Test: Air - 1


10 Questions MCQ Test Geography (Prelims) by Valor Academy | Test: Air - 1


Description
This mock test of Test: Air - 1 for UPSC helps you for every UPSC entrance exam. This contains 10 Multiple Choice Questions for UPSC Test: Air - 1 (mcq) to study with solutions a complete question bank. The solved questions answers in this Test: Air - 1 quiz give you a good mix of easy questions and tough questions. UPSC students definitely take this Test: Air - 1 exercise for a better result in the exam. You can find other Test: Air - 1 extra questions, long questions & short questions for UPSC on EduRev as well by searching above.
QUESTION: 1

Our earth is surrounded by a huge blanket of

Solution:

The Earth is wrapped in a blanket of air called the 'atmosphere', which is made up of several layers of gases. The Sun is much hotter than the Earth and it gives off rays of light energy that travel through the atmosphere and reach the Earth’s surface. The atmosphere is made up of several natural gases, some in tiny amounts, which trap the energy from the Sun and the heat given out by the Earth.

QUESTION: 2

Which two gases make up the bulk of the atmosphere

Solution:

Two gases make up the bulk of the earth's atmosphere: Nitrogen, which comprises 78% of the atmosphere, and oxygen, which accounts for 21%. Various trace gases make up the remainder.

QUESTION: 3

Cold air is ____ than hot air

Solution:

Cold air is denser than warm air. The molecules are packed closer together. The amount of water vapor in the air also affects the density of the air. The more water vapor that is in the air, the less dense the air becomes. That is why cold, dry air is much heavier than warm, humid air.

QUESTION: 4

Which is the second most plentiful gas in the air

Solution:

The most abundant gas in the Earth's atmosphere is nitrogen. The second most abundant gas is oxygen.

QUESTION: 5

Green plants use ____ to make their food and release ___

Solution:

Green plants take in carbon dioxide and give out oxygen in the process of photosynthesis.

QUESTION: 6

Which of the following is NOT the layer of atmosphere

Solution:

Troposphere
The troposphere is the lowest layer of our atmosphere. Starting at ground level, it extends upward to about 10 km (6.2 miles or about 33,000 feet) above sea level. We humans live in the troposphere, and nearly all weather occurs in this lowest layer. Most clouds appear here, mainly because 99% of the water vapor in the atmosphere is found in the troposphere. Air pressure drops, and temperatures get colder, as you climb higher in the troposphere.

Stratosphere
The next layer up is called the stratosphere. The stratosphere extends from the top of the troposphere to about 50 km (31 miles) above the ground. The infamous ozone layer is found within the stratosphere. Ozone molecules in this layer absorb high-energy ultraviolet (UV) light from the Sun, converting the UV energy into heat. Unlike the troposphere, the stratosphere actually gets warmer the higher you go! That trend of rising temperatures with altitude means that air in the stratosphere lacks the turbulence and updrafts of the troposphere beneath. Commercial passenger jets fly in the lower stratosphere, partly because this less-turbulent layer provides a smoother ride. The jet stream flows near the border between the troposphere and the stratosphere.

Mesosphere
Above the stratosphere is the mesosphere. It extends upward to a height of about 85 km (53 miles) above our planet. Most meteors burn up in the mesosphere. Unlike the stratosphere, temperatures once again grow colder as you rise up through the mesosphere. The coldest temperatures in Earth's atmosphere, about -90° C (-130° F), are found near the top of this layer. The air in the mesosphere is far too thin to breathe; air pressure at the bottom of the layer is well below 1% of the pressure at sea level, and continues dropping as you go higher.

Thermosphere
The layer of very rare air above the mesosphere is called the thermosphere. High-energy X-rays and UV radiation from the Sun are absorbed in the thermosphere, raising its temperature to hundreds or at times thousands of degrees. However, the air in this layer is so thin that it would feel freezing cold to us! In many ways, the thermosphere is more like outer space than a part of the atmosphere. Many satellites actually orbit Earth within the thermosphere! Variations in the amount of energy coming from the Sun exert a powerful influence on both the height of the top of this layer and the temperature within it. Because of this, the top of the thermosphere can be found anywhere between 500 and 1,000 km (311 to 621 miles) above the ground. Temperatures in the upper thermosphere can range from about 500° C (932° F) to 2,000° C (3,632° F) or higher. The aurora, the Northern Lights and Southern Lights, occur in the thermosphere.

Exosphere
Although some experts consider the thermosphere to be the uppermost layer of our atmosphere, others consider the exosphere to be the actual "final frontier" of Earth's gaseous envelope. As you might imagine, the "air" in the exosphere is very, very, very thin, making this layer even more space-like than the thermosphere. In fact, air in the exosphere is constantly - though very gradually - "leaking" out of Earth's atmosphere into outer space. There is no clear-cut upper boundary where the exosphere finally fades away into space. Different definitions place the top of the exosphere somewhere between 100,000 km (62,000 miles) and 190,000 km (120,000 miles) above the surface of Earth. The latter value is about halfway to the Moon!

Ionosphere
The ionosphere is not a distinct layer like the others mentioned above. Instead, the ionosphere is a series of regions in parts of the mesosphere and thermosphere where high-energy radiation from the Sun has knocked electrons loose from their parent atoms and molecules. The electrically charged atoms and molecules that are formed in this way are called ions, giving the ionosphere its name and endowing this region with some special properties.

Hence, the correct answer is 'Hydrosphere'.

QUESTION: 7

All the weather phenomena like rainfall, fog and hailstorm occur in which layer

Solution:

Troposphere: It is the most important layer of the atmosphere. The air we breathe exists here. It has the following features:

  • Its average height is 13 km.
  • Almost all the weather phenomena occur in this layer. The weather phenomena include: Rainfall, Fog, Hailstorm etc.
QUESTION: 8

Which layer is almost free from clouds

Solution:

The stratosphere is the second major layer of the atmosphere. The stratosphere defines a layer in which temperatures rises with increasing altitude. At the top of the stratosphere the thin air may attain temperatures close to 0 deg Celcius.

This rise in temperature is caused by the absorption of ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the Sun by the ozone layer. Such a temperature profile creates very stable atmospheric conditions, and the stratosphere lacks the air turbulence that is so prevalent in the troposphere. Consequently, the stratosphere is almost completely free of clouds or other forms of weather.

QUESTION: 9

The air breathe exist in

Solution:

Beginning at the surface of Earth, the troposphere extends to around seven miles up. This is the layer we live in and contains most of what we consider to be "the atmosphere", including the air we breathe and nearly all of the weather and clouds we see.

QUESTION: 10

Jet planes flying in the sky leave a ____ trail behind them

Solution:

When jet planes fly in the sky the moisture from their engines condenses. We then see a white trail of this condensed moisture behind them for some time when there is no air movement to disturb it. 

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