SBI Clerk Prelims Mock Test - 7


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Attempt SBI Clerk Prelims Mock Test - 7 | 100 questions in 60 minutes | Mock test for Banking Exams preparation | Free important questions MCQ to study SBI Clerk Prelims Mock Test Series for Banking Exams Exam | Download free PDF with solutions
QUESTION: 1

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

Last week, when nine well-known media houses began publishing directly to Facebook, allowing the social media giant’s 1.4 billion users to read stories then and there, those in the embattled media industry would have felt relieved and uneasy at the same time. Relieved, because of what, on the face of it, seems to be a sweet deal for all the nine publishers that are part of Facebook’s direct publishing feature, Instant Articles. The New York Times, National Geographic, BuzzFeed, NBC, The Atlantic, The Guardian, BBC, Spiegel Online, and Bild can sell advertisements on their own and keep all of those revenues. Alternatively, they can allow Facebook to sell and still keep 70 per cent of the proceeds. For an industry that is struggling with the aftermath of the digital disruption, this is a welcome revenue-raising opportunity. According to the Pew Research Center’s State of the News Media 2015 report, revenues from print advertising fell in 2014 over the previous year while revenues from digital advertising grew. The catch: the good showing of digital wasn’t even nearly good enough to make up for print’s shortfall. In the U.S., print advertising dollars fell by nearly a billion while digital dollars just about managed a growth of 100 million.

Still, it is difficult not to feel uncomfortable about Facebook’s growing clout as a distributor of news. Top publishers are already on board Instant Articles, and more are itching to follow suit. Their websites could increasingly become less relevant. As more and more publishers join it, each of them individually will need Facebook more than it needs them. But avoiding a partnership with Facebook, as some publishers have suggested they would, isn’t a wise thing to do. As the Pew Research Center’s report put it, nearly half of those surveyed said they had accessed news on politics and government on Facebook in the week before. Also, the platform attracts roughly a fourth of the display advertisement revenues and more than a third of mobile display advertisement revenues. This is in sharp contrast to the experience of news organisations in garnering digital revenues.Befriending Facebook now is a no-brainer, especially given that publishing houses long ago ceded control of news distribution to technology firms. They have only themselves to blame. What they ought to ensure now is not to become too dependent on any one platform, even as they continue to build their identities both online and offline. Fortunately for the publishers, the likes of Snapchat, Facebook’s promising rival which has managed to woo the youth, do seem to give the hope that the publisher-distributor relationship wouldn’t be one-sided.

Q. Choose an appropriate title for the passage.

Solution:
QUESTION: 2

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

Last week, when nine well-known media houses began publishing directly to Facebook, allowing the social media giant’s 1.4 billion users to read stories then and there, those in the embattled media industry would have felt relieved and uneasy at the same time. Relieved, because of what, on the face of it, seems to be a sweet deal for all the nine publishers that are part of Facebook’s direct publishing feature, Instant Articles. The New York Times, National Geographic, BuzzFeed, NBC, The Atlantic, The Guardian, BBC, Spiegel Online, and Bild can sell advertisements on their own and keep all of those revenues. Alternatively, they can allow Facebook to sell and still keep 70 per cent of the proceeds. For an industry that is struggling with the aftermath of the digital disruption, this is a welcome revenue-raising opportunity. According to the Pew Research Center’s State of the News Media 2015 report, revenues from print advertising fell in 2014 over the previous year while revenues from digital advertising grew. The catch: the good showing of digital wasn’t even nearly good enough to make up for print’s shortfall. In the U.S., print advertising dollars fell by nearly a billion while digital dollars just about managed a growth of 100 million.

Still, it is difficult not to feel uncomfortable about Facebook’s growing clout as a distributor of news. Top publishers are already on board Instant Articles, and more are itching to follow suit. Their websites could increasingly become less relevant. As more and more publishers join it, each of them individually will need Facebook more than it needs them. But avoiding a partnership with Facebook, as some publishers have suggested they would, isn’t a wise thing to do. As the Pew Research Center’s report put it, nearly half of those surveyed said they had accessed news on politics and government on Facebook in the week before. Also, the platform attracts roughly a fourth of the display advertisement revenues and more than a third of mobile display advertisement revenues. This is in sharp contrast to the experience of news organisations in garnering digital revenues.Befriending Facebook now is a no-brainer, especially given that publishing houses long ago ceded control of news distribution to technology firms. They have only themselves to blame. What they ought to ensure now is not to become too dependent on any one platform, even as they continue to build their identities both online and offline. Fortunately for the publishers, the likes of Snapchat, Facebook’s promising rival which has managed to woo the youth, do seem to give the hope that the publisher-distributor relationship wouldn’t be one-sided.

Q. Which of the following social networking sites is mentioned in the passage?

A) Facebook

B) Twitter

C) Snapchat

Solution:
QUESTION: 3

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

Last week, when nine well-known media houses began publishing directly to Facebook, allowing the social media giant’s 1.4 billion users to read stories then and there, those in the embattled media industry would have felt relieved and uneasy at the same time. Relieved, because of what, on the face of it, seems to be a sweet deal for all the nine publishers that are part of Facebook’s direct publishing feature, Instant Articles. The New York Times, National Geographic, BuzzFeed, NBC, The Atlantic, The Guardian, BBC, Spiegel Online, and Bild can sell advertisements on their own and keep all of those revenues. Alternatively, they can allow Facebook to sell and still keep 70 per cent of the proceeds. For an industry that is struggling with the aftermath of the digital disruption, this is a welcome revenue-raising opportunity. According to the Pew Research Center’s State of the News Media 2015 report, revenues from print advertising fell in 2014 over the previous year while revenues from digital advertising grew. The catch: the good showing of digital wasn’t even nearly good enough to make up for print’s shortfall. In the U.S., print advertising dollars fell by nearly a billion while digital dollars just about managed a growth of 100 million.

Still, it is difficult not to feel uncomfortable about Facebook’s growing clout as a distributor of news. Top publishers are already on board Instant Articles, and more are itching to follow suit. Their websites could increasingly become less relevant. As more and more publishers join it, each of them individually will need Facebook more than it needs them. But avoiding a partnership with Facebook, as some publishers have suggested they would, isn’t a wise thing to do. As the Pew Research Center’s report put it, nearly half of those surveyed said they had accessed news on politics and government on Facebook in the week before. Also, the platform attracts roughly a fourth of the display advertisement revenues and more than a third of mobile display advertisement revenues. This is in sharp contrast to the experience of news organisations in garnering digital revenues.Befriending Facebook now is a no-brainer, especially given that publishing houses long ago ceded control of news distribution to technology firms. They have only themselves to blame. What they ought to ensure now is not to become too dependent on any one platform, even as they continue to build their identities both online and offline. Fortunately for the publishers, the likes of Snapchat, Facebook’s promising rival which has managed to woo the youth, do seem to give the hope that the publisher-distributor relationship wouldn’t be one-sided.

Q. Which of the following is true according to the passage?

A) The platform attracts roughly a fourth of the display advertisement revenues and more than a third of mobile display advertisement revenues.

B) According to the Pew Research Center’s State of the News Media 2015 report, revenues from print advertising rose in 2014 over the previous year

C) Top publishers are already on board Instant Articles, and more are itching to follow suit.

Solution:
QUESTION: 4

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

Last week, when nine well-known media houses began publishing directly to Facebook, allowing the social media giant’s 1.4 billion users to read stories then and there, those in the embattled media industry would have felt relieved and uneasy at the same time. Relieved, because of what, on the face of it, seems to be a sweet deal for all the nine publishers that are part of Facebook’s direct publishing feature, Instant Articles. The New York Times, National Geographic, BuzzFeed, NBC, The Atlantic, The Guardian, BBC, Spiegel Online, and Bild can sell advertisements on their own and keep all of those revenues. Alternatively, they can allow Facebook to sell and still keep 70 per cent of the proceeds. For an industry that is struggling with the aftermath of the digital disruption, this is a welcome revenue-raising opportunity. According to the Pew Research Center’s State of the News Media 2015 report, revenues from print advertising fell in 2014 over the previous year while revenues from digital advertising grew. The catch: the good showing of digital wasn’t even nearly good enough to make up for print’s shortfall. In the U.S., print advertising dollars fell by nearly a billion while digital dollars just about managed a growth of 100 million.

Still, it is difficult not to feel uncomfortable about Facebook’s growing clout as a distributor of news. Top publishers are already on board Instant Articles, and more are itching to follow suit. Their websites could increasingly become less relevant. As more and more publishers join it, each of them individually will need Facebook more than it needs them. But avoiding a partnership with Facebook, as some publishers have suggested they would, isn’t a wise thing to do. As the Pew Research Center’s report put it, nearly half of those surveyed said they had accessed news on politics and government on Facebook in the week before. Also, the platform attracts roughly a fourth of the display advertisement revenues and more than a third of mobile display advertisement revenues. This is in sharp contrast to the experience of news organisations in garnering digital revenues.Befriending Facebook now is a no-brainer, especially given that publishing houses long ago ceded control of news distribution to technology firms. They have only themselves to blame. What they ought to ensure now is not to become too dependent on any one platform, even as they continue to build their identities both online and offline. Fortunately for the publishers, the likes of Snapchat, Facebook’s promising rival which has managed to woo the youth, do seem to give the hope that the publisher-distributor relationship wouldn’t be one-sided.

Q. What does the author suggest to the news publishing firms and urge them to ensure?

Solution:
QUESTION: 5

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

Last week, when nine well-known media houses began publishing directly to Facebook, allowing the social media giant’s 1.4 billion users to read stories then and there, those in the embattled media industry would have felt relieved and uneasy at the same time. Relieved, because of what, on the face of it, seems to be a sweet deal for all the nine publishers that are part of Facebook’s direct publishing feature, Instant Articles. The New York Times, National Geographic, BuzzFeed, NBC, The Atlantic, The Guardian, BBC, Spiegel Online, and Bild can sell advertisements on their own and keep all of those revenues. Alternatively, they can allow Facebook to sell and still keep 70 per cent of the proceeds. For an industry that is struggling with the aftermath of the digital disruption, this is a welcome revenue-raising opportunity. According to the Pew Research Center’s State of the News Media 2015 report, revenues from print advertising fell in 2014 over the previous year while revenues from digital advertising grew. The catch: the good showing of digital wasn’t even nearly good enough to make up for print’s shortfall. In the U.S., print advertising dollars fell by nearly a billion while digital dollars just about managed a growth of 100 million.

Still, it is difficult not to feel uncomfortable about Facebook’s growing clout as a distributor of news. Top publishers are already on board Instant Articles, and more are itching to follow suit. Their websites could increasingly become less relevant. As more and more publishers join it, each of them individually will need Facebook more than it needs them. But avoiding a partnership with Facebook, as some publishers have suggested they would, isn’t a wise thing to do. As the Pew Research Center’s report put it, nearly half of those surveyed said they had accessed news on politics and government on Facebook in the week before. Also, the platform attracts roughly a fourth of the display advertisement revenues and more than a third of mobile display advertisement revenues. This is in sharp contrast to the experience of news organisations in garnering digital revenues.Befriending Facebook now is a no-brainer, especially given that publishing houses long ago ceded control of news distribution to technology firms. They have only themselves to blame. What they ought to ensure now is not to become too dependent on any one platform, even as they continue to build their identities both online and offline. Fortunately for the publishers, the likes of Snapchat, Facebook’s promising rival which has managed to woo the youth, do seem to give the hope that the publisher-distributor relationship wouldn’t be one-sided.

Q. What does the author mean by the phrase “Befriending Facebook now is a no-brainer”?

Solution:
QUESTION: 6

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

Last week, when nine well-known media houses began publishing directly to Facebook, allowing the social media giant’s 1.4 billion users to read stories then and there, those in the embattled media industry would have felt relieved and uneasy at the same time. Relieved, because of what, on the face of it, seems to be a sweet deal for all the nine publishers that are part of Facebook’s direct publishing feature, Instant Articles. The New York Times, National Geographic, BuzzFeed, NBC, The Atlantic, The Guardian, BBC, Spiegel Online, and Bild can sell advertisements on their own and keep all of those revenues. Alternatively, they can allow Facebook to sell and still keep 70 per cent of the proceeds. For an industry that is struggling with the aftermath of the digital disruption, this is a welcome revenue-raising opportunity. According to the Pew Research Center’s State of the News Media 2015 report, revenues from print advertising fell in 2014 over the previous year while revenues from digital advertising grew. The catch: the good showing of digital wasn’t even nearly good enough to make up for print’s shortfall. In the U.S., print advertising dollars fell by nearly a billion while digital dollars just about managed a growth of 100 million.

Still, it is difficult not to feel uncomfortable about Facebook’s growing clout as a distributor of news. Top publishers are already on board Instant Articles, and more are itching to follow suit. Their websites could increasingly become less relevant. As more and more publishers join it, each of them individually will need Facebook more than it needs them. But avoiding a partnership with Facebook, as some publishers have suggested they would, isn’t a wise thing to do. As the Pew Research Center’s report put it, nearly half of those surveyed said they had accessed news on politics and government on Facebook in the week before. Also, the platform attracts roughly a fourth of the display advertisement revenues and more than a third of mobile display advertisement revenues. This is in sharp contrast to the experience of news organisations in garnering digital revenues.Befriending Facebook now is a no-brainer, especially given that publishing houses long ago ceded control of news distribution to technology firms. They have only themselves to blame. What they ought to ensure now is not to become too dependent on any one platform, even as they continue to build their identities both online and offline. Fortunately for the publishers, the likes of Snapchat, Facebook’s promising rival which has managed to woo the youth, do seem to give the hope that the publisher-distributor relationship wouldn’t be one-sided.

Q. Which of the following is not the synonym of the word “Ceded”?

Solution:
QUESTION: 7

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

Last week, when nine well-known media houses began publishing directly to Facebook, allowing the social media giant’s 1.4 billion users to read stories then and there, those in the embattled media industry would have felt relieved and uneasy at the same time. Relieved, because of what, on the face of it, seems to be a sweet deal for all the nine publishers that are part of Facebook’s direct publishing feature, Instant Articles. The New York Times, National Geographic, BuzzFeed, NBC, The Atlantic, The Guardian, BBC, Spiegel Online, and Bild can sell advertisements on their own and keep all of those revenues. Alternatively, they can allow Facebook to sell and still keep 70 per cent of the proceeds. For an industry that is struggling with the aftermath of the digital disruption, this is a welcome revenue-raising opportunity. According to the Pew Research Center’s State of the News Media 2015 report, revenues from print advertising fell in 2014 over the previous year while revenues from digital advertising grew. The catch: the good showing of digital wasn’t even nearly good enough to make up for print’s shortfall. In the U.S., print advertising dollars fell by nearly a billion while digital dollars just about managed a growth of 100 million.

Still, it is difficult not to feel uncomfortable about Facebook’s growing clout as a distributor of news. Top publishers are already on board Instant Articles, and more are itching to follow suit. Their websites could increasingly become less relevant. As more and more publishers join it, each of them individually will need Facebook more than it needs them. But avoiding a partnership with Facebook, as some publishers have suggested they would, isn’t a wise thing to do. As the Pew Research Center’s report put it, nearly half of those surveyed said they had accessed news on politics and government on Facebook in the week before. Also, the platform attracts roughly a fourth of the display advertisement revenues and more than a third of mobile display advertisement revenues. This is in sharp contrast to the experience of news organisations in garnering digital revenues.Befriending Facebook now is a no-brainer, especially given that publishing houses long ago ceded control of news distribution to technology firms. They have only themselves to blame. What they ought to ensure now is not to become too dependent on any one platform, even as they continue to build their identities both online and offline. Fortunately for the publishers, the likes of Snapchat, Facebook’s promising rival which has managed to woo the youth, do seem to give the hope that the publisher-distributor relationship wouldn’t be one-sided.

Q. Which of the following is the synonym of the word “Clout”?

Solution:
QUESTION: 8

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

Last week, when nine well-known media houses began publishing directly to Facebook, allowing the social media giant’s 1.4 billion users to read stories then and there, those in the embattled media industry would have felt relieved and uneasy at the same time. Relieved, because of what, on the face of it, seems to be a sweet deal for all the nine publishers that are part of Facebook’s direct publishing feature, Instant Articles. The New York Times, National Geographic, BuzzFeed, NBC, The Atlantic, The Guardian, BBC, Spiegel Online, and Bild can sell advertisements on their own and keep all of those revenues. Alternatively, they can allow Facebook to sell and still keep 70 per cent of the proceeds. For an industry that is struggling with the aftermath of the digital disruption, this is a welcome revenue-raising opportunity. According to the Pew Research Center’s State of the News Media 2015 report, revenues from print advertising fell in 2014 over the previous year while revenues from digital advertising grew. The catch: the good showing of digital wasn’t even nearly good enough to make up for print’s shortfall. In the U.S., print advertising dollars fell by nearly a billion while digital dollars just about managed a growth of 100 million.

Still, it is difficult not to feel uncomfortable about Facebook’s growing clout as a distributor of news. Top publishers are already on board Instant Articles, and more are itching to follow suit. Their websites could increasingly become less relevant. As more and more publishers join it, each of them individually will need Facebook more than it needs them. But avoiding a partnership with Facebook, as some publishers have suggested they would, isn’t a wise thing to do. As the Pew Research Center’s report put it, nearly half of those surveyed said they had accessed news on politics and government on Facebook in the week before. Also, the platform attracts roughly a fourth of the display advertisement revenues and more than a third of mobile display advertisement revenues. This is in sharp contrast to the experience of news organisations in garnering digital revenues.Befriending Facebook now is a no-brainer, especially given that publishing houses long ago ceded control of news distribution to technology firms. They have only themselves to blame. What they ought to ensure now is not to become too dependent on any one platform, even as they continue to build their identities both online and offline. Fortunately for the publishers, the likes of Snapchat, Facebook’s promising rival which has managed to woo the youth, do seem to give the hope that the publisher-distributor relationship wouldn’t be one-sided.

Q. Which of the following is the synonym of the word “accessed”?

Solution:
QUESTION: 9

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

Last week, when nine well-known media houses began publishing directly to Facebook, allowing the social media giant’s 1.4 billion users to read stories then and there, those in the embattled media industry would have felt relieved and uneasy at the same time. Relieved, because of what, on the face of it, seems to be a sweet deal for all the nine publishers that are part of Facebook’s direct publishing feature, Instant Articles. The New York Times, National Geographic, BuzzFeed, NBC, The Atlantic, The Guardian, BBC, Spiegel Online, and Bild can sell advertisements on their own and keep all of those revenues. Alternatively, they can allow Facebook to sell and still keep 70 per cent of the proceeds. For an industry that is struggling with the aftermath of the digital disruption, this is a welcome revenue-raising opportunity. According to the Pew Research Center’s State of the News Media 2015 report, revenues from print advertising fell in 2014 over the previous year while revenues from digital advertising grew. The catch: the good showing of digital wasn’t even nearly good enough to make up for print’s shortfall. In the U.S., print advertising dollars fell by nearly a billion while digital dollars just about managed a growth of 100 million.

Still, it is difficult not to feel uncomfortable about Facebook’s growing clout as a distributor of news. Top publishers are already on board Instant Articles, and more are itching to follow suit. Their websites could increasingly become less relevant. As more and more publishers join it, each of them individually will need Facebook more than it needs them. But avoiding a partnership with Facebook, as some publishers have suggested they would, isn’t a wise thing to do. As the Pew Research Center’s report put it, nearly half of those surveyed said they had accessed news on politics and government on Facebook in the week before. Also, the platform attracts roughly a fourth of the display advertisement revenues and more than a third of mobile display advertisement revenues. This is in sharp contrast to the experience of news organisations in garnering digital revenues.Befriending Facebook now is a no-brainer, especially given that publishing houses long ago ceded control of news distribution to technology firms. They have only themselves to blame. What they ought to ensure now is not to become too dependent on any one platform, even as they continue to build their identities both online and offline. Fortunately for the publishers, the likes of Snapchat, Facebook’s promising rival which has managed to woo the youth, do seem to give the hope that the publisher-distributor relationship wouldn’t be one-sided.

Q. Which of the following is the synonym of the word “embattled”?

Solution:
QUESTION: 10

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

Last week, when nine well-known media houses began publishing directly to Facebook, allowing the social media giant’s 1.4 billion users to read stories then and there, those in the embattled media industry would have felt relieved and uneasy at the same time. Relieved, because of what, on the face of it, seems to be a sweet deal for all the nine publishers that are part of Facebook’s direct publishing feature, Instant Articles. The New York Times, National Geographic, BuzzFeed, NBC, The Atlantic, The Guardian, BBC, Spiegel Online, and Bild can sell advertisements on their own and keep all of those revenues. Alternatively, they can allow Facebook to sell and still keep 70 per cent of the proceeds. For an industry that is struggling with the aftermath of the digital disruption, this is a welcome revenue-raising opportunity. According to the Pew Research Center’s State of the News Media 2015 report, revenues from print advertising fell in 2014 over the previous year while revenues from digital advertising grew. The catch: the good showing of digital wasn’t even nearly good enough to make up for print’s shortfall. In the U.S., print advertising dollars fell by nearly a billion while digital dollars just about managed a growth of 100 million.

Still, it is difficult not to feel uncomfortable about Facebook’s growing clout as a distributor of news. Top publishers are already on board Instant Articles, and more are itching to follow suit. Their websites could increasingly become less relevant. As more and more publishers join it, each of them individually will need Facebook more than it needs them. But avoiding a partnership with Facebook, as some publishers have suggested they would, isn’t a wise thing to do. As the Pew Research Center’s report put it, nearly half of those surveyed said they had accessed news on politics and government on Facebook in the week before. Also, the platform attracts roughly a fourth of the display advertisement revenues and more than a third of mobile display advertisement revenues. This is in sharp contrast to the experience of news organisations in garnering digital revenues.Befriending Facebook now is a no-brainer, especially given that publishing houses long ago ceded control of news distribution to technology firms. They have only themselves to blame. What they ought to ensure now is not to become too dependent on any one platform, even as they continue to build their identities both online and offline. Fortunately for the publishers, the likes of Snapchat, Facebook’s promising rival which has managed to woo the youth, do seem to give the hope that the publisher-distributor relationship wouldn’t be one-sided.

Q. Which of the following is not the synonym of the word “uneasy”?

Solution:
QUESTION: 11

Directions : In each of the following sentences there are two blank spaces. Below each sentence there are five pairs of words denoted by numbers (1), (2), (3)), ,(4) and (5). Find out which pair of words can be filled up in the blanks in the sentence in the same sequence to make the sentence grammatically correct and meaningfully complete.

At the dawn of history India __________on her unending quest and trackless centuries are __________ with her striving and the grandeur of her success and her failures. 

Solution:
QUESTION: 12

Directions : In each of the following sentences there are two blank spaces. Below each sentence there are five pairs of words denoted by numbers (1), (2), (3)), ,(4) and (5). Find out which pair of words can be filled up in the blanks in the sentence in the same sequence to make the sentence grammatically correct and meaningfully complete.

It is height of __________for men who fully appreciate in their own case the great advantages of a good education but __________ these advantages to women. 

Solution:
QUESTION: 13

Directions : In each of the following sentences there are two blank spaces. Below each sentence there are five pairs of words denoted by numbers (1), (2), (3)), ,(4) and (5). Find out which pair of words can be filled up in the blanks in the sentence in the same sequence to make the sentence grammatically correct and meaningfully complete.

As everybody is __________ attached to his motherland it is difficult to find a man who is __________ of love for his motherland. 

Solution:
QUESTION: 14

Directions : In each of the following sentences there are two blank spaces. Below each sentence there are five pairs of words denoted by numbers (1), (2), (3)), ,(4) and (5). Find out which pair of words can be filled up in the blanks in the sentence in the same sequence to make the sentence grammatically correct and meaningfully complete.

If we study the lives of great men we are __________  that we too can achieve greatness and when we die, we leave behind our __________ 

Solution:
QUESTION: 15

Directions : In each of the following sentences there are two blank spaces. Below each sentence there are five pairs of words denoted by numbers (1), (2), (3)), ,(4) and (5). Find out which pair of words can be filled up in the blanks in the sentence in the same sequence to make the sentence grammatically correct and meaningfully complete.

The society provides the individual security of life, __________ of thought and sustenance for action.  Every individual who __________ from society is indebted to the society. 

Solution:
QUESTION: 16

Directions : Read each sentence to find out whether there is any error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number of that part is the answer. If there is no error the answer is (5). (Ignore errors of punctuation, if any.) 

Many believe that 1) / nothing could have 2)/ avoided the war 3)/ between America and Iraq. 4) / No error 5)

Solution:

Substitute ‘averted’ for ‘avoided 

QUESTION: 17

Directions : Read each sentence to find out whether there is any error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number of that part is the answer. If there is no error the answer is (5). (Ignore errors of punctuation, if any.) 

The instructions clearly 1)/ state that 2) / each item is having 3) / two options. 4) / No error 5) 

Solution:

Replace ‘each’ with ‘every’

QUESTION: 18

Directions : Read each sentence to find out whether there is any error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number of that part is the answer. If there is no error the answer is (5). (Ignore errors of punctuation, if any.) 

The postman was polite 1)/ and said he regretted 2) / at the delay 3) / in delivery. 4) / No error 5) 

Solution:

delete at

QUESTION: 19

Directions : Read each sentence to find out whether there is any error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number of that part is the answer. If there is no error the answer is (5). (Ignore errors of punctuation, if any.) 

They have invited 1) / Sushma and I 2) / for the meeting to be 3) / held in the next month. 4) / No error 5)

Solution:

Substitute ‘me’ for ‘I’ because it (me) is the object of ‘invited’

QUESTION: 20

Directions : Read each sentence to find out whether there is any error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number of that part is the answer. If there is no error the answer is (5). (Ignore errors of punctuation, if any.) 

The city people stayed 1) / fearlessly despite of 2) / rumour of terrorist attack 3)/ in the area.4)/ No error 5)

Solution:

Delete ‘of’ after ‘despite

QUESTION: 21

Directions : Read each sentence to find out whether there is any error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number of that part is the answer. If there is no error the answer is (5). (Ignore errors of punctuation, if any.) 

1) The Board's decision has provided / 2) employees with the opportunity / 3) to acquire upto 100 / 4) shares by the. 5) No error

Solution:

 substitute of.

QUESTION: 22

Directions : Read each sentence to find out whether there is any error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number of that part is the answer. If there is no error the answer is (5). (Ignore errors of punctuation, if any.) 

1) Arranging such a large amount / 2) of funds now will be a problem why / 3) banks are usually not open. / 4) So early in the morning. 5) No error

Solution:

substitute because for why.

QUESTION: 23

Directions : Read each sentence to find out whether there is any error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number of that part is the answer. If there is no error the answer is (5). (Ignore errors of punctuation, if any.) 

1) If the manufacturing sector continues / 2) to grow at the same rate for / 3) the next few months. / 4) I think it has a high growth rate this year. 5) No error

Solution:

 substitute will have.

QUESTION: 24

Directions : Read each sentence to find out whether there is any error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number of that part is the answer. If there is no error the answer is (5). (Ignore errors of punctuation, if any.) 

1) Though he has promoted to / 2) the bank's board as a director / 3) he continues to carry out / 4) all his current responsibilities. 5) No error

Solution:

 substitute has been promoted.

QUESTION: 25

Directions : Read each sentence to find out whether there is any error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number of that part is the answer. If there is no error the answer is (5). (Ignore errors of punctuation, if any.) 

1) We were forced into react / 2) as no organisation can / 3) afford to adhere to / 4) these outdated regulations. 5) No error

Solution:

substitute to for into.

QUESTION: 26

Direction: Rearrange the following six sentences (A), (B), (C), (D), (E) and (F) in the proper sequence to form a meaningful paragraph and then answer the questions given below.

(A) They pay the "listed" price for items; perhaps they avoid conflict.

(B) Yet many individuals do not think of themselves as bargainers.

(C) But a shopping in local market gives you an opportunity to bargain and reflect about what you do as negotiator.

(D) Many people bargains and negotiates.

(E) Their reluctance to bargain may reflect reserve nature or lack of experience to risk through negotiation.

(F) Some people enjoy it; some people are good at it.

Which of the following would be the LAST sentence after rearrangement?

Solution:

DFBAEC

QUESTION: 27

Direction: Rearrange the following six sentences (A), (B), (C), (D), (E) and (F) in the proper sequence to form a meaningful paragraph and then answer the questions given below.

(A) They pay the "listed" price for items; perhaps they avoid conflict.

(B) Yet many individuals do not think of themselves as bargainers.

(C) But a shopping in local market gives you an opportunity to bargain and reflect about what you do as negotiator.

(D) Many people bargains and negotiates.

(E) Their reluctance to bargain may reflect reserve nature or lack of experience to risk through negotiation.

(F) Some people enjoy it; some people are good at it.

Which of the following would be the FIRST sentence after rearrangement?

Solution:

D F B A E C

QUESTION: 28

Direction: Rearrange the following six sentences (A), (B), (C), (D), (E) and (F) in the proper sequence to form a meaningful paragraph and then answer the questions given below.

(A) They pay the "listed" price for items; perhaps they avoid conflict.

(B) Yet many individuals do not think of themselves as bargainers.

(C) But a shopping in local market gives you an opportunity to bargain and reflect about what you do as negotiator.

(D) Many people bargains and negotiates.

(E) Their reluctance to bargain may reflect reserve nature or lack of experience to risk through negotiation.

(F) Some people enjoy it; some people are good at it.

Q. Which of the following would be the THIRD sentence after rearrangement?

Solution:

D F B A E C

QUESTION: 29

Direction: Rearrange the following six sentences (A), (B), (C), (D), (E) and (F) in the proper sequence to form a meaningful paragraph and then answer the questions given below.

(A) They pay the "listed" price for items; perhaps they avoid conflict.

(B) Yet many individuals do not think of themselves as bargainers.

(C) But a shopping in local market gives you an opportunity to bargain and reflect about what you do as negotiator.

(D) Many people bargains and negotiates.

(E) Their reluctance to bargain may reflect reserve nature or lack of experience to risk through negotiation.

(F) Some people enjoy it; some people are good at it.

Which of the following would be the FIFTH sentence after rearrangement?

Solution:

D F B A E C

QUESTION: 30

Direction: Rearrange the following six sentences (A), (B), (C), (D), (E) and (F) in the proper sequence to form a meaningful paragraph and then answer the questions given below.

(A) They pay the "listed" price for items; perhaps they avoid conflict.

(B) Yet many individuals do not think of themselves as bargainers.

(C) But a shopping in local market gives you an opportunity to bargain and reflect about what you do as negotiator.

(D) Many people bargains and negotiates.

(E) Their reluctance to bargain may reflect reserve nature or lack of experience to risk through negotiation.

(F) Some people enjoy it; some people are good at it.

Which of the following would be the SECOND sentence after rearrangement?

Solution:

D F B A E C

QUESTION: 31

Directions : The table given below shows the production of five types of buses by a company during the years 2008 to 2013. Study the table and answer the questions.

Q. In which year was the production of buses of all types taken together approximately equal to the average of the total production during the given period?

Solution:

Average of the total production during the given period,

In 2008 = 8 + 16 + 21 + 4 + 25 = 74

In 2009 = 20 + 10 + 17 + 6 + 18 = 71

In 2010 = 16 + 14 + 16 + 10 + 19 = 75

In 2011 = 17 + 12 + 15 + 16 + 30 = 90

In 2012 = 21 + 12 + 13 + 20 + 14 = 80

In 2013 = 6 + 14 + 8 + 31 + 27 =86

Total Average=(74+71+75+90+80+86)/6  =476/6≈80(79.33) 

In year 2012, total production = 80

QUESTION: 32

Directions : The table given below shows the production of five types of buses by a company during the years 2008 to 2013. Study the table and answer the questions.

Q. In which year was the total production of buses of type Volvo and Deluxe together equal to the total production of buses of type passion and Rock?

Solution:

The production of Volvo and Deluxe together in 2012 = 21 + 12 = 33 and the production of passion and Rock together

13 + 20 = 33

Hence, in the year 2012 the total production of Volvo and Deluxe is equal to the total production of passion and Rock.

QUESTION: 33

Directions : The table given below shows the production of five types of buses by a company during the years 2008 to 2013. Study the table and answer the questions.

Q. During the period 2008 -2013, in which type of buses was there a continuous increase in the production?

Solution:

From the table, in Rock type Bus there was a continuous increase in production.

QUESTION: 34

Directions : The table given below shows the production of five types of buses by a company during the years 2008 to 2013. Study the table and answer the questions.

Q. The production of which type of buses was 25% of total production of all types of buses during 2012?

Solution:

25% of 80 = 20

Production of Rock’s bus in 2012.

QUESTION: 35

Directions : The table given below shows the production of five types of buses by a company during the years 2008 to 2013. Study the table and answer the questions.

Q. The percentage increase in the total production of all types of buses in 2011 with respect to that in 2010 was?

Solution:

Required % increase =(90 - 75)/75×100

=15/75×100=20%

QUESTION: 36

Directions: Study the following data carefully and answer the questions given below.

Out of total number of commuters commuting daily in a city 17171 commuters commute only by trains daily. 7359 commuters commute only by bikes and 22077 commuters commute only by bus. 14718 commuters commute only by their private cars and 4906 commuters commute only by autos. 7359 commuters commute only by taxis. 26983 commuters commute only by bus as well as trains. Daily 9812 commuters commute by autos as well as trains daily. 12265 commuters commute by bus as well as autos daily.

Q. The total number of commuters commuting by trains form, what per cent of the total number of commuters commuting daily?

Solution:

QUESTION: 37

Directions: Study the following data carefully and answer the questions given below.

Out of total number of commuters commuting daily in a city 17171 commuters commute only by trains daily. 7359 commuters commute only by bikes and 22077 commuters commute only by bus. 14718 commuters commute only by their private cars and 4906 commuters commute only by autos. 7359 commuters commute only by taxis. 26983 commuters commute only by bus as well as trains. Daily 9812 commuters commute by autos as well as trains daily. 12265 commuters commute by bus as well as autos daily.

Q. The total number of commuters commuting by autos form, what per cent of the total number of commuters commuting daily?

Solution:

QUESTION: 38

Directions: Study the following data carefully and answer the questions given below.

Out of total number of commuters commuting daily in a city 17171 commuters commute only by trains daily. 7359 commuters commute only by bikes and 22077 commuters commute only by bus. 14718 commuters commute only by their private cars and 4906 commuters commute only by autos. 7359 commuters commute only by taxis. 26983 commuters commute only by bus as well as trains. Daily 9812 commuters commute by autos as well as trains daily. 12265 commuters commute by bus as well as autos daily.

Q. The total number of commuters commuting by bikes and taxis together form, what per cent of the total number of commuters commuting daily?

Solution:

QUESTION: 39

Directions: Study the following data carefully and answer the questions given below.

Out of total number of commuters commuting daily in a city 17171 commuters commute only by trains daily. 7359 commuters commute only by bikes and 22077 commuters commute only by bus. 14718 commuters commute only by their private cars and 4906 commuters commute only by autos. 7359 commuters commute only by taxis. 26983 commuters commute only by bus as well as trains. Daily 9812 commuters commute by autos as well as trains daily. 12265 commuters commute by bus as well as autos daily.

Q. What is the difference between the total number of commuters commuting by bus to the total number of commuters commuting by auto?

Solution:

QUESTION: 40

Directions: Study the following data carefully and answer the questions given below.

Out of total number of commuters commuting daily in a city 17171 commuters commute only by trains daily. 7359 commuters commute only by bikes and 22077 commuters commute only by bus. 14718 commuters commute only by their private cars and 4906 commuters commute only by autos. 7359 commuters commute only by taxis. 26983 commuters commute only by bus as well as trains. Daily 9812 commuters commute by autos as well as trains daily. 12265 commuters commute by bus as well as autos daily.

Q. The total number of commuters commuting by private car only is what per cent more/less than the total number of commuters commuting auto only?

Solution:

QUESTION: 41

X, Y, Z enters into a partnership investing Rs. 2500, Rs. 3500 and Rs. 4500. The respective shares of X, Y, Z in an annual profit of Rs. 14700 are: 

Solution:

QUESTION: 42

A began a business with Rs. 45000. Later, B joined him with Rs. 30000. At the end of the year, the profit was divided in the ratio of 2 : 1. When did B join?  

Solution:

QUESTION: 43

Each of the two cars is sold at the same price. A profit of 10% is made on the first and a loss of 7% is made on the second. What is the combined loss or gain?

Solution:

QUESTION: 44

Profit earned by an organisation is distributed among officers and clerks in the ratio of 5 : 3. If the number of officers is 45 and the number of clerks is 80 and the amount received by each officer is Rs25,000, what was the total amount of profit earned?

Solution:

QUESTION: 45

If A works alone, he would take 4 days more to complete the job than if both A and B worked together. If B worked alone, he would take 16 days more to complete the job than if A and B work together. How many days would they take to complete the work if both of them worked together?

Solution:

QUESTION: 46

Sunil completes a work in 4 days, whereas Dinesh completes the work in 6 days. Ramesh works 1 1/2 times as fast as Sunil. The three together can complete the work in:

Solution:

QUESTION: 47

A cistern has two taps which fill it in 12 minutes and 15 minutes respectively. There is also a waste pipe in the cistern. When all the pipes are opened, the empty cistern is full in 20 minutes. How long will the waste pipe take to empty a full cistern?

Solution:

QUESTION: 48

The ratio between the speed of a train and a car is 16 : 15 respectively. Also, a bus covered a distance of 480 km in 8 h. The speed of the bus is three-fourth the speed of the train. How much distance will the car cover in 6 h?

Solution:

Speed of bus = 480/8 = 60km/ h

Speed of train = (60*4)/3=80 km / h

Speed of train : Speed of car = 16 : 15

Speed of car =80/16 * 15 = 75 km/ h

Distance covered by car in 6 hr = 75 × 6 = 450 km

QUESTION: 49

A swimmer covers a distance of 28 Km against the current and 40 Km in the direction of the current. If in each case he takes 4 hours, then the speed of the current is:

Solution:

QUESTION: 50

What will be the cost of gardening 1 metre broad boundary around a rectangular plot having perimeter of 340 metres at the rate of Rs. 10 per square metre? 

Solution:

QUESTION: 51

(-6 + 9 × ? + 16 + 9)/(14 × 14 - 156) = 7

Solution:

– 6 + 9× ? + 25 = 7 (196 – 156)

19 + 9 × ? = 7 × 40

9 × ? = 261

? = 29

QUESTION: 52

√(?)/√(441) = √(529)/11.5

Solution:

√(?) = 23/11.5 * 21 = 42

? = 1764

QUESTION: 53

1.33 × 6 – 2.85 ÷ ? = 6.48

Solution:

2.85 ÷ ? = 7.98 – 6.48

? = 1.9

QUESTION: 54

(11×11)/(7×7) - (36×?)/(7×7) + (18×18)/(7×7) = 1

Solution:

121/49 + 324/49 - 1 = (36 * ?)/49

396 = 36 × ?

? = 11

QUESTION: 55

∛(658503) + ∛(2197) = ?

Solution:

? = 87 + 13 = 100

QUESTION: 56

5  3  6  ?  64.75

Solution:

QUESTION: 57

649.6875  1299.375  866.25  346.5  99  22  ?

Solution:

QUESTION: 58

30  16  10  8  8  9  ?

Solution:

QUESTION: 59

10  18  63  253  1137  5901  ?

Solution:

QUESTION: 60

6  9  15  27  51  ?

Solution:

+3,  +6,  +12,  +24,  +48,…

QUESTION: 61

Solution:

QUESTION: 62

Solution:

QUESTION: 63

Solution:

QUESTION: 64

Solution:

QUESTION: 65

Solution:

QUESTION: 66

Directions: Study the following information to answer the given questions:

Each of the seven products viz A, B, C, D, E, F and G are sold on a different day of a week starting from Monday and ending on Sunday of the same week. Product F is sold on Thursday. Two products are sold between product F and product A. Only one product is sold between product E and product D. Product E is not sold on the days immediately before or immediately after the day when product F is sold. Product C is sold the day immediately before the day when product G is sold. Product D is not sold after product B.

Q. How many products are sold between product C ad product D?

Solution:

QUESTION: 67

Directions: Study the following information to answer the given questions:

Each of the seven products viz A, B, C, D, E, F and G are sold on a different day of a week starting from Monday and ending on Sunday of the same week. Product F is sold on Thursday. Two products are sold between product F and product A. Only one product is sold between product E and product D. Product E is not sold on the days immediately before or immediately after the day when product F is sold. Product C is sold the day immediately before the day when product G is sold. Product D is not sold after product B.

Q. Which of the following product is sold on Saturday?

Solution:

QUESTION: 68

Directions: Study the following information to answer the given questions:

Each of the seven products viz A, B, C, D, E, F and G are sold on a different day of a week starting from Monday and ending on Sunday of the same week. Product F is sold on Thursday. Two products are sold between product F and product A. Only one product is sold between product E and product D. Product E is not sold on the days immediately before or immediately after the day when product F is sold. Product C is sold the day immediately before the day when product G is sold. Product D is not sold after product B.

Q. C is related to D in a certain way. In the same way A is related to F based on the given arrangements. Which of the following is G related to following the same pattern?

Solution:

QUESTION: 69

Directions: Study the following information to answer the given questions:

Each of the seven products viz A, B, C, D, E, F and G are sold on a different day of a week starting from Monday and ending on Sunday of the same week. Product F is sold on Thursday. Two products are sold between product F and product A. Only one product is sold between product E and product D. Product E is not sold on the days immediately before or immediately after the day when product F is sold. Product C is sold the day immediately before the day when product G is sold. Product D is not sold after product B.

Q. On which of the following days is product B sold?

Solution:

QUESTION: 70

Directions: Study the following information to answer the given questions:

Each of the seven products viz A, B, C, D, E, F and G are sold on a different day of a week starting from Monday and ending on Sunday of the same week. Product F is sold on Thursday. Two products are sold between product F and product A. Only one product is sold between product E and product D. Product E is not sold on the days immediately before or immediately after the day when product F is sold. Product C is sold the day immediately before the day when product G is sold. Product D is not sold after product B.

Q. Which of the following product is sold on Friday?

Solution:

QUESTION: 71

Directions : Study the following information carefully and answer the questions given below:

Eight friends – P, Q, R, S, T, U, V and W – are sitting around a circular table. P and Q are facing towards the centre while the other six friends are facing away from the centre. P is sitting second to the right of W. Q sits third to the left of P. S sits second to the right of V. V is immediate neighbour of neither Q nor P. T and U are immediate neighbours and are facing outside.

Q. What is the position of R with respect to S?

Solution:

QUESTION: 72

Directions : Study the following information carefully and answer the questions given below:

Eight friends – P, Q, R, S, T, U, V and W – are sitting around a circular table. P and Q are facing towards the centre while the other six friends are facing away from the centre. P is sitting second to the right of W. Q sits third to the left of P. S sits second to the right of V. V is immediate neighbour of neither Q nor P. T and U are immediate neighbours and are facing outside.

Q. Who is sitting on the immediate right of V?

Solution:

QUESTION: 73

Directions : Study the following information carefully and answer the questions given below:

Eight friends – P, Q, R, S, T, U, V and W – are sitting around a circular table. P and Q are facing towards the centre while the other six friends are facing away from the centre. P is sitting second to the right of W. Q sits third to the left of P. S sits second to the right of V. V is immediate neighbour of neither Q nor P. T and U are immediate neighbours and are facing outside.

Q. Which of the following pairs represents the friends who are immediate neighbours of R?

Solution:

QUESTION: 74

Directions : Study the following information carefully and answer the questions given below:

Eight friends – P, Q, R, S, T, U, V and W – are sitting around a circular table. P and Q are facing towards the centre while the other six friends are facing away from the centre. P is sitting second to the right of W. Q sits third to the left of P. S sits second to the right of V. V is immediate neighbour of neither Q nor P. T and U are immediate neighbours and are facing outside.

Q. Who is sitting third to the left of V?

Solution:

QUESTION: 75

Directions : Study the following information carefully and answer the questions given below:

Eight friends – P, Q, R, S, T, U, V and W – are sitting around a circular table. P and Q are facing towards the centre while the other six friends are facing away from the centre. P is sitting second to the right of W. Q sits third to the left of P. S sits second to the right of V. V is immediate neighbour of neither Q nor P. T and U are immediate neighbours and are facing outside.

Q. How many friends are there between Q and S?

Solution:

QUESTION: 76

Directions : Study the following information carefully and answer the given questions:

A person walks 5m North from point A and reaches B then takes a right turn and walks 8 km and reaches to point C. Again he takes left turn and walk for 4m and takes left turn again and walk 6 m and reaches point D. Finally he take left turn and walk 9m and reaches point E.

Q. What is the distance between A and E?

Solution:

2m

QUESTION: 77

Directions : Study the following information carefully and answer the given questions:

A person walks 5m North from point A and reaches B then takes a right turn and walks 8 km and reaches to point C. Again he takes left turn and walk for 4m and takes left turn again and walk 6 m and reaches point D. Finally he take left turn and walk 9m and reaches point E.

Q.  D is in which direction from point C?

Solution:

QUESTION: 78

Statements: All stamps are packets. Some packets are buckets. All buckets are tubes.
Conclusions: 
I. Some tubes are stamps.
II. Some buckets are stamps.
III. Some tubes are packets.

Solution:

QUESTION: 79

Statements: Some doors are windows. Some windows are lamps. All lamps are candles.

Conclusions
I. Some candles are doors.
II. Some candles are windows.
III. Some lamps are doors.

Solution:

QUESTION: 80

Statements: Some towns are villages. Some villages are lanes. Some lanes are hamlets.
Conclusions: 
I. Some hamlets are villages.
II. Some lanes are towns.
III. Some hamlets are towns.

Solution:

QUESTION: 81

Statements: Some rivers are hills. No hill is taxi. All taxis are buses.
Conclusions: 
I. Some buses are rivers.
II. Some taxis are rivers.
III. No bus is river.

Solution:

QUESTION: 82

Statements: All machines are crowns. All crowns are tablets. Some tablets are bottles.
Conclusions: 
I. Some bottles are crowns.
II. Some tablets are machines.
III. Some bottles are machines.

Solution:

QUESTION: 83

Directions : Read the following information carefully and answer the question below it

In a certain code, ‘il be pee’ means ‘roses are blue’; ‘silk hee’ means ‘red flowers’ and ‘pee mit hee’ means ‘flowers are vegetables’.

Q. How is ‘red’ written in that code?

Solution:

In the second and third statements, the common code word is ‘hee’ and the common word is ‘flowers’. So, ‘hee’ stand for ‘flowers’. Thus, in the second statement, ‘silk’ stands for ‘red’.

QUESTION: 84

Directions : Read the following information carefully and answer the question below it

In a certain code, ‘il be pee’ means ‘roses are blue’; ‘silk hee’ means ‘red flowers’ and ‘pee mit hee’ means ‘flowers are vegetables’.

Q. How is ‘roses’ written in that code?

Solution:

Since from the given information, we can only find the code for ‘are’ in the first statement, it cannot be determined which of the remaining two codes for ‘roses’.

QUESTION: 85

Directions : Read the following information carefully and answer the question below it

In a certain code, ‘il be pee’ means ‘roses are blue’; ‘silk hee’ means ‘red flowers’ and ‘pee mit hee’ means ‘flowers are vegetables’.

Q. How is ‘vegetables are red flowers’ written in this code?

Solution:

Clearly, the required codes will consist of the same codes as in the third statements with the code for ‘red’ i.e. silk added to it.

QUESTION: 86

Directions: Read the following information carefully and answer the question below it

In each of the Letter Analogy various terms of a letter series are given with one term missing as shown by (?). Choose the missing term out of the given alternatives.

Q. HUA GTZ FSY ERX ?

Solution:

All the letters of each term are moved one step backward to obtain the corresponding letters of the next term.

QUESTION: 87

Directions: Read the following information carefully and answer the question below it

In each of the Letter Analogy various terms of a letter series are given with one term missing as shown by (?). Choose the missing term out of the given alternatives.

DF GJ KM NQ RT ?

Solution:

There is a gap of one letter between both the letters of first term, a gap of two letters between both the letters of second term and again a gap of one two letters between the letters of third and fourth terms respectively. Besides, the last letter of each term and the first letter of next term are in alphabetical.

QUESTION: 88

Directions: Read the following information carefully and answer the questions given below:
Among five persons – P, Q, R, S and T – each has different height. Only two persons are shorter than S. T is shorter than S but taller than R. The one who is the second tallest among them is of 158 centimetres.

Q. Which of the following statements is definitely true with respect to the give information?

Solution:

From the information given in question, we have
R < T < S < P or Q
Either P or Q is of 158 cm.

QUESTION: 89

Directions: Read the following information carefully and answer the questions given below:
Among five persons – P, Q, R, S and T – each has different height. Only two persons are shorter than S. T is shorter than S but taller than R. The one who is the second tallest among them is of 158 centimetres

Q. Which of the following is possibly the height of Q?

Solution:

From the information given in question, we have
R < T < S < P or Q
Either P or Q is of 158 cm.

QUESTION: 90

Directions: Read the following information carefully and answer the questions given below:
Among five persons – P, Q, R, S and T – each has different height. Only two persons are shorter than S. T is shorter than S but taller than R. The one who is the second tallest among them is of 158 centimetres

Q. How many persons are shorter than Q?

Solution:

From the information given in question, we have
R < T < S < P or Q
Either P or Q is of 158 cm.

Either three or four persons are shorter than Q.
P > Q > S > T > R or, Q > P > S > T > R

QUESTION: 91

Suruchi ranks 15th from the bottom in a class of 45 students. What is her rank from the top?

Solution:
QUESTION: 92

How many such pairs of letters are there in the word CEREMONY each of which has as many letters between them in the word as in the English alphabet?

Solution:

QUESTION: 93

Directions: In these questions, a relationship between different elements is shown in the statements. The statements are followed by two conclusions. Give answer

Statements: M > A ≤ T ≥ R > X

Conclusions: I.T ≥ M II.T > X

Solution:

Given statements

QUESTION: 94

Directions: In these questions, a relationship between different elements is shown in the statements. The statements are followed by two conclusions. Give answer

Statements: W > F ≥ R, M > N = R

Conclusions: I.W = M II.F ≥ N

Solution:

Given statements

QUESTION: 95

Directions: In these questions, a relationship between different elements is shown in the statements. The statements are followed by two conclusions. Give answer

Statements: V < T = N, J ≥ F < V

Conclusions: I. N > F II.V ≥ N

Solution:

QUESTION: 96

Directions: In these questions, a relationship between different elements is shown in the statements. The statements are followed by two conclusions. Give answer

Statements: E < X ≥ A > M, E = P

Conclusions: I.X > P II.M < X

Solution:

QUESTION: 97

Directions: In these questions, a relationship between different elements is shown in the statements. The statements are followed by two conclusions. Give answer

Statements: D ≥ E ≥ C > P = N < I

Conclusions: I.D ≥ P II.I > E

Solution:

QUESTION: 98

How many pairs of letters are these in the word MEDITATION each of which has as many letters between them in the word as in the English alphabetical series?

Solution:

QUESTION: 99

In a certain code PIPE is written as ‘5954’ and REST is written as ‘8426’. How is SITE written in that code?

Solution:

QUESTION: 100

What will come next in the given alphabetical series?

XVU WUT VTS USR ?

Solution:

Each corresponding letter moves one letter backward in the alphabet. 

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