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Test: Migration: Types, Causes and Consequences- Source Based Type Questions


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15 Questions MCQ Test Geography Class 12 | Test: Migration: Types, Causes and Consequences- Source Based Type Questions

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Test: Migration: Types, Causes and Consequences- Source Based Type Questions - Question 1

Direction: Read the case study given below and answer the questions that follow:

The major benefit for the source region is the remittance sent by migrants. Remittances from the international migrants are one of the major sources of foreign exchange. In 2002, India received US$ 11 billion as remittances from international migrants. Punjab, Kerala and Tamil Nadu receive very significant amount from their international migrants. The amount of remittances sent by the internal migrants is very meagre as compared to international migrants, but it plays an important role in the growth of economy of the source area.

Remittances are mainly used for food, repayment of debts, treatment, marriages, children’s education, agricultural inputs, construction of houses, etc. For thousands of the poor villages of Bihar, Uttar Pradesh, Odisha, Andhra Pradesh, Himachal Pradesh, etc. remittance works as life blood for their economy. Migration from rural areas of Eastern Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Madhya Pradesh and Odisha to the rural areas of Punjab, Haryana, Western Uttar Pradesh accounted for the success of their green revolution strategy for agricultural development. Besides this, unregulated migration to the metropolitan cities of India has caused overcrowding. Development of slums in industrially developed states such as Maharashtra, Gujarat, Karnataka, Tamil Nadu and Delhi is a negative consequence of unregulated migration within the country.

A ________is a non-commercial transfer of money by a foreign worker, a member of a diaspora community, or a citizen for household income in their home country or homeland.

Detailed Solution for Test: Migration: Types, Causes and Consequences- Source Based Type Questions - Question 1 A remittance is a non-commercial transfer of money by a foreign worker, a member of a diaspora community, or a citizen for household income in their home country or homeland.
Test: Migration: Types, Causes and Consequences- Source Based Type Questions - Question 2

Direction: Read the case study given below and answer the questions that follow:

The major benefit for the source region is the remittance sent by migrants. Remittances from the international migrants are one of the major sources of foreign exchange. In 2002, India received US$ 11 billion as remittances from international migrants. Punjab, Kerala and Tamil Nadu receive very significant amount from their international migrants. The amount of remittances sent by the internal migrants is very meagre as compared to international migrants, but it plays an important role in the growth of economy of the source area.

Remittances are mainly used for food, repayment of debts, treatment, marriages, children’s education, agricultural inputs, construction of houses, etc. For thousands of the poor villages of Bihar, Uttar Pradesh, Odisha, Andhra Pradesh, Himachal Pradesh, etc. remittance works as life blood for their economy. Migration from rural areas of Eastern Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Madhya Pradesh and Odisha to the rural areas of Punjab, Haryana, Western Uttar Pradesh accounted for the success of their green revolution strategy for agricultural development. Besides this, unregulated migration to the metropolitan cities of India has caused overcrowding. Development of slums in industrially developed states such as Maharashtra, Gujarat, Karnataka, Tamil Nadu and Delhi is a negative consequence of unregulated migration within the country.

How much remittance did India receive in 2002 from international migrants?

Detailed Solution for Test: Migration: Types, Causes and Consequences- Source Based Type Questions - Question 2 India received US$ 11 billion in 2002 from international migrants.
Test: Migration: Types, Causes and Consequences- Source Based Type Questions - Question 3

Direction: Read the case study given below and answer the questions that follow:

The major benefit for the source region is the remittance sent by migrants. Remittances from the international migrants are one of the major sources of foreign exchange. In 2002, India received US$ 11 billion as remittances from international migrants. Punjab, Kerala and Tamil Nadu receive very significant amount from their international migrants. The amount of remittances sent by the internal migrants is very meagre as compared to international migrants, but it plays an important role in the growth of economy of the source area.

Remittances are mainly used for food, repayment of debts, treatment, marriages, children’s education, agricultural inputs, construction of houses, etc. For thousands of the poor villages of Bihar, Uttar Pradesh, Odisha, Andhra Pradesh, Himachal Pradesh, etc. remittance works as life blood for their economy. Migration from rural areas of Eastern Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Madhya Pradesh and Odisha to the rural areas of Punjab, Haryana, Western Uttar Pradesh accounted for the success of their green revolution strategy for agricultural development. Besides this, unregulated migration to the metropolitan cities of India has caused overcrowding. Development of slums in industrially developed states such as Maharashtra, Gujarat, Karnataka, Tamil Nadu and Delhi is a negative consequence of unregulated migration within the country.

What is the major benefit that the source regions receive from the migrants?

Detailed Solution for Test: Migration: Types, Causes and Consequences- Source Based Type Questions - Question 3 Remittance is the major benefit that the source regions receive from the migrants
Test: Migration: Types, Causes and Consequences- Source Based Type Questions - Question 4

Direction: Read the case study given below and answer the questions that follow:

The major benefit for the source region is the remittance sent by migrants. Remittances from the international migrants are one of the major sources of foreign exchange. In 2002, India received US$ 11 billion as remittances from international migrants. Punjab, Kerala and Tamil Nadu receive very significant amount from their international migrants. The amount of remittances sent by the internal migrants is very meagre as compared to international migrants, but it plays an important role in the growth of economy of the source area.

Remittances are mainly used for food, repayment of debts, treatment, marriages, children’s education, agricultural inputs, construction of houses, etc. For thousands of the poor villages of Bihar, Uttar Pradesh, Odisha, Andhra Pradesh, Himachal Pradesh, etc. remittance works as life blood for their economy. Migration from rural areas of Eastern Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Madhya Pradesh and Odisha to the rural areas of Punjab, Haryana, Western Uttar Pradesh accounted for the success of their green revolution strategy for agricultural development. Besides this, unregulated migration to the metropolitan cities of India has caused overcrowding. Development of slums in industrially developed states such as Maharashtra, Gujarat, Karnataka, Tamil Nadu and Delhi is a negative consequence of unregulated migration within the country.

Give an example of uses of remittance.

Detailed Solution for Test: Migration: Types, Causes and Consequences- Source Based Type Questions - Question 4 Repayment of debt, marriage and children’s education are all uses of remittance.
Test: Migration: Types, Causes and Consequences- Source Based Type Questions - Question 5

Direction: Read the case study given below and answer the questions that follow:

During colonial period (British period) millions of the indentured labourers were sent to Mauritius, Caribbean islands (Trinidad, Tobago and Guyana), Fiji and South Africa by British from Uttar Pradesh and Bihar; to Reunion Island, Guadeloupe, Martinique and Surinam by French and Dutch and by Portuguese from Goa, Daman and Diu to Angola, Mozambique to work as plantation workers. All such migrations were covered under the time-bound contract known as Girmit Act (Indian Emigration Act). However, the living conditions of these indentured labourers were not better than the slaves.

The second wave of migrants ventured out into the neighbouring countries in recent times as professionals, artisans, traders and factory workers, in search of economic opportunities to Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, Brunei and African countries, etc. and the trend still continues. There was a steady outflow of India’s semi-skilled and skilled labour in the wake of the oil boom in West Asia in the 1970s. There was also some outflow of entrepreneurs, store owners, professionals, businessmen to Western countries. Third wave of migrants was comprised of professionals like doctors, engineers (1960s onwards), software engineers, management consultants, financial experts, media persons (1980s onwards), and others migrated to countries such as USA, Canada, UK, Australia, New Zealand and Germany. These professionals enjoy the distinction of being one of highly educated, the highest earning and prospering groups. After liberalisation, in the 90s education and knowledge– based Indian emigration has made Indian Diaspora one of the most powerful diasporas in the world. In all these countries, Indian diaspora has been playing an important role in the development of the respective countries.

When did the knowledge-based Indian migrate from India?

Detailed Solution for Test: Migration: Types, Causes and Consequences- Source Based Type Questions - Question 5 The knowledge-based Indian migrate from India in 1990s.
Test: Migration: Types, Causes and Consequences- Source Based Type Questions - Question 6

Direction: Read the case study given below and answer the questions that follow:

During colonial period (British period) millions of the indentured labourers were sent to Mauritius, Caribbean islands (Trinidad, Tobago and Guyana), Fiji and South Africa by British from Uttar Pradesh and Bihar; to Reunion Island, Guadeloupe, Martinique and Surinam by French and Dutch and by Portuguese from Goa, Daman and Diu to Angola, Mozambique to work as plantation workers. All such migrations were covered under the time-bound contract known as Girmit Act (Indian Emigration Act). However, the living conditions of these indentured labourers were not better than the slaves.

The second wave of migrants ventured out into the neighbouring countries in recent times as professionals, artisans, traders and factory workers, in search of economic opportunities to Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, Brunei and African countries, etc. and the trend still continues. There was a steady outflow of India’s semi-skilled and skilled labour in the wake of the oil boom in West Asia in the 1970s. There was also some outflow of entrepreneurs, store owners, professionals, businessmen to Western countries. Third wave of migrants was comprised of professionals like doctors, engineers (1960s onwards), software engineers, management consultants, financial experts, media persons (1980s onwards), and others migrated to countries such as USA, Canada, UK, Australia, New Zealand and Germany. These professionals enjoy the distinction of being one of highly educated, the highest earning and prospering groups. After liberalisation, in the 90s education and knowledge– based Indian emigration has made Indian Diaspora one of the most powerful diasporas in the world. In all these countries, Indian diaspora has been playing an important role in the development of the respective countries.

Who sent the Indian labourers from Goa to Mozambique?

Detailed Solution for Test: Migration: Types, Causes and Consequences- Source Based Type Questions - Question 6 Portuguese sent the Indian labourers from Goa to Mozambique
Test: Migration: Types, Causes and Consequences- Source Based Type Questions - Question 7

Direction: Read the case study given below and answer the questions that follow:

During colonial period (British period) millions of the indentured labourers were sent to Mauritius, Caribbean islands (Trinidad, Tobago and Guyana), Fiji and South Africa by British from Uttar Pradesh and Bihar; to Reunion Island, Guadeloupe, Martinique and Surinam by French and Dutch and by Portuguese from Goa, Daman and Diu to Angola, Mozambique to work as plantation workers. All such migrations were covered under the time-bound contract known as Girmit Act (Indian Emigration Act). However, the living conditions of these indentured labourers were not better than the slaves.

The second wave of migrants ventured out into the neighbouring countries in recent times as professionals, artisans, traders and factory workers, in search of economic opportunities to Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, Brunei and African countries, etc. and the trend still continues. There was a steady outflow of India’s semi-skilled and skilled labour in the wake of the oil boom in West Asia in the 1970s. There was also some outflow of entrepreneurs, store owners, professionals, businessmen to Western countries. Third wave of migrants was comprised of professionals like doctors, engineers (1960s onwards), software engineers, management consultants, financial experts, media persons (1980s onwards), and others migrated to countries such as USA, Canada, UK, Australia, New Zealand and Germany. These professionals enjoy the distinction of being one of highly educated, the highest earning and prospering groups. After liberalisation, in the 90s education and knowledge– based Indian emigration has made Indian Diaspora one of the most powerful diasporas in the world. In all these countries, Indian diaspora has been playing an important role in the development of the respective countries.

Under the provisions of which Act were the labourers emigrated from India to other European colonies?

Detailed Solution for Test: Migration: Types, Causes and Consequences- Source Based Type Questions - Question 7 Under the provisions of Girmit Act were the labourers emigrated from India to other European colonies.
Test: Migration: Types, Causes and Consequences- Source Based Type Questions - Question 8

Direction: Read the case study given below and answer the questions that follow:

During colonial period (British period) millions of the indentured labourers were sent to Mauritius, Caribbean islands (Trinidad, Tobago and Guyana), Fiji and South Africa by British from Uttar Pradesh and Bihar; to Reunion Island, Guadeloupe, Martinique and Surinam by French and Dutch and by Portuguese from Goa, Daman and Diu to Angola, Mozambique to work as plantation workers. All such migrations were covered under the time-bound contract known as Girmit Act (Indian Emigration Act). However, the living conditions of these indentured labourers were not better than the slaves.

The second wave of migrants ventured out into the neighbouring countries in recent times as professionals, artisans, traders and factory workers, in search of economic opportunities to Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, Brunei and African countries, etc. and the trend still continues. There was a steady outflow of India’s semi-skilled and skilled labour in the wake of the oil boom in West Asia in the 1970s. There was also some outflow of entrepreneurs, store owners, professionals, businessmen to Western countries. Third wave of migrants was comprised of professionals like doctors, engineers (1960s onwards), software engineers, management consultants, financial experts, media persons (1980s onwards), and others migrated to countries such as USA, Canada, UK, Australia, New Zealand and Germany. These professionals enjoy the distinction of being one of highly educated, the highest earning and prospering groups. After liberalisation, in the 90s education and knowledge– based Indian emigration has made Indian Diaspora one of the most powerful diasporas in the world. In all these countries, Indian diaspora has been playing an important role in the development of the respective countries.

Which of these migrated from India during the second wave?

Detailed Solution for Test: Migration: Types, Causes and Consequences- Source Based Type Questions - Question 8 Artisans migrated from India during the second wave.
Test: Migration: Types, Causes and Consequences- Source Based Type Questions - Question 9

Direction: Read the case study given below and answer the questions that follow:

During colonial period (British period) millions of the indentured labourers were sent to Mauritius, Caribbean islands (Trinidad, Tobago and Guyana), Fiji and South Africa by British from Uttar Pradesh and Bihar; to Reunion Island, Guadeloupe, Martinique and Surinam by French and Dutch and by Portuguese from Goa, Daman and Diu to Angola, Mozambique to work as plantation workers. All such migrations were covered under the time-bound contract known as Girmit Act (Indian Emigration Act). However, the living conditions of these indentured labourers were not better than the slaves.

The second wave of migrants ventured out into the neighbouring countries in recent times as professionals, artisans, traders and factory workers, in search of economic opportunities to Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, Brunei and African countries, etc. and the trend still continues. There was a steady outflow of India’s semi-skilled and skilled labour in the wake of the oil boom in West Asia in the 1970s. There was also some outflow of entrepreneurs, store owners, professionals, businessmen to Western countries. Third wave of migrants was comprised of professionals like doctors, engineers (1960s onwards), software engineers, management consultants, financial experts, media persons (1980s onwards), and others migrated to countries such as USA, Canada, UK, Australia, New Zealand and Germany. These professionals enjoy the distinction of being one of highly educated, the highest earning and prospering groups. After liberalisation, in the 90s education and knowledge– based Indian emigration has made Indian Diaspora one of the most powerful diasporas in the world. In all these countries, Indian diaspora has been playing an important role in the development of the respective countries.

Which of these countries was a destination for migrants in the second wave?

Detailed Solution for Test: Migration: Types, Causes and Consequences- Source Based Type Questions - Question 9 Singapore was a destination for migrants in the second wave.
Test: Migration: Types, Causes and Consequences- Source Based Type Questions - Question 10

Direction: Read the case study given below and answer the questions that follow:

During colonial period (British period) millions of the indentured labourers were sent to Mauritius, Caribbean islands (Trinidad, Tobago and Guyana), Fiji and South Africa by British from Uttar Pradesh and Bihar; to Reunion Island, Guadeloupe, Martinique and Surinam by French and Dutch and by Portuguese from Goa, Daman and Diu to Angola, Mozambique to work as plantation workers. All such migrations were covered under the time-bound contract known as Girmit Act (Indian Emigration Act). However, the living conditions of these indentured labourers were not better than the slaves.

The second wave of migrants ventured out into the neighbouring countries in recent times as professionals, artisans, traders and factory workers, in search of economic opportunities to Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, Brunei and African countries, etc. and the trend still continues. There was a steady outflow of India’s semi-skilled and skilled labour in the wake of the oil boom in West Asia in the 1970s. There was also some outflow of entrepreneurs, store owners, professionals, businessmen to Western countries. Third wave of migrants was comprised of professionals like doctors, engineers (1960s onwards), software engineers, management consultants, financial experts, media persons (1980s onwards), and others migrated to countries such as USA, Canada, UK, Australia, New Zealand and Germany. These professionals enjoy the distinction of being one of highly educated, the highest earning and prospering groups. After liberalisation, in the 90s education and knowledge– based Indian emigration has made Indian Diaspora one of the most powerful diasporas in the world. In all these countries, Indian diaspora has been playing an important role in the development of the respective countries.

The living conditions of the indentured labourers resembled those of:

Detailed Solution for Test: Migration: Types, Causes and Consequences- Source Based Type Questions - Question 10 The living conditions of the indentured labourers resembled those of slaves.
Test: Migration: Types, Causes and Consequences- Source Based Type Questions - Question 11

Direction: Read the case study given below and answer the questions that follow:

During colonial period (British period) millions of the indentured labourers were sent to Mauritius, Caribbean islands (Trinidad, Tobago and Guyana), Fiji and South Africa by British from Uttar Pradesh and Bihar; to Reunion Island, Guadeloupe, Martinique and Surinam by French and Dutch and by Portuguese from Goa, Daman and Diu to Angola, Mozambique to work as plantation workers. All such migrations were covered under the time-bound contract known as Girmit Act (Indian Emigration Act). However, the living conditions of these indentured labourers were not better than the slaves.

The second wave of migrants ventured out into the neighbouring countries in recent times as professionals, artisans, traders and factory workers, in search of economic opportunities to Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, Brunei and African countries, etc. and the trend still continues. There was a steady outflow of India’s semi-skilled and skilled labour in the wake of the oil boom in West Asia in the 1970s. There was also some outflow of entrepreneurs, store owners, professionals, businessmen to Western countries. Third wave of migrants was comprised of professionals like doctors, engineers (1960s onwards), software engineers, management consultants, financial experts, media persons (1980s onwards), and others migrated to countries such as USA, Canada, UK, Australia, New Zealand and Germany. These professionals enjoy the distinction of being one of highly educated, the highest earning and prospering groups. After liberalisation, in the 90s education and knowledge– based Indian emigration has made Indian Diaspora one of the most powerful diasporas in the world. In all these countries, Indian diaspora has been playing an important role in the development of the respective countries.

Which of these is not a part of Caribbean Islands?

Detailed Solution for Test: Migration: Types, Causes and Consequences- Source Based Type Questions - Question 11 Fiji is not a part of Caribbean Islands.
Test: Migration: Types, Causes and Consequences- Source Based Type Questions - Question 12

Direction: Read the case study given below and answer the questions that follow:

During colonial period (British period) millions of the indentured labourers were sent to Mauritius, Caribbean islands (Trinidad, Tobago and Guyana), Fiji and South Africa by British from Uttar Pradesh and Bihar; to Reunion Island, Guadeloupe, Martinique and Surinam by French and Dutch and by Portuguese from Goa, Daman and Diu to Angola, Mozambique to work as plantation workers. All such migrations were covered under the time-bound contract known as Girmit Act (Indian Emigration Act). However, the living conditions of these indentured labourers were not better than the slaves.

The second wave of migrants ventured out into the neighbouring countries in recent times as professionals, artisans, traders and factory workers, in search of economic opportunities to Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, Brunei and African countries, etc. and the trend still continues. There was a steady outflow of India’s semi-skilled and skilled labour in the wake of the oil boom in West Asia in the 1970s. There was also some outflow of entrepreneurs, store owners, professionals, businessmen to Western countries. Third wave of migrants was comprised of professionals like doctors, engineers (1960s onwards), software engineers, management consultants, financial experts, media persons (1980s onwards), and others migrated to countries such as USA, Canada, UK, Australia, New Zealand and Germany. These professionals enjoy the distinction of being one of highly educated, the highest earning and prospering groups. After liberalisation, in the 90s education and knowledge– based Indian emigration has made Indian Diaspora one of the most powerful diasporas in the world. In all these countries, Indian diaspora has been playing an important role in the development of the respective countries.

Which of these events happened in West Asia in 1970s?

Detailed Solution for Test: Migration: Types, Causes and Consequences- Source Based Type Questions - Question 12 Oil boom happened in West Asia in 1970s.
Test: Migration: Types, Causes and Consequences- Source Based Type Questions - Question 13

Direction: Read the case study given below and answer the questions that follow:

The internal migration (within the country) and international migration (out of the country and into the country from other countries)are presented under the internal migrants. The stream was dominated by female migrants. Most of these were migrants related to marriage part from these streams of internal migration. India also experiences immigration from and emigration to the neighbouring countries. Indian Census 2011 has recorded that more than 5 million persons have migrated to India from other countries. Out of these, about 88.9 percent came from the neighbouring countries: Bangladesh followed by Nepal and Pakistan.

Out of the total migration, people migrated to India from Nepal, Bangladesh and Pakistan.

Detailed Solution for Test: Migration: Types, Causes and Consequences- Source Based Type Questions - Question 13 Approx. 88.9% people migrated to India from Nepal, Bangladesh and Pakistan.
Test: Migration: Types, Causes and Consequences- Source Based Type Questions - Question 14

Direction: Read the case study given below and answer the questions that follow:

The internal migration (within the country) and international migration (out of the country and into the country from other countries)are presented under the internal migrants. The stream was dominated by female migrants. Most of these were migrants related to marriage part from these streams of internal migration. India also experiences immigration from and emigration to the neighbouring countries. Indian Census 2011 has recorded that more than 5 million persons have migrated to India from other countries. Out of these, about 88.9 percent came from the neighbouring countries: Bangladesh followed by Nepal and Pakistan.

Internal migration is also known as :

Detailed Solution for Test: Migration: Types, Causes and Consequences- Source Based Type Questions - Question 14 Internal migration or domestic migration is human migration within a country. Internal migration tends to be travel for education and for economic improvement or because of a natural disaster or civil disturbance. Cross-border migration often occurs for political or economic reasons.
Test: Migration: Types, Causes and Consequences- Source Based Type Questions - Question 15

Direction: Read the case study given below and answer the questions that follow:

The internal migration (within the country) and international migration (out of the country and into the country from other countries)are presented under the internal migrants. The stream was dominated by female migrants. Most of these were migrants related to marriage part from these streams of internal migration. India also experiences immigration from and emigration to the neighbouring countries. Indian Census 2011 has recorded that more than 5 million persons have migrated to India from other countries. Out of these, about 88.9 percent came from the neighbouring countries: Bangladesh followed by Nepal and Pakistan.

Internal migration refers to :

Detailed Solution for Test: Migration: Types, Causes and Consequences- Source Based Type Questions - Question 15 Internal migration is the movement of people between usual residences within national states. In many countries the direction of internal migration has shifted to deconcentration from large cities to smaller towns and rural settlements.
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