Test: Mineral & Power Resources (Easy)


15 Questions MCQ Test Social Studies (SST) Class 8 | Test: Mineral & Power Resources (Easy)


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This mock test of Test: Mineral & Power Resources (Easy) for Class 8 helps you for every Class 8 entrance exam. This contains 15 Multiple Choice Questions for Class 8 Test: Mineral & Power Resources (Easy) (mcq) to study with solutions a complete question bank. The solved questions answers in this Test: Mineral & Power Resources (Easy) quiz give you a good mix of easy questions and tough questions. Class 8 students definitely take this Test: Mineral & Power Resources (Easy) exercise for a better result in the exam. You can find other Test: Mineral & Power Resources (Easy) extra questions, long questions & short questions for Class 8 on EduRev as well by searching above.
QUESTION: 1

Which one of the following is a leading producer of Lignite

Solution: Development of the Neyveli lignite mine in Tamil Nadu, India is described. Neyveli has estimated lignite reserves of 3,500,000 tonnes. Production began in 1956 and the first pit to be developed was expanded in 1978. A new fertiliser plant that will produce 1500 tonnes of urea per day is to be built.

QUESTION: 2

Madhapur near Bhuj is the largest producer of_________________.

Explanations: Madhapur near Bhuj in Gujarat is the largest producer of solar energy. India is a tropical country. It has enormous possibilities for tapping solar energy. Photovoltaic technology converts sunlight directly into electricity. Solar energy is fast becoming popular in rural and remote areas. Some big solar power plants are being established in different parts of India.

Solution:
QUESTION: 3

Mining is also known as_____industry.

Solution: Mining is called a robber industry because valuable resources are taken from the earth, hence depriving its resources. These resources are not formed in a small-time instead take millions of years to replenish. This is because it uses up the earth’s resources, therefore in a very poetic sense 'robbing' the earth of its natural resources that will not be laid down again, at least not for a too long period.

QUESTION: 4

The National Metallurgical Laboratory of India located at____________.

Solution: CSIR-NML is situated in Jamshedpur. The Steel City of India. Jamshedpur is well connected to Rail. Road and Air (via Ranchi/Kolkata).

QUESTION: 5

Which one of the following places is ideal for generating tidal energy for power plants?

Solution: The state government has approved Rs 25 crore for setting up the 50 MW plant at the Gulf of Kutch. It will produce energy from the ocean tides. According to the estimates of the Indian government, the country has a potential of 8,000 MW of tidal power.

QUESTION: 6

Which of the following uses potential energy the difference in height between high and low tides?

Solution: Potential energy is the energy possessed by a body under its position. Potential energy is used in Tidal stream generator and tidal barrage to produce energy by storing water at a particular height.

QUESTION: 7

Lignocellulosic Biomass Is Derived From

Solution: Lignocellulosic biomass (LB) is an abundant and renewable resource from plants mainly composed of polysaccharides (cellulose and hemicelluloses) and an aromatic polymer (lignin).

QUESTION: 8

________supports the industrial growth of a country.

Solution: Mining has the potential to shape and affect economies directly and indirectly. Mining brings employment, government revenues, and opportunities for economic growth and diversification.

QUESTION: 9

Which of the following is a Geothermal Resource?

Solution: Geothermal energy refers to the heat and electricity produced using the heat from the Earth’s interior. Groundwater in such areas absorbs heat from the rocks and becomes hot. It is so hot that when it rises to the earth’s surface, it turns into steam. This steam is used to drive turbines and generate electricity.

QUESTION: 10

Geothermal energy is the thermal energy present________.

Solution: Geothermal energy refers to the heat and electricity produced using the heat from the Earth’s interior. Geothermal energy refers to the heat and electricity produced by using the heat from the Earth’s interior. Groundwater in such areas absorbs heat from the rocks and becomes hot. It is so hot that when it rises to the earth’s surface, it turns into steam. This steam is used to drive turbines and generate electricity.

QUESTION: 11

Which of the following are non-conventional energy resource?

Solution: Renewable energy sources like solar energy, wind, tide, biomass, and life from waste material. These are called non-conventional energy sources. India is blessed with an abundance of sunlight, water, wind, and biomass.

QUESTION: 12

The rate of fall of pressure between two points is called_____________.

Solution: A pressure gradient is the rate of change (slope) of atmospheric (barometric) pressure concerning the horizontal distance at a given point in time. The pressure gradient is a force (P) that acts in a higher direction toward lower pressure.

QUESTION: 13

India has given top priority to develop solar energy because_______.

Solution: Geographically, India is an ideal country for solar energy since it is a tropical country and gets around 300 days of sunshine. Moreover, peak power demand is in the evening and not during the daytime, and has a seasonal peak in the summer.

QUESTION: 14

Khetri mines in Rajasthan are famous for the mining of_________.

Solution: Khetri Nagar is a town in Jhunjhunu district of Rajasthan in India. It is part of the Shekhawati region. Khetri is two towns, "Khetri Town" founded by Raja Khet Singhji Nirwan and "Khetri Nagar" which is about 10 km away from Khetri. Khetri Nagar, well known for its Copper Project, was built under Hindustan Copper Limited’s control, a public sector undertaking under the Government of India. Khetri Nagar is also very well known with the name of 'Copper'.

QUESTION: 15

The first windmill used for the production of electric power was built in the following countries?

Solution: The first windmill used for electric power production was built in Scotland in July 1887. It was built by Prof James Blyth of Anderson's College, Glasgow. Its height was 10 meters. The wind turbine was installed in the garden of his holiday cottage. It was used to charge accumulators developed by the Frenchman Camille Alphonse Faure, to power the house’s lighting.

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