NABARD Grade A Phase I Test 1


200 Questions MCQ Test NABARD Manager - Mock Tests & Previous Year Papers | NABARD Grade A Phase I Test 1


Description
This mock test of NABARD Grade A Phase I Test 1 for Banking Exams helps you for every Banking Exams entrance exam. This contains 200 Multiple Choice Questions for Banking Exams NABARD Grade A Phase I Test 1 (mcq) to study with solutions a complete question bank. The solved questions answers in this NABARD Grade A Phase I Test 1 quiz give you a good mix of easy questions and tough questions. Banking Exams students definitely take this NABARD Grade A Phase I Test 1 exercise for a better result in the exam. You can find other NABARD Grade A Phase I Test 1 extra questions, long questions & short questions for Banking Exams on EduRev as well by searching above.
QUESTION: 1

Directions for Below Question :

A word and number arrangement machine when given an input line of words and numbers rearranges them following a particular rule in each step. The following is an illustration of an input and rearrangement.

Input: uniform 46 train 54 fire 26 done 68 box 32

Step I: box uniform 46 train 54 fire 26 done 32 68

Step II: done box uniform 46 train fire 26 32 68 54

Step III: fire done box uniform train 26 32 68 54 46

Step IV: train fire done box uniform 26 68 54 46 32

Step V: uniform train fire done box 68 54 46 32 26

Step V is the last step of the above arrangement.

As per the rules followed in the steps given above, find out in each of the following questions the appropriate step for the given input.

Input: motor 48 wood 36 share 64 has 52 got 18


Question : How many steps are required to complete the arrangement?

Solution:

Words arrangement: Words are arranged in ascending order according to English dictionary from left to right.

Number arrangement: Numbers are arranged in descending order from right to left in each step.

Input: motor 48 wood 36 share 64 has 52 got 18

Step I: got motor 48 wood 36 share has 52 18 64

Step II: has got motor 48 wood 36 share 18 64 52

Step III: motor has got wood 36 share 18 64 52 48

Step IV: share motor has got wood 18 64 52 48 36

Step V: wood share motor has got 64 52 48 36 18

QUESTION: 2

Directions for Below Question :

A word and number arrangement machine when given an input line of words and numbers rearranges them following a particular rule in each step. The following is an illustration of an input and rearrangement.

Input: uniform 46 train 54 fire 26 done 68 box 32

Step I: box uniform 46 train 54 fire 26 done 32 68

Step II: done box uniform 46 train fire 26 32 68 54

Step III: fire done box uniform train 26 32 68 54 46

Step IV: train fire done box uniform 26 68 54 46 32

Step V: uniform train fire done box 68 54 46 32 26

Step V is the last step of the above arrangement.

As per the rules followed in the steps given above, find out in each of the following questions the appropriate step for the given input.

Input: motor 48 wood 36 share 64 has 52 got 18


Question : Which of the following step is:

motor has got wood 36 share 18 64 52 48

 

Solution:

Words arrangement: Words are arranged in ascending order according to English dictionary from left to right.

Number arrangement: Numbers are arranged in descending order according to right to left in each step.

Input: motor 48 wood 36 share 64 has 52 got 18

Step I: got motor 48 wood 36 share has 52 18 64

Step II: has got motor 48 wood 36 share 18 64 52

Step III: motor has got wood 36 share 18 64 52 48

Step IV: share motor has got wood 18 64 52 48 36

Step V: wood share motor has got 64 52 48 36 18

QUESTION: 3

Directions for Below Question :
A word and number arrangement machine when given an input line of words and numbers rearranges them following a particular rule in each step. The following is an illustration of an input and rearrangement.

Input: uniform 46 train 54 fire 26 done 68 box 32

Step I: box uniform 46 train 54 fire 26 done 32 68

Step II: done box uniform 46 train fire 26 32 68 54

Step III: fire done box uniform train 26 32 68 54 46

Step IV: train fire done box uniform 26 68 54 46 32

Step V: uniform train fire done box 68 54 46 32 26

Step V is the last step of the above arrangement.

As per the rules followed in the steps given above, find out in each of the following questions the appropriate step for the given input.

Input: motor 48 wood 36 share 64 has 52 got 18


Question : What is the position of “wood” in 4th step from the right end?

Solution:

Words arrangement: Words are arranged in ascending order according to English dictionary from left to right.

Number arrangement: Numbers are arranged in descending order according to right to left in each step.

Input: motor 48 wood 36 share 64 has 52 got 18

Step I: got motor 48 wood 36 share has 52 18 64

Step II: has got motor 48 wood 36 share 18 64 52

Step III: motor has got wood 36 share 18 64 52 48

Step IV: share motor has got wood 18 64 52 48 36

Step V: wood share motor has got 64 52 48 36 18

QUESTION: 4

Directions for Below Question :

A word and number arrangement machine when given an input line of words and numbers rearranges them following a particular rule in each step. The following is an illustration of an input and rearrangement.

Input: uniform 46 train 54 fire 26 done 68 box 32

Step I: box uniform 46 train 54 fire 26 done 32 68

Step II: done box uniform 46 train fire 26 32 68 54

Step III: fire done box uniform train 26 32 68 54 46

Step IV: train fire done box uniform 26 68 54 46 32

Step V: uniform train fire done box 68 54 46 32 26

Step V is the last step of the above arrangement.

As per the rules followed in the steps given above, find out in each of the following questions the appropriate step for the given input.

Input: motor 48 wood 36 share 64 has 52 got 18

Question : Which element is 4th from the left end in the second step?

Solution:

Words arrangement: Words are arranged in ascending order according to English dictionary from left to right.

Number arrangement: Numbers are arranged in descending order according to right to left in each step.

Input: motor 48 wood 36 share 64 has 52 got 18

Step I: got motor 48 wood 36 share has 52 18 64

Step II: has got motor 48 wood 36 share 18 64 52

Step III: motor has got wood 36 share 18 64 52 48

Step IV: share motor has got wood 18 64 52 48 36

Step V: wood share motor has got 64 52 48 36 18

QUESTION: 5

Directions for Below Question :

A word and number arrangement machine when given an input line of words and numbers rearranges them following a particular rule in each step. The following is an illustration of an input and rearrangement.

Input: uniform 46 train 54 fire 26 done 68 box 32

Step I: box uniform 46 train 54 fire 26 done 32 68

Step II: done box uniform 46 train fire 26 32 68 54

Step III: fire done box uniform train 26 32 68 54 46

Step IV: train fire done box uniform 26 68 54 46 32

Step V: uniform train fire done box 68 54 46 32 26

Step V is the last step of the above arrangement.

As per the rules followed in the steps given above, find out in each of the following questions the appropriate step for the given input.

Input: motor 48 wood 36 share 64 has 52 got 18

Question : What is the position of “64” in the last step?

Solution:

Words arrangement: Words are arranged in ascending order according to English dictionary from left to right.

Number arrangement: Numbers are arranged in descending order according to right to left in each step.

Input: motor 48 wood 36 share 64 has 52 got 18

Step I: got motor 48 wood 36 share has 52 18 64

Step II: has got motor 48 wood 36 share 18 64 52

Step III: motor has got wood 36 share 18 64 52 48

Step IV: share motor has got wood 18 64 52 48 36

Step V: wood share motor has got 64 52 48 36 18

QUESTION: 6

Directions for Below Question :

Study the following information carefully and answer the questions given below:

Eight friends P, Q, R, S, T, U, V and W are sitting in a straight line facing north. Each of them will celebrate their birthday in different months viz. January, February, March, April, May, June, July and August but not necessarily in the same order.P sits third to right of S. Only one person sits between P and the one whose birthday is in month which has 30 days. W sits third to left of one whose birthday is in April month. Q sits third to left of one whose birthday is in June month. More than two persons sit between S and V. V sits left of S. W and Q are not immediate neighbours of S. U’s birthday is in month which has less than 30 days. U is not immediate neighbour of S. The one whose birthday is in January sits third to left of one whose birthday is in April.

The one whose birthday is in March sits second to right of one whose birthday is in January. The one whose birthday is in July sits second to right of R. Immediate neighbour of T was not born in the month of August.


Question : Who sits to the immediate right of S?

Solution:

QUESTION: 7

Directions for Below Question :

Study the following information carefully and answer the questions given below:

Eight friends P, Q, R, S, T, U, V and W are sitting in a straight line facing north. Each of them will celebrate their birthday in different months viz. January, February, March, April, May, June, July and August but not necessarily in the same order.

P sits third to right of S. Only one person sits between P and the one whose birthday is in month which has 30 days. W sits third to left of one whose birthday is in April month. Q sits third to left of one whose birthday is in June month. More than two persons sit between S and V. V sits left of S. W and Q are not immediate neighbours of S. U’s birthday is in month which has less than 30 days. U is not immediate neighbour of S. The one whose birthday is in January sits third to left of one whose birthday is in April. The one whose birthday is in March sits second to right of one whose birthday is in January. The one whose birthday is in July sits second to right of R. Immediate neighbour of T was not born in the month of August.

Question : Who sits at extreme left end?

Solution:

QUESTION: 8

Directions for Below Question :

Study the following information carefully and answer the questions given below:

Eight friends P, Q, R, S, T, U, V and W are sitting in a straight line facing north. Each of them will celebrate their birthday in different months viz. January, February, March, April, May, June, July and August but not necessarily in the same order.

P sits third to right of S. Only one person sits between P and the one whose birthday is in month which has 30 days. W sits third to left of one whose birthday is in April month. Q sits third to left of one whose birthday is in June month. More than two persons sit between S and V. V sits left of S. W and Q are not immediate neighbours of S. U’s birthday is in month which has less than 30 days. U is not immediate neighbour of S. The one whose birthday is in January sits third to left of one whose birthday is in April. The one whose birthday is in March sits second to right of one whose birthday is in January. The one whose birthday is in July sits second to right of R. Immediate neighbour of T was not born in the month of August.

Question : Who celebrates his birthday in June?

Solution:

QUESTION: 9

Directions for Below Question :

Study the following information carefully and answer the questions given below:

Eight friends P, Q, R, S, T, U, V and W are sitting in a straight line facing north. Each of them will celebrate their birthday in different months viz. January, February, March, April, May, June, July and August but not necessarily in the same order.

P sits third to right of S. Only one person sits between P and the one whose birthday is in month which has 30 days. W sits third to left of one whose birthday is in April month. Q sits third to left of one whose birthday is in June month. More than two persons sit between S and V. V sits left of S. W and Q are not immediate neighbours of S. U’s birthday is in month which has less than 30 days. U is not immediate neighbour of S. The one whose birthday is in January sits third to left of one whose birthday is in April. The one whose birthday is in March sits second to right of one whose birthday is in January. The one whose birthday is in July sits second to right of R. Immediate neighbour of T was not born in the month of August.

Question : What is the position of Q with respect to U?

Solution:

QUESTION: 10

Directions for Below Question :

Study the following information carefully and answer the questions given below:

Eight friends P, Q, R, S, T, U, V and W are sitting in a straight line facing north. Each of them will celebrate their birthday in different months viz. January, February, March, April, May, June, July and August but not necessarily in the same order.

P sits third to right of S. Only one person sits between P and the one whose birthday is in month which has 30 days. W sits third to left of one whose birthday is in April month. Q sits third to left of one whose birthday is in June month. More than two persons sit between S and V. V sits left of S. W and Q are not immediate neighbours of S. U’s birthday is in month which has less than 30 days. U is not immediate neighbour of S. The one whose birthday is in January sits third to left of one whose birthday is in April. The one whose birthday is in March sits second to right of one whose birthday is in January. The one whose birthday is in July sits second to right of R. Immediate neighbour of T was not born in the month of August.

Question : Who celebrates his birthday in January?

Solution:

QUESTION: 11

Directions for Below Question :

In a certain code language:

‘milk is very tasty’ is written as ‘ta la ja sa’,

‘tea is black’ is written as ‘ha ja ka’

‘sweet milk and tea’ is written as ‘ha pa sa ra’.

Question : What is the code for “tea”?

Solution:

QUESTION: 12

Directions for Below Question :

In a certain code language:

‘milk is very tasty’ is written as ‘ta la ja sa’,

‘tea is black’ is written as ‘ha ja ka’

‘sweet milk and tea’ is written as ‘ha pa sa ra’.


Question : What is the code for “tasty”?

Solution:

QUESTION: 13

Directions for Below Question :

In a certain code language:

‘milk is very tasty’ is written as ‘ta la ja sa’,

‘tea is black’ is written as ‘ha ja ka’

‘sweet milk and tea’ is written as ‘ha pa sa ra’.

Question : “ka” is the code for which of the following?

Solution:

QUESTION: 14

Directions for Below Question :

In these questions a relationship between different elements is shown in the statements. The statements are followed by three conclusions. Choose the correct option.

Question : Statements: A > B ≤ C < D > E

Conclusions:

(I) A > E

(II) D > B

(III) B < E

Solution:

Statements: A > B ≤ C < D > E

From the above statements, we get

A > B

D > C ≥ B

D > E

Conclusions:

(I) A > E => not follows

(II) D > B => follows

(III) B < E => not follows

Hence, only II follows.

QUESTION: 15

Directions for Below Question :

In these questions a relationship between different elements is shown in the statements. The statements are followed by three conclusions. Choose the correct option.

Question : Statement: M ≤ N > O ≥ P = Q

Conclusions:

(I) N > P

(II) Q ≤ O

(III) Q < N

Solution:

Statement: M ≤ N > O ≥ P = Q

From the above statements, we get

M ≤ N

Q = P ≤ O < N

Conclusions:

(I) N > P => follows

(II) Q ≤ O => follows

(III) Q < N => follows

Hence, all follow.

QUESTION: 16

Directions for Below Question :

In these questions a relationship between different elements is shown in the statements. The statements are followed by three conclusions. Choose the correct option.

Question : Statements: G < H ≥ I = J, K = G < M

Conclusions:

(I) H > J

(II) H = J

(III) H < J

Solution:

Statements: G < H ≥ I = J, K = G < M

Combining the above statements, we get

H > G = K

M > G = K

H ≥ I = J

Conclusions:

(I) H > J => not follows

(II) H = J => not follows

But either I or II follows.

(III) H < J => not follows.

Hence, either I or II follows.

QUESTION: 17

Directions for Below Question :

In these questions a relationship between different elements is shown in the statements. The statements are followed by three conclusions. Choose the correct option.

Question : How many such pairs of letters are there in the word “PARENTS” each of which has as many letters between them as there are in English alphabetical series in both forward and backward direction?

Solution:

In the word “PARENTS”, there are 2 such pairs.

In forward direction: PR

In backward direction: ST

QUESTION: 18

Directions for Below Question :

In these questions a relationship between different elements is shown in the statements. The statements are followed by three conclusions. Choose the correct option.

Question : How many meaningful English words can be formed with the letters IABT using all the letters, and each letter only once in each word?

Solution:
QUESTION: 19

Directions for Below Question :

In these questions a relationship between different elements is shown in the statements. The statements are followed by three conclusions. Choose the correct option.

Question : In the question below some statements are given followed by some conclusions. You have to take the given statements to be true even if they seem to be at variance from commonly known facts. Read all the conclusions and then decide which of the given conclusions logically follow the given statements disregarding commonly known facts.

Statements:

Some cow is deer

No deer is dog

Some dog is fox

Conclusions:

(I) no cow is dog

(II) some dog are deer

(III) some fox is dog

Solution:


Conclusions:

(I) no cow is dog

=> This is a possibility but not a definite conclusion. => not follows.

(II) some dog are deer => not follows

(III) some fox is dog

Some dog is fox => some fox is dog => follows.

Hence, only III follows.

QUESTION: 20

Directions for Below Question :

In these questions a relationship between different elements is shown in the statements. The statements are followed by three conclusions. Choose the correct option.

Question : C is the son of G. D is the only sister of C. A is father of B. A is married to G. How is B is related to D?

Solution:


Here, '+' represents 'male' and '-' represents 'female'.

QUESTION: 21

Directions for Below Question :

In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been marked with numbers. Against each blank five words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find out the appropriate word in each case.

Investors who expected 2018 to be yet another blockbuster year for stocks may have to __(1)__ their expectations. After a strong start to the year, since the beginning of February, stock markets around the world have __(2)__ a sharp correction. The U.S.’s decision to impose import tariffs on steel and aluminium was the latest development to __(3)__ a sense of uncertainty. As of Tuesday, the Sensex and Nifty are marginally down since the beginning of the year. While the poor state of health of public sector banks has added to the pain, market breadth __(4)__ a more broad-based decline. Notably, this correction comes after a record Bull Run that stocks enjoyed in 2017. While the Sensex advanced about 28% in 2017, the Nifty climbed 30%. Judging by the initial trading sessions of the Indian indices in March, markets look likely to keep investors on __(5)__ feet. After the sharp correction in February, many expected Indian stocks to __(6)__ to new highs, as in the case of previous corrections. But the Nifty and the Sensex, which traded sideways until Monday after their initial fall in February, __(7)__ their short-term downtrend on Tuesday. Whether they will break lower to experience further correction or consolidate for a while __(8)__ moving upwards is anyone’s guess. But it is no secret that investors have been willing to bid up the prices of Indian stocks far ahead of their fundamentals. Despite the absence of any strong rebound in corporate earnings, an __(9)__ economy and economic shocks such as demonetisation and the GST, investors have found enough reason to stay optimistic about Indian stocks. It is only natural that stock prices have __(10)__ to reflect, at least partially, the underlying risks.

Question : __(1)__

Solution:
QUESTION: 22

Directions for Below Question :

In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been marked with numbers. Against each blank five words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find out the appropriate word in each case.

Investors who expected 2018 to be yet another blockbuster year for stocks may have to __(1)__ their expectations. After a strong start to the year, since the beginning of February, stock markets around the world have __(2)__ a sharp correction. The U.S.’s decision to impose import tariffs on steel and aluminium was the latest development to __(3)__ a sense of uncertainty. As of Tuesday, the Sensex and Nifty are marginally down since the beginning of the year. While the poor state of health of public sector banks has added to the pain, market breadth __(4)__ a more broad-based decline. Notably, this correction comes after a record Bull Run that stocks enjoyed in 2017. While the Sensex advanced about 28% in 2017, the Nifty climbed 30%. Judging by the initial trading sessions of the Indian indices in March, markets look likely to keep investors on __(5)__ feet. After the sharp correction in February, many expected Indian stocks to __(6)__ to new highs, as in the case of previous corrections. But the Nifty and the Sensex, which traded sideways until Monday after their initial fall in February, __(7)__ their short-term downtrend on Tuesday. Whether they will break lower to experience further correction or consolidate for a while __(8)__ moving upwards is anyone’s guess. But it is no secret that investors have been willing to bid up the prices of Indian stocks far ahead of their fundamentals. Despite the absence of any strong rebound in corporate earnings, an __(9)__ economy and economic shocks such as demonetisation and the GST, investors have found enough reason to stay optimistic about Indian stocks. It is only natural that stock prices have __(10)__ to reflect, at least partially, the underlying risks.

Question : __(2)__

Solution:
QUESTION: 23

Directions for Below Question :

In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been marked with numbers. Against each blank five words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find out the appropriate word in each case.

Investors who expected 2018 to be yet another blockbuster year for stocks may have to __(1)__ their expectations. After a strong start to the year, since the beginning of February, stock markets around the world have __(2)__ a sharp correction. The U.S.’s decision to impose import tariffs on steel and aluminium was the latest development to __(3)__ a sense of uncertainty. As of Tuesday, the Sensex and Nifty are marginally down since the beginning of the year. While the poor state of health of public sector banks has added to the pain, market breadth __(4)__ a more broad-based decline. Notably, this correction comes after a record Bull Run that stocks enjoyed in 2017. While the Sensex advanced about 28% in 2017, the Nifty climbed 30%. Judging by the initial trading sessions of the Indian indices in March, markets look likely to keep investors on __(5)__ feet. After the sharp correction in February, many expected Indian stocks to __(6)__ to new highs, as in the case of previous corrections. But the Nifty and the Sensex, which traded sideways until Monday after their initial fall in February, __(7)__ their short-term downtrend on Tuesday. Whether they will break lower to experience further correction or consolidate for a while __(8)__ moving upwards is anyone’s guess. But it is no secret that investors have been willing to bid up the prices of Indian stocks far ahead of their fundamentals. Despite the absence of any strong rebound in corporate earnings, an __(9)__ economy and economic shocks such as demonetisation and the GST, investors have found enough reason to stay optimistic about Indian stocks. It is only natural that stock prices have __(10)__ to reflect, at least partially, the underlying risks.

Question : __(3)__

Solution:
QUESTION: 24

Directions for Below Question :

In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been marked with numbers. Against each blank five words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find out the appropriate word in each case.

Investors who expected 2018 to be yet another blockbuster year for stocks may have to __(1)__ their expectations. After a strong start to the year, since the beginning of February, stock markets around the world have __(2)__ a sharp correction. The U.S.’s decision to impose import tariffs on steel and aluminium was the latest development to __(3)__ a sense of uncertainty. As of Tuesday, the Sensex and Nifty are marginally down since the beginning of the year. While the poor state of health of public sector banks has added to the pain, market breadth __(4)__ a more broad-based decline. Notably, this correction comes after a record Bull Run that stocks enjoyed in 2017. While the Sensex advanced about 28% in 2017, the Nifty climbed 30%. Judging by the initial trading sessions of the Indian indices in March, markets look likely to keep investors on __(5)__ feet. After the sharp correction in February, many expected Indian stocks to __(6)__ to new highs, as in the case of previous corrections. But the Nifty and the Sensex, which traded sideways until Monday after their initial fall in February, __(7)__ their short-term downtrend on Tuesday. Whether they will break lower to experience further correction or consolidate for a while __(8)__ moving upwards is anyone’s guess. But it is no secret that investors have been willing to bid up the prices of Indian stocks far ahead of their fundamentals. Despite the absence of any strong rebound in corporate earnings, an __(9)__ economy and economic shocks such as demonetisation and the GST, investors have found enough reason to stay optimistic about Indian stocks. It is only natural that stock prices have __(10)__ to reflect, at least partially, the underlying risks.

Question : __(4)__

Solution:
QUESTION: 25

Directions for Below Question :

In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been marked with numbers. Against each blank five words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find out the appropriate word in each case.

Investors who expected 2018 to be yet another blockbuster year for stocks may have to __(1)__ their expectations. After a strong start to the year, since the beginning of February, stock markets around the world have __(2)__ a sharp correction. The U.S.’s decision to impose import tariffs on steel and aluminium was the latest development to __(3)__ a sense of uncertainty. As of Tuesday, the Sensex and Nifty are marginally down since the beginning of the year. While the poor state of health of public sector banks has added to the pain, market breadth __(4)__ a more broad-based decline. Notably, this correction comes after a record Bull Run that stocks enjoyed in 2017. While the Sensex advanced about 28% in 2017, the Nifty climbed 30%. Judging by the initial trading sessions of the Indian indices in March, markets look likely to keep investors on __(5)__ feet. After the sharp correction in February, many expected Indian stocks to __(6)__ to new highs, as in the case of previous corrections. But the Nifty and the Sensex, which traded sideways until Monday after their initial fall in February, __(7)__ their short-term downtrend on Tuesday. Whether they will break lower to experience further correction or consolidate for a while __(8)__ moving upwards is anyone’s guess. But it is no secret that investors have been willing to bid up the prices of Indian stocks far ahead of their fundamentals. Despite the absence of any strong rebound in corporate earnings, an __(9)__ economy and economic shocks such as demonetisation and the GST, investors have found enough reason to stay optimistic about Indian stocks. It is only natural that stock prices have __(10)__ to reflect, at least partially, the underlying risks.

Question : __(5)__

Solution:
QUESTION: 26

Directions for Below Question :

In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been marked with numbers. Against each blank five words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find out the appropriate word in each case.

Investors who expected 2018 to be yet another blockbuster year for stocks may have to __(1)__ their expectations. After a strong start to the year, since the beginning of February, stock markets around the world have __(2)__ a sharp correction. The U.S.’s decision to impose import tariffs on steel and aluminium was the latest development to __(3)__ a sense of uncertainty. As of Tuesday, the Sensex and Nifty are marginally down since the beginning of the year. While the poor state of health of public sector banks has added to the pain, market breadth __(4)__ a more broad-based decline. Notably, this correction comes after a record Bull Run that stocks enjoyed in 2017. While the Sensex advanced about 28% in 2017, the Nifty climbed 30%. Judging by the initial trading sessions of the Indian indices in March, markets look likely to keep investors on __(5)__ feet. After the sharp correction in February, many expected Indian stocks to __(6)__ to new highs, as in the case of previous corrections. But the Nifty and the Sensex, which traded sideways until Monday after their initial fall in February, __(7)__ their short-term downtrend on Tuesday. Whether they will break lower to experience further correction or consolidate for a while __(8)__ moving upwards is anyone’s guess. But it is no secret that investors have been willing to bid up the prices of Indian stocks far ahead of their fundamentals. Despite the absence of any strong rebound in corporate earnings, an __(9)__ economy and economic shocks such as demonetisation and the GST, investors have found enough reason to stay optimistic about Indian stocks. It is only natural that stock prices have __(10)__ to reflect, at least partially, the underlying risks.

Question : __(6)__

Solution:
QUESTION: 27

Directions for Below Question :

In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been marked with numbers. Against each blank five words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find out the appropriate word in each case.

Investors who expected 2018 to be yet another blockbuster year for stocks may have to __(1)__ their expectations. After a strong start to the year, since the beginning of February, stock markets around the world have __(2)__ a sharp correction. The U.S.’s decision to impose import tariffs on steel and aluminium was the latest development to __(3)__ a sense of uncertainty. As of Tuesday, the Sensex and Nifty are marginally down since the beginning of the year. While the poor state of health of public sector banks has added to the pain, market breadth __(4)__ a more broad-based decline. Notably, this correction comes after a record Bull Run that stocks enjoyed in 2017. While the Sensex advanced about 28% in 2017, the Nifty climbed 30%. Judging by the initial trading sessions of the Indian indices in March, markets look likely to keep investors on __(5)__ feet. After the sharp correction in February, many expected Indian stocks to __(6)__ to new highs, as in the case of previous corrections. But the Nifty and the Sensex, which traded sideways until Monday after their initial fall in February, __(7)__ their short-term downtrend on Tuesday. Whether they will break lower to experience further correction or consolidate for a while __(8)__ moving upwards is anyone’s guess. But it is no secret that investors have been willing to bid up the prices of Indian stocks far ahead of their fundamentals. Despite the absence of any strong rebound in corporate earnings, an __(9)__ economy and economic shocks such as demonetisation and the GST, investors have found enough reason to stay optimistic about Indian stocks. It is only natural that stock prices have __(10)__ to reflect, at least partially, the underlying risks.

Question : __(7)__

Solution:
QUESTION: 28

Directions for Below Question :

In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been marked with numbers. Against each blank five words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find out the appropriate word in each case.

Investors who expected 2018 to be yet another blockbuster year for stocks may have to __(1)__ their expectations. After a strong start to the year, since the beginning of February, stock markets around the world have __(2)__ a sharp correction. The U.S.’s decision to impose import tariffs on steel and aluminium was the latest development to __(3)__ a sense of uncertainty. As of Tuesday, the Sensex and Nifty are marginally down since the beginning of the year. While the poor state of health of public sector banks has added to the pain, market breadth __(4)__ a more broad-based decline. Notably, this correction comes after a record Bull Run that stocks enjoyed in 2017. While the Sensex advanced about 28% in 2017, the Nifty climbed 30%. Judging by the initial trading sessions of the Indian indices in March, markets look likely to keep investors on __(5)__ feet. After the sharp correction in February, many expected Indian stocks to __(6)__ to new highs, as in the case of previous corrections. But the Nifty and the Sensex, which traded sideways until Monday after their initial fall in February, __(7)__ their short-term downtrend on Tuesday. Whether they will break lower to experience further correction or consolidate for a while __(8)__ moving upwards is anyone’s guess. But it is no secret that investors have been willing to bid up the prices of Indian stocks far ahead of their fundamentals. Despite the absence of any strong rebound in corporate earnings, an __(9)__ economy and economic shocks such as demonetisation and the GST, investors have found enough reason to stay optimistic about Indian stocks. It is only natural that stock prices have __(10)__ to reflect, at least partially, the underlying risks.

Question : __(8)__

Solution:
QUESTION: 29

Directions for Below Question :

In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been marked with numbers. Against each blank five words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find out the appropriate word in each case.

Investors who expected 2018 to be yet another blockbuster year for stocks may have to __(1)__ their expectations. After a strong start to the year, since the beginning of February, stock markets around the world have __(2)__ a sharp correction. The U.S.’s decision to impose import tariffs on steel and aluminium was the latest development to __(3)__ a sense of uncertainty. As of Tuesday, the Sensex and Nifty are marginally down since the beginning of the year. While the poor state of health of public sector banks has added to the pain, market breadth __(4)__ a more broad-based decline. Notably, this correction comes after a record Bull Run that stocks enjoyed in 2017. While the Sensex advanced about 28% in 2017, the Nifty climbed 30%. Judging by the initial trading sessions of the Indian indices in March, markets look likely to keep investors on __(5)__ feet. After the sharp correction in February, many expected Indian stocks to __(6)__ to new highs, as in the case of previous corrections. But the Nifty and the Sensex, which traded sideways until Monday after their initial fall in February, __(7)__ their short-term downtrend on Tuesday. Whether they will break lower to experience further correction or consolidate for a while __(8)__ moving upwards is anyone’s guess. But it is no secret that investors have been willing to bid up the prices of Indian stocks far ahead of their fundamentals. Despite the absence of any strong rebound in corporate earnings, an __(9)__ economy and economic shocks such as demonetisation and the GST, investors have found enough reason to stay optimistic about Indian stocks. It is only natural that stock prices have __(10)__ to reflect, at least partially, the underlying risks.

Question : __(9)__

Solution:
QUESTION: 30

Directions for Below Question :

In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been marked with numbers. Against each blank five words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find out the appropriate word in each case.

Investors who expected 2018 to be yet another blockbuster year for stocks may have to __(1)__ their expectations. After a strong start to the year, since the beginning of February, stock markets around the world have __(2)__ a sharp correction. The U.S.’s decision to impose import tariffs on steel and aluminium was the latest development to __(3)__ a sense of uncertainty. As of Tuesday, the Sensex and Nifty are marginally down since the beginning of the year. While the poor state of health of public sector banks has added to the pain, market breadth __(4)__ a more broad-based decline. Notably, this correction comes after a record Bull Run that stocks enjoyed in 2017. While the Sensex advanced about 28% in 2017, the Nifty climbed 30%. Judging by the initial trading sessions of the Indian indices in March, markets look likely to keep investors on __(5)__ feet. After the sharp correction in February, many expected Indian stocks to __(6)__ to new highs, as in the case of previous corrections. But the Nifty and the Sensex, which traded sideways until Monday after their initial fall in February, __(7)__ their short-term downtrend on Tuesday. Whether they will break lower to experience further correction or consolidate for a while __(8)__ moving upwards is anyone’s guess. But it is no secret that investors have been willing to bid up the prices of Indian stocks far ahead of their fundamentals. Despite the absence of any strong rebound in corporate earnings, an __(9)__ economy and economic shocks such as demonetisation and the GST, investors have found enough reason to stay optimistic about Indian stocks. It is only natural that stock prices have __(10)__ to reflect, at least partially, the underlying risks.

Question : __(10)__

Solution:
QUESTION: 31

Directions for Below Question :

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

Brazil does not look like an economy on the verge of over heating. The IMF expects it to shrink by 3% this year, and 1% next. (The country has not suffered two straight years of contractions since 1930-31). 1.2 million jobs vanished in September, unemployment has reached 7.6 % up from 4.9% a year ago. Those still in work are finding it harder to make ends meet. Real (i.e. adjusted for inflation) wages are down 4.3% year-on-year. Despite the weak economy, inflation is nudging double digits. The Central Bank recently conceded that it will miss its 4.5% inflation target next year. Markets don’t expect it to be met before 2019. If fast-rising prices are simply a passing effect of the Brazilian real recent fall, which has pushed up the cost of imported goods, then they are not too troubling.  But some economists have a more alarming explanation: that Brazil’s budgetary woes are so extreme that they have undermined the Central Bank’s power to fight inflation - a phenomenon known as fiscal dominance.

The immediate cause of Brazil’s troubles are external: the weak world economy, and China’s faltering appetite for oil and iron ore in particular, have enfeebled both exports and investment. But much of the country’s pain is self-inflicted. The President could have used the commodity windfall from the first term in 2011-14 to trim the bloated state, which swallows 36% of GDP in taxes despite offering few decent public services in return. Instead handouts, subsidized loans and costly tax breaks for favoured industries were splurgedon. These fuelled a consumption boom, and with it inflation, while hiding the economy’s underlying weaknesses: thick red tape, indispensable taxes, an unskilled workforce and shoddy infrastructure. The government’s profligacyalso left the public finances in tatters. The primary balance (before interest payments) went from a surplus of 3.1% of GDP in 2011 to a forecast deficit of 0.9% this year. In the same period public debt has swollen to 65% of GDP, an increase of 13 percentage points. That is lower than in many rich countries, but Brazil pays much higher interest on its debt. It will spend 8.5% GDP this year servicing it, more than any other big country. In September it lost its investment-grade credit rating.

Stagflation of the sort Brazil is experiencing presents central bankers with a dilemma. Raising interest rates to quell inflation might push the economy deeper into recession; lowering them to foster growth might send inflation spiraling out of control. Between October last year and July this year, the country’s rate-setters seemed to prioritize price stability, raising the benchmark SELIC rate by three percentage points, to 14.25% where it remains.

The alluring real rates of almost 5% ought to have made the Brazilian Real attractive to investors. Instead the currency has weakened and rising inflation despite higher interest rates, combined with a doubling of debt-servicing costs in the past three years has led to the diagnosis of fiscal dominance. The cost of servicing Brazil’s debt has become so high, that rates have to be set to keep it manageable rather than to rein in prices. That, in turn, leads a vicious circle of a falling currency and rising inflation. There is no question, however, that Brazilian monetary policy is at best hobbled. State-owned banks have extended nearly half the country’s credit at low, subdisidised rates that bear little relation to the SELIC - at a cost of more than 40 billion Rs ($10 billion) a year to the tax payer. As private banks have cut lending in the past year, public ones have continued to expand their loan books.  All this hampers monetary policy and if left unchecked, this spurt of lending may itself threaten price stability.

Question : Choose the word which is most nearly the same in meaning to the word ‘CONCEDED’ given in bold as used in the passage.

Solution:
QUESTION: 32

Directions for Below Question :

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

Brazil does not look like an economy on the verge of over heating. The IMF expects it to shrink by 3% this year, and 1% next. (The country has not suffered two straight years of contractions since 1930-31). 1.2 million jobs vanished in September, unemployment has reached 7.6 % up from 4.9% a year ago. Those still in work are finding it harder to make ends meet. Real (i.e. adjusted for inflation) wages are down 4.3% year-on-year. Despite the weak economy, inflation is nudging double digits. The Central Bank recently conceded that it will miss its 4.5% inflation target next year. Markets don’t expect it to be met before 2019. If fast-rising prices are simply a passing effect of the Brazilian real recent fall, which has pushed up the cost of imported goods, then they are not too troubling.  But some economists have a more alarming explanation: that Brazil’s budgetary woes are so extreme that they have undermined the Central Bank’s power to fight inflation - a phenomenon known as fiscal dominance.

The immediate cause of Brazil’s troubles are external: the weak world economy, and China’s faltering appetite for oil and iron ore in particular, have enfeebled both exports and investment. But much of the country’s pain is self-inflicted. The President could have used the commodity windfall from the first term in 2011-14 to trim the bloated state, which swallows 36% of GDP in taxes despite offering few decent public services in return. Instead handouts, subsidized loans and costly tax breaks for favoured industries were splurgedon. These fuelled a consumption boom, and with it inflation, while hiding the economy’s underlying weaknesses: thick red tape, indispensable taxes, an unskilled workforce and shoddy infrastructure. The government’s profligacyalso left the public finances in tatters. The primary balance (before interest payments) went from a surplus of 3.1% of GDP in 2011 to a forecast deficit of 0.9% this year. In the same period public debt has swollen to 65% of GDP, an increase of 13 percentage points. That is lower than in many rich countries, but Brazil pays much higher interest on its debt. It will spend 8.5% GDP this year servicing it, more than any other big country. In September it lost its investment-grade credit rating.

Stagflation of the sort Brazil is experiencing presents central bankers with a dilemma. Raising interest rates to quell inflation might push the economy deeper into recession; lowering them to foster growth might send inflation spiraling out of control. Between October last year and July this year, the country’s rate-setters seemed to prioritize price stability, raising the benchmark SELIC rate by three percentage points, to 14.25% where it remains.

The alluring real rates of almost 5% ought to have made the Brazilian Real attractive to investors. Instead the currency has weakened and rising inflation despite higher interest rates, combined with a doubling of debt-servicing costs in the past three years has led to the diagnosis of fiscal dominance. The cost of servicing Brazil’s debt has become so high, that rates have to be set to keep it manageable rather than to rein in prices. That, in turn, leads a vicious circle of a falling currency and rising inflation. There is no question, however, that Brazilian monetary policy is at best hobbled. State-owned banks have extended nearly half the country’s credit at low, subdisidised rates that bear little relation to the SELIC - at a cost of more than 40 billion Rs ($10 billion) a year to the tax payer. As private banks have cut lending in the past year, public ones have continued to expand their loan books.  All this hampers monetary policy and if left unchecked, this spurt of lending may itself threaten price stability.

Question : What do the statements regarding Brazil’s GDP, quoted in the passage convey?

Solution:
QUESTION: 33

Directions for Below Question :

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

Brazil does not look like an economy on the verge of over heating. The IMF expects it to shrink by 3% this year, and 1% next. (The country has not suffered two straight years of contractions since 1930-31). 1.2 million jobs vanished in September, unemployment has reached 7.6 % up from 4.9% a year ago. Those still in work are finding it harder to make ends meet. Real (i.e. adjusted for inflation) wages are down 4.3% year-on-year. Despite the weak economy, inflation is nudging double digits. The Central Bank recently conceded that it will miss its 4.5% inflation target next year. Markets don’t expect it to be met before 2019. If fast-rising prices are simply a passing effect of the Brazilian real recent fall, which has pushed up the cost of imported goods, then they are not too troubling.  But some economists have a more alarming explanation: that Brazil’s budgetary woes are so extreme that they have undermined the Central Bank’s power to fight inflation - a phenomenon known as fiscal dominance.

The immediate cause of Brazil’s troubles are external: the weak world economy, and China’s faltering appetite for oil and iron ore in particular, have enfeebled both exports and investment. But much of the country’s pain is self-inflicted. The President could have used the commodity windfall from the first term in 2011-14 to trim the bloated state, which swallows 36% of GDP in taxes despite offering few decent public services in return. Instead handouts, subsidized loans and costly tax breaks for favoured industries were splurgedon. These fuelled a consumption boom, and with it inflation, while hiding the economy’s underlying weaknesses: thick red tape, indispensable taxes, an unskilled workforce and shoddy infrastructure. The government’s profligacyalso left the public finances in tatters. The primary balance (before interest payments) went from a surplus of 3.1% of GDP in 2011 to a forecast deficit of 0.9% this year. In the same period public debt has swollen to 65% of GDP, an increase of 13 percentage points. That is lower than in many rich countries, but Brazil pays much higher interest on its debt. It will spend 8.5% GDP this year servicing it, more than any other big country. In September it lost its investment-grade credit rating.

Stagflation of the sort Brazil is experiencing presents central bankers with a dilemma. Raising interest rates to quell inflation might push the economy deeper into recession; lowering them to foster growth might send inflation spiraling out of control. Between October last year and July this year, the country’s rate-setters seemed to prioritize price stability, raising the benchmark SELIC rate by three percentage points, to 14.25% where it remains.

The alluring real rates of almost 5% ought to have made the Brazilian Real attractive to investors. Instead the currency has weakened and rising inflation despite higher interest rates, combined with a doubling of debt-servicing costs in the past three years has led to the diagnosis of fiscal dominance. The cost of servicing Brazil’s debt has become so high, that rates have to be set to keep it manageable rather than to rein in prices. That, in turn, leads a vicious circle of a falling currency and rising inflation. There is no question, however, that Brazilian monetary policy is at best hobbled. State-owned banks have extended nearly half the country’s credit at low, subdisidised rates that bear little relation to the SELIC - at a cost of more than 40 billion Rs ($10 billion) a year to the tax payer. As private banks have cut lending in the past year, public ones have continued to expand their loan books.  All this hampers monetary policy and if left unchecked, this spurt of lending may itself threaten price stability.

Question : Which of the following is true in the context of the passage?

Solution:
QUESTION: 34

Directions for Below Question :

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

Brazil does not look like an economy on the verge of over heating. The IMF expects it to shrink by 3% this year, and 1% next. (The country has not suffered two straight years of contractions since 1930-31). 1.2 million jobs vanished in September, unemployment has reached 7.6 % up from 4.9% a year ago. Those still in work are finding it harder to make ends meet. Real (i.e. adjusted for inflation) wages are down 4.3% year-on-year. Despite the weak economy, inflation is nudging double digits. The Central Bank recently conceded that it will miss its 4.5% inflation target next year. Markets don’t expect it to be met before 2019. If fast-rising prices are simply a passing effect of the Brazilian real recent fall, which has pushed up the cost of imported goods, then they are not too troubling.  But some economists have a more alarming explanation: that Brazil’s budgetary woes are so extreme that they have undermined the Central Bank’s power to fight inflation - a phenomenon known as fiscal dominance.

The immediate cause of Brazil’s troubles are external: the weak world economy, and China’s faltering appetite for oil and iron ore in particular, have enfeebled both exports and investment. But much of the country’s pain is self-inflicted. The President could have used the commodity windfall from the first term in 2011-14 to trim the bloated state, which swallows 36% of GDP in taxes despite offering few decent public services in return. Instead handouts, subsidized loans and costly tax breaks for favoured industries were splurgedon. These fuelled a consumption boom, and with it inflation, while hiding the economy’s underlying weaknesses: thick red tape, indispensable taxes, an unskilled workforce and shoddy infrastructure. The government’s profligacyalso left the public finances in tatters. The primary balance (before interest payments) went from a surplus of 3.1% of GDP in 2011 to a forecast deficit of 0.9% this year. In the same period public debt has swollen to 65% of GDP, an increase of 13 percentage points. That is lower than in many rich countries, but Brazil pays much higher interest on its debt. It will spend 8.5% GDP this year servicing it, more than any other big country. In September it lost its investment-grade credit rating.

Stagflation of the sort Brazil is experiencing presents central bankers with a dilemma. Raising interest rates to quell inflation might push the economy deeper into recession; lowering them to foster growth might send inflation spiraling out of control. Between October last year and July this year, the country’s rate-setters seemed to prioritize price stability, raising the benchmark SELIC rate by three percentage points, to 14.25% where it remains.

The alluring real rates of almost 5% ought to have made the Brazilian Real attractive to investors. Instead the currency has weakened and rising inflation despite higher interest rates, combined with a doubling of debt-servicing costs in the past three years has led to the diagnosis of fiscal dominance. The cost of servicing Brazil’s debt has become so high, that rates have to be set to keep it manageable rather than to rein in prices. That, in turn, leads a vicious circle of a falling currency and rising inflation. There is no question, however, that Brazilian monetary policy is at best hobbled. State-owned banks have extended nearly half the country’s credit at low, subdisidised rates that bear little relation to the SELIC - at a cost of more than 40 billion Rs ($10 billion) a year to the tax payer. As private banks have cut lending in the past year, public ones have continued to expand their loan books.  All this hampers monetary policy and if left unchecked, this spurt of lending may itself threaten price stability.

Question : According to the passage which of the following is/are factor/(s) that has/have impacted Brazil’s economy?

(A) Weakening of Brazil’s currency

(B) Drop in demand for oil

(C) Economic sanctions against it by the IMF

Solution:
QUESTION: 35

Directions for Below Question :

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

Brazil does not look like an economy on the verge of over heating. The IMF expects it to shrink by 3% this year, and 1% next. (The country has not suffered two straight years of contractions since 1930-31). 1.2 million jobs vanished in September, unemployment has reached 7.6 % up from 4.9% a year ago. Those still in work are finding it harder to make ends meet. Real (i.e. adjusted for inflation) wages are down 4.3% year-on-year. Despite the weak economy, inflation is nudging double digits. The Central Bank recently conceded that it will miss its 4.5% inflation target next year. Markets don’t expect it to be met before 2019. If fast-rising prices are simply a passing effect of the Brazilian real recent fall, which has pushed up the cost of imported goods, then they are not too troubling.  But some economists have a more alarming explanation: that Brazil’s budgetary woes are so extreme that they have undermined the Central Bank’s power to fight inflation - a phenomenon known as fiscal dominance.

The immediate cause of Brazil’s troubles are external: the weak world economy, and China’s faltering appetite for oil and iron ore in particular, have enfeebled both exports and investment. But much of the country’s pain is self-inflicted. The President could have used the commodity windfall from the first term in 2011-14 to trim the bloated state, which swallows 36% of GDP in taxes despite offering few decent public services in return. Instead handouts, subsidized loans and costly tax breaks for favoured industries were splurgedon. These fuelled a consumption boom, and with it inflation, while hiding the economy’s underlying weaknesses: thick red tape, indispensable taxes, an unskilled workforce and shoddy infrastructure. The government’s profligacyalso left the public finances in tatters. The primary balance (before interest payments) went from a surplus of 3.1% of GDP in 2011 to a forecast deficit of 0.9% this year. In the same period public debt has swollen to 65% of GDP, an increase of 13 percentage points. That is lower than in many rich countries, but Brazil pays much higher interest on its debt. It will spend 8.5% GDP this year servicing it, more than any other big country. In September it lost its investment-grade credit rating.

Stagflation of the sort Brazil is experiencing presents central bankers with a dilemma. Raising interest rates to quell inflation might push the economy deeper into recession; lowering them to foster growth might send inflation spiraling out of control. Between October last year and July this year, the country’s rate-setters seemed to prioritize price stability, raising the benchmark SELIC rate by three percentage points, to 14.25% where it remains.

The alluring real rates of almost 5% ought to have made the Brazilian Real attractive to investors. Instead the currency has weakened and rising inflation despite higher interest rates, combined with a doubling of debt-servicing costs in the past three years has led to the diagnosis of fiscal dominance. The cost of servicing Brazil’s debt has become so high, that rates have to be set to keep it manageable rather than to rein in prices. That, in turn, leads a vicious circle of a falling currency and rising inflation. There is no question, however, that Brazilian monetary policy is at best hobbled. State-owned banks have extended nearly half the country’s credit at low, subdisidised rates that bear little relation to the SELIC - at a cost of more than 40 billion Rs ($10 billion) a year to the tax payer. As private banks have cut lending in the past year, public ones have continued to expand their loan books.  All this hampers monetary policy and if left unchecked, this spurt of lending may itself threaten price stability.

Question : Which of the following is the central idea of the passage?

Solution:
QUESTION: 36

Directions for Below Question :

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

Brazil does not look like an economy on the verge of over heating. The IMF expects it to shrink by 3% this year, and 1% next. (The country has not suffered two straight years of contractions since 1930-31). 1.2 million jobs vanished in September, unemployment has reached 7.6 % up from 4.9% a year ago. Those still in work are finding it harder to make ends meet. Real (i.e. adjusted for inflation) wages are down 4.3% year-on-year. Despite the weak economy, inflation is nudging double digits. The Central Bank recently conceded that it will miss its 4.5% inflation target next year. Markets don’t expect it to be met before 2019. If fast-rising prices are simply a passing effect of the Brazilian real recent fall, which has pushed up the cost of imported goods, then they are not too troubling.  But some economists have a more alarming explanation: that Brazil’s budgetary woes are so extreme that they have undermined the Central Bank’s power to fight inflation - a phenomenon known as fiscal dominance.

The immediate cause of Brazil’s troubles are external: the weak world economy, and China’s faltering appetite for oil and iron ore in particular, have enfeebled both exports and investment. But much of the country’s pain is self-inflicted. The President could have used the commodity windfall from the first term in 2011-14 to trim the bloated state, which swallows 36% of GDP in taxes despite offering few decent public services in return. Instead handouts, subsidized loans and costly tax breaks for favoured industries were splurgedon. These fuelled a consumption boom, and with it inflation, while hiding the economy’s underlying weaknesses: thick red tape, indispensable taxes, an unskilled workforce and shoddy infrastructure. The government’s profligacyalso left the public finances in tatters. The primary balance (before interest payments) went from a surplus of 3.1% of GDP in 2011 to a forecast deficit of 0.9% this year. In the same period public debt has swollen to 65% of GDP, an increase of 13 percentage points. That is lower than in many rich countries, but Brazil pays much higher interest on its debt. It will spend 8.5% GDP this year servicing it, more than any other big country. In September it lost its investment-grade credit rating.

Stagflation of the sort Brazil is experiencing presents central bankers with a dilemma. Raising interest rates to quell inflation might push the economy deeper into recession; lowering them to foster growth might send inflation spiraling out of control. Between October last year and July this year, the country’s rate-setters seemed to prioritize price stability, raising the benchmark SELIC rate by three percentage points, to 14.25% where it remains.

The alluring real rates of almost 5% ought to have made the Brazilian Real attractive to investors. Instead the currency has weakened and rising inflation despite higher interest rates, combined with a doubling of debt-servicing costs in the past three years has led to the diagnosis of fiscal dominance. The cost of servicing Brazil’s debt has become so high, that rates have to be set to keep it manageable rather than to rein in prices. That, in turn, leads a vicious circle of a falling currency and rising inflation. There is no question, however, that Brazilian monetary policy is at best hobbled. State-owned banks have extended nearly half the country’s credit at low, subdisidised rates that bear little relation to the SELIC - at a cost of more than 40 billion Rs ($10 billion) a year to the tax payer. As private banks have cut lending in the past year, public ones have continued to expand their loan books.  All this hampers monetary policy and if left unchecked, this spurt of lending may itself threaten price stability.

Question : Which of the following describes the global perception of Brazil’s economy?

Solution:
QUESTION: 37

Directions for Below Question :

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

Brazil does not look like an economy on the verge of over heating. The IMF expects it to shrink by 3% this year, and 1% next. (The country has not suffered two straight years of contractions since 1930-31). 1.2 million jobs vanished in September, unemployment has reached 7.6 % up from 4.9% a year ago. Those still in work are finding it harder to make ends meet. Real (i.e. adjusted for inflation) wages are down 4.3% year-on-year. Despite the weak economy, inflation is nudging double digits. The Central Bank recently conceded that it will miss its 4.5% inflation target next year. Markets don’t expect it to be met before 2019. If fast-rising prices are simply a passing effect of the Brazilian real recent fall, which has pushed up the cost of imported goods, then they are not too troubling.  But some economists have a more alarming explanation: that Brazil’s budgetary woes are so extreme that they have undermined the Central Bank’s power to fight inflation - a phenomenon known as fiscal dominance.

The immediate cause of Brazil’s troubles are external: the weak world economy, and China’s faltering appetite for oil and iron ore in particular, have enfeebled both exports and investment. But much of the country’s pain is self-inflicted. The President could have used the commodity windfall from the first term in 2011-14 to trim the bloated state, which swallows 36% of GDP in taxes despite offering few decent public services in return. Instead handouts, subsidized loans and costly tax breaks for favoured industries were splurgedon. These fuelled a consumption boom, and with it inflation, while hiding the economy’s underlying weaknesses: thick red tape, indispensable taxes, an unskilled workforce and shoddy infrastructure. The government’s profligacyalso left the public finances in tatters. The primary balance (before interest payments) went from a surplus of 3.1% of GDP in 2011 to a forecast deficit of 0.9% this year. In the same period public debt has swollen to 65% of GDP, an increase of 13 percentage points. That is lower than in many rich countries, but Brazil pays much higher interest on its debt. It will spend 8.5% GDP this year servicing it, more than any other big country. In September it lost its investment-grade credit rating.

Stagflation of the sort Brazil is experiencing presents central bankers with a dilemma. Raising interest rates to quell inflation might push the economy deeper into recession; lowering them to foster growth might send inflation spiraling out of control. Between October last year and July this year, the country’s rate-setters seemed to prioritize price stability, raising the benchmark SELIC rate by three percentage points, to 14.25% where it remains.

The alluring real rates of almost 5% ought to have made the Brazilian Real attractive to investors. Instead the currency has weakened and rising inflation despite higher interest rates, combined with a doubling of debt-servicing costs in the past three years has led to the diagnosis of fiscal dominance. The cost of servicing Brazil’s debt has become so high, that rates have to be set to keep it manageable rather than to rein in prices. That, in turn, leads a vicious circle of a falling currency and rising inflation. There is no question, however, that Brazilian monetary policy is at best hobbled. State-owned banks have extended nearly half the country’s credit at low, subdisidised rates that bear little relation to the SELIC - at a cost of more than 40 billion Rs ($10 billion) a year to the tax payer. As private banks have cut lending in the past year, public ones have continued to expand their loan books.  All this hampers monetary policy and if left unchecked, this spurt of lending may itself threaten price stability.

Question : Choose the word which is most nearly the same in meaning to the word ‘REIN’ given in bold as used in the passage.

Solution:
QUESTION: 38

Directions for Below Question :

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

Brazil does not look like an economy on the verge of over heating. The IMF expects it to shrink by 3% this year, and 1% next. (The country has not suffered two straight years of contractions since 1930-31). 1.2 million jobs vanished in September, unemployment has reached 7.6 % up from 4.9% a year ago. Those still in work are finding it harder to make ends meet. Real (i.e. adjusted for inflation) wages are down 4.3% year-on-year. Despite the weak economy, inflation is nudging double digits. The Central Bank recently conceded that it will miss its 4.5% inflation target next year. Markets don’t expect it to be met before 2019. If fast-rising prices are simply a passing effect of the Brazilian real recent fall, which has pushed up the cost of imported goods, then they are not too troubling.  But some economists have a more alarming explanation: that Brazil’s budgetary woes are so extreme that they have undermined the Central Bank’s power to fight inflation - a phenomenon known as fiscal dominance.

The immediate cause of Brazil’s troubles are external: the weak world economy, and China’s faltering appetite for oil and iron ore in particular, have enfeebled both exports and investment. But much of the country’s pain is self-inflicted. The President could have used the commodity windfall from the first term in 2011-14 to trim the bloated state, which swallows 36% of GDP in taxes despite offering few decent public services in return. Instead handouts, subsidized loans and costly tax breaks for favoured industries were splurgedon. These fuelled a consumption boom, and with it inflation, while hiding the economy’s underlying weaknesses: thick red tape, indispensable taxes, an unskilled workforce and shoddy infrastructure. The government’s profligacyalso left the public finances in tatters. The primary balance (before interest payments) went from a surplus of 3.1% of GDP in 2011 to a forecast deficit of 0.9% this year. In the same period public debt has swollen to 65% of GDP, an increase of 13 percentage points. That is lower than in many rich countries, but Brazil pays much higher interest on its debt. It will spend 8.5% GDP this year servicing it, more than any other big country. In September it lost its investment-grade credit rating.

Stagflation of the sort Brazil is experiencing presents central bankers with a dilemma. Raising interest rates to quell inflation might push the economy deeper into recession; lowering them to foster growth might send inflation spiraling out of control. Between October last year and July this year, the country’s rate-setters seemed to prioritize price stability, raising the benchmark SELIC rate by three percentage points, to 14.25% where it remains.

The alluring real rates of almost 5% ought to have made the Brazilian Real attractive to investors. Instead the currency has weakened and rising inflation despite higher interest rates, combined with a doubling of debt-servicing costs in the past three years has led to the diagnosis of fiscal dominance. The cost of servicing Brazil’s debt has become so high, that rates have to be set to keep it manageable rather than to rein in prices. That, in turn, leads a vicious circle of a falling currency and rising inflation. There is no question, however, that Brazilian monetary policy is at best hobbled. State-owned banks have extended nearly half the country’s credit at low, subdisidised rates that bear little relation to the SELIC - at a cost of more than 40 billion Rs ($10 billion) a year to the tax payer. As private banks have cut lending in the past year, public ones have continued to expand their loan books.  All this hampers monetary policy and if left unchecked, this spurt of lending may itself threaten price stability.

Question : Choose the word which is most opposite in meaning to the word ‘SPURT’ given in bold as used in the passage.

Solution:
QUESTION: 39

Directions for Below Question :

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

Brazil does not look like an economy on the verge of over heating. The IMF expects it to shrink by 3% this year, and 1% next. (The country has not suffered two straight years of contractions since 1930-31). 1.2 million jobs vanished in September, unemployment has reached 7.6 % up from 4.9% a year ago. Those still in work are finding it harder to make ends meet. Real (i.e. adjusted for inflation) wages are down 4.3% year-on-year. Despite the weak economy, inflation is nudging double digits. The Central Bank recently conceded that it will miss its 4.5% inflation target next year. Markets don’t expect it to be met before 2019. If fast-rising prices are simply a passing effect of the Brazilian real recent fall, which has pushed up the cost of imported goods, then they are not too troubling.  But some economists have a more alarming explanation: that Brazil’s budgetary woes are so extreme that they have undermined the Central Bank’s power to fight inflation - a phenomenon known as fiscal dominance.

The immediate cause of Brazil’s troubles are external: the weak world economy, and China’s faltering appetite for oil and iron ore in particular, have enfeebled both exports and investment. But much of the country’s pain is self-inflicted. The President could have used the commodity windfall from the first term in 2011-14 to trim the bloated state, which swallows 36% of GDP in taxes despite offering few decent public services in return. Instead handouts, subsidized loans and costly tax breaks for favoured industries were splurgedon. These fuelled a consumption boom, and with it inflation, while hiding the economy’s underlying weaknesses: thick red tape, indispensable taxes, an unskilled workforce and shoddy infrastructure. The government’s profligacyalso left the public finances in tatters. The primary balance (before interest payments) went from a surplus of 3.1% of GDP in 2011 to a forecast deficit of 0.9% this year. In the same period public debt has swollen to 65% of GDP, an increase of 13 percentage points. That is lower than in many rich countries, but Brazil pays much higher interest on its debt. It will spend 8.5% GDP this year servicing it, more than any other big country. In September it lost its investment-grade credit rating.

Stagflation of the sort Brazil is experiencing presents central bankers with a dilemma. Raising interest rates to quell inflation might push the economy deeper into recession; lowering them to foster growth might send inflation spiraling out of control. Between October last year and July this year, the country’s rate-setters seemed to prioritize price stability, raising the benchmark SELIC rate by three percentage points, to 14.25% where it remains.

The alluring real rates of almost 5% ought to have made the Brazilian Real attractive to investors. Instead the currency has weakened and rising inflation despite higher interest rates, combined with a doubling of debt-servicing costs in the past three years has led to the diagnosis of fiscal dominance. The cost of servicing Brazil’s debt has become so high, that rates have to be set to keep it manageable rather than to rein in prices. That, in turn, leads a vicious circle of a falling currency and rising inflation. There is no question, however, that Brazilian monetary policy is at best hobbled. State-owned banks have extended nearly half the country’s credit at low, subdisidised rates that bear little relation to the SELIC - at a cost of more than 40 billion Rs ($10 billion) a year to the tax payer. As private banks have cut lending in the past year, public ones have continued to expand their loan books.  All this hampers monetary policy and if left unchecked, this spurt of lending may itself threaten price stability.

Question : Which of the following best describes the author’s view of Brazil’s Banks?

Solution:
QUESTION: 40

Directions for Below Question :

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

Brazil does not look like an economy on the verge of over heating. The IMF expects it to shrink by 3% this year, and 1% next. (The country has not suffered two straight years of contractions since 1930-31). 1.2 million jobs vanished in September, unemployment has reached 7.6 % up from 4.9% a year ago. Those still in work are finding it harder to make ends meet. Real (i.e. adjusted for inflation) wages are down 4.3% year-on-year. Despite the weak economy, inflation is nudging double digits. The Central Bank recently conceded that it will miss its 4.5% inflation target next year. Markets don’t expect it to be met before 2019. If fast-rising prices are simply a passing effect of the Brazilian real recent fall, which has pushed up the cost of imported goods, then they are not too troubling.  But some economists have a more alarming explanation: that Brazil’s budgetary woes are so extreme that they have undermined the Central Bank’s power to fight inflation - a phenomenon known as fiscal dominance.

The immediate cause of Brazil’s troubles are external: the weak world economy, and China’s faltering appetite for oil and iron ore in particular, have enfeebled both exports and investment. But much of the country’s pain is self-inflicted. The President could have used the commodity windfall from the first term in 2011-14 to trim the bloated state, which swallows 36% of GDP in taxes despite offering few decent public services in return. Instead handouts, subsidized loans and costly tax breaks for favoured industries were splurgedon. These fuelled a consumption boom, and with it inflation, while hiding the economy’s underlying weaknesses: thick red tape, indispensable taxes, an unskilled workforce and shoddy infrastructure. The government’s profligacyalso left the public finances in tatters. The primary balance (before interest payments) went from a surplus of 3.1% of GDP in 2011 to a forecast deficit of 0.9% this year. In the same period public debt has swollen to 65% of GDP, an increase of 13 percentage points. That is lower than in many rich countries, but Brazil pays much higher interest on its debt. It will spend 8.5% GDP this year servicing it, more than any other big country. In September it lost its investment-grade credit rating.

Stagflation of the sort Brazil is experiencing presents central bankers with a dilemma. Raising interest rates to quell inflation might push the economy deeper into recession; lowering them to foster growth might send inflation spiraling out of control. Between October last year and July this year, the country’s rate-setters seemed to prioritize price stability, raising the benchmark SELIC rate by three percentage points, to 14.25% where it remains.

The alluring real rates of almost 5% ought to have made the Brazilian Real attractive to investors. Instead the currency has weakened and rising inflation despite higher interest rates, combined with a doubling of debt-servicing costs in the past three years has led to the diagnosis of fiscal dominance. The cost of servicing Brazil’s debt has become so high, that rates have to be set to keep it manageable rather than to rein in prices. That, in turn, leads a vicious circle of a falling currency and rising inflation. There is no question, however, that Brazilian monetary policy is at best hobbled. State-owned banks have extended nearly half the country’s credit at low, subdisidised rates that bear little relation to the SELIC - at a cost of more than 40 billion Rs ($10 billion) a year to the tax payer. As private banks have cut lending in the past year, public ones have continued to expand their loan books.  All this hampers monetary policy and if left unchecked, this spurt of lending may itself threaten price stability.

Question : Choose the word which is most opposite in meaning to the word ‘PROFLIGACY’ given in bold as used in the passage.

Solution:
QUESTION: 41

Directions for Below Question :

In the following question, one/more than one part(s) of the sentence may have errors. Find out which part(s) of the sentence has/have an error(s) and select the appropriate option. If a sentence is free from error, select ‘No Error’.

Question : This machine (A)/ is much efficient (B)/ than any other (C)/ equipments in the workshop. (D

Solution:
QUESTION: 42

Directions for Below Question :

In the following question, one/more than one part(s) of the sentence may have errors. Find out which part(s) of the sentence has/have an error(s) and select the appropriate option. If a sentence is free from error, select ‘No Error’.

Question : To increase the (A)/ selling of sanitary pads (B)/ in rural areas, the company hires (C)/ over 500 skilled labourers (D)

Solution:
QUESTION: 43

Directions for Below Question :

In the following question, one/more than one part(s) of the sentence may have errors. Find out which part(s) of the sentence has/have an error(s) and select the appropriate option. If a sentence is free from error, select ‘No Error’.

Question : Today there are (A)/ very few giraffes left in India (B)/ and many NGOs are (C)/ working to save this endangered specie (D).

Solution:
QUESTION: 44

Directions for Below Question :

In the following question, one/more than one part(s) of the sentence may have errors. Find out which part(s) of the sentence has/have an error(s) and select the appropriate option. If a sentence is free from error, select ‘No Error’.

Question : An unlucky student almost lose (A)/ a 17th century violin worth $200,000 (B)/ when he left it in the waiting (C)/ room of a London station. (D

Solution:
QUESTION: 45

Directions for Below Question :

In the following question, one/more than one part(s) of the sentence may have errors. Find out which part(s) of the sentence has/have an error(s) and select the appropriate option. If a sentence is free from error, select ‘No Error’.

Question : Language communication (A)/ involves the interrelation (B)/ between (C)/speaker and hearer (D).

Solution:
QUESTION: 46

Directions for Below Question :

Directions: The following six sentences have to be arranged in the proper sequence, so as to form a meaningful paragraph. On the basis of your sequencing, answer the questions that follow:

1. At age 12, he began to practice sambo and judo.

2. He studied German at Saint Petersburg High School 281, and speaks German fluently.

3. He is a Judo black belt and national master of sports in Sambo.

4. He was one of a few in the class of approximately 45 pupils who was not yet member of the YPO.

5. On 1st September 1960, Putin started at School No.193 at Baskov Lane, near his home.

6. He wished to emulate the intelligence officers portrayed in Soviet cinema.

Question : After the rearrangement of sentences, what will be the second sentence?

Solution:
QUESTION: 47

Directions for Below Question :

Directions: The following six sentences have to be arranged in the proper sequence, so as to form a meaningful paragraph. On the basis of your sequencing, answer the questions that follow:

1. At age 12, he began to practice sambo and judo.

2. He studied German at Saint Petersburg High School 281, and speaks German fluently.

3. He is a Judo black belt and national master of sports in Sambo.

4. He was one of a few in the class of approximately 45 pupils who was not yet member of the YPO.

5. On 1st September 1960, Putin started at School No.193 at Baskov Lane, near his home.

6. He wished to emulate the intelligence officers portrayed in Soviet cinema.

Question : After the rearrangement of sentences, what will be the last sentence?

Solution:
QUESTION: 48

Directions for Below Question :

Directions: The following six sentences have to be arranged in the proper sequence, so as to form a meaningful paragraph. On the basis of your sequencing, answer the questions that follow:

1. At age 12, he began to practice sambo and judo.

2. He studied German at Saint Petersburg High School 281, and speaks German fluently.

3. He is a Judo black belt and national master of sports in Sambo.

4. He was one of a few in the class of approximately 45 pupils who was not yet member of the YPO.

5. On 1st September 1960, Putin started at School No.193 at Baskov Lane, near his home.

6. He wished to emulate the intelligence officers portrayed in Soviet cinema.

Question : After the rearrangement of sentences, what will be the fourth sentence?

Solution:
QUESTION: 49

Directions for Below Question :

Directions: The following six sentences have to be arranged in the proper sequence, so as to form a meaningful paragraph. On the basis of your sequencing, answer the questions that follow:

1. At age 12, he began to practice sambo and judo.

2. He studied German at Saint Petersburg High School 281, and speaks German fluently.

3. He is a Judo black belt and national master of sports in Sambo.

4. He was one of a few in the class of approximately 45 pupils who was not yet member of the YPO.

5. On 1st September 1960, Putin started at School No.193 at Baskov Lane, near his home.

6. He wished to emulate the intelligence officers portrayed in Soviet cinema.

Question : After the rearrangement of sentences, what will be the 2nd sentence from the end?

Solution:
QUESTION: 50

Directions for Below Question :

Directions: The following six sentences have to be arranged in the proper sequence, so as to form a meaningful paragraph. On the basis of your sequencing, answer the questions that follow:

1. At age 12, he began to practice sambo and judo.

2. He studied German at Saint Petersburg High School 281, and speaks German fluently.

3. He is a Judo black belt and national master of sports in Sambo.

4. He was one of a few in the class of approximately 45 pupils who was not yet member of the YPO.

5. On 1st September 1960, Putin started at School No.193 at Baskov Lane, near his home.

6. He wished to emulate the intelligence officers portrayed in Soviet cinema.

Question : After the rearrangement of sentences, what will be the third sentence

Solution:
QUESTION: 51

Directions for Below Question :

Improve the bracketed part of the sentence.

Question : Nepalis should never fight with (one another).

Solution:
QUESTION: 52

Directions for Below Question :

Improve the bracketed part of the sentence.

Question : (Any one) of his ears is deaf.

Solution:
QUESTION: 53

Directions for Below Question :

Improve the bracketed part of the sentence.

Question : (Your separation) is very painful to me.

Solution:
QUESTION: 54

Directions for Below Question :

Improve the bracketed part of the sentence.

Question : Only you and (I have brought your) books

Solution:
QUESTION: 55

Directions for Below Question :

Improve the bracketed part of the sentence.

Question : (Neither of his) legs was wounded in the attack.

Solution:
QUESTION: 56

Directions for Below Question :

In the questions given below, there are two statements, each statement consists of two blanks. You have to choose the option which provides the correct set of words that fits in the blanks in both the statements appropriately making them meaningful and grammatically correct.

Question : Narendra Modi government has removed the cap of Rs 10,000 per month _______ by it in July last year on educational ______ given to children of martyrs or those disabled in action

Solution:
QUESTION: 57

Directions for Below Question :

In the questions given below, there are two statements, each statement consists of two blanks. You have to choose the option which provides the correct set of words that fits in the blanks in both the statements appropriately making them meaningful and grammatically correct.

Question : Indian economy picks up after _______ reforms of demonetisation and GST, Indian job market _____ by MSME initiatives may expand by 20% in the next financial year

Solution:
QUESTION: 58

Directions for Below Question :

In the questions given below, there are two statements, each statement consists of two blanks. You have to choose the option which provides the correct set of words that fits in the blanks in both the statements appropriately making them meaningful and grammatically correct.

Question : Work has already begun to _______ the Brahmos supersonic cruise missile on 40 Sukhoi combat aircraft which is expected to fulfil the _______ needs of the Indian Air Force in the wake of evolving security dynamics in the region.

Solution:
QUESTION: 59

Directions for Below Question :

In the questions given below, there are two statements, each statement consists of two blanks. You have to choose the option which provides the correct set of words that fits in the blanks in both the statements appropriately making them meaningful and grammatically correct.

Question : Blockchain technology, which _______ cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin, presents new ______ for how we share data.

Solution:
QUESTION: 60

Directions for Below Question :

In the questions given below, there are two statements, each statement consists of two blanks. You have to choose the option which provides the correct set of words that fits in the blanks in both the statements appropriately making them meaningful and grammatically correct.

Question : Croatia _____ treaty on violence against women _______ protests

Solution:
QUESTION: 61

A stored link to a web page, in order to have a quick and easy access to it later is called_____.

Solution:
QUESTION: 62

To ‘maximize’ a window means to:

Solution:
QUESTION: 63

Which physical layer devices can be used to enlarge the area covered by a single LAN segment?

(1) Switch

(2) NIC

(3) Hub

(4) Repeater

(5) RJ45 transceive

Solution:
QUESTION: 64

Which of the following is the short cut key combination that can be used to type in bold in MS Excel?

Solution:
QUESTION: 65

Which among the following is the largest unit of storage?

Solution:
QUESTION: 66

Which of the following menu types is also called a drop-down menu?

Solution:
QUESTION: 67

Which of the following produces high-quality output?

Solution:
QUESTION: 68

The OCR recognises the _______ of the characters with the help of light source.

Solution:
QUESTION: 69

The __________ menu contains the options to add symbols in a Word document.

Solution:
QUESTION: 70

Which of the following general purpose software allows you to do mathematical or financial calculation?

Solution:
QUESTION: 71

Which of the following displays the work done by a computer?

Solution:
QUESTION: 72

Which of the following uses a handheld operating system?

Solution:
QUESTION: 73

A (n) __________ device is any hardware component that allows you to enter data and instruction into a computer.

Solution:
QUESTION: 74

What does DRAM stands for?

Solution:
QUESTION: 75

EPROM is generally erased by using ______.

Solution:
QUESTION: 76

The term attribute refers to a ___________ of a table.

Solution:
QUESTION: 77

The language used in application programs to request or select data from the DBMS is referred to as the:

Solution:
QUESTION: 78

Which one of the following is a set of one or more attributes taken collectively to uniquely identify a record?

Solution:
QUESTION: 79

In first generation of computers, they used which among the following?

Solution:
QUESTION: 80

What is the function of an operating system?

Solution:
QUESTION: 81

Who is the first player in the history of women’s ODI cricket to have crossed 6000 career runs?

Solution:

Indian skipper Mithali Raj scripted her name in history books during India's ICC World Cup 2017 match against Australia after she went on to become the highest run-getter in women's ODI cricket and also becomes the first woman cricketer to go past 6000-run mark.

QUESTION: 82

Where is the headquarter of the International Court of Justice (ICJ)?

Solution:
QUESTION: 83

Who appoints Governor of a state in India?

Solution:
QUESTION: 84

The latitude which passes through Sikkim also passes through _____.

Solution:
QUESTION: 85

Which of the following is a major river in Bangladesh which is also the main distributary of the Ganges?

Solution:

After entering Bangladesh, the main branch of the Ganges is known as the Padma joined by the Jamuna River, the largest distributary of the Brahmaputra.

QUESTION: 86

Where was the 2017 BRICS summit, an international relations conference held in?

Solution:

The 2017 BRICS summit was the ninth annual BRICS summit, an international relations conference attended by the heads of state or heads of government of the five member states Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa. The summit was held in Xiamen, China.

QUESTION: 87

Nal Sarovar Bird Sanctuary is located in which state?

Solution:

Nal Sarovar Bird Sanctuary, consisting primarily of a 120.82-square-kilometre (46.65 sq mi) lake and ambient marshes, is situated about 64 km to the west of Ahmedabad near Sanand Village, in the Gujarat state of India.

QUESTION: 88

Right to information is a law which was passed by Parliament on 15 June 2005 but when it came fully into force?

Solution:

This law was passed by Parliament on 15 June 2005 and came fully into force on 12 October 2005.

QUESTION: 89

Who is the chairman of Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO)?

Solution:

Renowned scientist K Sivan replaced Kiran Kumar as the chief of the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) on January 12, 2018.

QUESTION: 90

What was the Purpose of setting up Narasimham-II Committee?

Solution:

The Narasimham-II Committee was tasked with the progress review of the implementation of the banking reforms since 1992 with the aim of further strengthening the financial institutions of India. It focused on issues like size of banks and capital adequacy ratio among other things. The report of the Committee on Banking Sector Reforms was submitted to the Finance Minister in April 1998.

QUESTION: 91

____________ Scheme by the Central Government states that an insurance of 10 lakhs will cover each passenger traveling by Indian Rail while booking a ticket if an amount of 92paise is paid.

Solution:

Railway minister Mr. Suresh Prabhakar Prabhu had announced in his speech that from the month of September 2016, railways will provide an optional travel insurance of Rs.10 Lakh to the passengers while booking tickets from its website, which can be opted by paying an extra 92 paisa.

QUESTION: 92

Which one of the following teams was defeated by India to win the Women’s Hockey Asia Cup title, 2017?

Solution:

Indian women's hockey team won the 2017 Asia Cup hockey title. In the final match held at Kakamigahara in Japan, India defeated China by 5-4 goals in the penalty shootout.

QUESTION: 93

The Ministry of Communication has recently launched a Pan India scholarship programme for school children called ‘Deen Dayal SPARSH Yojana’. The objective of the scheme is to increase the reach of

Solution:

The Union Ministry of Communications has launched Deen Dayal SPARSH Yojana, a pan India scholarship program for school children to increase the reach of Philately (the collection and study of postage stamps).

QUESTION: 94

Which one of the following statements with regard to Antrix Corporation Limited is correct?

Solution:

Antrix Corporation Limited (ACL), Bengaluru is a wholly owned Government of India Company under the administrative control of the Department of Space.

QUESTION: 95

Who is the vice president of India?

Solution:
QUESTION: 96

Who among the following is the winner of the National Badminton Championship (Men), 2017?

Solution:
QUESTION: 97

What is the full form of RTI?

Solution:
QUESTION: 98

Where is the Bannerghatta National Park?

Solution:
QUESTION: 99

Which one among the following States of India has the largest number of seats in its Legislative Assembly?

Solution:

Uttar Pradesh Vidhan Sabha with 404 members is the largest State Assembly. The State of Uttar Pradesh has a bicameral legislature comprising of Legislative Council, an upper House and Legislative Assembly, the lower House. This is the largest legislature in India.

QUESTION: 100

The brownish film formed on iron when left in open is called?

Solution:

Rust is an iron oxide, a usually red oxide formed by the redox reaction of iron and oxygen in the presence of water or air moisture.

QUESTION: 101

A motor boat covers 72 km downstream and 48 km upstream in 12 hours, while it covers 72 km upstream and 48 km downstream in 13 hours. The stream rate is

Solution:

Let x be speed of boat in still water

And let y be stream rate

According to given statements,

72/(x+y) + 48/(x-y) = 12

48/(x+y) + 72/(x-y) = 13

Solving these equations, we get

x = 5y

Substituting this value in any of the equations, we get

Stream rate = 2 km/hr

QUESTION: 102

A train takes 6 hours less to cover 1680 km distance, if its speed is increased by 14 km/hr? What is the usual time taken by the train?

Solution:

According to the problem,

1680/x – 1680/(x+14) = 6

=> x = 56

The train moves at the speed of 56 km/hr,

Therefore, to cover 1680 km, it takes

1680/56 = 30hrs

QUESTION: 103

Directions for Below Question :

What will come in place of question mark in the given number series?

Question :

109, 191, 193, 203, ?

Solution:

Squares of the 1st and 3rd digits are added to the number, to get the next number.

109(+1+81=), 191(+1+1=), 193(+1+9=), 203(+4+9=), 216

QUESTION: 104

Directions for Below Question :

What will come in place of question mark in the given number series?

Question :

49, 33, 24, 20, 16, ?

Solution:

Square of the 1st digit is subtracted from the number to get the next number

49(-16=), 33(-9=), 24(-4=), 20(-4=), 16(-1=), 15

QUESTION: 105

Directions for Below Question :

In the following questions, two equations numbered I and II are given. You have to solve both the equations and

Give answer (a) if x>y

Give answer (b) if x≥y

Give answer (c) if x<y

Give answer (d) if x≤y

Give answer (e) if x=y or the relationship between x and y cannot be established.

Question :
I. 3x2 + 5x + 2 = 0

II. 2y2 + 7y + 5 = 0

Solution:

I. 3x2 + 5x + 2 = 0

3x2 + 3x + 2x + 2 = 0

3x (x + 1) + 2 (x + 1) = 0

(x + 1)(3x + 2)=0

X = -1, -0.6

II. 2y2 + 7y + 5 = 0

2y+ 5y + 2y + 5 = 0

y(2y + 5) + 1(2y + 5) = 0

(2y +5)(y + 1)=0

y = -2.5, -1

Therefore, x≥y

QUESTION: 106

Directions for Below Question :

In the following questions, two equations numbered I and II are given. You have to solve both the equations and

Give answer (a) if x>y

Give answer (b) if x≥y

Give answer (c) if x<y

Give answer (d) if x≤y

Give answer (e) if x=y or the relationship between x and y cannot be established.

Question :

I. 3x– 14x + 15 = 0

II. 2y– 13y + 21 = 0

Solution:

I. 3x– 14x + 15 = 0

3x– 9x – 5x + 15 = 0

3x(x – 3) – 5(x – 3) = 0

(x – 3)(3x – 5) = 0

x = 3, 1.6

II. 2y– 13y + 21 = 0

2y– 7y – 6y + 21 = 0

y(2y – 7) – 3(2y – 7) = 0

(2y – 7)(y – 3) = 0

y = 3.5, 3

Therefore, x≤y

QUESTION: 107

Directions for Below Question :

In the following questions, two equations numbered I and II are given. You have to solve both the equations and

Give answer (a) if x>y

Give answer (b) if x≥y

Give answer (c) if x<y

Give answer (d) if x≤y

Give answer (e) if x=y or the relationship between x and y cannot be established.

Question :

I. x– 7x + 12 = 0

II. 2y– 13y + 18 = 0

Solution:

I. (x – 4) (x – 3) = 0

x = 4, 3

II. 2y– 13y + 18 = 0

2y– 9y - 4y + 18 = 0

y(2y – 9) – 2(2y – 9) = 0

y = 4.5, 2

Therefore, relationship can’t be established.

QUESTION: 108

Directions for Below Question :

In the following questions, two equations numbered I and II are given. You have to solve both the equations and

Give answer (a) if x>y

Give answer (b) if x≥y

Give answer (c) if x<y

Give answer (d) if x≤y

Give answer (e) if x=y or the relationship between x and y cannot be established.

Question :

I. x– x – 20 = 0

II. y+ 6y +9 = 0

Solution:

I. x– x – 20 = 0

(x – 5)(x + 4) = 0

x = 5, -4

II. y+ 6y + 9 = 0

y = -3

Therefore, relationship cannot be established.

QUESTION: 109

Directions for Below Question :

In the following questions, two equations numbered I and II are given. You have to solve both the equations and

Give answer (a) if x>y

Give answer (b) if x≥y

Give answer (c) if x<y

Give answer (d) if x≤y

Give answer (e) if x=y or the relationship between x and y cannot be established.

Question :

I. 4x+ 9x + 5 = 0

II. y– 2y + 168 = 0

Solution:

I. 4x+ 9x + 5 = 0

4x+ 5x + 4x + 5 = 0

x(4x + 5) + 1(4x + 5) = 0

(4x + 5) (x + 1) = 0

x = -1.25, -1

II. y– 2y + 168 = 0

(y – 14)(y – 12) = 0

y = 14, 12

Therefore, x<y

QUESTION: 110

Directions for Below Question :

Read the following graph and answer the questions given below.

Question : When compared to the previous month, how many months have a growth rate more than 10%?

Solution:

In May, it’s 33.33% growth from April

In June, it’s 25% growth from May

In August, it’s 40% growth from July

In September, it’s 14.28% growth from August

QUESTION: 111

Directions for Below Question :

Read the following graph and answer the questions given below.

Question :  What is the approximate average of the price in May, July and September?

Solution:

Average = (4000 + 5000 + 8000)/3

= 17000/3

≈ 5667

QUESTION: 112

Directions for Below Question :

Read the following graph and answer the questions given below.

Question :  Difference between the prices of which of the following months is the least?

Solution:

April-May, difference is 1000

April-August, difference is 4000

April-June, difference is 2000

July-September, difference is 3000

May-August, difference is 3000

QUESTION: 113

Directions for Below Question :

Read the following graph and answer the questions given below.

Question :  What is the percentage increase in price from May to August?

Solution:

percentage increase = (7000/4000) X 100

= 175, which means 75% increase.

QUESTION: 114

Directions for Below Question :

Read the following graph and answer the questions given below.

Question :  How many months have the price above the average price of all the months?

Solution:

Only August and September have the price greater than the average.

QUESTION: 115

On selling a timepiece at 7% loss and a battery at 17% gain, a salesman gains Rs. 296. If he sells the timepiece at 7% gain and the battery at 12% gain, then he gains Rs. 400. The actual price of the battery is

Solution:

Let CP of timepiece be ‘t’

And CP of battery be ‘b’

According to given statement,

(93/100)t + (117/100)b = t + b + 296

93t + 117b = 100t + 100b + 29600

17b – 7t = 29600 ----- Equation (1)

(107/100)t + (112/100)b = t + b + 400

107t + 112b = 100t + 100b + 40000

12b + 7t = 40000 ---- Equation (2)

Adding Equations (1) & (2)

29b = 69600

Therefore, b = 2400

Hence, CP of charger = Rs. 2400.

QUESTION: 116

In 3 bottles, each having capacity of 20 L, mixture of milk and water is filled. The ratios of milk and water in 3 bottles respectively are 3:2, 5:2 and 1:3. If all the 3 bottles are emptied into a single bucket, then, find the proportion of milk and water in the bucket.

Solution:

Total milk in 3 bottles : Total water in 3 bottles

= 3/5 + 5/7 + 1/ 4 : 2/5 + 2/7 + 3/4

= (84 + 100 + 35)/140 : (56 + 40 + 105)/140

= 219 : 201

= 73 : 67

QUESTION: 117

A store has 3600 books in French. What will be the total number of books in German, if in that store 60% of the books are in Hindi, 60% of the remaining are in French and rest of the book are in German?

Solution:

Suppose, the books in the store be 100.

Hindi books will be 60

And 24 will be in French

Remaining 16 will be in German.

So, when the French books will be 3600,

German books will be, 2400.

QUESTION: 118

What approximate value should come in the place of question mark in the following equation?

Solution:


QUESTION: 119

Two workers A and B working together completed a job in 5 days. If A worked twice as efficiently as he actually did and B worked 1/3 as efficiently as he actually did, the work would have been completed in 3 days. A alone could complete the work in

Solution:

Let A’s 1 day’s work be ‘x’

B’s 1 day’s work be ‘y’.

Then, x + y = 1/5

=> 5x + 5y = 1 ---- equation 1

And, 2x + y/3 = 1/3

=> 6x + y = 1 ---- equation 2

From (1) and (2), we get:

Multiply (1) by 6 and (2) by 5 we get:

30x + 30y = 6 ---- equation 3

30x + 5y = 5 ---- equation 4

Subtract (4) from (1), we get:

25y = 1

y = 1/25

Therefore, Using (2),

6x = 1 – 1/25

=> x = 4/25

Therefore, A alone can complete the work in 25/4 i.e. 6.25 days.

QUESTION: 120

A 5-cubic centimetre cube is painted on all its sides. If it is sliced into 1 cubic centimetre cubes, how many 1 cubic centimetre cubes will have exactly one of their sides painted?

Solution:

A 5-cubic centimetre cube, when sliced into 1 cubic centimetre cubes,

Each face of bigger cube will be cut into 25 parts.

Only the parts in the middle will have only 1 face painted. Every face of bigger cube will have (3 X 3 =) 9 such cubes.

And a cube has 6 faces.

Hence, in total (9 * 6 =) 54 such cubes will be present.

QUESTION: 121

Which of the following measures is/are required to enhance the banking sector’s ability to absorb shocks arising from any financial crisis?

Solution:

Overall the purpose of the Basel III package is to ensure that the financial sector remains in a position to fulfil its primary function of providing credit to individuals and businesses. The objective of the reforms is to improve the banking sector’s ability to absorb shocks arising from financial and economic stress, whatever the source, thus reducing the risk of spillover from the financial sector to the real economy.

QUESTION: 122

Which of the following ways is/are used for the mobilization of resources under fiscal policy?

Solution:

Taxation -> Most important source of resource mobilization

Public Savings -> By reducing government expenditure and increasing surpluses of public sector enterprises.

Private Savings -> Through fiscal measures like Tax benefits, the government can raise resources from private sector and households.

QUESTION: 123

Which of the following does not come under non-development expenditure in India?

Solution:

It is that expenditure which is incurred on Non-Development activities of the Government in the form of provision of general services of the Government.

Example: Administrative Expenditure, Interest Payments, Defence, External affairs etc

All of the above are Non-development expenditures.

QUESTION: 124

The fastest growing state in terms of ‘Gross State Domestic Product’ (GSDP) in the financial year 2016-2017 is the Indian State of ______

Solution:

Andhra Pradesh was one of the relatively faster growing states in the country. Between 2011-12 and 2016-17, Gross State Domestic Product (GSDP) expanded at a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 13.01 per cent to US$ 108.5 billion.

QUESTION: 125

The situation where the inflation rate falls below zero (0%) per cent is described by economists as _______

Solution:

In economics, Deflation is a decrease in the general price level of goods and services. Deflation occurs when the inflation rate falls below 0% (a negative inflation rate). Deflation is distinct from disinflation, a slow-down in the inflation rate, i.e. when inflation declines to a lower rate but is still positive.

QUESTION: 126

The ‘International Monetary Fund’ (IMF) is an international organization headquartered in _____

Solution:
QUESTION: 127

The Human Poverty Index (HPI) concentrates on the deprivation in which of the following essential elements of human life that is already reflected in the HDI?

Solution:

The HPI concentrates on the deprivation in the three essential elements of human life: longevity, knowledge and a decent standard of living.

QUESTION: 128

‘Green Accounting’ means measuring the National Income of the country taking into account estimation of

Solution:

Green accounting is a type of accounting that attempts to factor environmental costs into the financial results of operations. It has been argued that gross domestic product ignores the environment and therefore policymakers need a revised model that incorporates green accounting.

QUESTION: 129

What is the main reason behind ‘Mass Poverty’ in developing economies?

Solution:

‘Mass Poverty’ in developing economies is not due to Poor natural resources, but due to inadequate development of natural resources and Exploitative social structure.

QUESTION: 130

The most significant single measure of comparison for different economies is

Solution:

Developing economies are distinguished from the developed economies based on their low Per capita income.

QUESTION: 131

Development economists use which concept to represent a specific minimum level of income needed to satisfy the basic physical needs?

Solution:

This is to represent a specific minimum level of income needed to satisfy the basic physical needs of food, clothing and shelter in order to ensure continued survival.

QUESTION: 132

Ethnic and religious diversity need not necessarily lead to

Solution:

Ethnic and religious diversity need not necessarily lead to Inequality, turmoil or instability. In diverse economies like Malaysia, Mauritius and United States, diversity is often cited as source of creativity and innovation.

QUESTION: 133

Which of the following indicators is/are not used to assess labour market conditions?

Solution:

Labour Force Participation Rate (LFPR), Work Participation Rate (WPR) and Unemployment Rate (UR) are a few of the major indicators generally being used to assess the labour market conditions.

QUESTION: 134

According to Jeffrey Sacks, the extreme poor lack in which of the following types of capital?

Solution:

Jeffrey Sacks in his famous work – “The end of poverty – How can we make it happen in our lifetime” mentions the extreme poor lacks Six major types of capital:

Human Capital, Business Capital, Infrastructure, National Capital, Public Institutional capital, Knowledge Capital

QUESTION: 135

Under the Pradhan Mantri Fasal Bima Yojana (PMFBY) farmers will have to pay a uniform premium of how much per cent for all kharif crops?

Solution:

Under the Pradhan Mantri Fasal Bima Yojana (PMFBY), there will be a uniform premium of only 2% to be paid by farmers for all Kharif crops and 1.5% for all Rabi crops. In case of annual commercial and horticultural crops, the premium to be paid by farmers will be only 5%.

QUESTION: 136

What is the basic reason behind poor not being able to participate in and benefit from the rapid growth of the economy?

Solution:

A basic reason why the poor are not able to participate in and benefit from the rapid growth of the economy lies in their poor human capital endowment. With a relatively meagre public investment in education and health, the poor have very limited chance of augmenting their human capital endowment.

QUESTION: 137

Which of the following articles in the Indian Constitution does not directly concern labour rights?

Solution:

All these articles concern labour rights in some way or the other.

QUESTION: 138

Which of the following is the most primary objective of the monetary policy?

Solution:

Monetary policy primarily aims at price stability. Price stability is a necessary precondition to Sustainable growth and Financial Stability.

QUESTION: 139

What is the objective of Pradhan Mantri Ujjwala Yojana?