Test : English - 9


20 Questions MCQ Test NDA (National Defence Academy) Mock Test Series | Test : English - 9


Description
This mock test of Test : English - 9 for Defence helps you for every Defence entrance exam. This contains 20 Multiple Choice Questions for Defence Test : English - 9 (mcq) to study with solutions a complete question bank. The solved questions answers in this Test : English - 9 quiz give you a good mix of easy questions and tough questions. Defence students definitely take this Test : English - 9 exercise for a better result in the exam. You can find other Test : English - 9 extra questions, long questions & short questions for Defence on EduRev as well by searching above.
QUESTION: 1

Direction : A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

Real policemen, both in Britain and the United States hardly recognize any resemblance between their lives and what they see on TV-if they ever get home in time. There are similarities, of course, but the cops don’t think much of them. The first difference is that a policeman’s real life revolves round the law. Most of his training is in criminal law. He has to know exactly what actions are crimes and what evidence can be used to prove them in court. He has to know nearly as much law as a professional lawyer, and what is more, he has to apply it on his feet, in the dark and rain, running down an alley after someone he wants to talk to.
Little of his time is spent in chatting to scantily-clad ladies or in dramatic confrontations with desperate criminals. He will spend most of his working life typing millions of words on thousands of forms about hundreds of sad, unimportant people who are guilty-or not-of stupid, petty crimes. Most television crime drama is about finding the criminal; as soon as he’s arrested, the story is over. In real life, finding criminals is seldom much of a problem. Except in very serious cases like murders and terrorist attacks-where failure to produce results reflects on the standing of the police-little effort is spent on searching. The police have an elaborate machinery which eventually shows up most wanted men.

Q. Which of the following statements is correct?

Solution:
QUESTION: 2

Direction: A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

Real policemen, both in Britain and the United States hardly recognize any resemblance between their lives and what they see on TV-if they ever get home in time. There are similarities, of course, but the cops don’t think much of them. The first difference is that a policeman’s real life revolves round the law. Most of his training is in criminal law. He has to know exactly what actions are crimes and what evidence can be used to prove them in court. He has to know nearly as much law as a professional lawyer, and what is more, he has to apply it on his feet, in the dark and rain, running down an alley after someone he wants to talk to.
Little of his time is spent in chatting to scantily-clad ladies or in dramatic confrontations with desperate criminals. He will spend most of his working life typing millions of words on thousands of forms about hundreds of sad, unimportant people who are guilty-or not-of stupid, petty crimes. Most television crime drama is about finding the criminal; as soon as he’s arrested, the story is over. In real life, finding criminals is seldom much of a problem. Except in very serious cases like murders and terrorist attacks-where failure to produce results reflects on the standing of the police-little effort is spent on searching. The police have an elaborate machinery which eventually shows up most wanted men.

Q. The everyday life of a policeman or detective is.

Solution:
QUESTION: 3

Direction: A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

Real policemen, both in Britain and the United States hardly recognize any resemblance between their lives and what they see on TV-if they ever get home in time. There are similarities, of course, but the cops don’t think much of them. The first difference is that a policeman’s real life revolves round the law. Most of his training is in criminal law. He has to know exactly what actions are crimes and what evidence can be used to prove them in court. He has to know nearly as much law as a professional lawyer, and what is more, he has to apply it on his feet, in the dark and rain, running down an alley after someone he wants to talk to.
Little of his time is spent in chatting to scantily-clad ladies or in dramatic confrontations with desperate criminals. He will spend most of his working life typing millions of words on thousands of forms about hundreds of sad, unimportant people who are guilty-or not-of stupid, petty crimes. Most television crime drama is about finding the criminal; as soon as he’s arrested, the story is over. In real life, finding criminals is seldom much of a problem. Except in very serious cases like murders and terrorist attacks-where failure to produce results reflects on the standing of the police-little effort is spent on searching. The police have an elaborate machinery which eventually shows up most wanted men.

Q. It is essential for a policeman to be trained in criminal law

Solution:
QUESTION: 4

Direction: A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

Real policemen, both in Britain and the United States hardly recognize any resemblance between their lives and what they see on TV-if they ever get home in time. There are similarities, of course, but the cops don’t think much of them. The first difference is that a policeman’s real life revolves round the law. Most of his training is in criminal law. He has to know exactly what actions are crimes and what evidence can be used to prove them in court. He has to know nearly as much law as a professional lawyer, and what is more, he has to apply it on his feet, in the dark and rain, running down an alley after someone he wants to talk to.
Little of his time is spent in chatting to scantily-clad ladies or in dramatic confrontations with desperate criminals. He will spend most of his working life typing millions of words on thousands of forms about hundreds of sad, unimportant people who are guilty-or not-of stupid, petty crimes. Most television crime drama is about finding the criminal; as soon as he’s arrested, the story is over. In real life, finding criminals is seldom much of a problem. Except in very serious cases like murders and terrorist attacks-where failure to produce results reflects on the standing of the police-little effort is spent on searching. The police have an elaborate machinery which eventually shows up most wanted men.

Q. When murders and terrorist attacks occur, the police

Solution:
QUESTION: 5

Direction: A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

Real policemen, both in Britain and the United States hardly recognize any resemblance between their lives and what they see on TV-if they ever get home in time. There are similarities, of course, but the cops don’t think much of them. The first difference is that a policeman’s real life revolves round the law. Most of his training is in criminal law. He has to know exactly what actions are crimes and what evidence can be used to prove them in court. He has to know nearly as much law as a professional lawyer, and what is more, he has to apply it on his feet, in the dark and rain, running down an alley after someone he wants to talk to.
Little of his time is spent in chatting to scantily-clad ladies or in dramatic confrontations with desperate criminals. He will spend most of his working life typing millions of words on thousands of forms about hundreds of sad, unimportant people who are guilty-or not-of stupid, petty crimes. Most television crime drama is about finding the criminal; as soon as he’s arrested, the story is over. In real life, finding criminals is seldom much of a problem. Except in very serious cases like murders and terrorist attacks-where failure to produce results reflects on the standing of the police-little effort is spent on searching. The police have an elaborate machinery which eventually shows up most wanted men.

Q. Which of the following statements is false?

Solution:
QUESTION: 6

Direction : A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

I am always amazed when I hear people saying that sport creates goodwill between the nations, and that if only the common people of the world could meet one another at football or cricket, they would have no inclination to meet on the battlefield. Even if one didn’t know from concrete examples (the 1936 Olympic Games, for instance) that international sporting contests lead to orgies of hatred, one could deduce it from general principles. Nearly all the sports practiced nowadays are competitive. You play to win, and the game has little meaning unless you do your utmost to win. In the village where you pick up sides and no feeling of local patriotism is involved, it is possible to play simply for the fun and exercise, but as soon as the question of prestige arises, as soon as you feel that you and some larger unit will be disgraced if you lose, the most savage combative instincts are aroused. Anyone who has played even in a school football match knows this. At the international level sport is frankly mimic warfare. But the significant thing is not the behaviour of the players but the attitude of the spectators: and, behind the spectators, of the nations who work themselves into furies over these absurd contests, and seriously believe-at any rate for short periods-that running, jumping and kicking a ball are tests of national virtue.

Q. The author of the passage believes that.

Solution:
QUESTION: 7

Direction: A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

I am always amazed when I hear people saying that sport creates goodwill between the nations, and that if only the common people of the world could meet one another at football or cricket, they would have no inclination to meet on the battlefield. Even if one didn’t know from concrete examples (the 1936 Olympic Games, for instance) that international sporting contests lead to orgies of hatred, one could deduce it from general principles. Nearly all the sports practiced nowadays are competitive. You play to win, and the game has little meaning unless you do your utmost to win. In the village where you pick up sides and no feeling of local patriotism is involved, it is possible to play simply for the fun and exercise, but as soon as the question of prestige arises, as soon as you feel that you and some larger unit will be disgraced if you lose, the most savage combative instincts are aroused. Anyone who has played even in a school football match knows this. At the international level sport is frankly mimic warfare. But the significant thing is not the behaviour of the players but the attitude of the spectators: and, behind the spectators, of the nations who work themselves into furies over these absurd contests, and seriously believe-at any rate for short periods-that running, jumping and kicking a ball are tests of national virtue.

Q. By ‘concrete examples’, the writer is referring to.

Solution:
QUESTION: 8

Direction: A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

I am always amazed when I hear people saying that sport creates goodwill between the nations, and that if only the common people of the world could meet one another at football or cricket, they would have no inclination to meet on the battlefield. Even if one didn’t know from concrete examples (the 1936 Olympic Games, for instance) that international sporting contests lead to orgies of hatred, one could deduce it from general principles. Nearly all the sports practiced nowadays are competitive. You play to win, and the game has little meaning unless you do your utmost to win. In the village where you pick up sides and no feeling of local patriotism is involved, it is possible to play simply for the fun and exercise, but as soon as the question of prestige arises, as soon as you feel that you and some larger unit will be disgraced if you lose, the most savage combative instincts are aroused. Anyone who has played even in a school football match knows this. At the international level sport is frankly mimic warfare. But the significant thing is not the behaviour of the players but the attitude of the spectators: and, behind the spectators, of the nations who work themselves into furies over these absurd contests, and seriously believe-at any rate for short periods-that running, jumping and kicking a ball are tests of national virtue.

Q. In competitive games, you

Solution:
QUESTION: 9

Direction: A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

I am always amazed when I hear people saying that sport creates goodwill between the nations, and that if only the common people of the world could meet one another at football or cricket, they would have no inclination to meet on the battlefield. Even if one didn’t know from concrete examples (the 1936 Olympic Games, for instance) that international sporting contests lead to orgies of hatred, one could deduce it from general principles. Nearly all the sports practiced nowadays are competitive. You play to win, and the game has little meaning unless you do your utmost to win. In the village where you pick up sides and no feeling of local patriotism is involved, it is possible to play simply for the fun and exercise, but as soon as the question of prestige arises, as soon as you feel that you and some larger unit will be disgraced if you lose, the most savage combative instincts are aroused. Anyone who has played even in a school football match knows this. At the international level sport is frankly mimic warfare. But the significant thing is not the behaviour of the players but the attitude of the spectators: and, behind the spectators, of the nations who work themselves into furies over these absurd contests, and seriously believe-at any rate for short periods-that running, jumping and kicking a ball are tests of national virtue.

Q. At the international level, sports

Solution:
QUESTION: 10

Direction: A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

I am always amazed when I hear people saying that sport creates goodwill between the nations, and that if only the common people of the world could meet one another at football or cricket, they would have no inclination to meet on the battlefield. Even if one didn’t know from concrete examples (the 1936 Olympic Games, for instance) that international sporting contests lead to orgies of hatred, one could deduce it from general principles. Nearly all the sports practiced nowadays are competitive. You play to win, and the game has little meaning unless you do your utmost to win. In the village where you pick up sides and no feeling of local patriotism is involved, it is possible to play simply for the fun and exercise, but as soon as the question of prestige arises, as soon as you feel that you and some larger unit will be disgraced if you lose, the most savage combative instincts are aroused. Anyone who has played even in a school football match knows this. At the international level sport is frankly mimic warfare. But the significant thing is not the behaviour of the players but the attitude of the spectators: and, behind the spectators, of the nations who work themselves into furies over these absurd contests, and seriously believe-at any rate for short periods-that running, jumping and kicking a ball are tests of national virtue.

Q. Orgies are.

Solution:
QUESTION: 11

Direction: Each question in this section has a sentence with three parts labelled (A), (B) and (C). Read each sentence to find out whether there is any error in any part and indicate your answer in the Answer Sheet against the corresponding letter i.e. (A) or (B) or (C). If you find no error, your answer should be indicated as (D).

Q. My mother has (A)/ returned back to (B)/ Delhi day before yesterday. (C)/ No error (D)

Solution:

Remove ‘back’ after ‘returned’.
Return: come or go back to a place or person.
Hence usage of ‘back’ with ‘return’ is superfluous and needs to be removed.

QUESTION: 12

Direction: Each question in this section has a sentence with three parts labelled (A), (B) and (C). Read each sentence to find out whether there is any error in any part and indicate your answer in the Answer Sheet against the corresponding letter i.e. (A) or (B) or (C). If you find no error, your answer should be indicated as (D).

Q. Our summer vacation is (A)/ between 10th May (B)/ to 10th June (C)/ No error (D)

Solution:

Replace ‘to’ with ‘and’. Correct conjunction pair is ‘between….and’

QUESTION: 13

Direction: Each question in this section has a sentence with three parts labelled (A), (B) and (C). Read each sentence to find out whether there is any error in any part and indicate your answer in the Answer Sheet against the corresponding letter i.e. (A) or (B) or (C). If you find no error, your answer should be indicated as (D).

Q. Please note that you will be eligible for (A)/ the voucher only if you (B)/ had received this email. (C)/ No Error (D)

Solution:

Replace ‘had received’ with ‘receive’. Simple future Tense +……….if + Subject + Present Indefinite Tense.

QUESTION: 14

Direction: Each question in this section has a sentence with three parts labelled (A), (B) and (C). Read each sentence to find out whether there is any error in any part and indicate your answer in the Answer Sheet against the corresponding letter i.e. (A) or (B) or (C). If you find no error, your answer should be indicated as (D)

Q. We know it is an extra early start to (A)/ your day, but we are certain (B)/ you too would like to contribute towards this. (C)/ No Error (D)

Solution:
QUESTION: 15

Direction: Each question in this section has a sentence with three parts labelled (A), (B) and (C). Read each sentence to find out whether there is any error in any part and indicate your answer in the Answer Sheet against the corresponding letter i.e. (A) or (B) or (C). If you find no error, your answer should be indicated as (D).

Q. A lot of efforts may (A)/ fell like they (B)/ are going unnoticed. (C)/ No Error (D)

Solution:

Replace ‘fell’ with ‘fall’.
‘Subject + Modal + Base form of Verb’ rule follows here.

QUESTION: 16

Direction: Each question in this section has a sentence with three parts labelled (A), (B) and (C). Read each sentence to find out whether there is any error in any part and indicate your answer in the Answer Sheet against the corresponding letter i.e. (A) or (B) or (C). If you find no error, your answer should be indicated as (D).

Q. Intrigued by this (A)/ problem, I began search (B)/ for a solution. (C)/ No Error (D)

Solution:

Replace ‘search’ with ‘searching’ or ‘to search’ as ‘begin’ is followed by either an infinitive (to + V1) or a gerund (V1 +ing).

QUESTION: 17

Direction: Each question in this section has a sentence with three parts labelled (A), (B) and (C). Read each sentence to find out whether there is any error in any part and indicate your answer in the Answer Sheet against the corresponding letter i.e. (A) or (B) or (C). If you find no error, your answer should be indicated as (D).

Q. We will not want our kids (A)/ to be influenced by (B)/ such TV serials. (C)/ No Error (D)

Solution:
QUESTION: 18

Direction: Each question in this section has a sentence with three parts labelled (A), (B) and (C). Read each sentence to find out whether there is any error in any part and indicate your answer in the Answer Sheet against the corresponding letter i.e. (A) or (B) or (C). If you find no error, your answer should be indicated as (D).

Q. Many were alarmed by the possibility for (A)/surveillance and monitoring of personal computers (b)/ that this rule throws off. (C)/ No Error (D)

Solution:

Replace ‘throw off’ with ‘throw up’
Throw off (phrasal verb): introduce errors or inaccuracies; to skew
Throw up (phrasal verb): to produce something new or unexpected; cause something new to exist.

QUESTION: 19

Direction: Each question in this section has a sentence with three parts labelled (A), (B) and (C). Read each sentence to find out whether there is any error in any part and indicate your answer in the Answer Sheet against the corresponding letter i.e. (A) or (B) or (C). If you find no error, your answer should be indicated as (D).

Q. While the exercise to regulate online content is necessary, (A)/ it is important that while framing such rules, a balance is struck between (B)/ legitimate public interest or individual rights. (C)/ No Error (D)

Solution:

Replace ‘or’ with ‘and’. As there are two subjects ‘public interest’ and ‘individual rights’ to deal with, correct conjunction pair should be ‘between….and’

QUESTION: 20

Direction: Each question in this section has a sentence with three parts labelled (A), (B) and (C). Read each sentence to find out whether there is any error in any part and indicate your answer in the Answer Sheet against the corresponding letter i.e. (A) or (B) or (C). If you find no error, your answer should be indicated as (D).

Q. Statutory norms relating to data protection are seen as essential (A)/to protect citizens from any breach of their information privacy; but (B)/ attempts to regulate online content are seen with suspicion.(C)/ No Error (D)

Solution:

Replace noun ‘information’ with adjective ‘informational’ to qualify the noun ‘privacy’. 
Informational (adjective): relating to or characterized by facts about something; providing information

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