

Step1:down exam 81 56 over up 16 64

Step2:down 81 exam 56 over up 16 64

Step3:down 81 exam 64 56 over up 16

Step4:down 81 exam 64  over 56 up 16

And step4 is the last step of rearrangement of above input.
As per the rule followed in above illustration answer the questions given below.

Q.

​Input: 98 11 64 22 but will an it Which of the following will be step6?

Solution:

Logic of rearrangements: In step 1 the word which comes first in alphabetic order rearranges first.

In step2 highest number gets rearranged and occupies the place after word rearranged in step1.

These two steps get repeated alternately.

Thus in last step, all words get arranged in alphabetic order and numbered get arranged in descending order.

If any word or number is already arranged , then next number/word is rearranged.

QUESTION: 78

Study the following information and answer the question that follow.
 

A word and number arrangement machine when given an input line of words and numbers rearranges them in following a particular rule in each step following is an illustration of input and rearrangement.
 

Input:exam 81 56 over down up 16 64

Step1:down exam 81 56 over up 16 64

Step2:down 81 exam 56 over up 16 64

Step3:down 81 exam 64 56 over up 16

Step4:down 81 exam 64  over 56 up 16

And step4 is the last step of rearrangement of above input.
As per the rule followed in above illustration answer the questions given below.

Q.

Input:32 now 20 gift 53 box 62 at Which of the following will be step4?

Solution:

Logic of rearrangements: In step 1 the word which comes first in alphabetic order rearranges first.

In step2 highest number gets rearranged and occupies the place after word rearranged in step1.

These two steps get repeated alternately.

Thus in last step, all words get arranged in alphabetic order and numbered get arranged in descending order.

If any word or number is already arranged , then next number/word is rearranged.

QUESTION: 79

Study the following information and answer the question that follow.
 

A word and number arrangement machine when given an input line of words and numbers rearranges them in following a particular rule in each step following is an illustration of input and rearrangement.
 

Input:exam 81 56 over down up 16 64

Step1:down exam 81 56 over up 16 64

Step2:down 81 exam 56 over up 16 64

Step3:down 81 exam 64 56 over up 16

Step4:down 81 exam 64  over 56 up 16

And step4 is the last step of rearrangement of above input.
As per the rule followed in above illustration answer the questions given below.

Q.

Input:pay by 18 36 nose ear 72 54 Which step will be last?

Solution:

Logic of rearrangements: In step 1 the word which comes first in alphabetic order rearranges first.

In step2 highest number gets rearranged and occupies the place after word rearranged in step1.

These two steps get repeated alternately.

Thus in last step, all words get arranged in alphabetic order and numbered get arranged in descending order.

If any word or number is already arranged , then next number/word is rearranged.

QUESTION: 80

Study the following information and answer the question that follow.
 

A word and number arrangement machine when given an input line of words and numbers rearranges them in following a particular rule in each step following is an illustration of input and rearrangement.
 

Input:exam 81 56 over down up 16 64

Step1:down exam 81 56 over up 16 64

Step2:down 81 exam 56 over up 16 64

Step3:down 81 exam 64 56 over up 16

Step4:down 81 exam 64  over 56 up 16

And step4 is the last step of rearrangement of above input.
As per the rule followed in above illustration answer the questions given below.

Q.

Step 3 of an input is damn 96 flag 87 78 14 saint put. Which will be last but one?

Solution:

Logic of rearrangements: In step 1 the word which comes first in alphabetic order rearranges first.

In step2 highest number gets rearranged and occupies the place after word rearranged in step1.

These two steps get repeated alternately.

Thus in last step, all words get arranged in alphabetic order and numbered get arranged in descending order.

If any word or number is already arranged , then next number/word is rearranged.

QUESTION: 81

In the following question, the symbols %, *, @, $ and # are used with the following meaning as illustrated below :

 'P @ Q’ means ‘P is not smaller than Q

‘P # Q’ means ‘P is not greater than Q ‘P % Q’ means ‘P is neither greater than nor equal to Q

‘P * Q’ means ‘P is neither smaller than nor greater than Q

‘P $ Q’ means ‘P is neither smaller than nor equal to Q

Q.

Statements : T$K, K#R, R*M

Conclusions: i. M*K,ii . M % T,iii. M$K

Solution:
QUESTION: 82

In the following question, the symbols %, *, @, $ and # are used with the following meaning as illustrated below :

 'P @ Q’ means ‘P is not smaller than Q

‘P # Q’ means ‘P is not greater than Q ‘P % Q’ means ‘P is neither greater than nor equal to Q

‘P * Q’ means ‘P is neither smaller than nor greater than Q

‘P $ Q’ means ‘P is neither smaller than nor equal to Q

Q.

Statements: M%R, R#T, T*N

Conclusions : I. N*R,II. N$R,III .N$M

Solution:
QUESTION: 83

In the following question, the symbols %, *, @, $ and # are used with the following meaning as illustrated below :

 'P @ Q’ means ‘P is not smaller than Q

‘P # Q’ means ‘P is not greater than Q ‘P % Q’ means ‘P is neither greater than nor equal to Q

‘P * Q’ means ‘P is neither smaller than nor greater than Q

‘P $ Q’ means ‘P is neither smaller than nor equal to Q

Q.

Statements: V@M,A$M,R#V

Conclusions: i.R#A,ii. V@A,iii. R$M

Solution:
QUESTION: 84

In the following question, the symbols %, *, @, $ and # are used with the following meaning as illustrated below :

 'P @ Q’ means ‘P is not smaller than Q

‘P # Q’ means ‘P is not greater than Q ‘P % Q’ means ‘P is neither greater than nor equal to Q

‘P * Q’ means ‘P is neither smaller than nor greater than Q

‘P $ Q’ means ‘P is neither smaller than nor equal to Q

Q.

Statements: B*D,D@H, H%F

Conclusions: i. B*F,ii. B$F,iii. D$F

Solution:
QUESTION: 85

In the following question, the symbols %, *, @, $ and # are used with the following meaning as illustrated below :

 'P @ Q’ means ‘P is not smaller than Q

‘P # Q’ means ‘P is not greater than Q ‘P % Q’ means ‘P is neither greater than nor equal to Q

‘P * Q’ means ‘P is neither smaller than nor greater than Q

‘P $ Q’ means ‘P is neither smaller than nor equal to Q

Q.

Statements: J#N,K@N, T$K

Conclusions: i. J%T,ii. T$N,iii.N@J

Solution:
QUESTION: 86

Study the information given below to answer the question that follow :

(i) There is a family of 5 persons A, B, C, D and E.

(ii) They are working as a doctor, a teacher, a trader, a lawyer and a farmer.

(iii) B, an unmarried teacher, is the daughter of A.

(iv) E, a lawyer, is the brother of C. (v) C is the husband of the only married couple in the family.

(vi) Daughter-in-law of A is a doctor.

Q.

Which of the following is a group of female members in the family?

Solution:

Clearly B and D are the females in the family

QUESTION: 87

Study the information given below to answer the question that follow :

(i) There is a family of 5 persons A, B, C, D and E.

(ii) They are working as a doctor, a teacher, a trader, a lawyer and a farmer.

(iii) B, an unmarried teacher, is the daughter of A.

(iv) E, a lawyer, is the brother of C. (v) C is the husband of the only married couple in the family.

(vi) Daughter-in-law of A is a doctor.

Q.

Which of the following is the married couple?

Solution:

C and D are married couples,

QUESTION: 88

Study the information given below to answer the question that follow :

(i) There is a family of 5 persons A, B, C, D and E.

(ii) They are working as a doctor, a teacher, a trader, a lawyer and a farmer.

(iii) B, an unmarried teacher, is the daughter of A.

(iv) E, a lawyer, is the brother of C. (v) C is the husband of the only married couple in the family.

(vi) Daughter-in-law of A is a doctor.

Q.

Which of the following is a group of male members in the family?

Solution:

C and E are the male members in the family

QUESTION: 89

Study the information given below to answer the question that follow :

(i) There is a family of 5 persons A, B, C, D and E.

(ii) They are working as a doctor, a teacher, a trader, a lawyer and a farmer.

(iii) B, an unmarried teacher, is the daughter of A.

(iv) E, a lawyer, is the brother of C. (v) C is the husband of the only married couple in the family.

(vi) Daughter-in-law of A is a doctor.

Q.

Who is the doctor in the family ?

Solution:

D is the doctor

QUESTION: 90

Study the information given below to answer the question that follow :

(i) There is a family of 5 persons A, B, C, D and E.

(ii) They are working as a doctor, a teacher, a trader, a lawyer and a farmer.

(iii) B, an unmarried teacher, is the daughter of A.

(iv) E, a lawyer, is the brother of C. (v) C is the husband of the only married couple in the family.

(vi) Daughter-in-law of A is a doctor.

Q.

Who is the trader in the family ?

Solution:

C is the trader in the family

QUESTION: 91

Of 5 villages P,Q,R,S and T situated close to each other, P is to the West of Q,R is to the South of P and T is to the North of Q and S is to the East of T. Then R is in which direction with respect to S?

Solution:
QUESTION: 92

Pointing to someone ,I said ,”She is my father’s sister and she is the only daughter”. How many children did my paternal grand parents have in all?

Solution:
QUESTION: 93

If the first day of the year(other than leap year) was Friday, then which was the last day of that year?

Solution:
QUESTION: 94

There are 5 different houses, A to E ,in a row. A is to the right of B and E is to the left of C and right of A, and B is to the right of D. Which of the following house is the middle?

Solution:
QUESTION: 95

Study the following information carefully and answer the questions that follow:
 

Mr Ghosh recently redecorated his house by co-coordinating orange and three other colours for the walls, carpets and curtains of four different rooms. From the information below, determine the colours of the carpet, walls and curtains for each of the room and answer the following questions:
(a) Yellow was the only colour used in all the four rooms. It was used at least once for walls, carpets and curtains.
(b) Three different colours were used in each room but only the dining room and the bedroom were decorated in the same three colours.
(c) The same colour was chosen for the curtains in the bedroom, the carpet in the living room and the walls in the dining room. That colour was not used at all in the study room.
(d) The only room with both green and grey in its colour scheme had carpet of the same colour as in the dining room.
(e) Grey was the only colour used exactly twice—both times for curtains ‘
(f) The study room walls were painted the same colour as the living room walls.

Q.

Which of the following rooms had orange curtains and green walls? _

Solution:
QUESTION: 96

Study the following information carefully and answer the questions that follow:
 

Mr Ghosh recently redecorated his house by co-coordinating orange and three other colours for the walls, carpets and curtains of four different rooms. From the information below, determine the colours of the carpet, walls and curtains for each of the room and answer the following questions:
(a) Yellow was the only colour used in all the four rooms. It was used at least once for walls, carpets and curtains.
(b) Three different colours were used in each room but only the dining room and the bedroom were decorated in the same three colours.
(c) The same colour was chosen for the curtains in the bedroom, the carpet in the living room and the walls in the dining room. That colour was not used at all in the study room.
(d) The only room with both green and grey in its colour scheme had carpet of the same colour as in the dining room.
(e) Grey was the only colour used exactly twice—both times for curtains ‘
(f) The study room walls were painted the same colour as the living room walls.

Q.

Which of the two rooms had green carpets?

Solution:
QUESTION: 97

Study the following information carefully and answer the questions that follow:
 

Mr Ghosh recently redecorated his house by co-coordinating orange and three other colours for the walls, carpets and curtains of four different rooms. From the information below, determine the colours of the carpet, walls and curtains for each of the room and answer the following questions:
(a) Yellow was the only colour used in all the four rooms. It was used at least once for walls, carpets and curtains.
(b) Three different colours were used in each room but only the dining room and the bedroom were decorated in the same three colours.
(c) The same colour was chosen for the curtains in the bedroom, the carpet in the living room and the walls in the dining room. That colour was not used at all in the study room.
(d) The only room with both green and grey in its colour scheme had carpet of the same colour as in the dining room.
(e) Grey was the only colour used exactly twice—both times for curtains ‘
(f) The study room walls were painted the same colour as the living room walls.

Q.

Which room did not use grey colour at all?

Solution:
QUESTION: 98

Study the following information carefully and answer the questions that follow:
 

Mr Ghosh recently redecorated his house by co-coordinating orange and three other colours for the walls, carpets and curtains of four different rooms. From the information below, determine the colours of the carpet, walls and curtains for each of the room and answer the following questions:
(a) Yellow was the only colour used in all the four rooms. It was used at least once for walls, carpets and curtains.
(b) Three different colours were used in each room but only the dining room and the bedroom were decorated in the same three colours.
(c) The same colour was chosen for the curtains in the bedroom, the carpet in the living room and the walls in the dining room. That colour was not used at all in the study room.
(d) The only room with both green and grey in its colour scheme had carpet of the same colour as in the dining room.
(e) Grey was the only colour used exactly twice—both times for curtains ‘
(f) The study room walls were painted the same colour as the living room walls.

Q.

The dining room had ___ curtains.

Solution:
QUESTION: 99

In the question given below is a statement followed by two assumptions numbered I and II. As assumption is something supposed to be or taken to be granted. You have to consider the statement and the assumptions and decide which of the assumption is implicit in the statement

Give answer (a) if only statement I is implicit

Give answer (b) if only statement II is implicit

Give answer (c) if either I or II is implicit

Give answer (d) if neither I nor II is implicit

Give answer (e) if both I and II are implicit

Q.

Statement-The minister cancelled all his engagements in Kanpur and airdashed  to the capital-A news item Assumptions:

I. Such news items are always headlines.
II. There is an air-link between Kanpur and the capital

Solution:
QUESTION: 100

In the question given below is a statement followed by two assumptions numbered I and II. As assumption is something supposed to be or taken to be granted. You have to consider the statement and the assumptions and decide which of the assumption is implicit in the statement

Give answer (a) if only statement I is implicit

Give answer (b) if only statement II is implicit

Give answer (c) if either I or II is implicit

Give answer (d) if neither I nor II is implicit

Give answer (e) if both I and II are implicit

Q.

Statement-Children, who get encouragement, usually perform- A note by the Principal to the parents.

Assumptions

I. Some parents do not encourage children

II. Parents may follow Principal’s advice

Solution:
QUESTION: 101

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been printed in Italic and Underline to help you locate them while answering some of the question.

Governments have traditionally equated economic progress with steel mills and cement factories. While hundreds of millions of farmers remain mired in poverty. However, fears of food shortage, a rethinking of anti-poverty priorities and the crushing recession in 2008 are causing a dramatic shift in world economic policy in favour of greater support for agriculture.

The last time when the world’s framers felt such love was in the 1970s. At the time, as food prices spiked, there was real concern that the world was facing a crisis in which the planet was simply unable to produce enough grain and meet for an expanding population. Governments across the developing world and international aid organizations plowed investment into agriculture in the early 1970s, while technological breakthroughs, like high-yield strains of important food crops, boosted production. The result was the green Revolution and food production exploded.

But the Green Revolution become a victim of its own success, Food prices plunged by some 60% by the late 1980s from their peak in the mid-1970s. Policy makers and aid workers turned their attention to the poor’s other "pressing" needs, such as health care and education. Farming got "starved" of resources and investment. By 2004, aid directed at agriculture sank to 3.5% and “Agriculture lost its glitter”. Also, as consumers in high-growth giants such as China and India became wealthier, they began eating more meat, so grain once used for human consumption got diverted to beef up livestock. By early 2008, panicked buying by importing countries and restrictions "slapped" on grain exports by some big producers helped drive prices upto heights not seen for three decades. Making matters worse, land and resources got reallocated to produce cash crops such as biofuels and the result was that voluminous reserves of grain "evaporated". Protests broke out across the emerging world and fierce food riots toppled governments.

This spurred global leaders into action. This made them aware that food security is one of the fundamental issues in the world that has to be dealt with in order to maintain administrative and political stability. This also spurred the US, which traditionally provisioned food aid from American grain surpluses to help needy nations, to move towards investing in farm sectors around the globe to boost productivity. This move helped countries become more productive for themselves and be in a better position to feed their own people.

Africa, which missed out on the first Green Revolution due to poor policy and limited resources, also witnessed a “change’ poverty-fighting method favoured by many policy-makers in Africa was to get farmers off their farms into modern jobs in factories and urban centers. But that strategy proved to be highly insufficient. Income levels in the countryside badly trailed those in cities while the FAO estimated that the number of poor going hungry in 2009 reached an all-time high at more than one billion.

In India, on other hand, with only 40% of its farmland irrigated, entire economic boom currently underway is held hostage by the unpredictable monsoon. With much of India’s farming areas suffering from drought this year, the government will have tough time meeting its economic growth targets. in a report, Goldman sachs predicted that if this year too receives weak rains, it could cause agriculture to contract by 2% this fiscal year, making the government’s 7% GDP growth target look “a bit rich”. Another green revolution is the need of the hour and to make it a reality, the global community still has much backbreaking farm work to do.

Q.

What is the main objective of the writer in the passage?

Solution:
QUESTION: 102

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been printed in Italic and Underline to help you locate them while answering some of the question.

Governments have traditionally equated economic progress with steel mills and cement factories. While hundreds of millions of farmers remain mired in poverty. However, fears of food shortage, a rethinking of anti-poverty priorities and the crushing recession in 2008 are causing a dramatic shift in world economic policy in favour of greater support for agriculture.

The last time when the world’s framers felt such love was in the 1970s. At the time, as food prices spiked, there was real concern that the world was facing a crisis in which the planet was simply unable to produce enough grain and meet for an expanding population. Governments across the developing world and international aid organizations plowed investment into agriculture in the early 1970s, while technological breakthroughs, like high-yield strains of important food crops, boosted production. The result was the green Revolution and food production exploded.

But the Green Revolution become a victim of its own success, Food prices plunged by some 60% by the late 1980s from their peak in the mid-1970s. Policy makers and aid workers turned their attention to the poor’s other "pressing" needs, such as health care and education. Farming got "starved" of resources and investment. By 2004, aid directed at agriculture sank to 3.5% and “Agriculture lost its glitter”. Also, as consumers in high-growth giants such as China and India became wealthier, they began eating more meat, so grain once used for human consumption got diverted to beef up livestock. By early 2008, panicked buying by importing countries and restrictions "slapped" on grain exports by some big producers helped drive prices upto heights not seen for three decades. Making matters worse, land and resources got reallocated to produce cash crops such as biofuels and the result was that voluminous reserves of grain "evaporated". Protests broke out across the emerging world and fierce food riots toppled governments.

This spurred global leaders into action. This made them aware that food security is one of the fundamental issues in the world that has to be dealt with in order to maintain administrative and political stability. This also spurred the US, which traditionally provisioned food aid from American grain surpluses to help needy nations, to move towards investing in farm sectors around the globe to boost productivity. This move helped countries become more productive for themselves and be in a better position to feed their own people.

Africa, which missed out on the first Green Revolution due to poor policy and limited resources, also witnessed a “change’ poverty-fighting method favoured by many policy-makers in Africa was to get farmers off their farms into modern jobs in factories and urban centers. But that strategy proved to be highly insufficient. Income levels in the countryside badly trailed those in cities while the FAO estimated that the number of poor going hungry in 2009 reached an all-time high at more than one billion.

In India, on other hand, with only 40% of its farmland irrigated, entire economic boom currently underway is held hostage by the unpredictable monsoon. With much of India’s farming areas suffering from drought this year, the government will have tough time meeting its economic growth targets. in a report, Goldman sachs predicted that if this year too receives weak rains, it could cause agriculture to contract by 2% this fiscal year, making the government’s 7% GDP growth target look “a bit rich”. Another green revolution is the need of the hour and to make it a reality, the global community still has much backbreaking farm work to do.

Q.

Which of the following is an adverse impact of the Green Revolution ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 103

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been printed in Italic and Underline to help you locate them while answering some of the question.

Governments have traditionally equated economic progress with steel mills and cement factories. While hundreds of millions of farmers remain mired in poverty. However, fears of food shortage, a rethinking of anti-poverty priorities and the crushing recession in 2008 are causing a dramatic shift in world economic policy in favour of greater support for agriculture.

The last time when the world’s framers felt such love was in the 1970s. At the time, as food prices spiked, there was real concern that the world was facing a crisis in which the planet was simply unable to produce enough grain and meet for an expanding population. Governments across the developing world and international aid organizations plowed investment into agriculture in the early 1970s, while technological breakthroughs, like high-yield strains of important food crops, boosted production. The result was the green Revolution and food production exploded.

But the Green Revolution become a victim of its own success, Food prices plunged by some 60% by the late 1980s from their peak in the mid-1970s. Policy makers and aid workers turned their attention to the poor’s other "pressing" needs, such as health care and education. Farming got "starved" of resources and investment. By 2004, aid directed at agriculture sank to 3.5% and “Agriculture lost its glitter”. Also, as consumers in high-growth giants such as China and India became wealthier, they began eating more meat, so grain once used for human consumption got diverted to beef up livestock. By early 2008, panicked buying by importing countries and restrictions "slapped" on grain exports by some big producers helped drive prices upto heights not seen for three decades. Making matters worse, land and resources got reallocated to produce cash crops such as biofuels and the result was that voluminous reserves of grain "evaporated". Protests broke out across the emerging world and fierce food riots toppled governments.

This spurred global leaders into action. This made them aware that food security is one of the fundamental issues in the world that has to be dealt with in order to maintain administrative and political stability. This also spurred the US, which traditionally provisioned food aid from American grain surpluses to help needy nations, to move towards investing in farm sectors around the globe to boost productivity. This move helped countries become more productive for themselves and be in a better position to feed their own people.

Africa, which missed out on the first Green Revolution due to poor policy and limited resources, also witnessed a “change’ poverty-fighting method favoured by many policy-makers in Africa was to get farmers off their farms into modern jobs in factories and urban centers. But that strategy proved to be highly insufficient. Income levels in the countryside badly trailed those in cities while the FAO estimated that the number of poor going hungry in 2009 reached an all-time high at more than one billion.

In India, on other hand, with only 40% of its farmland irrigated, entire economic boom currently underway is held hostage by the unpredictable monsoon. With much of India’s farming areas suffering from drought this year, the government will have tough time meeting its economic growth targets. in a report, Goldman sachs predicted that if this year too receives weak rains, it could cause agriculture to contract by 2% this fiscal year, making the government’s 7% GDP growth target look “a bit rich”. Another green revolution is the need of the hour and to make it a reality, the global community still has much backbreaking farm work to do.

Q.

What is the author trying to convey through the phrase “making the government’s 7% GDP growth target look “a bit rich”?

Solution:
QUESTION: 104

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been printed in Italic and Underline to help you locate them while answering some of the question.

Governments have traditionally equated economic progress with steel mills and cement factories. While hundreds of millions of farmers remain mired in poverty. However, fears of food shortage, a rethinking of anti-poverty priorities and the crushing recession in 2008 are causing a dramatic shift in world economic policy in favour of greater support for agriculture.

The last time when the world’s framers felt such love was in the 1970s. At the time, as food prices spiked, there was real concern that the world was facing a crisis in which the planet was simply unable to produce enough grain and meet for an expanding population. Governments across the developing world and international aid organizations plowed investment into agriculture in the early 1970s, while technological breakthroughs, like high-yield strains of important food crops, boosted production. The result was the green Revolution and food production exploded.

But the Green Revolution become a victim of its own success, Food prices plunged by some 60% by the late 1980s from their peak in the mid-1970s. Policy makers and aid workers turned their attention to the poor’s other "pressing" needs, such as health care and education. Farming got "starved" of resources and investment. By 2004, aid directed at agriculture sank to 3.5% and “Agriculture lost its glitter”. Also, as consumers in high-growth giants such as China and India became wealthier, they began eating more meat, so grain once used for human consumption got diverted to beef up livestock. By early 2008, panicked buying by importing countries and restrictions "slapped" on grain exports by some big producers helped drive prices upto heights not seen for three decades. Making matters worse, land and resources got reallocated to produce cash crops such as biofuels and the result was that voluminous reserves of grain "evaporated". Protests broke out across the emerging world and fierce food riots toppled governments.

This spurred global leaders into action. This made them aware that food security is one of the fundamental issues in the world that has to be dealt with in order to maintain administrative and political stability. This also spurred the US, which traditionally provisioned food aid from American grain surpluses to help needy nations, to move towards investing in farm sectors around the globe to boost productivity. This move helped countries become more productive for themselves and be in a better position to feed their own people.

Africa, which missed out on the first Green Revolution due to poor policy and limited resources, also witnessed a “change’ poverty-fighting method favoured by many policy-makers in Africa was to get farmers off their farms into modern jobs in factories and urban centers. But that strategy proved to be highly insufficient. Income levels in the countryside badly trailed those in cities while the FAO estimated that the number of poor going hungry in 2009 reached an all-time high at more than one billion.

In India, on other hand, with only 40% of its farmland irrigated, entire economic boom currently underway is held hostage by the unpredictable monsoon. With much of India’s farming areas suffering from drought this year, the government will have tough time meeting its economic growth targets. in a report, Goldman sachs predicted that if this year too receives weak rains, it could cause agriculture to contract by 2% this fiscal year, making the government’s 7% GDP growth target look “a bit rich”. Another green revolution is the need of the hour and to make it a reality, the global community still has much backbreaking farm work to do.

Q.

 

Which of the following factors was/were responsible for the neglect of the farming sector after the green revolution? 
(A) Steel and cement sectors generated more revenue for the government as compared to agriculture.

(B) Large scale protests against favouring agriculture at the cost of other important sectors such as education and healthcare.
(C) Attention of policy makers and aid organizations was diverted from agriculture to other sectors.nly

Solution:
QUESTION: 105

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been printed in Italic and Underline to help you locate them while answering some of the question.

Governments have traditionally equated economic progress with steel mills and cement factories. While hundreds of millions of farmers remain mired in poverty. However, fears of food shortage, a rethinking of anti-poverty priorities and the crushing recession in 2008 are causing a dramatic shift in world economic policy in favour of greater support for agriculture.

The last time when the world’s framers felt such love was in the 1970s. At the time, as food prices spiked, there was real concern that the world was facing a crisis in which the planet was simply unable to produce enough grain and meet for an expanding population. Governments across the developing world and international aid organizations plowed investment into agriculture in the early 1970s, while technological breakthroughs, like high-yield strains of important food crops, boosted production. The result was the green Revolution and food production exploded.

But the Green Revolution become a victim of its own success, Food prices plunged by some 60% by the late 1980s from their peak in the mid-1970s. Policy makers and aid workers turned their attention to the poor’s other "pressing" needs, such as health care and education. Farming got "starved" of resources and investment. By 2004, aid directed at agriculture sank to 3.5% and “Agriculture lost its glitter”. Also, as consumers in high-growth giants such as China and India became wealthier, they began eating more meat, so grain once used for human consumption got diverted to beef up livestock. By early 2008, panicked buying by importing countries and restrictions "slapped" on grain exports by some big producers helped drive prices upto heights not seen for three decades. Making matters worse, land and resources got reallocated to produce cash crops such as biofuels and the result was that voluminous reserves of grain "evaporated". Protests broke out across the emerging world and fierce food riots toppled governments.

This spurred global leaders into action. This made them aware that food security is one of the fundamental issues in the world that has to be dealt with in order to maintain administrative and political stability. This also spurred the US, which traditionally provisioned food aid from American grain surpluses to help needy nations, to move towards investing in farm sectors around the globe to boost productivity. This move helped countries become more productive for themselves and be in a better position to feed their own people.

Africa, which missed out on the first Green Revolution due to poor policy and limited resources, also witnessed a “change’ poverty-fighting method favoured by many policy-makers in Africa was to get farmers off their farms into modern jobs in factories and urban centers. But that strategy proved to be highly insufficient. Income levels in the countryside badly trailed those in cities while the FAO estimated that the number of poor going hungry in 2009 reached an all-time high at more than one billion.

In India, on other hand, with only 40% of its farmland irrigated, entire economic boom currently underway is held hostage by the unpredictable monsoon. With much of India’s farming areas suffering from drought this year, the government will have tough time meeting its economic growth targets. in a report, Goldman sachs predicted that if this year too receives weak rains, it could cause agriculture to contract by 2% this fiscal year, making the government’s 7% GDP growth target look “a bit rich”. Another green revolution is the need of the hour and to make it a reality, the global community still has much backbreaking farm work to do.

Q.

What prompted leaders throughout the world to take action to boost the agriculture sector in 2008?

Solution:
QUESTION: 106

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been printed in Italic and Underline to help you locate them while answering some of the question.

Governments have traditionally equated economic progress with steel mills and cement factories. While hundreds of millions of farmers remain mired in poverty. However, fears of food shortage, a rethinking of anti-poverty priorities and the crushing recession in 2008 are causing a dramatic shift in world economic policy in favour of greater support for agriculture.

The last time when the world’s framers felt such love was in the 1970s. At the time, as food prices spiked, there was real concern that the world was facing a crisis in which the planet was simply unable to produce enough grain and meet for an expanding population. Governments across the developing world and international aid organizations plowed investment into agriculture in the early 1970s, while technological breakthroughs, like high-yield strains of important food crops, boosted production. The result was the green Revolution and food production exploded.

But the Green Revolution become a victim of its own success, Food prices plunged by some 60% by the late 1980s from their peak in the mid-1970s. Policy makers and aid workers turned their attention to the poor’s other "pressing" needs, such as health care and education. Farming got "starved" of resources and investment. By 2004, aid directed at agriculture sank to 3.5% and “Agriculture lost its glitter”. Also, as consumers in high-growth giants such as China and India became wealthier, they began eating more meat, so grain once used for human consumption got diverted to beef up livestock. By early 2008, panicked buying by importing countries and restrictions "slapped" on grain exports by some big producers helped drive prices upto heights not seen for three decades. Making matters worse, land and resources got reallocated to produce cash crops such as biofuels and the result was that voluminous reserves of grain "evaporated". Protests broke out across the emerging world and fierce food riots toppled governments.

This spurred global leaders into action. This made them aware that food security is one of the fundamental issues in the world that has to be dealt with in order to maintain administrative and political stability. This also spurred the US, which traditionally provisioned food aid from American grain surpluses to help needy nations, to move towards investing in farm sectors around the globe to boost productivity. This move helped countries become more productive for themselves and be in a better position to feed their own people.

Africa, which missed out on the first Green Revolution due to poor policy and limited resources, also witnessed a “change’ poverty-fighting method favoured by many policy-makers in Africa was to get farmers off their farms into modern jobs in factories and urban centers. But that strategy proved to be highly insufficient. Income levels in the countryside badly trailed those in cities while the FAO estimated that the number of poor going hungry in 2009 reached an all-time high at more than one billion.

In India, on other hand, with only 40% of its farmland irrigated, entire economic boom currently underway is held hostage by the unpredictable monsoon. With much of India’s farming areas suffering from drought this year, the government will have tough time meeting its economic growth targets. in a report, Goldman sachs predicted that if this year too receives weak rains, it could cause agriculture to contract by 2% this fiscal year, making the government’s 7% GDP growth target look “a bit rich”. Another green revolution is the need of the hour and to make it a reality, the global community still has much backbreaking farm work to do.

Q.

What motivated the U.S. to focus on investing in agriculture across the globe ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 107

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been printed in Italic and Underline to help you locate them while answering some of the question.

Governments have traditionally equated economic progress with steel mills and cement factories. While hundreds of millions of farmers remain mired in poverty. However, fears of food shortage, a rethinking of anti-poverty priorities and the crushing recession in 2008 are causing a dramatic shift in world economic policy in favour of greater support for agriculture.

The last time when the world’s framers felt such love was in the 1970s. At the time, as food prices spiked, there was real concern that the world was facing a crisis in which the planet was simply unable to produce enough grain and meet for an expanding population. Governments across the developing world and international aid organizations plowed investment into agriculture in the early 1970s, while technological breakthroughs, like high-yield strains of important food crops, boosted production. The result was the green Revolution and food production exploded.

But the Green Revolution become a victim of its own success, Food prices plunged by some 60% by the late 1980s from their peak in the mid-1970s. Policy makers and aid workers turned their attention to the poor’s other "pressing" needs, such as health care and education. Farming got "starved" of resources and investment. By 2004, aid directed at agriculture sank to 3.5% and “Agriculture lost its glitter”. Also, as consumers in high-growth giants such as China and India became wealthier, they began eating more meat, so grain once used for human consumption got diverted to beef up livestock. By early 2008, panicked buying by importing countries and restrictions "slapped" on grain exports by some big producers helped drive prices upto heights not seen for three decades. Making matters worse, land and resources got reallocated to produce cash crops such as biofuels and the result was that voluminous reserves of grain "evaporated". Protests broke out across the emerging world and fierce food riots toppled governments.

This spurred global leaders into action. This made them aware that food security is one of the fundamental issues in the world that has to be dealt with in order to maintain administrative and political stability. This also spurred the US, which traditionally provisioned food aid from American grain surpluses to help needy nations, to move towards investing in farm sectors around the globe to boost productivity. This move helped countries become more productive for themselves and be in a better position to feed their own people.

Africa, which missed out on the first Green Revolution due to poor policy and limited resources, also witnessed a “change’ poverty-fighting method favoured by many policy-makers in Africa was to get farmers off their farms into modern jobs in factories and urban centers. But that strategy proved to be highly insufficient. Income levels in the countryside badly trailed those in cities while the FAO estimated that the number of poor going hungry in 2009 reached an all-time high at more than one billion.

In India, on other hand, with only 40% of its farmland irrigated, entire economic boom currently underway is held hostage by the unpredictable monsoon. With much of India’s farming areas suffering from drought this year, the government will have tough time meeting its economic growth targets. in a report, Goldman sachs predicted that if this year too receives weak rains, it could cause agriculture to contract by 2% this fiscal year, making the government’s 7% GDP growth target look “a bit rich”. Another green revolution is the need of the hour and to make it a reality, the global community still has much backbreaking farm work to do.

Q.

What impact did the economic recession of 2008 have on agriculture ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 108

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been printed in Italic and Underline to help you locate them while answering some of the question.

Governments have traditionally equated economic progress with steel mills and cement factories. While hundreds of millions of farmers remain mired in poverty. However, fears of food shortage, a rethinking of anti-poverty priorities and the crushing recession in 2008 are causing a dramatic shift in world economic policy in favour of greater support for agriculture.

The last time when the world’s framers felt such love was in the 1970s. At the time, as food prices spiked, there was real concern that the world was facing a crisis in which the planet was simply unable to produce enough grain and meet for an expanding population. Governments across the developing world and international aid organizations plowed investment into agriculture in the early 1970s, while technological breakthroughs, like high-yield strains of important food crops, boosted production. The result was the green Revolution and food production exploded.

But the Green Revolution become a victim of its own success, Food prices plunged by some 60% by the late 1980s from their peak in the mid-1970s. Policy makers and aid workers turned their attention to the poor’s other "pressing" needs, such as health care and education. Farming got "starved" of resources and investment. By 2004, aid directed at agriculture sank to 3.5% and “Agriculture lost its glitter”. Also, as consumers in high-growth giants such as China and India became wealthier, they began eating more meat, so grain once used for human consumption got diverted to beef up livestock. By early 2008, panicked buying by importing countries and restrictions "slapped" on grain exports by some big producers helped drive prices upto heights not seen for three decades. Making matters worse, land and resources got reallocated to produce cash crops such as biofuels and the result was that voluminous reserves of grain "evaporated". Protests broke out across the emerging world and fierce food riots toppled governments.

This spurred global leaders into action. This made them aware that food security is one of the fundamental issues in the world that has to be dealt with in order to maintain administrative and political stability. This also spurred the US, which traditionally provisioned food aid from American grain surpluses to help needy nations, to move towards investing in farm sectors around the globe to boost productivity. This move helped countries become more productive for themselves and be in a better position to feed their own people.

Africa, which missed out on the first Green Revolution due to poor policy and limited resources, also witnessed a “change’ poverty-fighting method favoured by many policy-makers in Africa was to get farmers off their farms into modern jobs in factories and urban centers. But that strategy proved to be highly insufficient. Income levels in the countryside badly trailed those in cities while the FAO estimated that the number of poor going hungry in 2009 reached an all-time high at more than one billion.

In India, on other hand, with only 40% of its farmland irrigated, entire economic boom currently underway is held hostage by the unpredictable monsoon. With much of India’s farming areas suffering from drought this year, the government will have tough time meeting its economic growth targets. in a report, Goldman sachs predicted that if this year too receives weak rains, it could cause agriculture to contract by 2% this fiscal year, making the government’s 7% GDP growth target look “a bit rich”. Another green revolution is the need of the hour and to make it a reality, the global community still has much backbreaking farm work to do.

Q.

What encouraged African policymakers to focus on urban jobs ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 109

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been printed in Italic and Underline to help you locate them while answering some of the question.

Governments have traditionally equated economic progress with steel mills and cement factories. While hundreds of millions of farmers remain mired in poverty. However, fears of food shortage, a rethinking of anti-poverty priorities and the crushing recession in 2008 are causing a dramatic shift in world economic policy in favour of greater support for agriculture.

The last time when the world’s framers felt such love was in the 1970s. At the time, as food prices spiked, there was real concern that the world was facing a crisis in which the planet was simply unable to produce enough grain and meet for an expanding population. Governments across the developing world and international aid organizations plowed investment into agriculture in the early 1970s, while technological breakthroughs, like high-yield strains of important food crops, boosted production. The result was the green Revolution and food production exploded.

But the Green Revolution become a victim of its own success, Food prices plunged by some 60% by the late 1980s from their peak in the mid-1970s. Policy makers and aid workers turned their attention to the poor’s other "pressing" needs, such as health care and education. Farming got "starved" of resources and investment. By 2004, aid directed at agriculture sank to 3.5% and “Agriculture lost its glitter”. Also, as consumers in high-growth giants such as China and India became wealthier, they began eating more meat, so grain once used for human consumption got diverted to beef up livestock. By early 2008, panicked buying by importing countries and restrictions "slapped" on grain exports by some big producers helped drive prices upto heights not seen for three decades. Making matters worse, land and resources got reallocated to produce cash crops such as biofuels and the result was that voluminous reserves of grain "evaporated". Protests broke out across the emerging world and fierce food riots toppled governments.

This spurred global leaders into action. This made them aware that food security is one of the fundamental issues in the world that has to be dealt with in order to maintain administrative and political stability. This also spurred the US, which traditionally provisioned food aid from American grain surpluses to help needy nations, to move towards investing in farm sectors around the globe to boost productivity. This move helped countries become more productive for themselves and be in a better position to feed their own people.

Africa, which missed out on the first Green Revolution due to poor policy and limited resources, also witnessed a “change’ poverty-fighting method favoured by many policy-makers in Africa was to get farmers off their farms into modern jobs in factories and urban centers. But that strategy proved to be highly insufficient. Income levels in the countryside badly trailed those in cities while the FAO estimated that the number of poor going hungry in 2009 reached an all-time high at more than one billion.

In India, on other hand, with only 40% of its farmland irrigated, entire economic boom currently underway is held hostage by the unpredictable monsoon. With much of India’s farming areas suffering from drought this year, the government will have tough time meeting its economic growth targets. in a report, Goldman sachs predicted that if this year too receives weak rains, it could cause agriculture to contract by 2% this fiscal year, making the government’s 7% GDP growth target look “a bit rich”. Another green revolution is the need of the hour and to make it a reality, the global community still has much backbreaking farm work to do.

Q.

Which of the following had contributed to exorbitant food prices in 2008 ?

(A) Hoarding of food stocks by local wholesalers Which inadvertently created a food shortage.

(B) Export of food grains was reduced by large producers

(C) Diverting resources from cultivation of food grains to that of more profitable crops.

Solution:
QUESTION: 110

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been printed in Italic and Underline to help you locate them while answering some of the question.

Governments have traditionally equated economic progress with steel mills and cement factories. While hundreds of millions of farmers remain mired in poverty. However, fears of food shortage, a rethinking of anti-poverty priorities and the crushing recession in 2008 are causing a dramatic shift in world economic policy in favour of greater support for agriculture.

The last time when the world’s framers felt such love was in the 1970s. At the time, as food prices spiked, there was real concern that the world was facing a crisis in which the planet was simply unable to produce enough grain and meet for an expanding population. Governments across the developing world and international aid organizations plowed investment into agriculture in the early 1970s, while technological breakthroughs, like high-yield strains of important food crops, boosted production. The result was the green Revolution and food production exploded.

But the Green Revolution become a victim of its own success, Food prices plunged by some 60% by the late 1980s from their peak in the mid-1970s. Policy makers and aid workers turned their attention to the poor’s other "pressing" needs, such as health care and education. Farming got "starved" of resources and investment. By 2004, aid directed at agriculture sank to 3.5% and “Agriculture lost its glitter”. Also, as consumers in high-growth giants such as China and India became wealthier, they began eating more meat, so grain once used for human consumption got diverted to beef up livestock. By early 2008, panicked buying by importing countries and restrictions "slapped" on grain exports by some big producers helped drive prices upto heights not seen for three decades. Making matters worse, land and resources got reallocated to produce cash crops such as biofuels and the result was that voluminous reserves of grain "evaporated". Protests broke out across the emerging world and fierce food riots toppled governments.

This spurred global leaders into action. This made them aware that food security is one of the fundamental issues in the world that has to be dealt with in order to maintain administrative and political stability. This also spurred the US, which traditionally provisioned food aid from American grain surpluses to help needy nations, to move towards investing in farm sectors around the globe to boost productivity. This move helped countries become more productive for themselves and be in a better position to feed their own people.

Africa, which missed out on the first Green Revolution due to poor policy and limited resources, also witnessed a “change’ poverty-fighting method favoured by many policy-makers in Africa was to get farmers off their farms into modern jobs in factories and urban centers. But that strategy proved to be highly insufficient. Income levels in the countryside badly trailed those in cities while the FAO estimated that the number of poor going hungry in 2009 reached an all-time high at more than one billion.

In India, on other hand, with only 40% of its farmland irrigated, entire economic boom currently underway is held hostage by the unpredictable monsoon. With much of India’s farming areas suffering from drought this year, the government will have tough time meeting its economic growth targets. in a report, Goldman sachs predicted that if this year too receives weak rains, it could cause agriculture to contract by 2% this fiscal year, making the government’s 7% GDP growth target look “a bit rich”. Another green revolution is the need of the hour and to make it a reality, the global community still has much backbreaking farm work to do.

Q.

Which of‘ the following is true about the state  agriculture in India at present ?

A) Of all the sectors, agriculture needs the highest allocation of funds.

(B)Contribution of agriculture to India’s GDP this year would depend  greatly upon the monsoon rains.

(C)As India is one of the high-growth countries, it has surplus food  reserves to export to other nations.

Solution:
QUESTION: 111

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been printed in Italic and Underline to help you locate them while answering some of the question.

Governments have traditionally equated economic progress with steel mills and cement factories. While hundreds of millions of farmers remain mired in poverty. However, fears of food shortage, a rethinking of anti-poverty priorities and the crushing recession in 2008 are causing a dramatic shift in world economic policy in favour of greater support for agriculture.

The last time when the world’s framers felt such love was in the 1970s. At the time, as food prices spiked, there was real concern that the world was facing a crisis in which the planet was simply unable to produce enough grain and meet for an expanding population. Governments across the developing world and international aid organizations plowed investment into agriculture in the early 1970s, while technological breakthroughs, like high-yield strains of important food crops, boosted production. The result was the green Revolution and food production exploded.

But the Green Revolution become a victim of its own success, Food prices plunged by some 60% by the late 1980s from their peak in the mid-1970s. Policy makers and aid workers turned their attention to the poor’s other "pressing" needs, such as health care and education. Farming got "starved" of resources and investment. By 2004, aid directed at agriculture sank to 3.5% and “Agriculture lost its glitter”. Also, as consumers in high-growth giants such as China and India became wealthier, they began eating more meat, so grain once used for human consumption got diverted to beef up livestock. By early 2008, panicked buying by importing countries and restrictions "slapped" on grain exports by some big producers helped drive prices upto heights not seen for three decades. Making matters worse, land and resources got reallocated to produce cash crops such as biofuels and the result was that voluminous reserves of grain "evaporated". Protests broke out across the emerging world and fierce food riots toppled governments.

This spurred global leaders into action. This made them aware that food security is one of the fundamental issues in the world that has to be dealt with in order to maintain administrative and political stability. This also spurred the US, which traditionally provisioned food aid from American grain surpluses to help needy nations, to move towards investing in farm sectors around the globe to boost productivity. This move helped countries become more productive for themselves and be in a better position to feed their own people.

Africa, which missed out on the first Green Revolution due to poor policy and limited resources, also witnessed a “change’ poverty-fighting method favoured by many policy-makers in Africa was to get farmers off their farms into modern jobs in factories and urban centers. But that strategy proved to be highly insufficient. Income levels in the countryside badly trailed those in cities while the FAO estimated that the number of poor going hungry in 2009 reached an all-time high at more than one billion.

In India, on other hand, with only 40% of its farmland irrigated, entire economic boom currently underway is held hostage by the unpredictable monsoon. With much of India’s farming areas suffering from drought this year, the government will have tough time meeting its economic growth targets. in a report, Goldman sachs predicted that if this year too receives weak rains, it could cause agriculture to contract by 2% this fiscal year, making the government’s 7% GDP growth target look “a bit rich”. Another green revolution is the need of the hour and to make it a reality, the global community still has much backbreaking farm work to do.

Q.

Choose the word/group words which is most similar it meaning to the word printed in bold as used in the passage.

STARVED

Solution:
QUESTION: 112

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been printed in Italic and Underline to help you locate them while answering some of the question.

Governments have traditionally equated economic progress with steel mills and cement factories. While hundreds of millions of farmers remain mired in poverty. However, fears of food shortage, a rethinking of anti-poverty priorities and the crushing recession in 2008 are causing a dramatic shift in world economic policy in favour of greater support for agriculture.

The last time when the world’s framers felt such love was in the 1970s. At the time, as food prices spiked, there was real concern that the world was facing a crisis in which the planet was simply unable to produce enough grain and meet for an expanding population. Governments across the developing world and international aid organizations plowed investment into agriculture in the early 1970s, while technological breakthroughs, like high-yield strains of important food crops, boosted production. The result was the green Revolution and food production exploded.

But the Green Revolution become a victim of its own success, Food prices plunged by some 60% by the late 1980s from their peak in the mid-1970s. Policy makers and aid workers turned their attention to the poor’s other "pressing" needs, such as health care and education. Farming got "starved" of resources and investment. By 2004, aid directed at agriculture sank to 3.5% and “Agriculture lost its glitter”. Also, as consumers in high-growth giants such as China and India became wealthier, they began eating more meat, so grain once used for human consumption got diverted to beef up livestock. By early 2008, panicked buying by importing countries and restrictions "slapped" on grain exports by some big producers helped drive prices upto heights not seen for three decades. Making matters worse, land and resources got reallocated to produce cash crops such as biofuels and the result was that voluminous reserves of grain "evaporated". Protests broke out across the emerging world and fierce food riots toppled governments.

This spurred global leaders into action. This made them aware that food security is one of the fundamental issues in the world that has to be dealt with in order to maintain administrative and political stability. This also spurred the US, which traditionally provisioned food aid from American grain surpluses to help needy nations, to move towards investing in farm sectors around the globe to boost productivity. This move helped countries become more productive for themselves and be in a better position to feed their own people.

Africa, which missed out on the first Green Revolution due to poor policy and limited resources, also witnessed a “change’ poverty-fighting method favoured by many policy-makers in Africa was to get farmers off their farms into modern jobs in factories and urban centers. But that strategy proved to be highly insufficient. Income levels in the countryside badly trailed those in cities while the FAO estimated that the number of poor going hungry in 2009 reached an all-time high at more than one billion.

In India, on other hand, with only 40% of its farmland irrigated, entire economic boom currently underway is held hostage by the unpredictable monsoon. With much of India’s farming areas suffering from drought this year, the government will have tough time meeting its economic growth targets. in a report, Goldman sachs predicted that if this year too receives weak rains, it could cause agriculture to contract by 2% this fiscal year, making the government’s 7% GDP growth target look “a bit rich”. Another green revolution is the need of the hour and to make it a reality, the global community still has much backbreaking farm work to do.

Q.

Choose the word/group words which is most similar it meaning to the word printed in bold as used in the passage.

SLAPPED

Solution:
QUESTION: 113

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been printed in Italic and Underline to help you locate them while answering some of the question.

Governments have traditionally equated economic progress with steel mills and cement factories. While hundreds of millions of farmers remain mired in poverty. However, fears of food shortage, a rethinking of anti-poverty priorities and the crushing recession in 2008 are causing a dramatic shift in world economic policy in favour of greater support for agriculture.

The last time when the world’s framers felt such love was in the 1970s. At the time, as food prices spiked, there was real concern that the world was facing a crisis in which the planet was simply unable to produce enough grain and meet for an expanding population. Governments across the developing world and international aid organizations plowed investment into agriculture in the early 1970s, while technological breakthroughs, like high-yield strains of important food crops, boosted production. The result was the green Revolution and food production exploded.

But the Green Revolution become a victim of its own success, Food prices plunged by some 60% by the late 1980s from their peak in the mid-1970s. Policy makers and aid workers turned their attention to the poor’s other "pressing" needs, such as health care and education. Farming got "starved" of resources and investment. By 2004, aid directed at agriculture sank to 3.5% and “Agriculture lost its glitter”. Also, as consumers in high-growth giants such as China and India became wealthier, they began eating more meat, so grain once used for human consumption got diverted to beef up livestock. By early 2008, panicked buying by importing countries and restrictions "slapped" on grain exports by some big producers helped drive prices upto heights not seen for three decades. Making matters worse, land and resources got reallocated to produce cash crops such as biofuels and the result was that voluminous reserves of grain "evaporated". Protests broke out across the emerging world and fierce food riots toppled governments.

This spurred global leaders into action. This made them aware that food security is one of the fundamental issues in the world that has to be dealt with in order to maintain administrative and political stability. This also spurred the US, which traditionally provisioned food aid from American grain surpluses to help needy nations, to move towards investing in farm sectors around the globe to boost productivity. This move helped countries become more productive for themselves and be in a better position to feed their own people.

Africa, which missed out on the first Green Revolution due to poor policy and limited resources, also witnessed a “change’ poverty-fighting method favoured by many policy-makers in Africa was to get farmers off their farms into modern jobs in factories and urban centers. But that strategy proved to be highly insufficient. Income levels in the countryside badly trailed those in cities while the FAO estimated that the number of poor going hungry in 2009 reached an all-time high at more than one billion.

In India, on other hand, with only 40% of its farmland irrigated, entire economic boom currently underway is held hostage by the unpredictable monsoon. With much of India’s farming areas suffering from drought this year, the government will have tough time meeting its economic growth targets. in a report, Goldman sachs predicted that if this year too receives weak rains, it could cause agriculture to contract by 2% this fiscal year, making the government’s 7% GDP growth target look “a bit rich”. Another green revolution is the need of the hour and to make it a reality, the global community still has much backbreaking farm work to do.

Q.

Choose the word/group words which is most similar it meaning to the word printed in bold as used in the passage.

PLOUGHED

Solution:
QUESTION: 114

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been printed in Italic and Underline to help you locate them while answering some of the question.

Governments have traditionally equated economic progress with steel mills and cement factories. While hundreds of millions of farmers remain mired in poverty. However, fears of food shortage, a rethinking of anti-poverty priorities and the crushing recession in 2008 are causing a dramatic shift in world economic policy in favour of greater support for agriculture.

The last time when the world’s framers felt such love was in the 1970s. At the time, as food prices spiked, there was real concern that the world was facing a crisis in which the planet was simply unable to produce enough grain and meet for an expanding population. Governments across the developing world and international aid organizations plowed investment into agriculture in the early 1970s, while technological breakthroughs, like high-yield strains of important food crops, boosted production. The result was the green Revolution and food production exploded.

But the Green Revolution become a victim of its own success, Food prices plunged by some 60% by the late 1980s from their peak in the mid-1970s. Policy makers and aid workers turned their attention to the poor’s other "pressing" needs, such as health care and education. Farming got "starved" of resources and investment. By 2004, aid directed at agriculture sank to 3.5% and “Agriculture lost its glitter”. Also, as consumers in high-growth giants such as China and India became wealthier, they began eating more meat, so grain once used for human consumption got diverted to beef up livestock. By early 2008, panicked buying by importing countries and restrictions "slapped" on grain exports by some big producers helped drive prices upto heights not seen for three decades. Making matters worse, land and resources got reallocated to produce cash crops such as biofuels and the result was that voluminous reserves of grain "evaporated". Protests broke out across the emerging world and fierce food riots toppled governments.

This spurred global leaders into action. This made them aware that food security is one of the fundamental issues in the world that has to be dealt with in order to maintain administrative and political stability. This also spurred the US, which traditionally provisioned food aid from American grain surpluses to help needy nations, to move towards investing in farm sectors around the globe to boost productivity. This move helped countries become more productive for themselves and be in a better position to feed their own people.

Africa, which missed out on the first Green Revolution due to poor policy and limited resources, also witnessed a “change’ poverty-fighting method favoured by many policy-makers in Africa was to get farmers off their farms into modern jobs in factories and urban centers. But that strategy proved to be highly insufficient. Income levels in the countryside badly trailed those in cities while the FAO estimated that the number of poor going hungry in 2009 reached an all-time high at more than one billion.

In India, on other hand, with only 40% of its farmland irrigated, entire economic boom currently underway is held hostage by the unpredictable monsoon. With much of India’s farming areas suffering from drought this year, the government will have tough time meeting its economic growth targets. in a report, Goldman sachs predicted that if this year too receives weak rains, it could cause agriculture to contract by 2% this fiscal year, making the government’s 7% GDP growth target look “a bit rich”. Another green revolution is the need of the hour and to make it a reality, the global community still has much backbreaking farm work to do.

Q.

Choose the word/phrase which is most opposite m meaning to the word printed in bold as used in the passage

PRESSING

Solution:
QUESTION: 115

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been printed in Italic and Underlined to help you locate them while answering some of the question.

Governments have traditionally equated economic progress with steel mills and cement factories. While hundreds of millions of farmers remain mired in poverty. However, fears of food shortage, a rethinking of anti-poverty priorities and the crushing recession in 2008 are causing a dramatic shift in world economic policy in favour of greater support for agriculture.

The last time when the world’s framers felt such love was in the 1970s. At the time, as food prices spiked, there was real concern that the world was facing a crisis in which the planet was simply unable to produce enough grain and meet for an expanding population. Governments across the developing world and international aid organizations plowed investment into agriculture in the early 1970s, while technological breakthroughs, like high-yield strains of important food crops, boosted production. The result was the green Revolution and food production exploded.

But the Green Revolution become a victim of its own success, Food prices plunged by some 60% by the late 1980s from their peak in the mid-1970s. Policy makers and aid workers turned their attention to the poor’s other "pressing" needs, such as health care and education. Farming got "starved" of resources and investment. By 2004, aid directed at agriculture sank to 3.5% and “Agriculture lost its glitter”. Also, as consumers in high-growth giants such as China and India became wealthier, they began eating more meat, so grain once used for human consumption got diverted to beef up livestock. By early 2008, panicked buying by importing countries and restrictions "slapped" on grain exports by some big producers helped drive prices upto heights not seen for three decades. Making matters worse, land and resources got reallocated to produce cash crops such as biofuels and the result was that voluminous reserves of grain "evaporated". Protests broke out across the emerging world and fierce food riots toppled governments.

This spurred global leaders into action. This made them aware that food security is one of the fundamental issues in the world that has to be dealt with in order to maintain administrative and political stability. This also spurred the US, which traditionally provisioned food aid from American grain surpluses to help needy nations, to move towards investing in farm sectors around the globe to boost productivity. This move helped countries become more productive for themselves and be in a better position to feed their own people.

Africa, which missed out on the first Green Revolution due to poor policy and limited resources, also witnessed a “change’ poverty-fighting method favoured by many policy-makers in Africa was to get farmers off their farms into modern jobs in factories and urban centers. But that strategy proved to be highly insufficient. Income levels in the countryside badly trailed those in cities while the FAO estimated that the number of poor going hungry in 2009 reached an all-time high at more than one billion.

In India, on other hand, with only 40% of its farmland irrigated, entire economic boom currently underway is held hostage by the unpredictable monsoon. With much of India’s farming areas suffering from drought this year, the government will have tough time meeting its economic growth targets. in a report, Goldman sachs predicted that if this year too receives weak rains, it could cause agriculture to contract by 2% this fiscal year, making the government’s 7% GDP growth target look “a bit rich”. Another green revolution is the need of the hour and to make it a reality, the global community still has much backbreaking farm work to do.

Q.

Choose the word/phrase which is most opposite m meaning to the word printed in bold as used in the passage

EVAPORATED

Solution:
QUESTION: 116

Rearrange the following five sentences A,B,C,D and E in the proper sequence so as to for a meaningful paragraph and answer the questions that follow.
A)It was started with four departments only

B)All these professors are highly qualified

C)This university has completed 100 years

D)Now it has 100 professors working in 26 departments E)This is the reason for achieving high academic excellence

Q.

Which of the following should be the first sentence after rearrangement’

Solution:
QUESTION: 117

Rearrange the following five sentences A,B,C,D and E in the proper sequence so as to for a meaningful paragraph and answer the questions that follow.
A)It was started with four departments only

B)All these professors are highly qualified

C)This university has completed 100 years

D)Now it has 100 professors working in 26 departments E)This is the reason for achieving high academic excellence

Q.

Which of the following should be the second sentence after rearrangement’

Solution:
QUESTION: 118

Rearrange the following five sentences A,B,C,D and E in the proper sequence so as to for a meaningful paragraph and answer the questions that follow.
A)It was started with four departments only

B)All these professors are highly qualified

C)This university has completed 100 years

D)Now it has 100 professors working in 26 departments E)This is the reason for achieving high academic excellence

Q.

Which of the following should be the third sentence after rearrangement’

Solution:
QUESTION: 119

Rearrange the following five sentences A,B,C,D and E in the proper sequence so as to for a meaningful paragraph and answer the questions that follow.
A)It was started with four departments only

B)All these professors are highly qualified

C)This university has completed 100 years

D)Now it has 100 professors working in 26 departments E)This is the reason for achieving high academic excellence

Q.

Which of the following should be the fourth sentence after rearrangement’

Solution:
QUESTION: 120

Rearrange the following five sentences A,B,C,D and E in the proper sequence so as to for a meaningful paragraph and answer the questions that follow.
A)It was started with four departments only

B)All these professors are highly qualified

C)This university has completed 100 years

D)Now it has 100 professors working in 26 departments E)This is the reason for achieving high academic excellence

Q.

Which of the following should be the last sentence after rearrangement’

Solution:
QUESTION: 121

In following passage some word are missing. Missing word are denoted by question numbers. Fill the blanks with the help of alternatives given. Mark your answer. Jawaharlal Nehru was probably the first important political leader to realize that if India were to (121)…. its problems, it would have to (122)… the age of science. The government of free India was one of the first in the world to establish department od science and technology. The (123)…. The government has attached to science is also clear (124)… the fact that the portfolio of science and technology has always been (124)… by the prime minister himself. ​

Solution:
QUESTION: 122

In following passage some word are missing. Missing word are denoted by question numbers.Fill the blanks with the help of alternatives given. Mark your answer. Jawaharlal Nehru was probably the first important political leader to realize that if India were to (121)…. its problems, it would have to (122)… the age of science. The government of free India was one of the first in the world to establish department od science and technology. The (123)…. The government has attached to science is also clear (124)… the fact that the portfolio of science and technology has always been (124)… by the prime minister himself. ​

Solution:
QUESTION: 123

In following passage some word are missing. Missing word are denoted by question numbers.Fill the blanks with the help of alternatives given. Mark your answer. Jawaharlal Nehru was probably the first important political leader to realize that if India were to (121)…. its problems, it would have to (122)… the age of science. The government of free India was one of the first in the world to establish department od science and technology. The (123)…. The government has attached to science is also clear (124)… the fact that the portfolio of science and technology has always been (124)… by the prime minister himself. ​

Solution:
QUESTION: 124

In following passage some word are missing. Missing word are denoted by question numbers.

Fill the blanks with the help of alternatives given. Mark your answer. Jawaharlal Nehru was probably the first important political leader to realize that if India were to (121)…. its problems, it would have to (122)… the age of science. The government of free India was one of the first in the world to establish department od science and technology. The (123)…. The government has attached to science is also clear (124)… the fact that the portfolio of science and technology has always been (124)… by the prime minister himself. 

Solution:
QUESTION: 125

In following passage some word are missing. Missing word are denoted by question numbers.

Fill the blanks with the help of alternatives given. Mark your answer. Jawaharlal Nehru was probably the first important political leader to realize that if India were to (121)…. its problems, it would have to (122)… the age of science. The government of free India was one of the first in the world to establish department od science and technology. The (123)…. The government has attached to science is also clear (124)… the fact that the portfolio of science and technology has always been (124)… by the prime minister himself. 

Solution:
QUESTION: 126

In the sentence given, a word/group of words is given in Quote. Below each sentence are given five word/group of word of which you have to choose one to substitute the Quote word/group of words without changing the meaning.

 Q.

He selected the books for library judiciously.

Solution:
QUESTION: 127

In the sentence given, a word/group of words is given in Quote. Below each sentence are given five word/group of word of which you have to choose one to substitute the Quote word/group of words without changing the meaning. 

Q.

The police arrested the thief but its accomplice escaped.

Solution:
QUESTION: 128

In the sentence given, a word/group of words is given in Quote. Below each sentence are given five word/group of word of which you have to choose one to substitute the Quote word/group of words without changing the meaning. 

Q.

They discussed for almost four hours but there was no consensus.

Solution:
QUESTION: 129

In the sentence given, a word/group of words is given in Quote. Below each sentence are given five word/group of word of which you have to choose one to substitute the Quote word/group of words without changing the meaning. 

Q.

Ambition is subdued by poverty.

Solution:
QUESTION: 130

In the sentence given, a word/group of words is given in Quote. Below each sentence are given five word/group of word of which you have to choose one to substitute the Quote word/group of words without changing the meaning. 

Q.

The tenth Five Year Plan aimed at a total production of 210 million kg. of tea.

Solution:
QUESTION: 131

Each of the following questions has a word or group of words missing. Five alternatives are given. You have to find out which one of them would make the sentence grammatically correct and meaningful. 

Q.

I ___ on my wife to attend the fashion show.

Solution:
QUESTION: 132

Each of the following questions has a word or group of words missing. Five alternatives are given. You have to find out which one of them would make the sentence grammatically correct and meaningful. 

Q.

He is considered the _____ Indian artist of this century.

Solution:
QUESTION: 133

Each of the following questions has a word or group of words missing. Five alternatives are given. You have to find out which one of them would make the sentence grammatically correct and meaningful. 

Q.

Many people tried to _____ land when oil was discovered in our district.

Solution:
QUESTION: 134

Each of the following questions has a word or group of words missing. Five alternatives are given. You have to find out which one of them would make the sentence grammatically correct and meaningful. 

Q.

Production of crude oil during the first six months of the last year was 10 million tonnes as ___ 9 million tonnes this year.