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Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2


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60 Questions MCQ Test Sample Papers For Class 9 | Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 for Class 9 2023 is part of Sample Papers For Class 9 preparation. The Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 questions and answers have been prepared according to the Class 9 exam syllabus.The Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 MCQs are made for Class 9 2023 Exam. Find important definitions, questions, notes, meanings, examples, exercises, MCQs and online tests for Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 below.
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Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 1

As the family finally sets off from home after many arguments there is a moment of a lull as the car takes off. "Alright, so where are we going for dinner now?" asks the one at the driving wheel. What follows is chaos as multiple voices make as many suggestions.
By the time order is restored and a decision is arrived at, tempers have risen, feelings injured and there is at least one person grumbling.
Twenty years ago, you would step out of home, decision meal and venue already made with no arguments opposition and everybody looked forward to the meal with equal enthusiasm. The decision was made by the head of the family and the others fell in line. Today every member of the family has a say in every decision which also promotes a sense of togetherness and bonding.
We empower our kids to make their own decisions from a very early age. We ask them the cuisine they prefer, the movie they want to see, the holiday they wish to go on and the subjects they wish to study. It's a closely connected world out there where children consult and guide each other. A parent's wellmeaning advice can sound like nothing more than unnecessary preaching. How then do we reach our children through all the conflicting views and make the voice of reason be heard? Children today question choices and prefer to go with the flow.
What then is the best path to take? I would say the most important thing one can do is listen to it. Listen to your children and their silences. Ensure that you keep some time aside for them, insist that they share their stories with you. Step into their world. It is not as complicated as it sounds; just a daily half an hour of the 'quality time' would do the trick.

Q. Why does chaos happen when deciding where to go for dinner?

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 2

As the family finally sets off from home after many arguments there is a moment of a lull as the car takes off. "Alright, so where are we going for dinner now?" asks the one at the driving wheel. What follows is chaos as multiple voices make as many suggestions.
By the time order is restored and a decision is arrived at, tempers have risen, feelings injured and there is at least one person grumbling.
Twenty years ago, you would step out of home, decision meal and venue already made with no arguments opposition and everybody looked forward to the meal with equal enthusiasm. The decision was made by the head of the family and the others fell in line. Today every member of the family has a say in every decision which also promotes a sense of togetherness and bonding.
We empower our kids to make their own decisions from a very early age. We ask them the cuisine they prefer, the movie they want to see, the holiday they wish to go on and the subjects they wish to study. It's a closely connected world out there where children consult and guide each other. A parent's wellmeaning advice can sound like nothing more than unnecessary preaching. How then do we reach our children through all the conflicting views and make the voice of reason be heard? Children today question choices and prefer to go with the flow.
What then is the best path to take? I would say the most important thing one can do is listen to it. Listen to your children and their silences. Ensure that you keep some time aside for them, insist that they share their stories with you. Step into their world. It is not as complicated as it sounds; just a daily half an hour of the 'quality time' would do the trick.

Q. Why was it easy to make decisions in families, twenty years ago?

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 3

As the family finally sets off from home after many arguments there is a moment of a lull as the car takes off. "Alright, so where are we going for dinner now?" asks the one at the driving wheel. What follows is chaos as multiple voices make as many suggestions.
By the time order is restored and a decision is arrived at, tempers have risen, feelings injured and there is at least one person grumbling.
Twenty years ago, you would step out of home, decision meal and venue already made with no arguments opposition and everybody looked forward to the meal with equal enthusiasm. The decision was made by the head of the family and the others fell in line. Today every member of the family has a say in every decision which also promotes a sense of togetherness and bonding.
We empower our kids to make their own decisions from a very early age. We ask them the cuisine they prefer, the movie they want to see, the holiday they wish to go on and the subjects they wish to study. It's a closely connected world out there where children consult and guide each other. A parent's wellmeaning advice can sound like nothing more than unnecessary preaching. How then do we reach our children through all the conflicting views and make the voice of reason be heard? Children today question choices and prefer to go with the flow.
What then is the best path to take? I would say the most important thing one can do is listen to it. Listen to your children and their silences. Ensure that you keep some time aside for them, insist that they share their stories with you. Step into their world. It is not as complicated as it sounds; just a daily half an hour of the 'quality time' would do the trick.

Q. Who took important decisions twenty years ago?

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 4

As the family finally sets off from home after many arguments there is a moment of a lull as the car takes off. "Alright, so where are we going for dinner now?" asks the one at the driving wheel. What follows is chaos as multiple voices make as many suggestions.
By the time order is restored and a decision is arrived at, tempers have risen, feelings injured and there is at least one person grumbling.
Twenty years ago, you would step out of home, decision meal and venue already made with no arguments opposition and everybody looked forward to the meal with equal enthusiasm. The decision was made by the head of the family and the others fell in line. Today every member of the family has a say in every decision which also promotes a sense of togetherness and bonding.
We empower our kids to make their own decisions from a very early age. We ask them the cuisine they prefer, the movie they want to see, the holiday they wish to go on and the subjects they wish to study. It's a closely connected world out there where children consult and guide each other. A parent's wellmeaning advice can sound like nothing more than unnecessary preaching. How then do we reach our children through all the conflicting views and make the voice of reason be heard? Children today question choices and prefer to go with the flow.
What then is the best path to take? I would say the most important thing one can do is listen to it. Listen to your children and their silences. Ensure that you keep some time aside for them, insist that they share their stories with you. Step into their world. It is not as complicated as it sounds; just a daily half an hour of the 'quality time' would do the trick.

Q. What is the advantage of involving everyone in decision-making?

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 5

As the family finally sets off from home after many arguments there is a moment of a lull as the car takes off. "Alright, so where are we going for dinner now?" asks the one at the driving wheel. What follows is chaos as multiple voices make as many suggestions.
By the time order is restored and a decision is arrived at, tempers have risen, feelings injured and there is at least one person grumbling.
Twenty years ago, you would step out of home, decision meal and venue already made with no arguments opposition and everybody looked forward to the meal with equal enthusiasm. The decision was made by the head of the family and the others fell in line. Today every member of the family has a say in every decision which also promotes a sense of togetherness and bonding.
We empower our kids to make their own decisions from a very early age. We ask them the cuisine they prefer, the movie they want to see, the holiday they wish to go on and the subjects they wish to study. It's a closely connected world out there where children consult and guide each other. A parent's wellmeaning advice can sound like nothing more than unnecessary preaching. How then do we reach our children through all the conflicting views and make the voice of reason be heard? Children today question choices and prefer to go with the flow.
What then is the best path to take? I would say the most important thing one can do is listen to it. Listen to your children and their silences. Ensure that you keep some time aside for them, insist that they share their stories with you. Step into their world. It is not as complicated as it sounds; just a daily half an hour of the 'quality time' would do the trick.

Q. In today's world, why parents involve their kids in decision-making?

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 6

As the family finally sets off from home after many arguments there is a moment of a lull as the car takes off. "Alright, so where are we going for dinner now?" asks the one at the driving wheel. What follows is chaos as multiple voices make as many suggestions.
By the time order is restored and a decision is arrived at, tempers have risen, feelings injured and there is at least one person grumbling.
Twenty years ago, you would step out of home, decision meal and venue already made with no arguments opposition and everybody looked forward to the meal with equal enthusiasm. The decision was made by the head of the family and the others fell in line. Today every member of the family has a say in every decision which also promotes a sense of togetherness and bonding.
We empower our kids to make their own decisions from a very early age. We ask them the cuisine they prefer, the movie they want to see, the holiday they wish to go on and the subjects they wish to study. It's a closely connected world out there where children consult and guide each other. A parent's wellmeaning advice can sound like nothing more than unnecessary preaching. How then do we reach our children through all the conflicting views and make the voice of reason be heard? Children today question choices and prefer to go with the flow.
What then is the best path to take? I would say the most important thing one can do is listen to it. Listen to your children and their silences. Ensure that you keep some time aside for them, insist that they share their stories with you. Step into their world. It is not as complicated as it sounds; just a daily half an hour of the 'quality time' would do the trick.

Q. What advice does the writer give to the parents?

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 7

As the family finally sets off from home after many arguments there is a moment of a lull as the car takes off. "Alright, so where are we going for dinner now?" asks the one at the driving wheel. What follows is chaos as multiple voices make as many suggestions.
By the time order is restored and a decision is arrived at, tempers have risen, feelings injured and there is at least one person grumbling.
Twenty years ago, you would step out of home, decision meal and venue already made with no arguments opposition and everybody looked forward to the meal with equal enthusiasm. The decision was made by the head of the family and the others fell in line. Today every member of the family has a say in every decision which also promotes a sense of togetherness and bonding.
We empower our kids to make their own decisions from a very early age. We ask them the cuisine they prefer, the movie they want to see, the holiday they wish to go on and the subjects they wish to study. It's a closely connected world out there where children consult and guide each other. A parent's wellmeaning advice can sound like nothing more than unnecessary preaching. How then do we reach our children through all the conflicting views and make the voice of reason be heard? Children today question choices and prefer to go with the flow.
What then is the best path to take? I would say the most important thing one can do is listen to it. Listen to your children and their silences. Ensure that you keep some time aside for them, insist that they share their stories with you. Step into their world. It is not as complicated as it sounds; just a daily half an hour of the 'quality time' would do the trick.

Q. What all does a parent need to listen too?

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 8

As the family finally sets off from home after many arguments there is a moment of a lull as the car takes off. "Alright, so where are we going for dinner now?" asks the one at the driving wheel. What follows is chaos as multiple voices make as many suggestions.
By the time order is restored and a decision is arrived at, tempers have risen, feelings injured and there is at least one person grumbling.
Twenty years ago, you would step out of home, decision meal and venue already made with no arguments opposition and everybody looked forward to the meal with equal enthusiasm. The decision was made by the head of the family and the others fell in line. Today every member of the family has a say in every decision which also promotes a sense of togetherness and bonding.
We empower our kids to make their own decisions from a very early age. We ask them the cuisine they prefer, the movie they want to see, the holiday they wish to go on and the subjects they wish to study. It's a closely connected world out there where children consult and guide each other. A parent's wellmeaning advice can sound like nothing more than unnecessary preaching. How then do we reach our children through all the conflicting views and make the voice of reason be heard? Children today question choices and prefer to go with the flow.
What then is the best path to take? I would say the most important thing one can do is listen to it. Listen to your children and their silences. Ensure that you keep some time aside for them, insist that they share their stories with you. Step into their world. It is not as complicated as it sounds; just a daily half an hour of the 'quality time' would do the trick.

Q. What would the half-hour quality time do?

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 9

As the family finally sets off from home after many arguments there is a moment of a lull as the car takes off. "Alright, so where are we going for dinner now?" asks the one at the driving wheel. What follows is chaos as multiple voices make as many suggestions.
By the time order is restored and a decision is arrived at, tempers have risen, feelings injured and there is at least one person grumbling.
Twenty years ago, you would step out of home, decision meal and venue already made with no arguments opposition and everybody looked forward to the meal with equal enthusiasm. The decision was made by the head of the family and the others fell in line. Today every member of the family has a say in every decision which also promotes a sense of togetherness and bonding.
We empower our kids to make their own decisions from a very early age. We ask them the cuisine they prefer, the movie they want to see, the holiday they wish to go on and the subjects they wish to study. It's a closely connected world out there where children consult and guide each other. A parent's wellmeaning advice can sound like nothing more than unnecessary preaching. How then do we reach our children through all the conflicting views and make the voice of reason be heard? Children today question choices and prefer to go with the flow.
What then is the best path to take? I would say the most important thing one can do is listen to it. Listen to your children and their silences. Ensure that you keep some time aside for them, insist that they share their stories with you. Step into their world. It is not as complicated as it sounds; just a daily half an hour of the 'quality time' would do the trick.

Q. The synonym of hurt as given in paragraph 2 is ________.

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 10

As the family finally sets off from home after many arguments there is a moment of a lull as the car takes off. "Alright, so where are we going for dinner now?" asks the one at the driving wheel. What follows is chaos as multiple voices make as many suggestions.
By the time order is restored and a decision is arrived at, tempers have risen, feelings injured and there is at least one person grumbling.
Twenty years ago, you would step out of home, decision meal and venue already made with no arguments opposition and everybody looked forward to the meal with equal enthusiasm. The decision was made by the head of the family and the others fell in line. Today every member of the family has a say in every decision which also promotes a sense of togetherness and bonding.
We empower our kids to make their own decisions from a very early age. We ask them the cuisine they prefer, the movie they want to see, the holiday they wish to go on and the subjects they wish to study. It's a closely connected world out there where children consult and guide each other. A parent's wellmeaning advice can sound like nothing more than unnecessary preaching. How then do we reach our children through all the conflicting views and make the voice of reason be heard? Children today question choices and prefer to go with the flow.
What then is the best path to take? I would say the most important thing one can do is listen to it. Listen to your children and their silences. Ensure that you keep some time aside for them, insist that they share their stories with you. Step into their world. It is not as complicated as it sounds; just a daily half an hour of the 'quality time' would do the trick.

Q. The word which means the same as a style or method of cooking in paragraph 4 is:

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 11

Both water and energy are integral parts of the human body. By weight about 60% of an adult's human body is water and dehydration is one of the biggest single killers of children in the modern world. Life without water is unthinkable.
The human body needs its daily intake of food to meet its energy requirements, which according to the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations is about 1,800 kcal per day. Life without energy is equally unthinkable.
The energy that we take in through food again depends, amongst other things, on the water for agriculture and often that water is pumped with electrical or other forms of energy. The interdependence of energy and water is evident.
The world at large seeks both water and energy security. The Worldwatch Institute estimates that about 1.1 billion people (one-fifth of the world population) live in areas of physical water scarcity and another 1.6 billion are facing economic water shortage (when existing water sources cannot be used because of a lack of investment in water-related infrastructure). We will probably have a world population of 9 billion by 2050 and this will put further stress on the water sourcing and supply systems. Here again, the connection between energy and water is evident: globally about 70% of water consumption is for the agricultural sector. No water, no food, no energy.
Actions needed on the waterfront include a reduction in water usage for agriculture (pump efficiencies, drip irrigation instead of flood irrigation, change in crop patterns), recycling of water, extensive rainwater harvesting programmes, stoppage of run-offs and water pollution.
We need to remind ourselves that the fossil-based energy that we rely on so much for almost everything we do is stored solar energy. And while the sun took over 150 million years to store its energy in the form of fossil fuels, we are busy discharging that huge solar battery in a matter of a few hundred years.

Q. Antonyms of word evident:

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 12

Both water and energy are integral parts of the human body. By weight about 60% of an adult's human body is water and dehydration is one of the biggest single killers of children in the modern world. Life without water is unthinkable.
The human body needs its daily intake of food to meet its energy requirements, which according to the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations is about 1,800 kcal per day. Life without energy is equally unthinkable.
The energy that we take in through food again depends, amongst other things, on the water for agriculture and often that water is pumped with electrical or other forms of energy. The interdependence of energy and water is evident.
The world at large seeks both water and energy security. The Worldwatch Institute estimates that about 1.1 billion people (one-fifth of the world population) live in areas of physical water scarcity and another 1.6 billion are facing economic water shortage (when existing water sources cannot be used because of a lack of investment in water-related infrastructure). We will probably have a world population of 9 billion by 2050 and this will put further stress on the water sourcing and supply systems. Here again, the connection between energy and water is evident: globally about 70% of water consumption is for the agricultural sector. No water, no food, no energy.
Actions needed on the waterfront include a reduction in water usage for agriculture (pump efficiencies, drip irrigation instead of flood irrigation, change in crop patterns), recycling of water, extensive rainwater harvesting programmes, stoppage of run-offs and water pollution.
We need to remind ourselves that the fossil-based energy that we rely on so much for almost everything we do is stored solar energy. And while the sun took over 150 million years to store its energy in the form of fossil fuels, we are busy discharging that huge solar battery in a matter of a few hundred years.

Q. By weight, an adult human body contains about:

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 13

Both water and energy are integral parts of the human body. By weight about 60% of an adult's human body is water and dehydration is one of the biggest single killers of children in the modern world. Life without water is unthinkable.
The human body needs its daily intake of food to meet its energy requirements, which according to the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations is about 1,800 kcal per day. Life without energy is equally unthinkable.
The energy that we take in through food again depends, amongst other things, on the water for agriculture and often that water is pumped with electrical or other forms of energy. The interdependence of energy and water is evident.
The world at large seeks both water and energy security. The Worldwatch Institute estimates that about 1.1 billion people (one-fifth of the world population) live in areas of physical water scarcity and another 1.6 billion are facing economic water shortage (when existing water sources cannot be used because of a lack of investment in water-related infrastructure). We will probably have a world population of 9 billion by 2050 and this will put further stress on the water sourcing and supply systems. Here again, the connection between energy and water is evident: globally about 70% of water consumption is for the agricultural sector. No water, no food, no energy.
Actions needed on the waterfront include a reduction in water usage for agriculture (pump efficiencies, drip irrigation instead of flood irrigation, change in crop patterns), recycling of water, extensive rainwater harvesting programmes, stoppage of run-offs and water pollution.
We need to remind ourselves that the fossil-based energy that we rely on so much for almost everything we do is stored solar energy. And while the sun took over 150 million years to store its energy in the form of fossil fuels, we are busy discharging that huge solar battery in a matter of a few hundred years.

Q. The interdependence of is evident.

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 14

Both water and energy are integral parts of the human body. By weight about 60% of an adult's human body is water and dehydration is one of the biggest single killers of children in the modern world. Life without water is unthinkable.
The human body needs its daily intake of food to meet its energy requirements, which according to the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations is about 1,800 kcal per day. Life without energy is equally unthinkable.
The energy that we take in through food again depends, amongst other things, on the water for agriculture and often that water is pumped with electrical or other forms of energy. The interdependence of energy and water is evident.
The world at large seeks both water and energy security. The Worldwatch Institute estimates that about 1.1 billion people (one-fifth of the world population) live in areas of physical water scarcity and another 1.6 billion are facing economic water shortage (when existing water sources cannot be used because of a lack of investment in water-related infrastructure). We will probably have a world population of 9 billion by 2050 and this will put further stress on the water sourcing and supply systems. Here again, the connection between energy and water is evident: globally about 70% of water consumption is for the agricultural sector. No water, no food, no energy.
Actions needed on the waterfront include a reduction in water usage for agriculture (pump efficiencies, drip irrigation instead of flood irrigation, change in crop patterns), recycling of water, extensive rainwater harvesting programmes, stoppage of run-offs and water pollution.
We need to remind ourselves that the fossil-based energy that we rely on so much for almost everything we do is stored solar energy. And while the sun took over 150 million years to store its energy in the form of fossil fuels, we are busy discharging that huge solar battery in a matter of a few hundred years.

Q. Fuel found under the ground such as coal is called:

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 15

Both water and energy are integral parts of the human body. By weight about 60% of an adult's human body is water and dehydration is one of the biggest single killers of children in the modern world. Life without water is unthinkable.
The human body needs its daily intake of food to meet its energy requirements, which according to the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations is about 1,800 kcal per day. Life without energy is equally unthinkable.
The energy that we take in through food again depends, amongst other things, on the water for agriculture and often that water is pumped with electrical or other forms of energy. The interdependence of energy and water is evident.
The world at large seeks both water and energy security. The Worldwatch Institute estimates that about 1.1 billion people (one-fifth of the world population) live in areas of physical water scarcity and another 1.6 billion are facing economic water shortage (when existing water sources cannot be used because of a lack of investment in water-related infrastructure). We will probably have a world population of 9 billion by 2050 and this will put further stress on the water sourcing and supply systems. Here again, the connection between energy and water is evident: globally about 70% of water consumption is for the agricultural sector. No water, no food, no energy.
Actions needed on the waterfront include a reduction in water usage for agriculture (pump efficiencies, drip irrigation instead of flood irrigation, change in crop patterns), recycling of water, extensive rainwater harvesting programmes, stoppage of run-offs and water pollution.
We need to remind ourselves that the fossil-based energy that we rely on so much for almost everything we do is stored solar energy. And while the sun took over 150 million years to store its energy in the form of fossil fuels, we are busy discharging that huge solar battery in a matter of a few hundred years.

Q. We get ________ from food.

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 16

Both water and energy are integral parts of the human body. By weight about 60% of an adult's human body is water and dehydration is one of the biggest single killers of children in the modern world. Life without water is unthinkable.
The human body needs its daily intake of food to meet its energy requirements, which according to the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations is about 1,800 kcal per day. Life without energy is equally unthinkable.
The energy that we take in through food again depends, amongst other things, on the water for agriculture and often that water is pumped with electrical or other forms of energy. The interdependence of energy and water is evident.
The world at large seeks both water and energy security. The Worldwatch Institute estimates that about 1.1 billion people (one-fifth of the world population) live in areas of physical water scarcity and another 1.6 billion are facing economic water shortage (when existing water sources cannot be used because of a lack of investment in water-related infrastructure). We will probably have a world population of 9 billion by 2050 and this will put further stress on the water sourcing and supply systems. Here again, the connection between energy and water is evident: globally about 70% of water consumption is for the agricultural sector. No water, no food, no energy.
Actions needed on the waterfront include a reduction in water usage for agriculture (pump efficiencies, drip irrigation instead of flood irrigation, change in crop patterns), recycling of water, extensive rainwater harvesting programmes, stoppage of run-offs and water pollution.
We need to remind ourselves that the fossil-based energy that we rely on so much for almost everything we do is stored solar energy. And while the sun took over 150 million years to store its energy in the form of fossil fuels, we are busy discharging that huge solar battery in a matter of a few hundred years.

Q. Find the word from the passage which means the same as clear/easily seen.

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 17

Both water and energy are integral parts of the human body. By weight about 60% of an adult's human body is water and dehydration is one of the biggest single killers of children in the modern world. Life without water is unthinkable.
The human body needs its daily intake of food to meet its energy requirements, which according to the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations is about 1,800 kcal per day. Life without energy is equally unthinkable.
The energy that we take in through food again depends, amongst other things, on the water for agriculture and often that water is pumped with electrical or other forms of energy. The interdependence of energy and water is evident.
The world at large seeks both water and energy security. The Worldwatch Institute estimates that about 1.1 billion people (one-fifth of the world population) live in areas of physical water scarcity and another 1.6 billion are facing economic water shortage (when existing water sources cannot be used because of a lack of investment in water-related infrastructure). We will probably have a world population of 9 billion by 2050 and this will put further stress on the water sourcing and supply systems. Here again, the connection between energy and water is evident: globally about 70% of water consumption is for the agricultural sector. No water, no food, no energy.
Actions needed on the waterfront include a reduction in water usage for agriculture (pump efficiencies, drip irrigation instead of flood irrigation, change in crop patterns), recycling of water, extensive rainwater harvesting programmes, stoppage of run-offs and water pollution.
We need to remind ourselves that the fossil-based energy that we rely on so much for almost everything we do is stored solar energy. And while the sun took over 150 million years to store its energy in the form of fossil fuels, we are busy discharging that huge solar battery in a matter of a few hundred years.

Q. The Worldwatch Institute estimates that ________ are facing economic water shortage.

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 18

Both water and energy are integral parts of the human body. By weight about 60% of an adult's human body is water and dehydration is one of the biggest single killers of children in the modern world. Life without water is unthinkable.
The human body needs its daily intake of food to meet its energy requirements, which according to the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations is about 1,800 kcal per day. Life without energy is equally unthinkable.
The energy that we take in through food again depends, amongst other things, on the water for agriculture and often that water is pumped with electrical or other forms of energy. The interdependence of energy and water is evident.
The world at large seeks both water and energy security. The Worldwatch Institute estimates that about 1.1 billion people (one-fifth of the world population) live in areas of physical water scarcity and another 1.6 billion are facing economic water shortage (when existing water sources cannot be used because of a lack of investment in water-related infrastructure). We will probably have a world population of 9 billion by 2050 and this will put further stress on the water sourcing and supply systems. Here again, the connection between energy and water is evident: globally about 70% of water consumption is for the agricultural sector. No water, no food, no energy.
Actions needed on the waterfront include a reduction in water usage for agriculture (pump efficiencies, drip irrigation instead of flood irrigation, change in crop patterns), recycling of water, extensive rainwater harvesting programmes, stoppage of run-offs and water pollution.
We need to remind ourselves that the fossil-based energy that we rely on so much for almost everything we do is stored solar energy. And while the sun took over 150 million years to store its energy in the form of fossil fuels, we are busy discharging that huge solar battery in a matter of a few hundred years.

Q. We will probably have a world population of 9 billion by ________.

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 19

You went to a friend’s place for a house party. You are describing the party and your experience.

Q. One of your friends did something unusual to surprise others. Which of the following sentences is most descriptive?

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 20

You went to a friend’s place for a house party. You are describing the party and your experience.

Q. Which of the following points a good descriptive writing should avoid?

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 21

You went to a friend’s place for a house party. You are describing the party and your experience.

Q. Which of the following is the most effective piece of description for your friend’s room?

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 22

You went to a friend’s place for a house party. You are describing the party and your experience.

Q. While writing a descriptive paragraph you should focus on the ________.

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 23

You went to a friend’s place for a house party. You are describing the party and your experience.

Q. Choose the most effective description of your discussion from the following options.
i. Those were the days, fun-filled lovely colleges days ... and remember that professor who used to blew things out of proportion.
ii. Remember those colleges days- how lively life was until that professor came to make it boring with his length lecture.
iii. Remember those colleges days- our lives were in elements... and the professor used exaggerate a topic.
iv. How lovely our college days were! We enjoyed so much. How can we forget that professor and his endless lectures?

Detailed Solution for Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 23

Those were the days, fun-filled lovely   colleges days ...    and remember   that professor who used to blew things out   of proportion.

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 24

You went to a friend’s place for a house party. You are describing the party and your experience.

Q. Which of the following can good descriptive writing use?

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 25

When we _____ the forest, it _____ darker.

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 26

As the President ____ the hall, all the guests ____ to their feet to welcome him.

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 27

Each candidate ________ fill in these forms and sign them.

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 28

Students ________ borrow up to 6 books at any time.

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 29

I don't think there will be a severe shortage of usable water because there was ________ rainfall yesterday.

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 30

He said to her, "Don't read so fast".
Reported speech: ________

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 31

She never stuttered with other people - had quite given it up - but only with Father, because then she was trying so hard to say the words properly. "What’s the matter? What are you looking so wretched about?" Mother, I wish you taught this child not to appear on the brink of suicide... "Here, Kezia, carry my teacup back to the table carefully." He was so big - his hands and his neck, especially his mouth when he yawned. Thinking about him alone was like thinking about a giant.

Q. Whom did the author compare to a giant?

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 32

She never stuttered with other people - had quite given it up - but only with Father, because then she was trying so hard to say the words properly. "What’s the matter? What are you looking so wretched about?" Mother, I wish you taught this child not to appear on the brink of suicide... "Here, Kezia, carry my teacup back to the table carefully." He was so big - his hands and his neck, especially his mouth when he yawned. Thinking about him alone was like thinking about a giant.

Q. What does the word wretched mean?

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 33

She never stuttered with other people - had quite given it up - but only with Father, because then she was trying so hard to say the words properly. "What’s the matter? What are you looking so wretched about?" Mother, I wish you taught this child not to appear on the brink of suicide... "Here, Kezia, carry my teacup back to the table carefully." He was so big - his hands and his neck, especially his mouth when he yawned. Thinking about him alone was like thinking about a giant.

Q. What did her father ask her to do?

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 34

She never stuttered with other people - had quite given it up - but only with Father, because then she was trying so hard to say the words properly. "What’s the matter? What are you looking so wretched about?" Mother, I wish you taught this child not to appear on the brink of suicide... "Here, Kezia, carry my teacup back to the table carefully." He was so big - his hands and his neck, especially his mouth when he yawned. Thinking about him alone was like thinking about a giant.

Q. In front of whom did kezia stutter?

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 35

She never stuttered with other people - had quite given it up - but only with Father, because then she was trying so hard to say the words properly. "What’s the matter? What are you looking so wretched about?" Mother, I wish you taught this child not to appear on the brink of suicide... "Here, Kezia, carry my teacup back to the table carefully." He was so big - his hands and his neck, especially his mouth when he yawned. Thinking about him alone was like thinking about a giant.

Q. Name the chapter from which the given extract has been taken?

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 36

I was one of many children- a short boy with rather undistinguished looks, born to tall and handsome parents. We lived in our ancestral house, which was built in the middle of the nineteenth century. It was a fairly large pucca house, made of limestone and brick, on the Mosque Street in Rameswaram. My austere father used to avoid all inessential comforts and luxuries. However, all necessities were provided for, in terms of food, medicine or clothes. In fact, I would say mine was a very secure childhood, both materially and emotionally.

Q. What did his father often avoid?

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 37

I was one of many children- a short boy with rather undistinguished looks, born to tall and handsome parents. We lived in our ancestral house, which was built in the middle of the nineteenth century. It was a fairly large pucca house, made of limestone and brick, on the Mosque Street in Rameswaram. My austere father used to avoid all inessential comforts and luxuries. However, all necessities were provided for, in terms of food, medicine or clothes. In fact, I would say mine was a very secure childhood, both materially and emotionally.

Q. What necessities did the author talk about?

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 38

I was one of many children- a short boy with rather undistinguished looks, born to tall and handsome parents. We lived in our ancestral house, which was built in the middle of the nineteenth century. It was a fairly large pucca house, made of limestone and brick, on the Mosque Street in Rameswaram. My austere father used to avoid all inessential comforts and luxuries. However, all necessities were provided for, in terms of food, medicine or clothes. In fact, I would say mine was a very secure childhood, both materially and emotionally.

Q. Write the meaning of secure.

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 39

I was one of many children- a short boy with rather undistinguished looks, born to tall and handsome parents. We lived in our ancestral house, which was built in the middle of the nineteenth century. It was a fairly large pucca house, made of limestone and brick, on the Mosque Street in Rameswaram. My austere father used to avoid all inessential comforts and luxuries. However, all necessities were provided for, in terms of food, medicine or clothes. In fact, I would say mine was a very secure childhood, both materially and emotionally.

Q. Describe Kalam's childhood.

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 40

I was one of many children- a short boy with rather undistinguished looks, born to tall and handsome parents. We lived in our ancestral house, which was built in the middle of the nineteenth century. It was a fairly large pucca house, made of limestone and brick, on the Mosque Street in Rameswaram. My austere father used to avoid all inessential comforts and luxuries. However, all necessities were provided for, in terms of food, medicine or clothes. In fact, I would say mine was a very secure childhood, both materially and emotionally.

Q. Where was Kalam's ancestral house located?

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 41

Frail crumbling houses, crumbling doors, crumbling rafters,
crumbling wood, crumbling bodies, crumbling lives,
crumbling heartsthe
wind god winnows and crushes them all.

Q. What does crumbling hearts refer to?

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 42

Frail crumbling houses, crumbling doors, crumbling rafters,
crumbling wood, crumbling bodies, crumbling lives,
crumbling heartsthe
wind god winnows and crushes them all.

Q. The wind god winnows ________.

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 43

Frail crumbling houses, crumbling doors, crumbling rafters,
crumbling wood, crumbling bodies, crumbling lives,
crumbling heartsthe
wind god winnows and crushes them all.

Q. How does the wind behave with the non-living object?

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 44

Frail crumbling houses, crumbling doors, crumbling rafters,
crumbling wood, crumbling bodies, crumbling lives,
crumbling heartsthe
wind god winnows and crushes them all.

Q. Why do people winnow the grain?

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 45

Frail crumbling houses, crumbling doors, crumbling rafters,
crumbling wood, crumbling bodies, crumbling lives,
crumbling heartsthe
wind god winnows and crushes them all.

Q. Who is the poet of the poem?

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 46

"I will put up there," he cried. "It is a fine position with plenty of fresh air." So he alighted just between the feet of the Happy Prince."

Q. Who is the speaker of the above lines?

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 47

"I will put up there," he cried. "It is a fine position with plenty of fresh air." So he alighted just between the feet of the Happy Prince."

Q. The speaker is speaking about:

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 48

"I will put up there," he cried. "It is a fine position with plenty of fresh air." So he alighted just between the feet of the Happy Prince."

Q. In the above extract, there stands for:

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 49

"I will put up there," he cried. "It is a fine position with plenty of fresh air." So he alighted just between the feet of the Happy Prince."

Q. Where was the statue?

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 50

"I will put up there," he cried. "It is a fine position with plenty of fresh air." So he alighted just between the feet of the Happy Prince."

Q. Which word from the following means the same as get down?

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 51

To which world does the story take the readers? (The Fun They Had)

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 52

A Truly Beautiful Mind, what did Albert's playmates call him?

Detailed Solution for Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 52

Albert had no idea as to what he   should do with the other children. He   was like a boring child for his   playmates so they named him   "Brother Boring".    

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 53

With whom did Einstein fall in love?

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 54

Who all were present at the event of 15th August? (The Sound of Music)

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 55

What are the humid shadows doing in the sphere? (Rain on the Roof)

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 56

What was the little woman doing when Saint Peter came to the door of her cottage?

Detailed Solution for Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 56

When Saint Peter came to the door of   her cottage she was making cakes   and baking them on the hearth.

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 57

Why was Toto sold by the narrator's grandfather?

Detailed Solution for Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 57

The monkey was difficult to handle.   The narrator's middle-class family   could not bear the frequent  damages   of utensils and other household items that Toto caused.

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 58

Whom did the bricklayer blame for his inaccurate work in the story, In the Kingdom of Fools?

Detailed Solution for Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 58

The bricklayer blamed the dancing  girl    for his inaccurate work because it   was her ankles that jingled when she   walked up and down the street which    kept the bricklayer distracted from his work.

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 59

Who played the flute at the fair in The Lost Child?

Detailed Solution for Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 59

The child was mesmerized by the music from a flute played by a snake charmer at the fair. He stood playing the flute to a snake sitting inside a basket.

Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 60

What was compared to melting gold in the story The lost child?

Detailed Solution for Test: Class 9 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper Term I - 2 - Question 60

The child's mother compared the flowering mustard-field to melting gold. She tried to divert her son's attention towards the field which appeared as pale as melting gold to her.

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