Test: The Third Level- Extract Based Type Questions- 2


20 Questions MCQ Test English Class 12 | Test: The Third Level- Extract Based Type Questions- 2


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Attempt Test: The Third Level- Extract Based Type Questions- 2 | 20 questions in 40 minutes | Mock test for Class 12 preparation | Free important questions MCQ to study English Class 12 for Class 12 Exam | Download free PDF with solutions
QUESTION: 1

Read the given extracts and answer the questions that follow:

But that’s the reason, he said, and my friends all agreed. Everything points to it, they claimed. My stamp collecting, for example; that’s a ‘temporary refuge from reality.’

Q. Who is ‘he’ in the above extract?

Solution: Sam is ‘he’ in the above extract.
QUESTION: 2

Read the given extracts and answer the questions that follow:

But that’s the reason, he said, and my friends all agreed. Everything points to it, they claimed. My stamp collecting, for example; that’s a ‘temporary refuge from reality.’

Q. Which other evidence did prove that Charley was an escapist?

Solution: When Charley told his psychiatrist friend, Sam, about the third level, he explained it was a waking dream, a wish-fulfillment. When he said that his stamp collecting hobby was also a 'temporary refuge from reality', all his friends agreed.
QUESTION: 3

Read the given extracts and answer the questions that follow:

But that’s the reason, he said, and my friends all agreed. Everything points to it, they claimed. My stamp collecting, for example; that’s a ‘temporary refuge from reality.’

Q. Which reason of the problem is being cited here?

Solution: The third level was a medium of escape for Charley from the unhappy modern world that is full of insecurity, fear, war, worry and the like. He could never find it again at the Grand Central Station.
QUESTION: 4

Read the given extracts and answer the questions that follow:

But that’s the reason, he said, and my friends all agreed. Everything points to it, they claimed. My stamp collecting, for example; that’s a ‘temporary refuge from reality.’

Q. Who in Charley ’s ancestors pursued philately?

Solution: Even stamps collecting is a temporary refuge from reality. So he talks to his psychiatrist friend Sam about the third level at the Grand Central Station. He terms it as a “ waking-dream wish fulfilment.” The compulsions and realities of modern life make Charley escape into a world of fancy and romance.
QUESTION: 5

Read the given extracts and answer the questions that follow:

I talked to a psychiatrist friend of mine, among others. I told him about the third level at Grand Central Station, and he said it was a waking dream wish fulfillment. He said I was unhappy. That made my wife kind of mad, but he explained that he meant the modern world is full of insecurity, fear, war, worry and all the rest of it, and that I just want to escape.

Q. Who is the psychiatrist friend of ‘I’?

Solution: Charley's psychiatrist friend Sam had disappeared. One night going through his first-day covers, Charley found one dated 1894 and with his Grandfather's address on it. He opened and found inside a letter from Sam addressed to him.
QUESTION: 6

Read the given extracts and answer the questions that follow:

I talked to a psychiatrist friend of mine, among others. I told him about the third level at Grand Central Station, and he said it was a waking dream wish fulfillment. He said I was unhappy. That made my wife kind of mad, but he explained that he meant the modern world is full of insecurity, fear, war, worry and all the rest of it, and that I just want to escape.

Q. Why did the psychiatrist’s analysis make Louisa lose her temper?

Solution: The psychiatrist said that Charlie was unhappy. The modern world, full of insecurity, fear, war and worry oppressed him, and he just wanted to escape.
QUESTION: 7

Read the given extracts and answer the questions that follow:

I talked to a psychiatrist friend of mine, among others. I told him about the third level at Grand Central Station, and he said it was a waking dream wish fulfillment. He said I was unhappy. That made my wife kind of mad, but he explained that he meant the modern world is full of insecurity, fear, war, worry and all the rest of it, and that I just want to escape.

Q. How did his psychiatrist friend diagnose his problem?

Solution: The psychiatrist friend interpreted Charley's finding the third level was the result of stress, fear, and insecurity of the modern world. He explained to him that the stress and fear had urged him to find an escape to a world that was peaceful and had plenty of leisure.
QUESTION: 8

Read the given extracts and answer the questions that follow:

I talked to a psychiatrist friend of mine, among others. I told him about the third level at Grand Central Station, and he said it was a waking dream wish fulfillment. He said I was unhappy. That made my wife kind of mad, but he explained that he meant the modern world is full of insecurity, fear, war, worry and all the rest of it, and that I just want to escape.

Q. How did the psychiatrist explain the problem of ‘I’ and appease Louisa?

Solution: This is at the Grand Central Station in the existence of the third level but was told that it was only a waking- dream wish fulfillment. Charley was also told by the psychiatrist that Charley was unhappy because of the fear, insecurity, worry and war that he just wanted to escape.
QUESTION: 9

Read the given extracts and answer the questions that follow:

The presidents of the New York Central and the New York, New Haven and Hartford railroads will swear on a stack of timetables that there are only two. However, I say there are three, because I’ve been on the third level of the Grand Central Station.

Q. Who is ‘I’ in the above lines?

Solution: Charley is ‘I’ in the above lines.
QUESTION: 10

Read the given extracts and answer the questions that follow:

The presidents of the New York Central and the New York, New Haven and Hartford railroads will swear on a stack of timetables that there are only two. However, I say there are three, because I’ve been on the third level of the Grand Central Station.

Q. Why did ‘I’ contradict them?

Solution: Charley says that the rooms on the third level were smaller than that of the second level. There were fewer ticket windows and train gates and the information booth in the centre was wood and old looking. There were open- flame gaslights and brass spittoons on the floor.
QUESTION: 11

Read the given extracts and answer the questions that follow:

The presidents of the New York Central and the New York, New Haven and Hartford railroads will swear on a stack of timetables that there are only two. However, I say there are three, because I’ve been on the third level of the Grand Central Station.

Q. What will the presidents of railway stations swear?

Solution: According to Charley the president of the New York central will swear there are only two timetables followed at the New York Central. One for intra-city trains and the other for inter-city trains.
QUESTION: 12

Read the given extracts and answer the questions that follow:

The presidents of the New York Central and the New York, New Haven and Hartford railroads will swear on a stack of timetables that there are only two. However, I say there are three, because I’ve been on the third level of the Grand Central Station.

Q. Pick up the word which has the similar meaning as ‘a pile of objects’.

Solution: A Pile of objects means Stack.
QUESTION: 13

Read the given extracts and answer the questions that follow:

Have you ever been there? It’s a wonderful town, still with big old frame houses, huge lawns and tremendous trees whose branches meet overhead and roof the streets. And in 1894, summer evenings were twice as long, and people sat out on their lawns, the men smoking cigars and talking quietly, the women waving palm-leaf fans, with the fire-flies all around, in a peaceful world. To be back there with the First World War still twenty years off, and World War II over forty years in the future... I wanted two tickets for that.

Q. Who does ‘you’ refer to?

Solution: You is refers to ‘The reader’.
QUESTION: 14

Read the given extracts and answer the questions that follow:

Have you ever been there? It’s a wonderful town, still with big old frame houses, huge lawns and tremendous trees whose branches meet overhead and roof the streets. And in 1894, summer evenings were twice as long, and people sat out on their lawns, the men smoking cigars and talking quietly, the women waving palm-leaf fans, with the fire-flies all around, in a peaceful world. To be back there with the First World War still twenty years off, and World War II over forty years in the future... I wanted two tickets for that.

Imagine that the city of Galesburg is hosting a series of conferences and workshops.

Q. In which of the following conferences or workshops are you least likely to find the description of Galesburg given in the above extract?

Solution: To make his description of the third level very realistic, Charley describes its minute details, vividly comparing it to the second level of the Grand Central station. He says the rooms here were smaller. He also gives a detailed description about the people he saw at the third level and their dresses.
QUESTION: 15

Read the given extracts and answer the questions that follow:

Have you ever been there? It’s a wonderful town, still with big old frame houses, huge lawns and tremendous trees whose branches meet overhead and roof the streets. And in 1894, summer evenings were twice as long, and people sat out on their lawns, the men smoking cigars and talking quietly, the women waving palm-leaf fans, with the fire-flies all around, in a peaceful world. To be back there with the First World War still twenty years off, and World War II over forty years in the future... I wanted two tickets for that.

Q. Choose the option that best describes the society represented in the above extract.

Solution: The third level refers to the Grand Central Station subway which will carry passengers to Galesburg, Illinois. The station's third stage was a means of relief from the harsh realities of everyday life for Charley, the narrator.
QUESTION: 16

Read the given extracts and answer the questions that follow:

Have you ever been there? It’s a wonderful town, still with big old frame houses, huge lawns and tremendous trees whose branches meet overhead and roof the streets. And in 1894, summer evenings were twice as long, and people sat out on their lawns, the men smoking cigars and talking quietly, the women waving palm-leaf fans, with the fire-flies all around, in a peaceful world. To be back there with the First World War still twenty years off, and World War II over forty years in the future... I wanted two tickets for that.

Q. “tremendous trees whose branches meet overhead and roof the streets” is NOT an example of :

(i) imagery

(ii) metaphor

(iii) alliteration

(iv) anachronism

Solution: metaphor: a figure of speech in which a word or phrase is applied to an object or action to which it is not literally applicable.

anachronism: a thing belonging or appropriate to a period other than that in which it exists, especially a thing that is conspicuously old-fashioned.

QUESTION: 17

Read the given extracts and answer the questions that follow:

Sometimes I think Grand Central is growing like a tree, pushing out new corridors and staircases like roots. There’s probably a long tunnel that nobody knows about feeling its way under the city right now, on its way to Times Square, and maybe another to Central Park. And maybe — because for so many people through the years Grand Central has been an exit, a way of escape — maybe that’s how the tunnel I got into... But I never told my psychiatrist friend about that idea.

Q. The above extract is NOT an example of ________.

Solution: allegory: a story, poem, or picture that can be interpreted to reveal a hidden meaning, typically a moral or political one.
QUESTION: 18

Read the given extracts and answer the questions that follow:

Sometimes I think Grand Central is growing like a tree, pushing out new corridors and staircases like roots. There’s probably a long tunnel that nobody knows about feeling its way under the city right now, on its way to Times Square, and maybe another to Central Park. And maybe — because for so many people through the years Grand Central has been an exit, a way of escape — maybe that’s how the tunnel I got into... But I never told my psychiatrist friend about that idea.

Look at the given image that lists some of the ways in which the symbolism of a tree is employed.

Q. Which of the following would represent an example as used by Charley in the above extract?

Solution: Charley used an example ‘Keep growing’ as the station keeps renovating and expanding.
QUESTION: 19

Read the given extracts and answer the questions that follow:

Sometimes I think Grand Central is growing like a tree, pushing out new corridors and staircases like roots. There’s probably a long tunnel that nobody knows about feeling its way under the city right now, on its way to Times Square, and maybe another to Central Park. And maybe — because for so many people through the years Grand Central has been an exit, a way of escape — maybe that’s how the tunnel I got into... But I never told my psychiatrist friend about that idea.

Q. Charley decided not to tell his psychiatrist friend about his idea. Choose the option that reflects the reaction Charley anticipated from his friend.

Solution: Charley felt there was a tunnel that nobody knew about. Grand Central, he felt, was like an exit, a way of escape and perhaps that's how he got into the tunnel. He didn't want to tell the psychiatrist, for he would not have believed him and would have wanted to treat him.
QUESTION: 20

Read the given extracts and answer the questions that follow:

Sometimes I think Grand Central is growing like a tree, pushing out new corridors and staircases like roots. There’s probably a long tunnel that nobody knows about feeling its way under the city right now, on its way to Times Square, and maybe another to Central Park. And maybe — because for so many people through the years Grand Central has been an exit, a way of escape — maybe that’s how the tunnel I got into... But I never told my psychiatrist friend about that idea.

Q. The idiom ‘feeling its way ’ implies ______ movement.

Solution: The idiom ‘feeling its way ’ implies tentative movement.

Tentative means To proceed with some task slowly and carefully, typically by using intuition or trial and error, as opposed to previous experience or expert knowledge. The intended image is of one tentatively navigating through a dark space by touch instead of sight.

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