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UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - UPSC MCQ


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UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 1

Directions forthe following 11 (eleven) items:

Read the following three passages and answer the items that follow each passage. Your answers to these items should be based on these passages only.

                             Passage 1

Any government that runs on a huge fiscal deficit has to, at some point, finance that deficit by creating money through borrowings. When the government does that, there is more money chasing the same number of goods and services in the economy. The result is a hike in prices, or inflation. At 5.1%, India's fiscal deficit is dangerously high, controlling which should have been the government's highest priority. Raising diesel prices by 14% such that the subsidy bill on the fuel falls will help bring this deficit under control. To put that issue in perspective, at Rs.47,800 crore oil subsidies for the first quarter of the current financial year have already exceeded the full year's budgeted figure.

For consumers already reeling under a double digit onslaught of food prices, the hike in the diesel prices will hurt, no doubt. Part of this increase can be neutralized, by cutting excise duties on the fuel, for instance. But for successive governments that have been unable to curb spending on vote buying schemes- some of them crucial - or on an inflated and unproductive bureaucracy, the other option is to increase taxes and return to the sky high rates of the coercive 1970s, a regime that is best behind us.

This brings us to the next issue: economic growth. With a high fiscal deficit that keeps inflation high, there is no way the RBI will cut interest rates. Even though most ofthe inflationary expectations are coming from goods outside India's control- crude oil imports, a falling rupee and a globally rising food and commodity prices- RBI's stance has been to keep policy rates high so that thousands cut down on discretionary grounds. In the process, home loan EMIs have been rising and along with inflation on one side, scissoring household targets.

Making matters more complex is the fact that today the sovereign has very little control over its finances. Like it or nor, India cant and will not grow at 9% if the rest of the world is contracting, thereby closing business opportunities- there, the UPA government is right. "The political power of the sovereign goes down with every move towards globalization," Kaushik Basu said. "Economics has become an instrument of global, political and even military strategy." To illustrate, Indian farmers and businesses get affected by WTO negotiations, Indian workers by ILO negotiations, Indian fiscal policy by G20 communities, Indian markets by QE3.

 

Q.From the passage, it can be inferred that the main aim of the author is

Detailed Solution for UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 1

The passage starts by discussing the rationale for raising diesel prices to control the rising fiscal deficit. It then goes on to discuss how rising food prices, linked with the increase in diesel prices and rising inflation, can be neutralised. The passage then moves on to other issues linked with a high fiscal deficit and rising inflation and subsequently to discuss matters of economic growth and globalisation. The subsequent paragraphs in the passage are all written in an effort to present a platform that helps establish the rationale for the government to tackle the rising fiscal deficit. Option c is the answer. Option a is incorrect as the people of the country and their importance is not discussed. The common man has not been mentioned in the passage. Thus option d is incorrect. Option b is also incorrect as the negative impact of not controlling the fiscal deficit on outside investment is not discussed in the passage.

UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 2

   Passage 1

Any government that runs on a huge fiscal deficit has to, at some point, finance that deficit by creating money through borrowings. When the government does that, there is more money chasing the same number of goods and services in the economy. The result is a hike in prices, or inflation. At 5.1%, India's fiscal deficit is dangerously high, controlling which should have been the government's highest priority. Raising diesel prices by 14% such that the subsidy bill on the fuel falls will help bring this deficit under control. To put that issue in perspective, at Rs.47,800 crore oil subsidies for the first quarter of the current financial year have already exceeded the full year's budgeted figure.

For consumers already reeling under a double digit onslaught of food prices, the hike in the diesel prices will hurt, no doubt. Part of this increase can be neutralized, by cutting excise duties on the fuel, for instance. But for successive governments that have been unable to curb spending on vote buying schemes- some of them crucial - or on an inflated and unproductive bureaucracy, the other option is to increase taxes and return to the sky high rates of the coercive 1970s, a regime that is best behind us.

This brings us to the next issue: economic growth. With a high fiscal deficit that keeps inflation high, there is no way the RBI will cut interest rates. Even though most ofthe inflationary expectations are coming from goods outside India's control- crude oil imports, a falling rupee and a globally rising food and commodity prices- RBI's stance has been to keep policy rates high so that thousands cut down on discretionary grounds. In the process, home loan EMIs have been rising and along with inflation on one side, scissoring household targets.

Making matters more complex is the fact that today the sovereign has very little control over its finances. Like it or nor, India cant and will not grow at 9% if the rest of the world is contracting, thereby closing business opportunities- there, the UPA government is right. "The political power of the sovereign goes down with every move towards globalization," Kaushik Basu said. "Economics has become an instrument of global, political and even military strategy." To illustrate, Indian farmers and businesses get affected by WTO negotiations, Indian workers by ILO negotiations, Indian fiscal policy by G20 communities, Indian markets by QE3.

 

Q.Which of the following best explains why raising diesel prices will control the fiscal deficit?

Detailed Solution for UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 2

Refer to the sentence "Raising diesel prices........ deficit under control," given in the first paragraph. It is clear in

this statement that the increase in the diesel subsidy boll has a direct link with the increasing fiscal deficit. Raising diesel prices will lead to a reduction in the diesel subsidy bill and thus will decrease the fiscal deficit. Option b is the answer. Option a is incorrect as it fails to bring in the link between the diesel prices and the fiscal deficit. Option c is incorrect as the passage does not suggest that raising diesel prices is the only way to control the fiscal deficit. Option d is incorrect as it is vague and does not establish the link between diesel prices and fiscal deficit.

UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 3

Passage 1

Any government that runs on a huge fiscal deficit has to, at some point, finance that deficit by creating money through borrowings. When the government does that, there is more money chasing the same number of goods and services in the economy. The result is a hike in prices, or inflation. At 5.1%, India's fiscal deficit is dangerously high, controlling which should have been the government's highest priority. Raising diesel prices by 14% such that the subsidy bill on the fuel falls will help bring this deficit under control. To put that issue in perspective, at Rs.47,800 crore oil subsidies for the first quarter of the current financial year have already exceeded the full year's budgeted figure.

For consumers already reeling under a double digit onslaught of food prices, the hike in the diesel prices will hurt, no doubt. Part of this increase can be neutralized, by cutting excise duties on the fuel, for instance. But for successive governments that have been unable to curb spending on vote buying schemes- some of them crucial - or on an inflated and unproductive bureaucracy, the other option is to increase taxes and return to the sky high rates of the coercive 1970s, a regime that is best behind us.

This brings us to the next issue: economic growth. With a high fiscal deficit that keeps inflation high, there is no way the RBI will cut interest rates. Even though most ofthe inflationary expectations are coming from goods outside India's control- crude oil imports, a falling rupee and a globally rising food and commodity prices- RBI's stance has been to keep policy rates high so that thousands cut down on discretionary grounds. In the process, home loan EMIs have been rising and along with inflation on one side, scissoring household targets.

Making matters more complex is the fact that today the sovereign has very little control over its finances. Like it or nor, India cant and will not grow at 9% if the rest of the world is contracting, thereby closing business opportunities- there, the UPA government is right. "The political power of the sovereign goes down with every move towards globalization," Kaushik Basu said. "Economics has become an instrument of global, political and even military strategy." To illustrate, Indian farmers and businesses get affected by WTO negotiations, Indian workers by ILO negotiations, Indian fiscal policy by G20 communities, Indian markets by QE3.

 

Q.Consider the following statements:

1.Globalization ensures that economies have less autonomy and thus less say in matters of their economic growth.

2.The WTO has adversely affected the Indian farmer and the prospects of agricultural goods in the country. With reference to the above passage, which ofthe following assumptions is/are valid?

Detailed Solution for UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 3

Refer to the last paragraph. Assumption 1 is not valid and cannot be inferred from the passage as the passage provides no information which suggests that globalisation ensures that economies have less autonomy and thus less say in matters of their economic growth. Assumption 2 is incorrect as the sentence "To illustrate, Indian farmers....markets by QE3" given in the last paragraph only states that Indian farmers get affected by the WTO negotiations. However, there is not enough information to assume that the WTO has adversely affected the agricultural growth of the country. Option d is the correct answer.

UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 4

Passage 1

Any government that runs on a huge fiscal deficit has to, at some point, finance that deficit by creating money through borrowings. When the government does that, there is more money chasing the same number of goods and services in the economy. The result is a hike in prices, or inflation. At 5.1%, India's fiscal deficit is dangerously high, controlling which should have been the government's highest priority. Raising diesel prices by 14% such that the subsidy bill on the fuel falls will help bring this deficit under control. To put that issue in perspective, at Rs.47,800 crore oil subsidies for the first quarter of the current financial year have already exceeded the full year's budgeted figure.

For consumers already reeling under a double digit onslaught of food prices, the hike in the diesel prices will hurt, no doubt. Part of this increase can be neutralized, by cutting excise duties on the fuel, for instance. But for successive governments that have been unable to curb spending on vote buying schemes- some of them crucial - or on an inflated and unproductive bureaucracy, the other option is to increase taxes and return to the sky high rates of the coercive 1970s, a regime that is best behind us.

This brings us to the next issue: economic growth. With a high fiscal deficit that keeps inflation high, there is no way the RBI will cut interest rates. Even though most ofthe inflationary expectations are coming from goods outside India's control- crude oil imports, a falling rupee and a globally rising food and commodity prices- RBI's stance has been to keep policy rates high so that thousands cut down on discretionary grounds. In the process, home loan EMIs have been rising and along with inflation on one side, scissoring household targets.

Making matters more complex is the fact that today the sovereign has very little control over its finances. Like it or nor, India cant and will not grow at 9% if the rest of the world is contracting, thereby closing business opportunities- there, the UPA government is right. "The political power of the sovereign goes down with every move towards globalization," Kaushik Basu said. "Economics has become an instrument of global, political and even military strategy." To illustrate, Indian farmers and businesses get affected by WTO negotiations, Indian workers by ILO negotiations, Indian fiscal policy by G20 communities, Indian markets by QE3.

 

Q.Which of the following would help explain the relationship between the interest rates and a high fiscal deficit?

Detailed Solution for UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 4

Refer to the third paragraph that states that with a high inflation rate one cannot expect the RBI to reduce the interest rates. It can be assumed that the interest rates will either remain as they are or rise further. The rest of the paragraph indicates that the interest rates are rising. Option a is incorrect as the passage does not indicate the funding of government requirements through market borrowings. Option b goes against the discussion in the third paragraph. The author suggests an impact on the fiscal deficit not only in this paragraph but in the entire passage. Option c is incorrect as the paragraph suggests a link between interest rates and fiscal deficit.

UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 5

                        Passage 2

There is a controversy raging over the entry of giants such as Tesco and the Wall Mart into India after the government permitted FDI in multi-brand retail. Most economic analysts look at it in terms of capital coming into India to oust local shopkeepers or in terms of capital coming in to offer better prices to farmers or set up distribution chains and storage facilities to help consumers. These arguments seem a little old. There is a technological dimension to this that may reveal that it is India that it is India that is behind the competitive edge of big retail chains.

In 2009, Walmart picked Bangalore based Infosys Technologies and India centric Cognizant among three information technology service vendors for a $600 million multi-year contract. Finance is now easily available for retail companies from banks and equity markets. What sets the real smart retail giants apart is their ability to leverage software and IT to keep their competitive edge.

Supply chain software can help lower costs by managing inventories. Data analytics and customer relations software can help them identify the more lucrative customers or choose discount strategies. Partners, employees and vendors of retail giants are now connected by software Indian talent figures in all this.

Infosys was an early adapter ofWalmart's move to go in for radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags that helps the retail chain track inventories at low cost.

Last year, Walmart also acquired Kosmix, a cutting edge search engine, founded by Indian born Venky Harinarayan and Anand Rajaraman (who earlier co-founded Junglee.com that Amazon acquired). Now Kosmix is a part of Walmart Labs. Its technology filters and aggregates information by topic from Twitter messages and the larger Web in real time. This is a new way to interact with shoppers.

Tesco now owes its edge to its Bangalore IT facility called the "Hindustan Service Centre". The British retail chain says 6000 employee strong HSC's strategic initiatives coverthe "IT, business, financial, commercial and property aspects." In Bangalore, Indian techies develop tools like mobile applications for Tesco.

 

Q.It can be assumed that the author's views on FDI in multi brand retail are

Detailed Solution for UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 5

In the sentence "There is a technological....... of big retail chains", the author highlights that India has played an

important role in giving the retail giants a competitive edge. Option c is the answer. Options a and b are incorrect as they place importance on the interests of the local shopkeepers whereas the author does not highlight this in the passage. Option d is incorrect as it goes against the stand that the author takes in the first paragraph.

UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 6

  Passage 2

There is a controversy raging over the entry of giants such as Tesco and the Wall Mart into India after the government permitted FDI in multi-brand retail. Most economic analysts look at it in terms of capital coming into India to oust local shopkeepers or in terms of capital coming in to offer better prices to farmers or set up distribution chains and storage facilities to help consumers. These arguments seem a little old. There is a technological dimension to this that may reveal that it is India that it is India that is behind the competitive edge of big retail chains.

In 2009, Walmart picked Bangalore based Infosys Technologies and India centric Cognizant among three information technology service vendors for a $600 million multi-year contract. Finance is now easily available for retail companies from banks and equity markets. What sets the real smart retail giants apart is their ability to leverage software and IT to keep their competitive edge.

Supply chain software can help lower costs by managing inventories. Data analytics and customer relations software can help them identify the more lucrative customers or choose discount strategies. Partners, employees and vendors of retail giants are now connected by software Indian talent figures in all this.

Infosys was an early adapter ofWalmart's move to go in for radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags that helps the retail chain track inventories at low cost.

Last year, Walmart also acquired Kosmix, a cutting edge search engine, founded by Indian born Venky Harinarayan and Anand Rajaraman (who earlier co-founded Junglee.com that Amazon acquired). Now Kosmix is a part of Walmart Labs. Its technology filters and aggregates information by topic from Twitter messages and the larger Web in real time. This is a new way to interact with shoppers.

Tesco now owes its edge to its Bangalore IT facility called the "Hindustan Service Centre". The British retail chain says 6000 employee strong HSC's strategic initiatives coverthe "IT, business, financial, commercial and property aspects." In Bangalore, Indian techies develop tools like mobile applications for Tesco.

 

Q.Which of the following are the essential elements in the success of retail giants?

1.The use of technology to maintain an advantage over others.

2.Sales and marketing strategies based on an analysis of customer data.

Detailed Solution for UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 6

Statement 1 can be inferred from the last line of the second paragraph.

Statement 2 can be inferred from the sentence "Data analytics and customer relations...choose discount strategies"

UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 7

Passage 2

There is a controversy raging over the entry of giants such as Tesco and the Wall Mart into India after the government permitted FDI in multi-brand retail. Most economic analysts look at it in terms of capital coming into India to oust local shopkeepers or in terms of capital coming in to offer better prices to farmers or set up distribution chains and storage facilities to help consumers. These arguments seem a little old. There is a technological dimension to this that may reveal that it is India that it is India that is behind the competitive edge of big retail chains.

In 2009, Walmart picked Bangalore based Infosys Technologies and India centric Cognizant among three information technology service vendors for a $600 million multi-year contract. Finance is now easily available for retail companies from banks and equity markets. What sets the real smart retail giants apart is their ability to leverage software and IT to keep their competitive edge.

Supply chain software can help lower costs by managing inventories. Data analytics and customer relations software can help them identify the more lucrative customers or choose discount strategies. Partners, employees and vendors of retail giants are now connected by software Indian talent figures in all this.

Infosys was an early adapter ofWalmart's move to go in for radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags that helps the retail chain track inventories at low cost.

Last year, Walmart also acquired Kosmix, a cutting edge search engine, founded by Indian born Venky Harinarayan and Anand Rajaraman (who earlier co-founded Junglee.com that Amazon acquired). Now Kosmix is a part of Walmart Labs. Its technology filters and aggregates information by topic from Twitter messages and the larger Web in real time. This is a new way to interact with shoppers.

Tesco now owes its edge to its Bangalore IT facility called the "Hindustan Service Centre". The British retail chain says 6000 employee strong HSC's strategic initiatives coverthe "IT, business, financial, commercial and property aspects." In Bangalore, Indian techies develop tools like mobile applications for Tesco.

 

Q.Which of the following options best explains the purpose of the last four paragraphs?

Detailed Solution for UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 7

In the last four paragraphs, the author presents examples of how Indian firms and professionals have, though technology, helped in the growth of the foreign retail giants. Refer to the last line of the first paragraph which helps infer that option b is the answer. Option a is incorrect as it does not point out the role of Indian technology firms and professionals. Option c is incorrect as it is a general statement while the author only presents information on Indian IT firms and does not link this with the growth of retail giants. Option d is incorrect as it leaves out the role of the Indian IT firms.

UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 8

                        Passage 3

The relation between gender and poverty is a complex and controversial topic that is now being debated more than ever before. Although much policymaking has been informed by the idea of feminization of poverty, the precise nature of the nexus between gender and poverty needs to be better understood and operationalized in policymaking. The difficulty originates from the different shapes and forms gender inequalities and poverty take depending on the economic, social and ideological context. Yet another difficulty involves the scarcity of gender disaggregated data for a number of countries. For the last three decades, many women's advocates have been arguing that women are poorer than men. The most common empirical expression of this idea is the concept of feminization of poverty. This idea has become popular both in shaping analyses of poverty and poverty alleviation strategies. Thus, targeting women has become one vehicle for gender sensitive poverty alleviation. Poor women have become the explicit focus of policymaking, for example, in the area of microcredit programs and income generation activities.

However, the universal validity of the feminization of poverty is being empirically challenged. Although the idea that there are gender differences in experiences of poverty is not abandoned, a more nuanced and complex analysis of poverty and gender inequalities is emerging. This, in turn, is giving rise to a more gender aware approach to poverty elimination strategies.

 

Q.Which of the following statements agree with the author's opinions on the feminization of poverty?

1.It has drawn attention away from aspects of poverty in its generalization.

2.It has produced results in the areas of microcredit programs and income generation activities.

Detailed Solution for UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 8

It is nowhere mentioned in the passage that feminization of poverty has drawn attention away from some aspects of poverty. Neither it is mentioned that feminization of poverty has produced results in the areas of microcredit programs and income generation activities. Thus option d is correct.

UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 9

    Passage 3

The relation between gender and poverty is a complex and controversial topic that is now being debated more than ever before. Although much policymaking has been informed by the idea of feminization of poverty, the precise nature of the nexus between gender and poverty needs to be better understood and operationalized in policymaking. The difficulty originates from the different shapes and forms gender inequalities and poverty take depending on the economic, social and ideological context. Yet another difficulty involves the scarcity of gender disaggregated data for a number of countries. For the last three decades, many women's advocates have been arguing that women are poorer than men. The most common empirical expression of this idea is the concept of feminization of poverty. This idea has become popular both in shaping analyses of poverty and poverty alleviation strategies. Thus, targeting women has become one vehicle for gender sensitive poverty alleviation. Poor women have become the explicit focus of policymaking, for example, in the area of microcredit programs and income generation activities.

However, the universal validity of the feminization of poverty is being empirically challenged. Although the idea that there are gender differences in experiences of poverty is not abandoned, a more nuanced and complex analysis of poverty and gender inequalities is emerging. This, in turn, is giving rise to a more gender aware approach to poverty elimination strategies.

 

Q.Which of the following has/have not been mentioned in the passage?

1.Experiences of poverty

2.Failed poverty alleviation strategies.

Detailed Solution for UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 9

Only 2 has not been mentioned in the passage.

UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 10

    Passage 3

The relation between gender and poverty is a complex and controversial topic that is now being debated more than ever before. Although much policymaking has been informed by the idea of feminization of poverty, the precise nature of the nexus between gender and poverty needs to be better understood and operationalized in policymaking. The difficulty originates from the different shapes and forms gender inequalities and poverty take depending on the economic, social and ideological context. Yet another difficulty involves the scarcity of gender disaggregated data for a number of countries. For the last three decades, many women's advocates have been arguing that women are poorer than men. The most common empirical expression of this idea is the concept of feminization of poverty. This idea has become popular both in shaping analyses of poverty and poverty alleviation strategies. Thus, targeting women has become one vehicle for gender sensitive poverty alleviation. Poor women have become the explicit focus of policymaking, for example, in the area of microcredit programs and income generation activities.

However, the universal validity of the feminization of poverty is being empirically challenged. Although the idea that there are gender differences in experiences of poverty is not abandoned, a more nuanced and complex analysis of poverty and gender inequalities is emerging. This, in turn, is giving rise to a more gender aware approach to poverty elimination strategies.

 

Q.Consider the following statements:

1.The feminization of poverty happened due to a lack of empirical data.

2.Understanding gender issues in poverty is important.

With reference to the above passage, which ofthe following assumptions is/are valid?

Detailed Solution for UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 10

In the passage, no relation has been given between feminisation of poverty and the lack of empirical data. Statement 2 is valid as the first few lines of the passage emphasize on the importance of gender

issues in poverty. Refer to the line “the precise nature of the........... operationalized in policymaking.” Thus

option b is correct.

UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 11

  Passage 3

The relation between gender and poverty is a complex and controversial topic that is now being debated more than ever before. Although much policymaking has been informed by the idea of feminization of poverty, the precise nature of the nexus between gender and poverty needs to be better understood and operationalized in policymaking. The difficulty originates from the different shapes and forms gender inequalities and poverty take depending on the economic, social and ideological context. Yet another difficulty involves the scarcity of gender disaggregated data for a number of countries. For the last three decades, many women's advocates have been arguing that women are poorer than men. The most common empirical expression of this idea is the concept of feminization of poverty. This idea has become popular both in shaping analyses of poverty and poverty alleviation strategies. Thus, targeting women has become one vehicle for gender sensitive poverty alleviation. Poor women have become the explicit focus of policymaking, for example, in the area of microcredit programs and income generation activities.

However, the universal validity of the feminization of poverty is being empirically challenged. Although the idea that there are gender differences in experiences of poverty is not abandoned, a more nuanced and complex analysis of poverty and gender inequalities is emerging. This, in turn, is giving rise to a more gender aware approach to poverty elimination strategies.

 

Q.Consider the following statements-

1.Policymaking, till date, has ignored the link between poverty and gender.

2.Gender disaggregated data is important for formulating policies that factor in the link between poverty and gender.

With reference to the above passage, which ofthe following statements is/are valid?

Detailed Solution for UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 11

We cannot say that policy making has ignored the link between poverty and gender. However, the passage mentions the scarcity of gender-disaggregated data and how it poses a difficulty in policymaking exercise. Thus option b is correct.

UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 12

Directions forthe following 5 (five) items:

Each of the items below consists of a question and two statements. You have to decide whether the data provided in the statements are sufficient to answer the question. Give answer as:

Statements:

1. Rahul at present is 25 years younger to his mother.

2. Rahul's brother, who was born in 1964, is 35 years younger to his mother.

 

Q. In which year was Rahul born?

Detailed Solution for UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 12

From both I and II, we find that Rahul is (35 - 25) = 10 years older than his brother, who was born in 1964. So, Rahul was born in 1954.

UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 13

Statements:

1. One-fourth of the weight of each pole is 5 kg.

2. The total weight ofthree poles is 20 kilograms more than the total weight oftwo poles.

 

Q. What will be the total weight of 10 poles, each of the same weight ?

Detailed Solution for UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 13

From I, we conclude that weight of each pole = (4x5) kg = 20 kg.

So, total weight of 10 poles = (20 x 10) kg = 200 kg.

From II, we conclude that:

Weight of each pole = (weight of 3 poles) - (weight of 2 poles) = 20 kg.

So, total weight of 10 pojes = (20 x 10) kg = 200 kg.

UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 14

Statements:

1. H is the only daughter of X who is wife of M.

2. K and J are brothers of M.

 

Q.How many children does M have?

Detailed Solution for UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 14

From I, we conclude that H is the only daughter of M. But this does not indicate that M has no son. The information given in II is immaterial.

UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 15

Statements:

1. The company sold 8000 units of product A each costing Rs. 25.

2. This company has no other product line.

 

Q.How much was the total sale of the company ?

Detailed Solution for UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 15

From I, total sale of product A = Rs. (8000 x 25) = Rs. 200000.

From II, we know that the company deals only in product A.

This implies that sale of product A is the total sale of the company, which is Rs. 200000.

UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 16

Statements:

1. P is fifteenth from the left in the row.

2.Q is exactly in the middle and there are ten children towards his right.

 

Q.How many children are there between P and Qina row of children?

Detailed Solution for UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 16

From II, Q being in the middle, there are 10 children to his right as well as to his left. So, Q is 11th from the left. From I, P is 15th from the left.

Thus, from both I and II, we conclude that there are 3 children between P and Q.

UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 17

You are appointed the Vice Chairman in an authority that is responsible for fulfilling the needs in the area. The area has a substantial number of weaker sections and low income groups, which cannot afford to buy expensive houses. You have been asked by the State Housing minister to sell the land that is meant for building houses for the poor to private builders at throw away prices so that they can build plush apartments and sell them at an exorbitant premium. You will

Detailed Solution for UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 17

Option c is the best choice as it shows that you are not giving in to undue pressure. Option d is the 2nd best option as here you are making sure that the purpose for which the land is meant is fulfilled, however, it seems to be a compromise. Option b would portray that you act on impulse and also go ahead with impracticable solutions. Option a is negated as it would portray you as a weak personality.

UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 18

You are newly appointed as secretary in the telecom commission. The commission is ready to sell the radio wave spectrum to private companies. After the scrutiny of the documents you have come to know that the price at which the spectrum is being sold is substantially lower than the current market valuation. You think that this may cause a huge loss. You will

Detailed Solution for UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 18

Option c is the best option as it deals with the problem at hand and provides a solution that is feasible and also not time consuming. Option d is the next best choice as it deals with the problem to some extent but it is infeasible as you may need several clearances from various departments and ministries to change the process. Option a is inappropriate as you are acting on impulse and moreover this may be infeasible as redoing all the documents may take a lot of time, which the commission does not have at its disposal, as it is ready to sell the spectrum. Going with option b would be unethical as you do not know whether this would definitely result in low prices for the services related to the spectrum.

UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 19

You are the head of the foreign diplomacy department of your country. The country's economy is ailing and it needs fresh infusion of capital. You have been asked by the foreign minister to do something about this problem. You will

Detailed Solution for UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 19

Option b is the best choice as not only it will help in solving the problem at hand (infusion of capital) but also is the right way to approach businesses in other countries. Option a is the 2nd best option as even though it looks it may solve the problem it is not clear why the business houses will devise ways to bring in foreign capital on your behest. Option c would be not correct as it may mean that you have some personal interest in your friends setting up business in the country. Option d will portray you as a quitter.

UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 20

You have been appointed the head of a committee, which has been created to look into the demands of various groups to create smaller states based on ethnicities and language differences in existing states as they think that development in all areas is not even and some areas are extremely backward. These groups are highly vocal in nature for creation of new states but the government thinks that creating new states will hamper the unity of the country. You belong to one of these states. You will

Detailed Solution for UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 20

Option b is the best answer as it takes into consideration the view of other members of the committee and incorporated the view of the other members. Option c is the next best option as it will take care of the concern of the government but you cannot ask the government to decide on amending the laws regarding this. Option a is inappropriate as it is based on your personal feelings and may be biased. Option d is incorrect as there should be no interest from your side to convince the government that the demands are genuine.

UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 21

The district where you are working as a collector has been affected by a severe drought. The majority of the population, which was clearly impoverished, has been hit hard by the non availability of the staple food grain. However, the government storages are full of grains and some of it is on the verge of decay. In this situation, you will

Detailed Solution for UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 21

Option c is the best answer as it shows how proactive you are and it will help in dealing with the given problem. Option d is the 2nd best choice as you are being honest with the people and telling them the reality but it also shows that you are not proactive at all. Option a is unviable as to distribute the grains a system has to be followed and opening the coffers may create chaos. Option b is incorrect as you do not know the intentions of the dealers and it is quite possible that they may not sell the grain at a nominal rate.

UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 22

You are the chief engineer in the Highway authority and are responsible to construct roads and highways. The authority is building a new road and the project has hit a roadblock because there is a temple in the way where the road is to be built. It is a religiously sensitive area and the people in this area are protesting that they will not let the temple be broken as it would be a religious sacrilege to them. It is not technically possible for you to take the road around the temple as there is a high probability that this turn would result in frequent accidents. You will

UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 23

You are a district collector in a small district where the local goons are rampant. A particular area is notorious for the instances of goons being involved in eve teasing and rape and has found place in many national media reports. The National Commission for Women (NCW) has pointed this out to you and asked you to do something about it. You will

Detailed Solution for UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 23

Option c is the best choice as it directly addresses the issue at hand. Moreover, tackling the root of the problem directly would serve to fix the problem for the long term. Option b is the next choice as it would help contain the menace of eve teasing as well as the problem of rape but it is not a long term solution as it may not be possible to deploy extra platoons of policemen at the place permanently. Options a and d indicate an irresponsive attitude on your part.

UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 24

You are a police constable on duty and notice two people on a bike riding without helmets. You ask them to pull over and are about to fine them when the driver tells you that they could not put on their helmets as the pillion rider is extremely sick and needs to be taken to the hospital urgently. You will

 

Detailed Solution for UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 24

The rider has broken the law and needs to be fined. Even if you are in an emergency it does not take much time to grab a helmet for your own safety. Option d is the best choice as quickly arranging for an ambulance and fining them will not only take care of the sick person but also penalize the rider for breaking the law. Option c is the next best choice as it only falls short of providing a help to the sick person. Options a and b are incorrect as in both cases you are allowing them to ride without the helmet once again.

UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 25

Your father has had a heart attack and needs to be taken to the hospital right away. You are the only one in your house as other family members are on a tour. While you are taking your father to the hospital you see that a small girl has fallen into a deep drain. You will

Detailed Solution for UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 25

Option b is the best choice as you cannot stop while taking your father to the hospital, so the best you can do is call an ambulance for the girl. Option d is the next best choice as it is not able to provide immediate help to the girl. Option c may endanger your father's life and option a is incorrect as you cannot ignore the girl.

UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 26

Directions forthe following 9 (nine) items:

The following nine items are based on three passages in English to test the comprehension of English language and therefore these items do not have Hindi version. Read each passage and answer the items that follow.

                         Passage - 1

The poor baron bore it all, as long as he could, and when he could bear it no longer, lost his appetite and his spirits, and sat himself gloomily and dejectedly down. But there were worse troubles yet in store for him, and as they came on, his melancholy and sadness increased. Times changed. He got into debt. The Germain coffers went empty, though the Heusen family had looked upon them as inexhaustible; and just when the baroness was on the point of making a thirteenth addition to the family pedigree, Von discovered that he had no means of replenishing them

 

Q.The baron-

Detailed Solution for UPSC CSE Prelims Paper 2 Practice Test - 8 - Question 26

The passage clearly mentions that the baron was in economic trouble. All other options are incorrect.