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BITSAT English Proficiency Test - 6 - JEE MCQ


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10 Questions MCQ Test BITSAT Mock Tests Series & Past Year Papers 2025 - BITSAT English Proficiency Test - 6

BITSAT English Proficiency Test - 6 for JEE 2024 is part of BITSAT Mock Tests Series & Past Year Papers 2025 preparation. The BITSAT English Proficiency Test - 6 questions and answers have been prepared according to the JEE exam syllabus.The BITSAT English Proficiency Test - 6 MCQs are made for JEE 2024 Exam. Find important definitions, questions, notes, meanings, examples, exercises, MCQs and online tests for BITSAT English Proficiency Test - 6 below.
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BITSAT English Proficiency Test - 6 - Question 1

Direction: Read the following passage carefully and answer the question given below.

Ever since the Centre and the States passed the landmark legislation in 2016 adopting a single countrywide Goods and Services Tax (GST), the federal council that is tasked with overseeing all the regulatory aspects of the indirect tax has had its hands full. From recommending the rates that could apply to various products and services, to deciding on what could be tax exempted, the GST Council has had the onerous task of laying out the policy framework for administering the tax in a manner that benefits all stakeholders – the governments, the consumers and the suppliers along the value chain. Given the complexity of the legacy taxes that GST subsumed and replaced and the teething troubles of operating a new tax system, ensuring optimal outcomes has proved an abiding challenge. A significant concern relates to the loopholes that unscrupulous operators have sought to exploit, whereby revenue that ought to have accrued to the Centre and the States has leaked while allowing these elements to derive illicit profits. And the scale of some has been breath-taking. Earlier this month, the Directorate General of GST Intelligence and the Directorate General of Revenue Intelligence conducted a pan-India joint operation, which saw about 1,200 officers simultaneously conducting searches at 336 different locations. In the process they unearthed a network of exporters and their suppliers who had connived to claim fraudulent refunds of Integrated GST, with more than ₹470 crore of input tax credit availed being based on non-existent entities or suppliers with fictitious addresses. A further ₹450 crore of IGST refund is also under review.

It is against the backdrop of such cases, and the fact that frauds totaling up to a staggering ₹45,682 crore have been detected since the roll-out of the tax in July 2017, that the GST Council has decided “in principle” to recommend linking Aadhaar with registration of taxpayers. In its 37th meeting in Goa on Friday, the council also agreed to appraise the possibility of making the biometrics-based unique identifier mandatory for claiming refunds. Already the GST Network — the information technology backbone on which the whole tax system runs — has made it mandatory for new dealers registering under the composition scheme for small businesses to either authenticate their Aadhaar or submit to physical verification of their business, starting January 2020. The council too needs to follow the network’s lead and move swiftly to recommend mandatory linking for refunds, especially since that has proved to be the main source of most frauds. In a becalmed economy, neither the Centre nor States can afford to forego even a rupee of revenue that is due to the public coffers.

Q. According to the passage, what remedial actions are suggested to avoid fraudulent activities?

Detailed Solution for BITSAT English Proficiency Test - 6 - Question 1

Refer to the passsage below:

'To appraise the possibility of making the biometrics-based unique identifier mandatory for claiming refunds. Already the GST Network has made it mandatory for new dealers registering under the composition scheme for small businesses to either authenticate their Aadhaar or submit to  physical verification of their business,’

On reading the passage carefully, we see all the above remedial measures listed as recommendations to reduce fraudulent activities.

BITSAT English Proficiency Test - 6 - Question 2

Direction: Read the following passage carefully and answer the question given below.

Ever since the Centre and the States passed the landmark legislation in 2016 adopting a single countrywide Goods and Services Tax (GST), the federal council that is tasked with overseeing all the regulatory aspects of the indirect tax has had its hands full. From recommending the rates that could apply to various products and services, to deciding on what could be tax exempted, the GST Council has had the onerous task of laying out the policy framework for administering the tax in a manner that benefits all stakeholders – the governments, the consumers and the suppliers along the value chain. Given the complexity of the legacy taxes that GST subsumed and replaced and the teething troubles of operating a new tax system, ensuring optimal outcomes has proved an abiding challenge. A significant concern relates to the loopholes that unscrupulous operators have sought to exploit, whereby revenue that ought to have accrued to the Centre and the States has leaked while allowing these elements to derive illicit profits. And the scale of some has been breath-taking. Earlier this month, the Directorate General of GST Intelligence and the Directorate General of Revenue Intelligence conducted a pan-India joint operation, which saw about 1,200 officers simultaneously conducting searches at 336 different locations. In the process they unearthed a network of exporters and their suppliers who had connived to claim fraudulent refunds of Integrated GST, with more than ₹470 crore of input tax credit availed being based on non-existent entities or suppliers with fictitious addresses. A further ₹450 crore of IGST refund is also under review.

It is against the backdrop of such cases, and the fact that frauds totaling up to a staggering ₹45,682 crore have been detected since the roll-out of the tax in July 2017, that the GST Council has decided “in principle” to recommend linking Aadhaar with registration of taxpayers. In its 37th meeting in Goa on Friday, the council also agreed to appraise the possibility of making the biometrics-based unique identifier mandatory for claiming refunds. Already the GST Network — the information technology backbone on which the whole tax system runs — has made it mandatory for new dealers registering under the composition scheme for small businesses to either authenticate their Aadhaar or submit to physical verification of their business, starting January 2020. The council too needs to follow the network’s lead and move swiftly to recommend mandatory linking for refunds, especially since that has proved to be the main source of most frauds. In a becalmed economy, neither the Centre nor States can afford to forego even a rupee of revenue that is due to the public coffers.

Q. What can be concluded from the passage above?

Detailed Solution for BITSAT English Proficiency Test - 6 - Question 2

Option (A) is incorrect as no such issue that cannot be solved has been mentioned.
Option (B) is opposite of what has been mentioned in the passage.
Option (C) is factually incorrect.
Option (D) is correct as the author feels this step would reduce fraud.

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BITSAT English Proficiency Test - 6 - Question 3

Direction: Read the following passage carefully and answer the question given below.

Ever since the Centre and the States passed the landmark legislation in 2016 adopting a single countrywide Goods and Services Tax (GST), the federal council that is tasked with overseeing all the regulatory aspects of the indirect tax has had its hands full. From recommending the rates that could apply to various products and services, to deciding on what could be tax exempted, the GST Council has had the onerous task of laying out the policy framework for administering the tax in a manner that benefits all stakeholders – the governments, the consumers and the suppliers along the value chain. Given the complexity of the legacy taxes that GST subsumed and replaced and the teething troubles of operating a new tax system, ensuring optimal outcomes has proved an abiding challenge. A significant concern relates to the loopholes that unscrupulous operators have sought to exploit, whereby revenue that ought to have accrued to the Centre and the States has leaked while allowing these elements to derive illicit profits. And the scale of some has been breath-taking. Earlier this month, the Directorate General of GST Intelligence and the Directorate General of Revenue Intelligence conducted a pan-India joint operation, which saw about 1,200 officers simultaneously conducting searches at 336 different locations. In the process they unearthed a network of exporters and their suppliers who had connived to claim fraudulent refunds of Integrated GST, with more than ₹470 crore of input tax credit availed being based on non-existent entities or suppliers with fictitious addresses. A further ₹450 crore of IGST refund is also under review.

It is against the backdrop of such cases, and the fact that frauds totaling up to a staggering ₹45,682 crore have been detected since the roll-out of the tax in July 2017, that the GST Council has decided “in principle” to recommend linking Aadhaar with registration of taxpayers. In its 37th meeting in Goa on Friday, the council also agreed to appraise the possibility of making the biometrics-based unique identifier mandatory for claiming refunds. Already the GST Network — the information technology backbone on which the whole tax system runs — has made it mandatory for new dealers registering under the composition scheme for small businesses to either authenticate their Aadhaar or submit to physical verification of their business, starting January 2020. The council too needs to follow the network’s lead and move swiftly to recommend mandatory linking for refunds, especially since that has proved to be the main source of most frauds. In a becalmed economy, neither the Centre nor States can afford to forego even a rupee of revenue that is due to the public coffers.

Q. Why has the GST legislation and its successful implementation become a challenge?

Detailed Solution for BITSAT English Proficiency Test - 6 - Question 3

Refer to the passage,

‘A significant concern relates to the loopholes that unscrupulous operators have sought to exploit, whereby revenue that ought to have accrued to the Centre and the States has leaked while allowing these elements to derive illicit profits.’

Of all the options, option (B) fits in the best with the others being incorrect.

BITSAT English Proficiency Test - 6 - Question 4

Direction: Read the following passage carefully and answer the question given below.

Ever since the Centre and the States passed the landmark legislation in 2016 adopting a single countrywide Goods and Services Tax (GST), the federal council that is tasked with overseeing all the regulatory aspects of the indirect tax has had its hands full. From recommending the rates that could apply to various products and services, to deciding on what could be tax exempted, the GST Council has had the onerous task of laying out the policy framework for administering the tax in a manner that benefits all stakeholders – the governments, the consumers and the suppliers along the value chain. Given the complexity of the legacy taxes that GST subsumed and replaced and the teething troubles of operating a new tax system, ensuring optimal outcomes has proved an abiding challenge. A significant concern relates to the loopholes that unscrupulous operators have sought to exploit, whereby revenue that ought to have accrued to the Centre and the States has leaked while allowing these elements to derive illicit profits. And the scale of some has been breath-taking. Earlier this month, the Directorate General of GST Intelligence and the Directorate General of Revenue Intelligence conducted a pan-India joint operation, which saw about 1,200 officers simultaneously conducting searches at 336 different locations. In the process they unearthed a network of exporters and their suppliers who had connived to claim fraudulent refunds of Integrated GST, with more than ₹470 crore of input tax credit availed being based on non-existent entities or suppliers with fictitious addresses. A further ₹450 crore of IGST refund is also under review.

It is against the backdrop of such cases, and the fact that frauds totaling up to a staggering ₹45,682 crore have been detected since the roll-out of the tax in July 2017, that the GST Council has decided “in principle” to recommend linking Aadhaar with registration of taxpayers. In its 37th meeting in Goa on Friday, the council also agreed to appraise the possibility of making the biometrics-based unique identifier mandatory for claiming refunds. Already the GST Network — the information technology backbone on which the whole tax system runs — has made it mandatory for new dealers registering under the composition scheme for small businesses to either authenticate their Aadhaar or submit to physical verification of their business, starting January 2020. The council too needs to follow the network’s lead and move swiftly to recommend mandatory linking for refunds, especially since that has proved to be the main source of most frauds. In a becalmed economy, neither the Centre nor States can afford to forego even a rupee of revenue that is due to the public coffers.

Q. Which of the following is true as per the passage?
I. The GST has opened up a can of worms and needs to be scrapped.
II. There would be no frauds after the Aadhar is linked with taxpayers.
III. The new dealers have to physically go for new registrations.

Detailed Solution for BITSAT English Proficiency Test - 6 - Question 4

None of the statements are correct as per the passage. The information is given in the statement, that does not come under the passage.

BITSAT English Proficiency Test - 6 - Question 5

Direction: Read the following passage carefully and answer the question given below.

Ever since the Centre and the States passed the landmark legislation in 2016 adopting a single countrywide Goods and Services Tax (GST), the federal council that is tasked with overseeing all the regulatory aspects of the indirect tax has had its hands full. From recommending the rates that could apply to various products and services, to deciding on what could be tax exempted, the GST Council has had the onerous task of laying out the policy framework for administering the tax in a manner that benefits all stakeholders – the governments, the consumers and the suppliers along the value chain. Given the complexity of the legacy taxes that GST subsumed and replaced and the teething troubles of operating a new tax system, ensuring optimal outcomes has proved an abiding challenge. A significant concern relates to the loopholes that unscrupulous operators have sought to exploit, whereby revenue that ought to have accrued to the Centre and the States has leaked while allowing these elements to derive illicit profits. And the scale of some has been breath-taking. Earlier this month, the Directorate General of GST Intelligence and the Directorate General of Revenue Intelligence conducted a pan-India joint operation, which saw about 1,200 officers simultaneously conducting searches at 336 different locations. In the process they unearthed a network of exporters and their suppliers who had connived to claim fraudulent refunds of Integrated GST, with more than ₹470 crore of input tax credit availed being based on non-existent entities or suppliers with fictitious addresses. A further ₹450 crore of IGST refund is also under review.

It is against the backdrop of such cases, and the fact that frauds totaling up to a staggering ₹45,682 crore have been detected since the roll-out of the tax in July 2017, that the GST Council has decided “in principle” to recommend linking Aadhaar with registration of taxpayers. In its 37th meeting in Goa on Friday, the council also agreed to appraise the possibility of making the biometrics-based unique identifier mandatory for claiming refunds. Already the GST Network — the information technology backbone on which the whole tax system runs — has made it mandatory for new dealers registering under the composition scheme for small businesses to either authenticate their Aadhaar or submit to physical verification of their business, starting January 2020. The council too needs to follow the network’s lead and move swiftly to recommend mandatory linking for refunds, especially since that has proved to be the main source of most frauds. In a becalmed economy, neither the Centre nor States can afford to forego even a rupee of revenue that is due to the public coffers.

Q. Which of the following is true about GST?
I. GST applies different rates to same products.
II. The tax has become a subject of national unrest.
III. Some loopholes have been exploited to dupe government.

Detailed Solution for BITSAT English Proficiency Test - 6 - Question 5

Statements I and II are incorrect as have not been stated in the passage. Statement III is correct as a case of fraud has been highlighted in the passage and is the main reason to link Aadhar with Taxpayers.

BITSAT English Proficiency Test - 6 - Question 6

P: Jane planned
Q: some stamps
R: to buy
S: this afternoon
The correct sequence should be:

Detailed Solution for BITSAT English Proficiency Test - 6 - Question 6

From the options given, it can be guessed that the parts labelled P, Q, R, S can be ordered to form a meaningful sentence as
Jane planned to buy some stamps this afternoon.
So, the order is PRQS.
"Planned" will be followed by the plan which in this case is "to buy". This will be followed by the object to be bought, i.e. stamps. Finally, the time the plan is about to be executed should be mentioned, which in this case is "this afternoon".

BITSAT English Proficiency Test - 6 - Question 7

In this question, each passage consists of six sentences. The first and sixth sentences are given in the beginning. The middle four sentences have been removed and jumbled up. These are labeled as P, Q, R, and S. You are required to find out the proper sequence of the four sentences from the given alternatives (a), (b), (c), and (d). If none of the following options is correct, your answer is (e).
S1. On vacation in Tangier, Morocco, my friend and I sat down at a street cafe.
S6. Finally, a man walked over to me and whispered, "Hey buddy... this guy's your waiter and he wants your order".
P. At one point, he bent over with a big smile, showing me a single gold tooth and a dingy fez.
Q. Soon I felt the presence of someone standing alongside me.
R. But this one wouldn't budge.
S. We had been cautioned about beggars and were told to ignore them.

The proper sequence should be:

Detailed Solution for BITSAT English Proficiency Test - 6 - Question 7

The author describes his strange encounter with a man in Morocco. He is not able to understand what the man wanted and is scared by his looks until he is helped by a bystander who was onlooking. The proper sequence must be-

  1. Soon I felt the presence of someone standing alongside me.
  2. We had been cautioned about beggars and were told to ignore them.
  3. But this one wouldn't budge.
  4. At one point, he bent over with a big smile, showing me a single gold tooth and a dingy fez.
BITSAT English Proficiency Test - 6 - Question 8

Rearrange each of the following five sentences A, B, C, D and E in the proper sequence so as to form a meaningful paragraph; then answer the question given below them.
(A) She said that she was a school teacher and a social worker
(B) Then for sometime we discussed her plans for schooling of the children living in slums.
(C) Our conversation now took another direction.
(D) She also said that social work was her hobby only and not the job.
(E) I asked Meena about her occupation

Which of the following should be the Last sentence?

Detailed Solution for BITSAT English Proficiency Test - 6 - Question 8

The passage follows question answer pattern. It started with a question followed by answer and further discussion on answer. 
Statement E opens the passage with a question, "I asked" Meena about her occupation.
Sentence 'E' will be followed by sentence 'A' as this sentence starts with 'She said' and tell about her occuption i.e., She was a school teacher and a social worker.
Sentence 'A' will be followed by sentence 'D' as she further clarifies her answer by saying that social work was her hobby only and not the job.
Sentence 'D' will be followed by sentence 'C' because sentence 'D' opens up a new direction to their conversation.
The concluding sentence will be 'B' as after that  sentence 'C' they started disccusing the new topic about the plans for schooling the children living in slums. Hence, the correct sequence will be - EADCB.
Sentence 'B' is the last sentence.

BITSAT English Proficiency Test - 6 - Question 9

If Sentence (C), "There is one strong message from the findings of the Annual Status of Education Report (Rural) 2017, it is that the Right of Children to Free and Compulsory Education Act should cover the entire spectrum of 18 years, and not confine itself to those aged 6 to 14." is the first sentence, what is the order of other sentences after rearrangement?
A. Guaranteed inclusion will empower those in the 14-18 age group who are not enrolled anywhere, and help them acquire finishing education that is so vital to their participation in the workforce.
B. It is absolutely essential for all of them to get an education that equips them with the skills, especially job-oriented vocational capabilities,
C. There is one strong message from the findings of the Annual Status of Education Report (Rural) 2017, it is that the Right of Children to Free and Compulsory Education Act should cover the entire spectrum of 18 years, and not confine itself to those aged 6 to 14.
D. Unfortunately, the state of rural elementary education is far from encouraging.
E. if the expectation of a demographic dividend is to be meaningful.
F. The ASER sample study estimates that 14% of this age group - a total of 125 million young Indians in this category- are not enrolled.

Detailed Solution for BITSAT English Proficiency Test - 6 - Question 9

Sentence (C) is the first sentence given in the question of the message sent by ASER stating that children between 6 to 14 years of age should be included in the Act. Sentence (A) speaks to the majority of the age group from 14 to 18, so the sentence (A) is the second sentence.
Sentence (F) gives the ASER sample analysis in which sentence (B) is based on specifying that all children should be taught, and sentence (E) is the continuation of (B)
Then (F) is the third sentence (B) is the fourth sentence, and (E) is the fifth sentence that eventually leaves (D) as the last sentence.

BITSAT English Proficiency Test - 6 - Question 10

If Sentence (C), "Ever since the price of bitcoins skyrocketed from a little under $1,000 (around ₹63,400 now) in 2016 to touch nearly $20,000  last year, people have been posing a Hamlet kind of question: to buy or not to buy? ," is the first sentence, what is the order of other sentences after rearrangement?

A. Some have explicitly warned investors to exercise caution, while those like the Indian government have begun imposing a tax on the gains from the sale of bitcoins.
B. Their dilemma is understandable.
C. Ever since the price of bitcoins skyrocketed from a little under $1,000 (around ₹ 63,400 now) in 2016 to touch nearly $20,000 last year, people have been posing a Hamlet kind of question: to buy or not to buy?
D. On the other hand, there is the nagging feeling that one may end up investing in a virtual currency whose price is extremely volatile and whose true value cannot be assessed.
E. Adding to the confusion, most governments remain non-committal on the legality of bitcoins since it is hot regulated by central banks.
F. On the one hand, there is the fear of losing out on an opportunity to make money hand over fist by investing or trading in bitcoins since their price rose by around 20-fold since the start of of 2017.

Detailed Solution for BITSAT English Proficiency Test - 6 - Question 10
  • Sentence (C) is the first sentence given in the question that tells about the growth of bitcoins and people's minds.
  • Sentence (B) talks about the difficulties of people being understood, and it concludes with the sentence (C).
  • Sentence (F) speaks of the fear of losing the ability to make money and of being linked to sentence (B). Sentence (D) says the expression "on the other hand" while sentence (F) began with "on the one hand" which indicates that (D) follows (F).
  • The sentence (E) speaks of some government not disclosing the legality of bitcoins, and the term "some" in the sentence (A) refers to the governments listed in the sentence (E). Thus, (E) takes the fifth position, and sentence (A) finishes last.
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