SBI Clerk Prelims Mock Test - 5


100 Questions MCQ Test SBI Clerk Prelims Mock Test Series | SBI Clerk Prelims Mock Test - 5


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Attempt SBI Clerk Prelims Mock Test - 5 | 100 questions in 60 minutes | Mock test for Banking Exams preparation | Free important questions MCQ to study SBI Clerk Prelims Mock Test Series for Banking Exams Exam | Download free PDF with solutions
QUESTION: 1

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

With the Indian economy not picking up speed as was being anticipated, the spotlight is on the banking industry. It has been asked why the industry has been reluctant to pass on the double-dose rate reduction effected by the Reserve Bank of India in twin installments outside the policy cycle this year. The answer is not difficult to find. The rising load of bad loans has put banks — especially those in the public sector — in a pincer-like situation. A combination of factors saw gross Non Performing Assets drop from a high of 12 per cent in 2000-01 to 2.5 per cent in 2008-09. These factors included an improved economy, the establishment of debt recovery tribunals, and the enactment of the Securitisation and Reconstruction of Financial Assets and Enforcement of Security Interest Act, 2002. But the trend was reversed and the figure rose to 4.6 per cent in September 2014. An estimate by rating agency Crisil suggests that ‘stressed assets’ could stay flat at 6 per cent in 2015-16. And Crisil put the value of such assets at a mind-boggling Rs.5.3 trillion. RBI Governor Raghuram Rajan has said he isn’t quite sure if the banking system has seen the peak yet in bad loans. Since public sector banks account for two-thirds of all banking activity, it is turning out to be a huge worry.

        Are bad loans a transitory phenomenon, or are they a chronic problem? If it indeed is a transitory issue, it should slowly evaporate as the economy picks up. If they are the consequence of systemic ills, then the solution lies in fixing the causes. If the economic slowdown is a part of the problem, scam-induced, court-ordained interventions in vital sectors such as coal, mining and telecom have added to the banks’ misery with bad loans. The stressed banks are wary of fresh lending. The need for stricter provisioning in view of the new Basel stipulations will add to their problems. Moreover, banks will no longer be allowed to treat restructured loans as standard ones. The revamped 5/25 scheme is essentially meant to remedy the situation. It allows banks to rejig long-term infrastructure loans by refinancing or selling loans every five years. But the scheme will at best mask stressed assets since banks need not report such loans. Bad loans have put the government in a moral predicament. Can it use the taxpayers’ money to nurse the banks back to health? Besides putting in place a watertight loan appraisal mechanism, the situation calls for a new framework outside the normal banking system to address the funding needs of long-term projects. Bad loans bode ill not just for banks but also the economy. The issue needs to be addressed with the utmost priority.

Q. Choose an appropriate title for the passage.

Solution:
QUESTION: 2

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

With the Indian economy not picking up speed as was being anticipated, the spotlight is on the banking industry. It has been asked why the industry has been reluctant to pass on the double-dose rate reduction effected by the Reserve Bank of India in twin installments outside the policy cycle this year. The answer is not difficult to find. The rising load of bad loans has put banks — especially those in the public sector — in a pincer-like situation. A combination of factors saw gross Non Performing Assets drop from a high of 12 per cent in 2000-01 to 2.5 per cent in 2008-09. These factors included an improved economy, the establishment of debt recovery tribunals, and the enactment of the Securitisation and Reconstruction of Financial Assets and Enforcement of Security Interest Act, 2002. But the trend was reversed and the figure rose to 4.6 per cent in September 2014. An estimate by rating agency Crisil suggests that ‘stressed assets’ could stay flat at 6 per cent in 2015-16. And Crisil put the value of such assets at a mind-boggling Rs.5.3 trillion. RBI Governor Raghuram Rajan has said he isn’t quite sure if the banking system has seen the peak yet in bad loans. Since public sector banks account for two-thirds of all banking activity, it is turning out to be a huge worry.

        Are bad loans a transitory phenomenon, or are they a chronic problem? If it indeed is a transitory issue, it should slowly evaporate as the economy picks up. If they are the consequence of systemic ills, then the solution lies in fixing the causes. If the economic slowdown is a part of the problem, scam-induced, court-ordained interventions in vital sectors such as coal, mining and telecom have added to the banks’ misery with bad loans. The stressed banks are wary of fresh lending. The need for stricter provisioning in view of the new Basel stipulations will add to their problems. Moreover, banks will no longer be allowed to treat restructured loans as standard ones. The revamped 5/25 scheme is essentially meant to remedy the situation. It allows banks to rejig long-term infrastructure loans by refinancing or selling loans every five years. But the scheme will at best mask stressed assets since banks need not report such loans. Bad loans have put the government in a moral predicament. Can it use the taxpayers’ money to nurse the banks back to health? Besides putting in place a watertight loan appraisal mechanism, the situation calls for a new framework outside the normal banking system to address the funding needs of long-term projects. Bad loans bode ill not just for banks but also the economy. The issue needs to be addressed with the utmost priority.

Q. Which remark of the Governor of RBI is a huge worry for the Economy of our country?

A) The stressed assets could stay flat at 6 per cent in 2015-16.

B) Indian banking system has not seen its worst phase yet.

C) The value of NPA in the year 15-16 is going to be 5.3 trillion

Solution:
QUESTION: 3

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

With the Indian economy not picking up speed as was being anticipated, the spotlight is on the banking industry. It has been asked why the industry has been reluctant to pass on the double-dose rate reduction effected by the Reserve Bank of India in twin installments outside the policy cycle this year. The answer is not difficult to find. The rising load of bad loans has put banks — especially those in the public sector — in a pincer-like situation. A combination of factors saw gross Non Performing Assets drop from a high of 12 per cent in 2000-01 to 2.5 per cent in 2008-09. These factors included an improved economy, the establishment of debt recovery tribunals, and the enactment of the Securitisation and Reconstruction of Financial Assets and Enforcement of Security Interest Act, 2002. But the trend was reversed and the figure rose to 4.6 per cent in September 2014. An estimate by rating agency Crisil suggests that ‘stressed assets’ could stay flat at 6 per cent in 2015-16. And Crisil put the value of such assets at a mind-boggling Rs.5.3 trillion. RBI Governor Raghuram Rajan has said he isn’t quite sure if the banking system has seen the peak yet in bad loans. Since public sector banks account for two-thirds of all banking activity, it is turning out to be a huge worry.

        Are bad loans a transitory phenomenon, or are they a chronic problem? If it indeed is a transitory issue, it should slowly evaporate as the economy picks up. If they are the consequence of systemic ills, then the solution lies in fixing the causes. If the economic slowdown is a part of the problem, scam-induced, court-ordained interventions in vital sectors such as coal, mining and telecom have added to the banks’ misery with bad loans. The stressed banks are wary of fresh lending. The need for stricter provisioning in view of the new Basel stipulations will add to their problems. Moreover, banks will no longer be allowed to treat restructured loans as standard ones. The revamped 5/25 scheme is essentially meant to remedy the situation. It allows banks to rejig long-term infrastructure loans by refinancing or selling loans every five years. But the scheme will at best mask stressed assets since banks need not report such loans. Bad loans have put the government in a moral predicament. Can it use the taxpayers’ money to nurse the banks back to health? Besides putting in place a watertight loan appraisal mechanism, the situation calls for a new framework outside the normal banking system to address the funding needs of long-term projects. Bad loans bode ill not just for banks but also the economy. The issue needs to be addressed with the utmost priority.

Q. Which of the following is true according to the passage?

A) The rising burden of bad loans, especially on public sector, has put them in a difficult situation.

B) CRISIL has alarmed about the rising trend of Indian economy to the Govt.

C) Banks will no longer be allowed to treat restructured loans as standard ones

Solution:
QUESTION: 4

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

With the Indian economy not picking up speed as was being anticipated, the spotlight is on the banking industry. It has been asked why the industry has been reluctant to pass on the double-dose rate reduction effected by the Reserve Bank of India in twin installments outside the policy cycle this year. The answer is not difficult to find. The rising load of bad loans has put banks — especially those in the public sector — in a pincer-like situation. A combination of factors saw gross Non Performing Assets drop from a high of 12 per cent in 2000-01 to 2.5 per cent in 2008-09. These factors included an improved economy, the establishment of debt recovery tribunals, and the enactment of the Securitisation and Reconstruction of Financial Assets and Enforcement of Security Interest Act, 2002. But the trend was reversed and the figure rose to 4.6 per cent in September 2014. An estimate by rating agency Crisil suggests that ‘stressed assets’ could stay flat at 6 per cent in 2015-16. And Crisil put the value of such assets at a mind-boggling Rs.5.3 trillion. RBI Governor Raghuram Rajan has said he isn’t quite sure if the banking system has seen the peak yet in bad loans. Since public sector banks account for two-thirds of all banking activity, it is turning out to be a huge worry.

        Are bad loans a transitory phenomenon, or are they a chronic problem? If it indeed is a transitory issue, it should slowly evaporate as the economy picks up. If they are the consequence of systemic ills, then the solution lies in fixing the causes. If the economic slowdown is a part of the problem, scam-induced, court-ordained interventions in vital sectors such as coal, mining and telecom have added to the banks’ misery with bad loans. The stressed banks are wary of fresh lending. The need for stricter provisioning in view of the new Basel stipulations will add to their problems. Moreover, banks will no longer be allowed to treat restructured loans as standard ones. The revamped 5/25 scheme is essentially meant to remedy the situation. It allows banks to rejig long-term infrastructure loans by refinancing or selling loans every five years. But the scheme will at best mask stressed assets since banks need not report such loans. Bad loans have put the government in a moral predicament. Can it use the taxpayers’ money to nurse the banks back to health? Besides putting in place a watertight loan appraisal mechanism, the situation calls for a new framework outside the normal banking system to address the funding needs of long-term projects. Bad loans bode ill not just for banks but also the economy. The issue needs to be addressed with the utmost priority.

Q. What solution did the author offer if this rising NPA is a transitory phenomenon?

Solution:
QUESTION: 5

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

With the Indian economy not picking up speed as was being anticipated, the spotlight is on the banking industry. It has been asked why the industry has been reluctant to pass on the double-dose rate reduction effected by the Reserve Bank of India in twin installments outside the policy cycle this year. The answer is not difficult to find. The rising load of bad loans has put banks — especially those in the public sector — in a pincer-like situation. A combination of factors saw gross Non Performing Assets drop from a high of 12 per cent in 2000-01 to 2.5 per cent in 2008-09. These factors included an improved economy, the establishment of debt recovery tribunals, and the enactment of the Securitisation and Reconstruction of Financial Assets and Enforcement of Security Interest Act, 2002. But the trend was reversed and the figure rose to 4.6 per cent in September 2014. An estimate by rating agency Crisil suggests that ‘stressed assets’ could stay flat at 6 per cent in 2015-16. And Crisil put the value of such assets at a mind-boggling Rs.5.3 trillion. RBI Governor Raghuram Rajan has said he isn’t quite sure if the banking system has seen the peak yet in bad loans. Since public sector banks account for two-thirds of all banking activity, it is turning out to be a huge worry.

        Are bad loans a transitory phenomenon, or are they a chronic problem? If it indeed is a transitory issue, it should slowly evaporate as the economy picks up. If they are the consequence of systemic ills, then the solution lies in fixing the causes. If the economic slowdown is a part of the problem, scam-induced, court-ordained interventions in vital sectors such as coal, mining and telecom have added to the banks’ misery with bad loans. The stressed banks are wary of fresh lending. The need for stricter provisioning in view of the new Basel stipulations will add to their problems. Moreover, banks will no longer be allowed to treat restructured loans as standard ones. The revamped 5/25 scheme is essentially meant to remedy the situation. It allows banks to rejig long-term infrastructure loans by refinancing or selling loans every five years. But the scheme will at best mask stressed assets since banks need not report such loans. Bad loans have put the government in a moral predicament. Can it use the taxpayers’ money to nurse the banks back to health? Besides putting in place a watertight loan appraisal mechanism, the situation calls for a new framework outside the normal banking system to address the funding needs of long-term projects. Bad loans bode ill not just for banks but also the economy. The issue needs to be addressed with the utmost priority.

Q. What does the author mean by the phrase “If they are the consequence of systemic ills”?

Solution:
QUESTION: 6

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

With the Indian economy not picking up speed as was being anticipated, the spotlight is on the banking industry. It has been asked why the industry has been reluctant to pass on the double-dose rate reduction effected by the Reserve Bank of India in twin installments outside the policy cycle this year. The answer is not difficult to find. The rising load of bad loans has put banks — especially those in the public sector — in a pincer-like situation. A combination of factors saw gross Non Performing Assets drop from a high of 12 per cent in 2000-01 to 2.5 per cent in 2008-09. These factors included an improved economy, the establishment of debt recovery tribunals, and the enactment of the Securitisation and Reconstruction of Financial Assets and Enforcement of Security Interest Act, 2002. But the trend was reversed and the figure rose to 4.6 per cent in September 2014. An estimate by rating agency Crisil suggests that ‘stressed assets’ could stay flat at 6 per cent in 2015-16. And Crisil put the value of such assets at a mind-boggling Rs.5.3 trillion. RBI Governor Raghuram Rajan has said he isn’t quite sure if the banking system has seen the peak yet in bad loans. Since public sector banks account for two-thirds of all banking activity, it is turning out to be a huge worry.

        Are bad loans a transitory phenomenon, or are they a chronic problem? If it indeed is a transitory issue, it should slowly evaporate as the economy picks up. If they are the consequence of systemic ills, then the solution lies in fixing the causes. If the economic slowdown is a part of the problem, scam-induced, court-ordained interventions in vital sectors such as coal, mining and telecom have added to the banks’ misery with bad loans. The stressed banks are wary of fresh lending. The need for stricter provisioning in view of the new Basel stipulations will add to their problems. Moreover, banks will no longer be allowed to treat restructured loans as standard ones. The revamped 5/25 scheme is essentially meant to remedy the situation. It allows banks to rejig long-term infrastructure loans by refinancing or selling loans every five years. But the scheme will at best mask stressed assets since banks need not report such loans. Bad loans have put the government in a moral predicament. Can it use the taxpayers’ money to nurse the banks back to health? Besides putting in place a watertight loan appraisal mechanism, the situation calls for a new framework outside the normal banking system to address the funding needs of long-term projects. Bad loans bode ill not just for banks but also the economy. The issue needs to be addressed with the utmost priority.

Q. Which of the following is not the synonym of the word “remedy”?

Solution:
QUESTION: 7

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

With the Indian economy not picking up speed as was being anticipated, the spotlight is on the banking industry. It has been asked why the industry has been reluctant to pass on the double-dose rate reduction effected by the Reserve Bank of India in twin installments outside the policy cycle this year. The answer is not difficult to find. The rising load of bad loans has put banks — especially those in the public sector — in a pincer-like situation. A combination of factors saw gross Non Performing Assets drop from a high of 12 per cent in 2000-01 to 2.5 per cent in 2008-09. These factors included an improved economy, the establishment of debt recovery tribunals, and the enactment of the Securitisation and Reconstruction of Financial Assets and Enforcement of Security Interest Act, 2002. But the trend was reversed and the figure rose to 4.6 per cent in September 2014. An estimate by rating agency Crisil suggests that ‘stressed assets’ could stay flat at 6 per cent in 2015-16. And Crisil put the value of such assets at a mind-boggling Rs.5.3 trillion. RBI Governor Raghuram Rajan has said he isn’t quite sure if the banking system has seen the peak yet in bad loans. Since public sector banks account for two-thirds of all banking activity, it is turning out to be a huge worry.

        Are bad loans a transitory phenomenon, or are they a chronic problem? If it indeed is a transitory issue, it should slowly evaporate as the economy picks up. If they are the consequence of systemic ills, then the solution lies in fixing the causes. If the economic slowdown is a part of the problem, scam-induced, court-ordained interventions in vital sectors such as coal, mining and telecom have added to the banks’ misery with bad loans. The stressed banks are wary of fresh lending. The need for stricter provisioning in view of the new Basel stipulations will add to their problems. Moreover, banks will no longer be allowed to treat restructured loans as standard ones. The revamped 5/25 scheme is essentially meant to remedy the situation. It allows banks to rejig long-term infrastructure loans by refinancing or selling loans every five years. But the scheme will at best mask stressed assets since banks need not report such loans. Bad loans have put the government in a moral predicament. Can it use the taxpayers’ money to nurse the banks back to health? Besides putting in place a watertight loan appraisal mechanism, the situation calls for a new framework outside the normal banking system to address the funding needs of long-term projects. Bad loans bode ill not just for banks but also the economy. The issue needs to be addressed with the utmost priority.

Q. Which of the following is not the synonym of the word “reluctant”?

Solution:
QUESTION: 8

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

With the Indian economy not picking up speed as was being anticipated, the spotlight is on the banking industry. It has been asked why the industry has been reluctant to pass on the double-dose rate reduction effected by the Reserve Bank of India in twin installments outside the policy cycle this year. The answer is not difficult to find. The rising load of bad loans has put banks — especially those in the public sector — in a pincer-like situation. A combination of factors saw gross Non Performing Assets drop from a high of 12 per cent in 2000-01 to 2.5 per cent in 2008-09. These factors included an improved economy, the establishment of debt recovery tribunals, and the enactment of the Securitisation and Reconstruction of Financial Assets and Enforcement of Security Interest Act, 2002. But the trend was reversed and the figure rose to 4.6 per cent in September 2014. An estimate by rating agency Crisil suggests that ‘stressed assets’ could stay flat at 6 per cent in 2015-16. And Crisil put the value of such assets at a mind-boggling Rs.5.3 trillion. RBI Governor Raghuram Rajan has said he isn’t quite sure if the banking system has seen the peak yet in bad loans. Since public sector banks account for two-thirds of all banking activity, it is turning out to be a huge worry.

        Are bad loans a transitory phenomenon, or are they a chronic problem? If it indeed is a transitory issue, it should slowly evaporate as the economy picks up. If they are the consequence of systemic ills, then the solution lies in fixing the causes. If the economic slowdown is a part of the problem, scam-induced, court-ordained interventions in vital sectors such as coal, mining and telecom have added to the banks’ misery with bad loans. The stressed banks are wary of fresh lending. The need for stricter provisioning in view of the new Basel stipulations will add to their problems. Moreover, banks will no longer be allowed to treat restructured loans as standard ones. The revamped 5/25 scheme is essentially meant to remedy the situation. It allows banks to rejig long-term infrastructure loans by refinancing or selling loans every five years. But the scheme will at best mask stressed assets since banks need not report such loans. Bad loans have put the government in a moral predicament. Can it use the taxpayers’ money to nurse the banks back to health? Besides putting in place a watertight loan appraisal mechanism, the situation calls for a new framework outside the normal banking system to address the funding needs of long-term projects. Bad loans bode ill not just for banks but also the economy. The issue needs to be addressed with the utmost priority.

Q. Which of the following is the synonym of the word “stipulations”?

Solution:
QUESTION: 9

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

With the Indian economy not picking up speed as was being anticipated, the spotlight is on the banking industry. It has been asked why the industry has been reluctant to pass on the double-dose rate reduction effected by the Reserve Bank of India in twin installments outside the policy cycle this year. The answer is not difficult to find. The rising load of bad loans has put banks — especially those in the public sector — in a pincer-like situation. A combination of factors saw gross Non Performing Assets drop from a high of 12 per cent in 2000-01 to 2.5 per cent in 2008-09. These factors included an improved economy, the establishment of debt recovery tribunals, and the enactment of the Securitisation and Reconstruction of Financial Assets and Enforcement of Security Interest Act, 2002. But the trend was reversed and the figure rose to 4.6 per cent in September 2014. An estimate by rating agency Crisil suggests that ‘stressed assets’ could stay flat at 6 per cent in 2015-16. And Crisil put the value of such assets at a mind-boggling Rs.5.3 trillion. RBI Governor Raghuram Rajan has said he isn’t quite sure if the banking system has seen the peak yet in bad loans. Since public sector banks account for two-thirds of all banking activity, it is turning out to be a huge worry.

        Are bad loans a transitory phenomenon, or are they a chronic problem? If it indeed is a transitory issue, it should slowly evaporate as the economy picks up. If they are the consequence of systemic ills, then the solution lies in fixing the causes. If the economic slowdown is a part of the problem, scam-induced, court-ordained interventions in vital sectors such as coal, mining and telecom have added to the banks’ misery with bad loans. The stressed banks are wary of fresh lending. The need for stricter provisioning in view of the new Basel stipulations will add to their problems. Moreover, banks will no longer be allowed to treat restructured loans as standard ones. The revamped 5/25 scheme is essentially meant to remedy the situation. It allows banks to rejig long-term infrastructure loans by refinancing or selling loans every five years. But the scheme will at best mask stressed assets since banks need not report such loans. Bad loans have put the government in a moral predicament. Can it use the taxpayers’ money to nurse the banks back to health? Besides putting in place a watertight loan appraisal mechanism, the situation calls for a new framework outside the normal banking system to address the funding needs of long-term projects. Bad loans bode ill not just for banks but also the economy. The issue needs to be addressed with the utmost priority.

Q. Which of the following is the synonym of the word “predicament”?

Solution:
QUESTION: 10

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

With the Indian economy not picking up speed as was being anticipated, the spotlight is on the banking industry. It has been asked why the industry has been reluctant to pass on the double-dose rate reduction effected by the Reserve Bank of India in twin installments outside the policy cycle this year. The answer is not difficult to find. The rising load of bad loans has put banks — especially those in the public sector — in a pincer-like situation. A combination of factors saw gross Non Performing Assets drop from a high of 12 per cent in 2000-01 to 2.5 per cent in 2008-09. These factors included an improved economy, the establishment of debt recovery tribunals, and the enactment of the Securitisation and Reconstruction of Financial Assets and Enforcement of Security Interest Act, 2002. But the trend was reversed and the figure rose to 4.6 per cent in September 2014. An estimate by rating agency Crisil suggests that ‘stressed assets’ could stay flat at 6 per cent in 2015-16. And Crisil put the value of such assets at a mind-boggling Rs.5.3 trillion. RBI Governor Raghuram Rajan has said he isn’t quite sure if the banking system has seen the peak yet in bad loans. Since public sector banks account for two-thirds of all banking activity, it is turning out to be a huge worry.

        Are bad loans a transitory phenomenon, or are they a chronic problem? If it indeed is a transitory issue, it should slowly evaporate as the economy picks up. If they are the consequence of systemic ills, then the solution lies in fixing the causes. If the economic slowdown is a part of the problem, scam-induced, court-ordained interventions in vital sectors such as coal, mining and telecom have added to the banks’ misery with bad loans. The stressed banks are wary of fresh lending. The need for stricter provisioning in view of the new Basel stipulations will add to their problems. Moreover, banks will no longer be allowed to treat restructured loans as standard ones. The revamped 5/25 scheme is essentially meant to remedy the situation. It allows banks to rejig long-term infrastructure loans by refinancing or selling loans every five years. But the scheme will at best mask stressed assets since banks need not report such loans. Bad loans have put the government in a moral predicament. Can it use the taxpayers’ money to nurse the banks back to health? Besides putting in place a watertight loan appraisal mechanism, the situation calls for a new framework outside the normal banking system to address the funding needs of long-term projects. Bad loans bode ill not just for banks but also the economy. The issue needs to be addressed with the utmost priority.

Q. Which of the following is the synonym of the word “bode”?

Solution:
QUESTION: 11

Directions: Rearrange the following sentences into a meaningful paragraph and then answer the questions given below it.

(A) Development of drought resistance could benefit large numbers of farmers.

(B) Hence the human race has no choice but to adapt to these impacts.

(C) lndia has to be concerned about climatic changes.

(D)This impact can run into decades and centuries.

(E) Environment day is thus an important occasion to assess the past and our future.

(F) Since there is a possibility of adverse impact on agriculture which could deter growth.

Q. Which is the THIRD sentence of the paragraph? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 12

Directions: Rearrange the following sentences into a meaningful paragraph and then answer the questions given below it.

(A) Development of drought resistance could benefit large numbers of farmers.

(B) Hence the human race has no choice but to adapt to these impacts.

(C) lndia has to be concerned about climatic changes.

(D)This impact can run into decades and centuries.

(E) Environment day is thus an important occasion to assess the past and our future.

(F) Since there is a possibility of adverse impact on agriculture which could deter growth.

Q. Which is the LAST (SIXTH) sentence of the paragraph?

Solution:
QUESTION: 13

Directions: Rearrange the following sentences into a meaningful paragraph and then answer the questions given below it.

(A) Development of drought resistance could benefit large numbers of farmers.

(B) Hence the human race has no choice but to adapt to these impacts.

(C) lndia has to be concerned about climatic changes.

(D)This impact can run into decades and centuries.

(E) Environment day is thus an important occasion to assess the past and our future.

(F) Since there is a possibility of adverse impact on agriculture which could deter growth.

Q. Which is the FIRST sentence of the paragraph?

Solution:
QUESTION: 14

Directions: Rearrange the following sentences into a meaningful paragraph and then answer the questions given below it.

(A) Development of drought resistance could benefit large numbers of farmers.

(B) Hence the human race has no choice but to adapt to these impacts.

(C) lndia has to be concerned about climatic changes.

(D)This impact can run into decades and centuries.

(E) Environment day is thus an important occasion to assess the past and our future.

(F) Since there is a possibility of adverse impact on agriculture which could deter growth.

Q. Which is the FIFTH’ sentence of the paragraph?

Solution:
QUESTION: 15

Directions: Rearrange the following sentences into a meaningful paragraph and then answer the questions given below it.

(A) Development of drought resistance could benefit large numbers of farmers.

(B) Hence the human race has no choice but to adapt to these impacts.

(C) lndia has to be concerned about climatic changes.

(D)This impact can run into decades and centuries.

(E) Environment day is thus an important occasion to assess the past and our future.

(F) Since there is a possibility of adverse impact on agriculture which could deter growth.

Q. Which is the SECOND sentence of the paragraph?

Solution:
QUESTION: 16

Directions: In each of the following sentences there are two blank spaces. Below each sentence there are five pairs of words denoted by numbers (1), (2), (3)), ,(4) and (5). Find out which pair of words can be filled up in the blanks in the sentence in the same sequence to make the sentence grammatically correct and meaningfully complete.

The criterion for________ a player should be based on his recent performance; but unfortunately, the journalists are ________ to be carried away by earlier successes.

Solution:
QUESTION: 17

Directions: In each of the following sentences there are two blank spaces. Below each sentence there are five pairs of words denoted by numbers (1), (2), (3)), ,(4) and (5). Find out which pair of words can be filled up in the blanks in the sentence in the same sequence to make the sentence grammatically correct and meaningfully complete.

For the last half century he ________ himself to public affairs ________ taking a holiday.

Solution:
QUESTION: 18

Directions: In each of the following sentences there are two blank spaces. Below each sentence there are five pairs of words denoted by numbers (1), (2), (3)), ,(4) and (5). Find out which pair of words can be filled up in the blanks in the sentence in the same sequence to make the sentence grammatically correct and meaningfully complete.

You will see signs of ________ everywhere, which speak well for the ________ of these people.

Solution:
QUESTION: 19

Directions: In each of the following sentences there are two blank spaces. Below each sentence there are five pairs of words denoted by numbers (1), (2), (3)), ,(4) and (5). Find out which pair of words can be filled up in the blanks in the sentence in the same sequence to make the sentence grammatically correct and meaningfully complete.

The police arrested Ramesh on a________ of theft but for lack of evidence ________ him.

Solution:
QUESTION: 20

Directions: In each of the following sentences there are two blank spaces. Below each sentence there are five pairs of words denoted by numbers (1), (2), (3)), ,(4) and (5). Find out which pair of words can be filled up in the blanks in the sentence in the same sequence to make the sentence grammatically correct and meaningfully complete.

The ________ violence that our town is witnessing has turned it into the most ________ town of our country

Solution:
QUESTION: 21

Directions : Read each sentence to find out whether there is any error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number of that part is the answer. If there is no error the answer is (5). (Ignore errors of punctuation, if any.) 

The ground outside the village, l)/ abounding with frogs and snakes, 2)/ the enemies of mankind, 3)/ is soft and marshy. 4) / No error 5) 

Solution:
QUESTION: 22

Directions : Read each sentence to find out whether there is any error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number of that part is the answer. If there is no error the answer is (5). (Ignore errors of punctuation, if any.) 

We are all short-sighted 1) / and very often see but one side of the matter. 2) / Our views are not extended 3)/ to all that has a connection with it. 4)/ No error 5)

Solution:

 Replace ‘with’ with ‘to’

QUESTION: 23

Directions : Read each sentence to find out whether there is any error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number of that part is the answer. If there is no error the answer is (5). (Ignore errors of punctuation, if any.) 

Just laws are no restraint on 1) / the freedom of the good, 2)/ for the good man desires nothing 3) / which a just law interfere with. 4)/ No error 5)

Solution:

Replace ‘interfere’ with ‘interferes’ because ‘a law’ is singular.

QUESTION: 24

Directions : Read each sentence to find out whether there is any error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number of that part is the answer. If there is no error the answer is (5). (Ignore errors of punctuation, if any.) 

Had he done 1) / his home work well 2) / he would not have 3)/ suffered this embarrassment. 4)/ No error 5).

Solution:
QUESTION: 25

Directions : Read each sentence to find out whether there is any error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number of that part is the answer. If there is no error the answer is (5). (Ignore errors of punctuation, if any.)

He was angry with me 1) / because he thought my 2) / remark was 3) / aimed before him. 4) / No error 5) 

Solution:

Replace ‘before’ with ‘at’ 

QUESTION: 26

Directions : Which of the phrase (1), (2), (3), (4) given below each sentences should replace the phrase printed in bold to make the sentence grammatically correct? If the sentence is correct as it is, mark (5) is ‘No correction required’ as the answer. 

Banks must be ensured that 18 per cent of their loans is given to the agricultural sector.

Solution:
QUESTION: 27

Directions : Which of the phrase (1), (2), (3), (4) given below each sentences should replace the phrase printed in bold to make the sentence grammatically correct? If the sentence is correct as it is, mark (5) is ‘No correction required’ as the answer. 

The government has announced several initiatives benefiting to factory workers.

Solution:
QUESTION: 28

Directions : Which of the phrase (1), (2), (3), (4) given below each sentences should replace the phrase printed in bold to make the sentence grammatically correct? If the sentence is correct as it is, mark (5) is ‘No correction required’ as the answer. 

A date for the committee meeting to discuss the details of the proposal has yet to be decided.

Solution:
QUESTION: 29

Directions : Which of the phrase (1), (2), (3), (4) given below each sentences should replace the phrase printed in bold to make the sentence grammatically correct? If the sentence is correct as it is, mark (5) is ‘No correction required’ as the answer. 

With the raining heavily the multi-storey office building was badly damaged and collapsed.

Solution:
QUESTION: 30

Directions : Which of the phrase (1), (2), (3), (4) given below each sentences should replace the phrase printed in bold to make the sentence grammatically correct? If the sentence is correct as it is, mark (5) is ‘No correction required’ as the answer. 

The majority of our clients prefer our new office timings, which are convenience for them.

Solution:
QUESTION: 31

Study the graph carefully to answer the questions that follow.

Q. If profit for company Y in 2012 is 2000 and expenditure in 2013 for company  Y is 50,000, then what is the total revenue in 2013 for Y? Give that total revenue = expenditure + profit. 

Solution:

QUESTION: 32

Study the graph carefully to answer the questions that follow.

Q. If profit in year 2015 for company Z is 3000 and profit of company X in 2013 is equal to profit of company Z in 2014 then what is the profit of company X in 2013 

Solution:

QUESTION: 33

Study the graph carefully to answer the questions that follow.

Q. What is the average percentage increase in profit for company Y over all the years.

Solution:

QUESTION: 34

Study the graph carefully to answer the questions that follow.

Q. What was the approximate percent increase in percent increase of profit of company X in the year 2014 from its previous year

Solution:

QUESTION: 35

Study the graph carefully to answer the questions that follow.

Q. If profit earned by company Y in 2014 is 27,000 and by company Z in 2014 is 43500 then what is the total profit earned by them in year 2013? 

Solution:

QUESTION: 36

Directions : A team of 5 players participated in a tournament and played four matches (1 to 4). The following table gives partial information about their individual scores and the total runs scored by the team in each match.

Each column has two values missing. These are the runs scored by the two lowest scorers in that match. None of the two missing values is more than 10% of the total runs scored in that match.

Q. What is the maximum possible percentage contribution of Ajinkya in the total runs scored in the four matches (approximately)?

Solution:

QUESTION: 37

Directions : A team of 5 players participated in a tournament and played four matches (1 to 4). The following table gives partial information about their individual scores and the total runs scored by the team in each match.

Each column has two values missing. These are the runs scored by the two lowest scorers in that match. None of the two missing values is more than 10% of the total runs scored in that match.

Q. What is the maximum possible percentage contribution of Virat in the total runs scored in the four matches?

Solution:

QUESTION: 38

Directions : A team of 5 players participated in a tournament and played four matches (1 to 4). The following table gives partial information about their individual scores and the total runs scored by the team in each match.

Each column has two values missing. These are the runs scored by the two lowest scorers in that match. None of the two missing values is more than 10% of the total runs scored in that match.

Q. If the absolute difference between the total runs scored by Ajinkya and Cheteshwar in the  Four matches is minimum possible then what is the ratio of Ajinkya and Cheteshwar’s total runs scored by them in the four matches. 

Solution:

QUESTION: 39

Directions : A team of 5 players participated in a tournament and played four matches (1 to 4). The following table gives partial information about their individual scores and the total runs scored by the team in each match.

Each column has two values missing. These are the runs scored by the two lowest scorers in that match. None of the two missing values is more than 10% of the total runs scored in that match.

\

Q. If the absolute difference between the total runs scored by Ajinkya and  Cheteshwar in the four matches is minimum possible then what is the absolute difference between total runs scored by Pandya and Virat in the four matches?

Solution:

QUESTION: 40

Directions : A team of 5 players participated in a tournament and played four matches (1 to 4). The following table gives partial information about their individual scores and the total runs scored by the team in each match.

Each column has two values missing. These are the runs scored by the two lowest scorers in that match. None of the two missing values is more than 10% of the total runs scored in that match.

Q. The players are ranked 1 to 5 on the basis of the total runs scored by them in the four matches, with the highest scorer getting Rank 1. If it is known that no two players scored the same number of total runs, how many players are there whose ranks can be exactly determined?

Solution:

QUESTION: 41

A and B are partners in a business. A contributes 1/4 of the capital for 15 months and B received 2/3 of the profit. Find for how long B’s money was invested in the business?  

Solution:

QUESTION: 42

A, B and C are partners of a company. During a particular year A received 1/3 of the profit, B received 1/4 of the profit and C received remaining Rs. 5000. How much did A receive? 

Solution:

QUESTION: 43

Goods are sold so that when 4 per cent is taken off the list price, a profit of 20% is made. How much per cent is the list price more than the cost price?

Solution:

QUESTION: 44

A man sells an article at 5% profit. If he had bought it at 5% less and sold it for Re 1 less, he would have gained 10%. Find the cost price.

Solution:

QUESTION: 45

A is thrice as good a workman as B, therefore, A is able to finish a piece of work in 60 days less that B. The time (in days) in which they can do it working together is:

Solution:

QUESTION: 46

A and B working separately can do a piece of work in 9 and 12 days, respectively. If they work for a day alternately with A beginning, the work would be complete in:

Solution:

QUESTION: 47

The length of a rectangular plot is 5 folds its width. Half the area of the plot is covered by a playground whose area is 245 square meter. What is the length of the plot?

Solution:

Let width = x, length = 5x
X * 5x = 245*2
x = 7√2
Length = 5 * 7√2 = 35√2

QUESTION: 48

The length of a rectangular landscape is 4 times its breadth. There is a playground in it whose area is 1200 square meter and which is one third of the total landscape. What is the length of the landscape?

Solution:

x * 4x = 3 * 1200
x = 30
Length = 4 * 30 = 120

QUESTION: 49

A pipe can fill a cistern in 6 hours. Due to a leak in its bottom, it is filled in 7 hours. When the cistern is full, in how much time will it be emptied by the leak?

Solution:

QUESTION: 50

A bike covers a certain distance at the speed of 64 km/h in 8 hours. If the bike was to cover the same distance in approximately 6 hours, at what approximate speed should the bike travel?

Solution:

Total distance = 64 × 8 = 512 km

Now speed = 512/6 = 85.34 km/ h

QUESTION: 51

6245.998 ÷ 18.01 × 39.88 = ? ÷ 25.089 × 40.01

Solution:

6246/18 * 40 = ? / 25 * 40

? = 8675

QUESTION: 52

19.85% of 1540 + 13.899% of 1050 = 20% of ?

Solution:

20% * 1540 + 14% * 1050 = 20% * ?

? = (308 + 147)/0.2

? = 2275

QUESTION: 53

958.08 × 779.98 ÷ 24.01 = ?

Solution:

958 * 780 / 24 = 31135

QUESTION: 54

377.98 ÷ 8.93 + 123.94 ÷ 8.01 + 1460 × 1.25 = ?

Solution:

378/9 + 124/8 + 1460*1.25 = 42 + 15.5 + 1825 = 1882.5

QUESTION: 55

9/11 of 517/12 = ? / 212

Solution:

QUESTION: 56

586  587  586  581  570  ?  522

Solution:

QUESTION: 57

435  354  282  219  165  ?

Solution:

QUESTION: 58

325  314  288  247  191  ?

Solution:

QUESTION: 59

6  4  8  23  ?  385.25

Solution:

QUESTION: 60

9  11  15  ?  39  71

Solution:

QUESTION: 61

99 50/51  * 561 = ?

Solution:

? = (99×51-50)/51*561= (100 - 1/51) * 561 = 56089

QUESTION: 62

6269 + 0.75 × 444 + 0.8 × 185 = ? × 15 

Solution:

6269 + 333 + 148 = ? × 15

? = 6750/15 = 450

QUESTION: 63

456.675 + 35.7683 × 67.909 – 58.876 = ?

Solution:

456.675 + 35.7683 × 67.909 – 58.876 = 2826.79 = 2830

QUESTION: 64

Solution:

QUESTION: 65

Solution:

QUESTION: 66

Directions : Study the following information carefully and answer the given questions:

There are ten family members A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I and J. There are three generations in the family. There are three married couple in the family. B is the only sister of G's brother H. G and J are the married couple. A is the mother of J. D is the brother of J. C is the father in law of G. I is the mother of B. F is the father in law of J. E is the son G.

Q. ​How is G related to D?

Solution:

QUESTION: 67

Directions : Study the following information carefully and answer the given questions:

There are ten family members A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I and J. There are three generations in the family. There are three married couple in the family. B is the only sister of G's brother H. G and J are the married couple. A is the mother of J. D is the brother of J. C is the father in law of G. I is the mother of B. F is the father in law of J. E is the son G.

Q. How is I related to E?

Solution:

QUESTION: 68

Directions : Study the following information carefully and answer the given questions:

There are ten family members A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I and J. There are three generations in the family. There are three married couple in the family. B is the only sister of G's brother H. G and J are the married couple. A is the mother of J. D is the brother of J. C is the father in law of G. I is the mother of B. F is the father in law of J. E is the son G.

Q. How is B related to E?

Solution:

QUESTION: 69

Directions : In these questions, relationship between different elements is shown in the statements. The statements are followed by conclusions.

Statements X ≥ G = H; G > J ≥ L;  J ≥ K < Y

Conclusions

I. X≥ L

II. L< H

III. L>Y

Solution:

X≥G=H>J≥L

X≥G=H>J≥K<Y

QUESTION: 70

Directions : In these questions, relationship between different elements is shown in the statements. The statements are followed by conclusions.Give answer

Statements A<B = R ≥ S ≥ T; X<J≤K<T

Conclusions

I. T ≤B

II. X>A

III. J>B

Solution:

A<B=R≥S≥T>K≥J>X

QUESTION: 71

Directions : In these questions, relationship between different elements is shown in the statements. The statements are followed by conclusions.Give answer

Statements P≤ Q< C; P≥ D; C ≤ F; Q≤L>M

Conclusions

I. D ≤C

II. L> D

III. P≤L

Solution:

D≤P≤Q<C≤F, 

D≤P≤Q≤L>M

QUESTION: 72

Directions : In these questions, relationship between different elements is shown in the statements. The statements are followed by conclusions.Give answer

Statements U >P = I ≤ O <Q; I≥K>L≤N

Conclusions

I. I ≤Q

II. L> UIII. N<Q

Solution:

U>P=I≤O<Q
U>P=I≥K>L≤N

QUESTION: 73

Directions : In these questions, relationship between different elements is shown in the statements. The statements are followed by conclusions.Give answer

Statements L = A≥B; A> P; L < K; B≥J>M

Conclusions

I. K > P

II. B< K

III. L>M

Solution:

P<L=A≥B≥J>M
K>L=A≥B≥J>M

QUESTION: 74

A, B, C, D, E, F and G are seven students of the Engineering college. All of them belongs to different branch of Engineering: Mechanical, Chemical, Electrical, Computer Science, IT, Textile and Electronics but not necessarily in the same order. Each one of them likes different sports Snooker, Golf, Tennis, Badminton, Cricket, Football and Volleyball not necessarily in the same order. All of them are of different height. D is taller than C and F. E is taller than G.B studies in Mechanical and likes Football. E studies in Computer Science but not likes Tennis or Cricket. The one who studies in IT likes Snooker. F likes Golf but does not studies in Chemical or Electronics. C is taller than E. B is taller than only A.A person who studies in Electrical likes Badminton. The one who studies in Electronics does not like Cricket. G studies in IT and C likes Tennis. The one who is tallest likes Badminton.

Q. Who plays the Cricket?

Solution:

QUESTION: 75

A, B, C, D, E, F and G are seven students of the Engineering college. All of them belongs to different branch of Engineering: Mechanical, Chemical, Electrical, Computer Science, IT, Textile and Electronics but not necessarily in the same order. Each one of them likes different sports Snooker, Golf, Tennis, Badminton, Cricket, Football and Volleyball not necessarily in the same order. All of them are of different height. D is taller than C and F. E is taller than G.B studies in Mechanical and likes Football. E studies in Computer Science but not likes Tennis or Cricket. The one who studies in IT likes Snooker. F likes Golf but does not studies in Chemical or Electronics. C is taller than E. B is taller than only A.A person who studies in Electrical likes Badminton. The one who studies in Electronics does not like Cricket. G studies in IT and C likes Tennis. The one who is tallest likes Badminton.

Q. E plays which game?

Solution:

D > C > E > G > B > A
From given information, we know about F that he is surely less than D and can come anywhere from D to B.

QUESTION: 76

A, B, C, D, E, F and G are seven students of the Engineering college. All of them belongs to different branch of Engineering: Mechanical, Chemical, Electrical, Computer Science, IT, Textile and Electronics but not necessarily in the same order. Each one of them likes different sports Snooker, Golf, Tennis, Badminton, Cricket, Football and Volleyball not necessarily in the same order. All of them are of different height. D is taller than C and F. E is taller than G.B studies in Mechanical and likes Football. E studies in Computer Science but not likes Tennis or Cricket. The one who studies in IT likes Snooker. F likes Golf but does not studies in Chemical or Electronics. C is taller than E. B is taller than only A.A person who studies in Electrical likes Badminton. The one who studies in Electronics does not like Cricket. G studies in IT and C likes Tennis. The one who is tallest likes Badminton.

Q. Which of the following combinations of branch-person-sports is definitely correct?

Solution:

D > C > E > G > B > A
From given information, we know about F that he is surely less than D and can come anywhere from D to B.

QUESTION: 77

A, B, C, D, E, F and G are seven students of the Engineering college. All of them belongs to different branch of Engineering: Mechanical, Chemical, Electrical, Computer Science, IT, Textile and Electronics but not necessarily in the same order. Each one of them likes different sports Snooker, Golf, Tennis, Badminton, Cricket, Football and Volleyball not necessarily in the same order. All of them are of different height. D is taller than C and F. E is taller than G.B studies in Mechanical and likes Football. E studies in Computer Science but not likes Tennis or Cricket. The one who studies in IT likes Snooker. F likes Golf but does not studies in Chemical or Electronics. C is taller than E. B is taller than only A.A person who studies in Electrical likes Badminton. The one who studies in Electronics does not like Cricket. G studies in IT and C likes Tennis. The one who is tallest likes Badminton.

Q. Who studies Textile?

Solution:

D > C > E > G > B > A
From given information, we know about F that he is surely less than D and can come anywhere from D to B.

QUESTION: 78

A, B, C, D, E, F and G are seven students of the Engineering college. All of them belongs to different branch of Engineering: Mechanical, Chemical, Electrical, Computer Science, IT, Textile and Electronics but not necessarily in the same order. Each one of them likes different sports Snooker, Golf, Tennis, Badminton, Cricket, Football and Volleyball not necessarily in the same order. All of them are of different height. D is taller than C and F. E is taller than G.B studies in Mechanical and likes Football. E studies in Computer Science but not likes Tennis or Cricket. The one who studies in IT likes Snooker. F likes Golf but does not studies in Chemical or Electronics. C is taller than E. B is taller than only A.A person who studies in Electrical likes Badminton. The one who studies in Electronics does not like Cricket. G studies in IT and C likes Tennis. The one who is tallest likes Badminton.

Q. Who is the Golfer?

Solution:

D > C > E > G > B > A
From given information, we know about F that he is surely less than D and can come anywhere from D to B.

QUESTION: 79

Statements: Some toys are cameras. All cameras are branches. All branches are nets. Some nets are drills.
Conclusions:
I. Some drills are cameras.
II. Some nets are toys.
III. Some branches are toys.
IV. Some drills are toys.

Solution:

QUESTION: 80

Statements: All paints are cements. Some cements are bolds. Some bolds are lanes. All lanes are roads.
Conclusions:
I. Some roads are bolds.
II. Some lanes are cements.
III. Some bolds are paints.
IV. Some roads are cements.

Solution:

QUESTION: 81

Statements: Some pens are kites. Some kites are dishes. All dishes are jungles. All jungles are mountains.
Conclusions:
I. Some mountains are pens.
II. Some jungles are pens.
III. Some mountains are dishes.
IV. Some jungles are kites.

Solution:

QUESTION: 82

Statements: All storms are horrors. No horrors is ring. Some rings are doors. All doors are winds.
Conclusions:
I. Some winds are storms.
II. Some winds are rings.
III. No winds is storms.
IV. Some rings are storms.

Solution:

QUESTION: 83

Statements: All points are clocks. Some clocks are timers. Some timers are worlds. Some worlds are buses.
Conclusions:
I. Some buses are timers.
II. Some worlds are clocks.
III. Some worlds are points.
IV. Some buses are clocks.

Solution:

QUESTION: 84

Directions : Read the following information carefully and answer the questions.
There is a group of six persons A, B, C, D, E and F. Each of them has a different height. D is taller than E. A is taller than B but smaller than C. F is shorter than only two persons. E is shorter than only one person.

Q. Who among the following is the tallest?

Solution:

D> E …(i)

C > A> B …(ii)

_ > _ > F …(iii)

_ > E …(iv)

Combining these, we get

D > E > F > C> A > B

QUESTION: 85

Directions : Read the following information carefully and answer the questions.
There is a group of six persons A, B, C, D, E and F. Each of them has a different height. D is taller than E. A is taller than B but smaller than C. F is shorter than only two persons. E is shorter than only one person.

Q. Who among the following is the third shortest?

Solution:

D> E …(i)

C > A> B …(ii)

_ > _ > F …(iii)

_ > E …(iv)

Combining these, we get

D > E > F > C> A > B

QUESTION: 86

Directions : Read the following information carefully and answer the questions.
There is a group of six persons A, B, C, D, E and F. Each of them has a different height. D is taller than E. A is taller than B but smaller than C. F is shorter than only two persons. E is shorter than only one person.

Q. How many persons are taller than only A?

Solution:

D> E …(i)

C > A> B …(ii)

_ > _ > F …(iii)

_ > E …(iv)

Combining these, we get

D > E > F > C> A > B

QUESTION: 87

If the expressions, R < P and Q ≥ T are true then which of the following symbols should be placed in the blank spaces respectively in the given expression?

R _ P > N = T _ Q

Solution:
QUESTION: 88

Directions: Study the following information carefully and answer the questions given below:

P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W and X are sitting around a circular table. Two of them are not facing the centre. U is fourth to the left of P, who is third to the right of Q. X is fourth to the left of Q. S is third to the left of X. R is third to the right of W. T is second to the right of V, who is not the neighbour of X. P is not facing the centre.

Q. Who is third to the right of T?

Solution:

QUESTION: 89

Directions: Study the following information carefully and answer the questions given below:

P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W and X are sitting around a circular table. Two of them are not facing the centre. U is fourth to the left of P, who is third to the right of Q. X is fourth to the left of Q. S is third to the left of X. R is third to the right of W. T is second to the right of V, who is not the neighbour of X. P is not facing the centre.

Q. Who among the following is fourth to the right of V?

Solution:

QUESTION: 90

Directions: Study the following information carefully and answer the questions given below:

P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W and X are sitting around a circular table. Two of them are not facing the centre. U is fourth to the left of P, who is third to the right of Q. X is fourth to the left of Q. S is third to the left of X. R is third to the right of W. T is second to the right of V, who is not the neighbour of X. P is not facing the centre.

Q. Who among the following is on the immediate right of X?

Solution:

QUESTION: 91

Directions: Study the following information carefully and answer the questions given below:

P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W and X are sitting around a circular table. Two of them are not facing the centre. U is fourth to the left of P, who is third to the right of Q. X is fourth to the left of Q. S is third to the left of X. R is third to the right of W. T is second to the right of V, who is not the neighbour of X. P is not facing the centre.

Q. Four of the following five are alike in a certain way and hence form a group. Which is the one that does not belong to that group?

Solution:

QUESTION: 92

Directions: Study the following information carefully and answer the questions given below:

P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W and X are sitting around a circular table. Two of them are not facing the centre. U is fourth to the left of P, who is third to the right of Q. X is fourth to the left of Q. S is third to the left of X. R is third to the right of W. T is second to the right of V, who is not the neighbour of X. P is not facing the centre.

Q. What is the position of S with respect to V?

Solution:

QUESTION: 93

Danyal walks 20 metres towards North. He then turns left and walks 40 metres. He again turns left and walks 20 metres. Further, he moves 20 metres after turning to the right. How far is he from his original position?

Solution:

The movement of Danyalare as shown in Figure.

i.e. A to B, B to C, C to D and D to E.

A = Starting Point

E = End Point

Therefore, Danyal’s distance from his starting position

A = AE = (AD + DE) = (BC + DE)

= (40 + 20) m = 60 m.

QUESTION: 94

Deepa moves towards South-East a distance of 7 m, then the moves towards west and travels a distance of 14 m. From here, she moves towards North-West a distance of 7 m and finally she moves a distance of 4 m towards East and stood at the point. How far is the starting point from where she stood?

Solution:

The movements of Deepa are as shown in Figure.

i.e. P to Q, Q to R, R to S and S to T.

 

P = Starting Point

T = End Point

Therefore, Deepa’s distance from the starting point

P = PT = (PS – ST) = (QR – ST)

= (14 – 4) m = 10 m

QUESTION: 95

In a certain code language ‘how many are there’ is written as ‘ka na ta da’ and ‘many are welcome here’ is written as ‘na pi ni ka’. How is ‘how’ written in that code language?

Solution:

how many are there = ka na ta da  …(i)

many are welcome here = na pi ni ka  …(ii)

From (i) and (ii), many are = ka na  …(iii)

Using (iii) in (i), we get: how = ta or da 

QUESTION: 96

If the positions of the first and the fifth digits of the number 83591427 are interchanged, similarly the positions of the second and the sixth digits are interchanged, and so on, then which of the following will be the second digit from the right end after the rearrangement?

Solution:
QUESTION: 97

How many such pairs of letters are there in the word ADJUSTING, each of which has as many letters between them in the word as in the English alphabet?

Solution:

QUESTION: 98

If ‘R’ denotes ‘÷’; T denotes ‘−’; ‘M’ denotes ‘+’ and W denotes ‘×’, then

27 T 15 R 3 W 4 M 6 = ?

Solution:

27 – 15 ÷ 3 × 4 + 6

= 27 – 20 + 6 = 13

QUESTION: 99

In a certain code WAVE is written as ‘5%3*’ and WINS is written as ‘59@©’. How is SANE written in the code? 

Solution:

QUESTION: 100

How many such pairs of letters are there in the word ‘SCIENTIST’ each of which has as many letters between them in word (in both forward and backward directions) as in English alphabetical series?

Solution:

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