Test: The Rise of Nationalism in Europe- Case Based Type Questions- 1


10 Questions MCQ Test Social Studies (SST) Class 10 | Test: The Rise of Nationalism in Europe- Case Based Type Questions- 1


Description
This mock test of Test: The Rise of Nationalism in Europe- Case Based Type Questions- 1 for Class 10 helps you for every Class 10 entrance exam. This contains 10 Multiple Choice Questions for Class 10 Test: The Rise of Nationalism in Europe- Case Based Type Questions- 1 (mcq) to study with solutions a complete question bank. The solved questions answers in this Test: The Rise of Nationalism in Europe- Case Based Type Questions- 1 quiz give you a good mix of easy questions and tough questions. Class 10 students definitely take this Test: The Rise of Nationalism in Europe- Case Based Type Questions- 1 exercise for a better result in the exam. You can find other Test: The Rise of Nationalism in Europe- Case Based Type Questions- 1 extra questions, long questions & short questions for Class 10 on EduRev as well by searching above.
QUESTION: 1

Read the source given below and answer the questions that follows:

Following the defeat of Napoleon in 1815, European governments were driven by a spirit of conservatism. Conservatives believed that established traditional institutions of state and society – like the monarchy, the Church, social hierarchies, property and the family – should be preserved. Most conservatives, however, did not propose a return to the society of pre- revolutionary days. Rather, they realised, from the changes initiated by Napoleon, that modernisation could in fact strengthen traditional institutions like the monarchy. It could make the state's power more effective and stronger. A modern army, an efficient bureaucracy, a dynamic economy, the abolition of feudalism and serfdom could strengthen the autocratic monarchies of Europe. In 1815, representatives of the European powers who had collectively defeated Napoleon, met at Vienna to draw up a settlement for Europe. The Congress was hosted by the Austrian Chancellor Duke Metternich. The delegates drew up the Treaty of Vienna of 1815 with the object of undoing most of the changes that had come about in Europe during the Napoleonic wars. The Bourbon dynasty, which had been deposed during the French Revolution, was restored to power, and France lost the territories it had annexed under Napoleon. A series of states were set up on the boundaries of France to prevent French expansion in future.

Answer the following MCQs by choosing the most appropriate option.

Which of the following statements correctly describes about European conservative ideology?

Solution: Conservatism stands for the people who don’t like Changes. The European Conservatives and Reformists (ECR) is a Eurosceptic, anti-federalist political group of the European Parliament.
QUESTION: 2

Read the source given below and answer the questions that follows:

Following the defeat of Napoleon in 1815, European governments were driven by a spirit of conservatism. Conservatives believed that established traditional institutions of state and society – like the monarchy, the Church, social hierarchies, property and the family – should be preserved. Most conservatives, however, did not propose a return to the society of pre- revolutionary days. Rather, they realised, from the changes initiated by Napoleon, that modernisation could in fact strengthen traditional institutions like the monarchy. It could make the state's power more effective and stronger. A modern army, an efficient bureaucracy, a dynamic economy, the abolition of feudalism and serfdom could strengthen the autocratic monarchies of Europe. In 1815, representatives of the European powers who had collectively defeated Napoleon, met at Vienna to draw up a settlement for Europe. The Congress was hosted by the Austrian Chancellor Duke Metternich. The delegates drew up the Treaty of Vienna of 1815 with the object of undoing most of the changes that had come about in Europe during the Napoleonic wars. The Bourbon dynasty, which had been deposed during the French Revolution, was restored to power, and France lost the territories it had annexed under Napoleon. A series of states were set up on the boundaries of France to prevent French expansion in future.

Answer the following MCQs by choosing the most appropriate option.

What did conservatives focus on at the Congress of Vienna? Select the appropriate option.

Solution: The conservatives' goal at the meeting, led by Prince Klemens von Metternich of Austria, was said to be to re-establish peace in Europe. Metternich and the other four states sought to do so by restoring the old ruling families and to create buffer zones between the major powers.
QUESTION: 3

Read the source given below and answer the questions that follows:

One such individual was the Italian revolutionary, Giuseppe Mazzini. Born in Genoa in 1807, he became a member of the secret society of the Carbonari. As a young man of 24, he was sent into exile in 1831 for attempting a revolution in Liguria. He subsequently founded two more underground societies, first, Young Italy in Marseilles, and then, Young Europe in Berne, whose members were like-minded young men from Poland, France, Italy and the German states. Mazzini believed that God had intended nations to be the natural units of mankind. So Italy could not continue to be a patchwork of small states and kingdoms. It had to be forged into a single unified republic within a wider alliance of nations. This unification alone could be the basis of Italian liberty. Following his model, secret societies were set up in Germany, France, Switzerland and Poland. Mazzini’s relentless opposition to monarchy and his vision of democratic republics frightened the conservatives. Metternich described him as ‘the most dangerous enemy of our social order’.

Answer the following MCQs by choosing the most appropriate option.

Where was Giuseppe Mazzini born?

Solution: Giuseppe Mazzini born Genoa, Italy on 22 June 1805. Giuseppe Mazzini was an Italian politician, journalist, activist for the unification of Italy and spearhead of the Italian revolutionary movement. Guisippe mazini was an Italian revolutionary who played an important role in the unification of Italy by establishment of secret society named Young Italy and young Europe.
QUESTION: 4

Read the source given below and answer the questions that follows:

One such individual was the Italian revolutionary, Giuseppe Mazzini. Born in Genoa in 1807, he became a member of the secret society of the Carbonari. As a young man of 24, he was sent into exile in 1831 for attempting a revolution in Liguria. He subsequently founded two more underground societies, first, Young Italy in Marseilles, and then, Young Europe in Berne, whose members were like-minded young men from Poland, France, Italy and the German states. Mazzini believed that God had intended nations to be the natural units of mankind. So Italy could not continue to be a patchwork of small states and kingdoms. It had to be forged into a single unified republic within a wider alliance of nations. This unification alone could be the basis of Italian liberty. Following his model, secret societies were set up in Germany, France, Switzerland and Poland. Mazzini’s relentless opposition to monarchy and his vision of democratic republics frightened the conservatives. Metternich described him as ‘the most dangerous enemy of our social order’.

Answer the following MCQs by choosing the most appropriate option.

Who described Mazzini as 'the most dangerous enemy of our social order'?

Solution: Metternich described Mazzini as ‘the most dangerous enemy of our social order’ because of the following reasons:
  • Mazzini’s vision of a democratic republic frightened the conservatives.

  • Mazzini was the founder of Young Italy, and he believed in liberal nationalism.

  • He also founded the underground society called Young Europe in Berne.

  • These two societies aimed at uniting several states and kingdoms into one republic.

  • He wrote many essays that brought injustice to common people such as artists, professionals, peasants, etc., to the limelight.

QUESTION: 5

Read the source given below and answer the questions that follows:

Like Germany, Italy too had a long history of political fragmentation. Italians were scattered over several dynastic states as well as the multi- national Habsburg Empire. During the middle of the nineteenth century, Italy was divided into seven states, of which only one, Sardinia-Piedmont, was ruled by an Italian princely house. The north was under Austrian Habsburgs, the centre was ruled by the Pope and the southern regions were under the domination of the Bourbon kings of Spain. Even the Italian language had not acquired one common form and still had many regional and local variations.

Answer the following MCQs by choosing the most appropriate option.

During the mid-19th century, Italy was divided into ________ states.

Solution: In 1858, Italy was divided into seven states, with the North being under the Austrian Habsburgs, the centre being ruled by the Pope and the Southern regions being under Spain's domination.
QUESTION: 6

Read the source given below and answer the questions that follows:

Like Germany, Italy too had a long history of political fragmentation. Italians were scattered over several dynastic states as well as the multi- national Habsburg Empire. During the middle of the nineteenth century, Italy was divided into seven states, of which only one, Sardinia-Piedmont, was ruled by an Italian princely house. The north was under Austrian Habsburgs, the centre was ruled by the Pope and the southern regions were under the domination of the Bourbon kings of Spain. Even the Italian language had not acquired one common form and still had many regional and local variations.

Answer the following MCQs by choosing the most appropriate option.

Who dominated the south regions of Italy?

Solution:
  • In 1734 the Spanish prince Don Carlos de Borbón (later King Charles III) conquered Naples and Sicily, which were then governed by the Spanish Bourbons as a separate kingdom.

  • The Treaty of Casalanza restored Ferdinand IV of Bourbon to the throne of Naples and the island of Sicily (where the constitution of 1812 virtually had disempowered him) was returned to him.

QUESTION: 7

Read the source given below and answer the questions that follows:

Similar female allegories were invented by artists in the nineteenth century to represent the nation. In France she was christened Marianne, a popular Christian name, which underlined the idea of a people's nation. Her characteristics were drawn from those of Liberty and the Republic - the red cap, the tricolour and the cockade. Statues of Marianne were erected in public squares to remind the public of the national symbol of unity and to persuade them to identify with it. Marianne images were marked on coins and stamps. Similarly, Germania became the allegory of the German nation. In visual representations, Germania wears a crown of oak leaves, as the German oak stands for heroism.

Answer the following MCQs by choosing the most appropriate option

What was the name given to the female allegory in France?

Solution: Marianne, the female allegory of Liberty, was chosen to represent the new regime of the French Republic, while remaining to symbolise liberty at the same time.
QUESTION: 8

Read the source given below and answer the questions that follows:

Similar female allegories were invented by artists in the nineteenth century to represent the nation. In France she was christened Marianne, a popular Christian name, which underlined the idea of a people's nation. Her characteristics were drawn from those of Liberty and the Republic - the red cap, the tricolour and the cockade. Statues of Marianne were erected in public squares to remind the public of the national symbol of unity and to persuade them to identify with it. Marianne images were marked on coins and stamps. Similarly, Germania became the allegory of the German nation. In visual representations, Germania wears a crown of oak leaves, as the German oak stands for heroism.

Answer the following MCQs by choosing the most appropriate option

What does the German oak stand for?

Solution: The German Oak stands for Heroism. In the 18th and 19th-century, artists began personifying a nation in the form of an allegory. Germania was the female figure wearing a crown of oak leaves. The oak leaves represented heroism.
QUESTION: 9

Read the source given below and answer the questions that follows:

In the German regions, a large number of political associations whose members were middle-class professionals, businessmen and prosperous artisans, came together in the city of Frankfurt and decided to vote for an all-German National Assembly. On 18 May, 1848, 831 elected representatives marched in a festive Procession to take their places in the Frankfurt Parliament convened in the Church of St Paul. They drafted a constitution for a German nation to be headed by a monarchy subject to a parliament. When the deputies offered the crown on these terms to Friedrich Wilhelm IV, King of Prussia, he rejected it and joined other monarchs to oppose the elected assembly. While the opposition of the aristocracy and military became stronger, the social basis of parliament eroded. The Parliament was dominated by the middle classes who resisted the demands of workers and artisans and consequently lost their support. In the end, troops were called in and the assembly was forced to disband. The issue of extending political rights to women was a controversial one within the liberal movement, in which large numbers of women had participated actively over the years. Women had formed their own political associations, founded newspapers and taken part in political meetings and demonstrations. Despite this, they were denied suffrage rights during the election of the Assembly. When the Frankfurt Parliament convened in the Church of St Paul, women were admitted only as observers to stand in the visitors’ gallery.

Answer the following MCQs by choosing the most appropriate option

People from which classes mainly constituted the members of many political associations in the German region?

Solution: All those political associations existing in the German region whose members were middle-class professionals, Businessmen and Prosperous Artisans.
QUESTION: 10

Read the source given below and answer the questions that follows:

In the German regions, a large number of political associations whose members were middle-class professionals, businessmen and prosperous artisans, came together in the city of Frankfurt and decided to vote for an all-German National Assembly. On 18 May, 1848, 831 elected representatives marched in a festive Procession to take their places in the Frankfurt Parliament convened in the Church of St Paul. They drafted a constitution for a German nation to be headed by a monarchy subject to a parliament. When the deputies offered the crown on these terms to Friedrich Wilhelm IV, King of Prussia, he rejected it and joined other monarchs to oppose the elected assembly. While the opposition of the aristocracy and military became stronger, the social basis of parliament eroded. The Parliament was dominated by the middle classes who resisted the demands of workers and artisans and consequently lost their support. In the end, troops were called in and the assembly was forced to disband. The issue of extending political rights to women was a controversial one within the liberal movement, in which large numbers of women had participated actively over the years. Women had formed their own political associations, founded newspapers and taken part in political meetings and demonstrations. Despite this, they were denied suffrage rights during the election of the Assembly. When the Frankfurt Parliament convened in the Church of St Paul, women were admitted only as observers to stand in the visitors’ gallery.

Answer the following MCQs by choosing the most appropriate option

Otto Von Bismarcks' contribution in building the nation of Germany is remarkable. Who was he?

Solution:
  • Otto von Bismarck was a conservative Prussian statesman who dominated German and European affairs from the 1860s until 1890.

  •  

    In the 1860s he engineered a series of wars that unified the German states, significantly and deliberately excluding Austria, into a powerful German Empire under Prussian leadership.

 

Download free EduRev App

Track your progress, build streaks, highlight & save important lessons and more!