NABARD Manager English Mock Test 2


40 Questions MCQ Test NABARD Manager - Mock Tests & Previous Year Papers | NABARD Manager English Mock Test 2


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This mock test of NABARD Manager English Mock Test 2 for Banking Exams helps you for every Banking Exams entrance exam. This contains 40 Multiple Choice Questions for Banking Exams NABARD Manager English Mock Test 2 (mcq) to study with solutions a complete question bank. The solved questions answers in this NABARD Manager English Mock Test 2 quiz give you a good mix of easy questions and tough questions. Banking Exams students definitely take this NABARD Manager English Mock Test 2 exercise for a better result in the exam. You can find other NABARD Manager English Mock Test 2 extra questions, long questions & short questions for Banking Exams on EduRev as well by searching above.
QUESTION: 1

Fill in the blanks with appropriate word.

A ___B1___ part of Arabia is desert. Here there is ___B2___ but sand and rock. The sand is so hot that you ___B3___ walk ___B4___ it with your bare feet in the day time. Here and there in the desert are ___B5___ of water that come from deep ___B6___ . Under the ground-so deep that the sun cannot dry them ___B7___. These springs are ___B8___ and far apart, but wherever there is one, green grass very soon covers the ground ___B9___ it. Soon fig trees and palm trees grow tall and ___B10___, making a cool green shady place around the spring. Such a place is called an ___B11___. The Arabs who are not in the cities ___B12___ the desert all the year round. They live in tents that can be put in and ___B13___ very easily and quickly, so that they can move from one oasis to another, ___B14___ grass and water for their sheep, goats, camels and horses. These desert Arabs eat ripe, sweet figs, and also the dates that grow upon the palm trees; they dry them, too, and use them as food all the ___B15___.

Q. Appropriate word at B1 is

Solution:
QUESTION: 2

Fill in the blanks with appropriate word.

A ___B1___ part of Arabia is desert. Here there is ___B2___ but sand and rock. The sand is so hot that you ___B3___ walk ___B4___ it with your bare feet in the day time. Here and there in the desert are ___B5___ of water that come from deep ___B6___ . Under the ground-so deep that the sun cannot dry them ___B7___. These springs are ___B8___ and far apart, but wherever there is one, green grass very soon covers the ground ___B9___ it. Soon fig trees and palm trees grow tall and ___B10___, making a cool green shady place around the spring. Such a place is called an ___B11___. The Arabs who are not in the cities ___B12___ the desert all the year round. They live in tents that can be put in and ___B13___ very easily and quickly, so that they can move from one oasis to another, ___B14___ grass and water for their sheep, goats, camels and horses. These desert Arabs eat ripe, sweet figs, and also the dates that grow upon the palm trees; they dry them, too, and use them as food all the ___B15___.

Q. Appropriate word at B2 is

Solution:
QUESTION: 3

Fill in the blanks with appropriate word.

A ___B1___ part of Arabia is desert. Here there is ___B2___ but sand and rock. The sand is so hot that you ___B3___ walk ___B4___ it with your bare feet in the day time. Here and there in the desert are ___B5___ of water that come from deep ___B6___ . Under the ground-so deep that the sun cannot dry them ___B7___. These springs are ___B8___ and far apart, but wherever there is one, green grass very soon covers the ground ___B9___ it. Soon fig trees and palm trees grow tall and ___B10___, making a cool green shady place around the spring. Such a place is called an ___B11___. The Arabs who are not in the cities ___B12___ the desert all the year round. They live in tents that can be put in and ___B13___ very easily and quickly, so that they can move from one oasis to another, ___B14___ grass and water for their sheep, goats, camels and horses. These desert Arabs eat ripe, sweet figs, and also the dates that grow upon the palm trees; they dry them, too, and use them as food all the ___B15___.

Q. Appropriate word at B3 is

Solution:
QUESTION: 4

Fill in the blanks with appropriate word.

A ___B1___ part of Arabia is desert. Here there is ___B2___ but sand and rock. The sand is so hot that you ___B3___ walk ___B4___ it with your bare feet in the day time. Here and there in the desert are ___B5___ of water that come from deep ___B6___ . Under the ground-so deep that the sun cannot dry them ___B7___. These springs are ___B8___ and far apart, but wherever there is one, green grass very soon covers the ground ___B9___ it. Soon fig trees and palm trees grow tall and ___B10___, making a cool green shady place around the spring. Such a place is called an ___B11___. The Arabs who are not in the cities ___B12___ the desert all the year round. They live in tents that can be put in and ___B13___ very easily and quickly, so that they can move from one oasis to another, ___B14___ grass and water for their sheep, goats, camels and horses. These desert Arabs eat ripe, sweet figs, and also the dates that grow upon the palm trees; they dry them, too, and use them as food all the ___B15___.

Q. Appropriate word at B4 is

Solution:
QUESTION: 5

Fill in the blanks with appropriate word.

A ___B1___ part of Arabia is desert. Here there is ___B2___ but sand and rock. The sand is so hot that you ___B3___ walk ___B4___ it with your bare feet in the day time. Here and there in the desert are ___B5___ of water that come from deep ___B6___ . Under the ground-so deep that the sun cannot dry them ___B7___. These springs are ___B8___ and far apart, but wherever there is one, green grass very soon covers the ground ___B9___ it. Soon fig trees and palm trees grow tall and ___B10___, making a cool green shady place around the spring. Such a place is called an ___B11___. The Arabs who are not in the cities ___B12___ the desert all the year round. They live in tents that can be put in and ___B13___ very easily and quickly, so that they can move from one oasis to another, ___B14___ grass and water for their sheep, goats, camels and horses. These desert Arabs eat ripe, sweet figs, and also the dates that grow upon the palm trees; they dry them, too, and use them as food all the ___B15___.

Q. Appropriate word at B5 is

Solution:
QUESTION: 6

Fill in the blanks with appropriate word.

A ___B1___ part of Arabia is desert. Here there is ___B2___ but sand and rock. The sand is so hot that you ___B3___ walk ___B4___ it with your bare feet in the day time. Here and there in the desert are ___B5___ of water that come from deep ___B6___ . Under the ground-so deep that the sun cannot dry them ___B7___. These springs are ___B8___ and far apart, but wherever there is one, green grass very soon covers the ground ___B9___ it. Soon fig trees and palm trees grow tall and ___B10___, making a cool green shady place around the spring. Such a place is called an ___B11___. The Arabs who are not in the cities ___B12___ the desert all the year round. They live in tents that can be put in and ___B13___ very easily and quickly, so that they can move from one oasis to another, ___B14___ grass and water for their sheep, goats, camels and horses. These desert Arabs eat ripe, sweet figs, and also the dates that grow upon the palm trees; they dry them, too, and use them as food all the ___B15___.

Q. Appropriate word at B6 is

Solution:
QUESTION: 7

Fill in the blanks with appropriate word.

A ___B1___ part of Arabia is desert. Here there is ___B2___ but sand and rock. The sand is so hot that you ___B3___ walk ___B4___ it with your bare feet in the day time. Here and there in the desert are ___B5___ of water that come from deep ___B6___ . Under the ground-so deep that the sun cannot dry them ___B7___. These springs are ___B8___ and far apart, but wherever there is one, green grass very soon covers the ground ___B9___ it. Soon fig trees and palm trees grow tall and ___B10___, making a cool green shady place around the spring. Such a place is called an ___B11___. The Arabs who are not in the cities ___B12___ the desert all the year round. They live in tents that can be put in and ___B13___ very easily and quickly, so that they can move from one oasis to another, ___B14___ grass and water for their sheep, goats, camels and horses. These desert Arabs eat ripe, sweet figs, and also the dates that grow upon the palm trees; they dry them, too, and use them as food all the ___B15___.

Q. Appropriate word at B7 is

Solution:
QUESTION: 8

Fill in the blanks with appropriate word.

A ___B1___ part of Arabia is desert. Here there is ___B2___ but sand and rock. The sand is so hot that you ___B3___ walk ___B4___ it with your bare feet in the day time. Here and there in the desert are ___B5___ of water that come from deep ___B6___ . Under the ground-so deep that the sun cannot dry them ___B7___. These springs are ___B8___ and far apart, but wherever there is one, green grass very soon covers the ground ___B9___ it. Soon fig trees and palm trees grow tall and ___B10___, making a cool green shady place around the spring. Such a place is called an ___B11___. The Arabs who are not in the cities ___B12___ the desert all the year round. They live in tents that can be put in and ___B13___ very easily and quickly, so that they can move from one oasis to another, ___B14___ grass and water for their sheep, goats, camels and horses. These desert Arabs eat ripe, sweet figs, and also the dates that grow upon the palm trees; they dry them, too, and use them as food all the ___B15___.

Q. Appropriate word at B8 is

Solution:
QUESTION: 9

Fill in the blanks with appropriate word.

A ___B1___ part of Arabia is desert. Here there is ___B2___ but sand and rock. The sand is so hot that you ___B3___ walk ___B4___ it with your bare feet in the day time. Here and there in the desert are ___B5___ of water that come from deep ___B6___ . Under the ground-so deep that the sun cannot dry them ___B7___. These springs are ___B8___ and far apart, but wherever there is one, green grass very soon covers the ground ___B9___ it. Soon fig trees and palm trees grow tall and ___B10___, making a cool green shady place around the spring. Such a place is called an ___B11___. The Arabs who are not in the cities ___B12___ the desert all the year round. They live in tents that can be put in and ___B13___ very easily and quickly, so that they can move from one oasis to another, ___B14___ grass and water for their sheep, goats, camels and horses. These desert Arabs eat ripe, sweet figs, and also the dates that grow upon the palm trees; they dry them, too, and use them as food all the ___B15___.

Q. Appropriate word at B9 is

Solution:
QUESTION: 10

Fill in the blanks with appropriate word.

A ___B1___ part of Arabia is desert. Here there is ___B2___ but sand and rock. The sand is so hot that you ___B3___ walk ___B4___ it with your bare feet in the day time. Here and there in the desert are ___B5___ of water that come from deep ___B6___ . Under the ground-so deep that the sun cannot dry them ___B7___. These springs are ___B8___ and far apart, but wherever there is one, green grass very soon covers the ground ___B9___ it. Soon fig trees and palm trees grow tall and ___B10___, making a cool green shady place around the spring. Such a place is called an ___B11___. The Arabs who are not in the cities ___B12___ the desert all the year round. They live in tents that can be put in and ___B13___ very easily and quickly, so that they can move from one oasis to another, ___B14___ grass and water for their sheep, goats, camels and horses. These desert Arabs eat ripe, sweet figs, and also the dates that grow upon the palm trees; they dry them, too, and use them as food all the ___B15___.

Q. Appropriate word at B10 is

Solution:
QUESTION: 11

The great fear in Asia a short while ago was that the region would suffer through the wealth destruction already taking place in the U.S. as a result of the financial crisis. Stock markets tumbled as exports plunged and economic growth deteriorated. Lofty property prices in China and elsewhere looked set to bust as credit tightened and buyers evaporated. But with surprising speed, fear in Asia swung back to greed as the region shows signs of recovery and property and stock prices are soaring in many parts of Asia.
Why should the sharp Asian turnaround be greeted with scepticism? Higher asset prices mean households feel wealthier and better able to spend, which could further fuel the region's nascent rebound. But just as easily, Asia could soon find itself saddled with overheated markets similar to the U.S. housing market. In short the world has not changed, it has just moved places.
The incipient bubble is being created by government policy. In response to the global credit crunch of 2008, policy makers in Asia slashed interest rates and flooded financial sectors with cash in frantic attempts to keep loans flowing and economies growing. These steps were logical for central bankers striving to reverse a deepening economic crisis. But there's evidence that there is too much easy money around. It's winding up in stocks and real estate, pushing prices up too far and too fast for the underlying economic fundamentals.
Much of the concern is focused on China, where government stimulus efforts have been large and effective. Money in China has been especially easy to find. Aggregate new bank lending surged 201% in the first half of 2009 from the same period a year earlier, to nearly $ 1.1 trillion.
Exuberance over a quick recovery-which was given a boost by China's surprisingly strong 7.9% GDP growth in the second quarter-has buoyed investor sentiment not just for stocks but also for real estate.
Former U.S. Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan argued that bubbles could only be recognised in hindsight. But investors-who have been well schooled in the dangers of bubbles over the past decade are increasingly wary that price have risen too far, and that the slightest bit of negative economic news could knock markets for a loop. These fears are compounded by the possibility that Asia's central bankers will being taking steps to shut off the money. Rumours that Beijing was on the verge of tightening credit led to Shanghai stocks plunging 5%. Yet many economists believe that, "there is close to a zero possibility that the Chinese government will do anything this year that constitutes tightening." And without a major shift in thinking the easy money conditions will stay in place. In a global economy that has produced more dramatic ups and downs than anyone thought possible over the past two years. Asia may be heading for another disheartening plunge.

Q. To which of the following has the author attributed the 2008 Asian financial crisis?
(I) Reluctance of Asian governments to taper off the economic stimulus
(II) Greed of Asian investors causing them to trade stocks of American companies at high prices
(III Inflated real estate prices in Asian countries

Solution:
QUESTION: 12

The great fear in Asia a short while ago was that the region would suffer through the wealth destruction already taking place in the U.S. as a result of the financial crisis. Stock markets tumbled as exports plunged and economic growth deteriorated. Lofty property prices in China and elsewhere looked set to bust as credit tightened and buyers evaporated. But with surprising speed, fear in Asia swung back to greed as the region shows signs of recovery and property and stock prices are soaring in many parts of Asia.
Why should the sharp Asian turnaround be greeted with scepticism? Higher asset prices mean households feel wealthier and better able to spend, which could further fuel the region's nascent rebound. But just as easily, Asia could soon find itself saddled with overheated markets similar to the U.S. housing market. In short the world has not changed, it has just moved places.
The incipient bubble is being created by government policy. In response to the global credit crunch of 2008, policy makers in Asia slashed interest rates and flooded financial sectors with cash in frantic attempts to keep loans flowing and economies growing. These steps were logical for central bankers striving to reverse a deepening economic crisis. But there's evidence that there is too much easy money around. It's winding up in stocks and real estate, pushing prices up too far and too fast for the underlying economic fundamentals.
Much of the concern is focused on China, where government stimulus efforts have been large and effective. Money in China has been especially easy to find. Aggregate new bank lending surged 201% in the first half of 2009 from the same period a year earlier, to nearly $ 1.1 trillion.
Exuberance over a quick recovery-which was given a boost by China's surprisingly strong 7.9% GDP growth in the second quarter-has buoyed investor sentiment not just for stocks but also for real estate.
Former U.S. Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan argued that bubbles could only be recognised in hindsight. But investors-who have been well schooled in the dangers of bubbles over the past decade are increasingly wary that price have risen too far, and that the slightest bit of negative economic news could knock markets for a loop. These fears are compounded by the possibility that Asia's central bankers will being taking steps to shut off the money. Rumours that Beijing was on the verge of tightening credit led to Shanghai stocks plunging 5%. Yet many economists believe that, "there is close to a zero possibility that the Chinese government will do anything this year that constitutes tightening." And without a major shift in thinking the easy money conditions will stay in place. In a global economy that has produced more dramatic ups and downs than anyone thought possible over the past two years. Asia may be heading for another disheartening plunge.

Q. What does the author want to convey through the phrase "The world has not changed it has just moved places"?

Solution:
QUESTION: 13

The great fear in Asia a short while ago was that the region would suffer through the wealth destruction already taking place in the U.S. as a result of the financial crisis. Stock markets tumbled as exports plunged and economic growth deteriorated. Lofty property prices in China and elsewhere looked set to bust as credit tightened and buyers evaporated. But with surprising speed, fear in Asia swung back to greed as the region shows signs of recovery and property and stock prices are soaring in many parts of Asia.
Why should the sharp Asian turnaround be greeted with scepticism? Higher asset prices mean households feel wealthier and better able to spend, which could further fuel the region's nascent rebound. But just as easily, Asia could soon find itself saddled with overheated markets similar to the U.S. housing market. In short the world has not changed, it has just moved places.
The incipient bubble is being created by government policy. In response to the global credit crunch of 2008, policy makers in Asia slashed interest rates and flooded financial sectors with cash in frantic attempts to keep loans flowing and economies growing. These steps were logical for central bankers striving to reverse a deepening economic crisis. But there's evidence that there is too much easy money around. It's winding up in stocks and real estate, pushing prices up too far and too fast for the underlying economic fundamentals.
Much of the concern is focused on China, where government stimulus efforts have been large and effective. Money in China has been especially easy to find. Aggregate new bank lending surged 201% in the first half of 2009 from the same period a year earlier, to nearly $ 1.1 trillion.
Exuberance over a quick recovery-which was given a boost by China's surprisingly strong 7.9% GDP growth in the second quarter-has buoyed investor sentiment not just for stocks but also for real estate.
Former U.S. Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan argued that bubbles could only be recognised in hindsight. But investors-who have been well schooled in the dangers of bubbles over the past decade are increasingly wary that price have risen too far, and that the slightest bit of negative economic news could knock markets for a loop. These fears are compounded by the possibility that Asia's central bankers will being taking steps to shut off the money. Rumours that Beijing was on the verge of tightening credit led to Shanghai stocks plunging 5%. Yet many economists believe that, "there is close to a zero possibility that the Chinese government will do anything this year that constitutes tightening." And without a major shift in thinking the easy money conditions will stay in place. In a global economy that has produced more dramatic ups and downs than anyone thought possible over the past two years. Asia may be heading for another disheartening plunge.

Q. Which of the following can be said about the Chinese government's efforts to revive the economy?

Solution:
QUESTION: 14

The great fear in Asia a short while ago was that the region would suffer through the wealth destruction already taking place in the U.S. as a result of the financial crisis. Stock markets tumbled as exports plunged and economic growth deteriorated. Lofty property prices in China and elsewhere looked set to bust as credit tightened and buyers evaporated. But with surprising speed, fear in Asia swung back to greed as the region shows signs of recovery and property and stock prices are soaring in many parts of Asia.
Why should the sharp Asian turnaround be greeted with scepticism? Higher asset prices mean households feel wealthier and better able to spend, which could further fuel the region's nascent rebound. But just as easily, Asia could soon find itself saddled with overheated markets similar to the U.S. housing market. In short the world has not changed, it has just moved places.
The incipient bubble is being created by government policy. In response to the global credit crunch of 2008, policy makers in Asia slashed interest rates and flooded financial sectors with cash in frantic attempts to keep loans flowing and economies growing. These steps were logical for central bankers striving to reverse a deepening economic crisis. But there's evidence that there is too much easy money around. It's winding up in stocks and real estate, pushing prices up too far and too fast for the underlying economic fundamentals.
Much of the concern is focused on China, where government stimulus efforts have been large and effective. Money in China has been especially easy to find. Aggregate new bank lending surged 201% in the first half of 2009 from the same period a year earlier, to nearly $ 1.1 trillion.
Exuberance over a quick recovery-which was given a boost by China's surprisingly strong 7.9% GDP growth in the second quarter-has buoyed investor sentiment not just for stocks but also for real estate.
Former U.S. Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan argued that bubbles could only be recognised in hindsight. But investors-who have been well schooled in the dangers of bubbles over the past decade are increasingly wary that price have risen too far, and that the slightest bit of negative economic news could knock markets for a loop. These fears are compounded by the possibility that Asia's central bankers will being taking steps to shut off the money. Rumours that Beijing was on the verge of tightening credit led to Shanghai stocks plunging 5%. Yet many economists believe that, "there is close to a zero possibility that the Chinese government will do anything this year that constitutes tightening." And without a major shift in thinking the easy money conditions will stay in place. In a global economy that has produced more dramatic ups and downs than anyone thought possible over the past two years. Asia may be heading for another disheartening plunge.

Q. Why do experts predict that Asian policy makers will not withdraw fiscal stimulus?
(I) The US economy is not likely to recover for a long time
(II) Stock markets are yet to regain their former levels
(III) Fear of revolt by greedy citizens

Solution:
QUESTION: 15

The great fear in Asia a short while ago was that the region would suffer through the wealth destruction already taking place in the U.S. as a result of the financial crisis. Stock markets tumbled as exports plunged and economic growth deteriorated. Lofty property prices in China and elsewhere looked set to bust as credit tightened and buyers evaporated. But with surprising speed, fear in Asia swung back to greed as the region shows signs of recovery and property and stock prices are soaring in many parts of Asia.
Why should the sharp Asian turnaround be greeted with scepticism? Higher asset prices mean households feel wealthier and better able to spend, which could further fuel the region's nascent rebound. But just as easily, Asia could soon find itself saddled with overheated markets similar to the U.S. housing market. In short the world has not changed, it has just moved places.
The incipient bubble is being created by government policy. In response to the global credit crunch of 2008, policy makers in Asia slashed interest rates and flooded financial sectors with cash in frantic attempts to keep loans flowing and economies growing. These steps were logical for central bankers striving to reverse a deepening economic crisis. But there's evidence that there is too much easy money around. It's winding up in stocks and real estate, pushing prices up too far and too fast for the underlying economic fundamentals.
Much of the concern is focused on China, where government stimulus efforts have been large and effective. Money in China has been especially easy to find. Aggregate new bank lending surged 201% in the first half of 2009 from the same period a year earlier, to nearly $ 1.1 trillion.
Exuberance over a quick recovery-which was given a boost by China's surprisingly strong 7.9% GDP growth in the second quarter-has buoyed investor sentiment not just for stocks but also for real estate.
Former U.S. Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan argued that bubbles could only be recognised in hindsight. But investors-who have been well schooled in the dangers of bubbles over the past decade are increasingly wary that price have risen too far, and that the slightest bit of negative economic news could knock markets for a loop. These fears are compounded by the possibility that Asia's central bankers will being taking steps to shut off the money. Rumours that Beijing was on the verge of tightening credit led to Shanghai stocks plunging 5%. Yet many economists believe that, "there is close to a zero possibility that the Chinese government will do anything this year that constitutes tightening." And without a major shift in thinking the easy money conditions will stay in place. In a global economy that has produced more dramatic ups and downs than anyone thought possible over the past two years. Asia may be heading for another disheartening plunge.

Q. What do the statistics about loans given by Chinese banks in 2009 indicate?

Solution:
QUESTION: 16

The great fear in Asia a short while ago was that the region would suffer through the wealth destruction already taking place in the U.S. as a result of the financial crisis. Stock markets tumbled as exports plunged and economic growth deteriorated. Lofty property prices in China and elsewhere looked set to bust as credit tightened and buyers evaporated. But with surprising speed, fear in Asia swung back to greed as the region shows signs of recovery and property and stock prices are soaring in many parts of Asia.
Why should the sharp Asian turnaround be greeted with scepticism? Higher asset prices mean households feel wealthier and better able to spend, which could further fuel the region's nascent rebound. But just as easily, Asia could soon find itself saddled with overheated markets similar to the U.S. housing market. In short the world has not changed, it has just moved places.
The incipient bubble is being created by government policy. In response to the global credit crunch of 2008, policy makers in Asia slashed interest rates and flooded financial sectors with cash in frantic attempts to keep loans flowing and economies growing. These steps were logical for central bankers striving to reverse a deepening economic crisis. But there's evidence that there is too much easy money around. It's winding up in stocks and real estate, pushing prices up too far and too fast for the underlying economic fundamentals.
Much of the concern is focused on China, where government stimulus efforts have been large and effective. Money in China has been especially easy to find. Aggregate new bank lending surged 201% in the first half of 2009 from the same period a year earlier, to nearly $ 1.1 trillion.
Exuberance over a quick recovery-which was given a boost by China's surprisingly strong 7.9% GDP growth in the second quarter-has buoyed investor sentiment not just for stocks but also for real estate.
Former U.S. Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan argued that bubbles could only be recognised in hindsight. But investors-who have been well schooled in the dangers of bubbles over the past decade are increasingly wary that price have risen too far, and that the slightest bit of negative economic news could knock markets for a loop. These fears are compounded by the possibility that Asia's central bankers will being taking steps to shut off the money. Rumours that Beijing was on the verge of tightening credit led to Shanghai stocks plunging 5%. Yet many economists believe that, "there is close to a zero possibility that the Chinese government will do anything this year that constitutes tightening." And without a major shift in thinking the easy money conditions will stay in place. In a global economy that has produced more dramatic ups and downs than anyone thought possible over the past two years. Asia may be heading for another disheartening plunge.

Q. Why has investor confidence in the Chinese stock market been restored?
(I) Existing property prices which are stable and affordable 
(II) The government has decided to tighten credit
(III) Healthy growth of the economy indicated by GDP figures.

Solution:
QUESTION: 17

The great fear in Asia a short while ago was that the region would suffer through the wealth destruction already taking place in the U.S. as a result of the financial crisis. Stock markets tumbled as exports plunged and economic growth deteriorated. Lofty property prices in China and elsewhere looked set to bust as credit tightened and buyers evaporated. But with surprising speed, fear in Asia swung back to greed as the region shows signs of recovery and property and stock prices are soaring in many parts of Asia.
Why should the sharp Asian turnaround be greeted with scepticism? Higher asset prices mean households feel wealthier and better able to spend, which could further fuel the region's nascent rebound. But just as easily, Asia could soon find itself saddled with overheated markets similar to the U.S. housing market. In short the world has not changed, it has just moved places.
The incipient bubble is being created by government policy. In response to the global credit crunch of 2008, policy makers in Asia slashed interest rates and flooded financial sectors with cash in frantic attempts to keep loans flowing and economies growing. These steps were logical for central bankers striving to reverse a deepening economic crisis. But there's evidence that there is too much easy money around. It's winding up in stocks and real estate, pushing prices up too far and too fast for the underlying economic fundamentals.
Much of the concern is focused on China, where government stimulus efforts have been large and effective. Money in China has been especially easy to find. Aggregate new bank lending surged 201% in the first half of 2009 from the same period a year earlier, to nearly $ 1.1 trillion.
Exuberance over a quick recovery-which was given a boost by China's surprisingly strong 7.9% GDP growth in the second quarter-has buoyed investor sentiment not just for stocks but also for real estate.
Former U.S. Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan argued that bubbles could only be recognised in hindsight. But investors-who have been well schooled in the dangers of bubbles over the past decade are increasingly wary that price have risen too far, and that the slightest bit of negative economic news could knock markets for a loop. These fears are compounded by the possibility that Asia's central bankers will being taking steps to shut off the money. Rumours that Beijing was on the verge of tightening credit led to Shanghai stocks plunging 5%. Yet many economists believe that, "there is close to a zero possibility that the Chinese government will do anything this year that constitutes tightening." And without a major shift in thinking the easy money conditions will stay in place. In a global economy that has produced more dramatic ups and downs than anyone thought possible over the past two years. Asia may be heading for another disheartening plunge.

Q. What is the author's main objective in writing the passage?

Solution:
QUESTION: 18

The great fear in Asia a short while ago was that the region would suffer through the wealth destruction already taking place in the U.S. as a result of the financial crisis. Stock markets tumbled as exports plunged and economic growth deteriorated. Lofty property prices in China and elsewhere looked set to bust as credit tightened and buyers evaporated. But with surprising speed, fear in Asia swung back to greed as the region shows signs of recovery and property and stock prices are soaring in many parts of Asia.
Why should the sharp Asian turnaround be greeted with scepticism? Higher asset prices mean households feel wealthier and better able to spend, which could further fuel the region's nascent rebound. But just as easily, Asia could soon find itself saddled with overheated markets similar to the U.S. housing market. In short the world has not changed, it has just moved places.
The incipient bubble is being created by government policy. In response to the global credit crunch of 2008, policy makers in Asia slashed interest rates and flooded financial sectors with cash in frantic attempts to keep loans flowing and economies growing. These steps were logical for central bankers striving to reverse a deepening economic crisis. But there's evidence that there is too much easy money around. It's winding up in stocks and real estate, pushing prices up too far and too fast for the underlying economic fundamentals.
Much of the concern is focused on China, where government stimulus efforts have been large and effective. Money in China has been especially easy to find. Aggregate new bank lending surged 201% in the first half of 2009 from the same period a year earlier, to nearly $ 1.1 trillion.
Exuberance over a quick recovery-which was given a boost by China's surprisingly strong 7.9% GDP growth in the second quarter-has buoyed investor sentiment not just for stocks but also for real estate.
Former U.S. Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan argued that bubbles could only be recognised in hindsight. But investors-who have been well schooled in the dangers of bubbles over the past decade are increasingly wary that price have risen too far, and that the slightest bit of negative economic news could knock markets for a loop. These fears are compounded by the possibility that Asia's central bankers will being taking steps to shut off the money. Rumours that Beijing was on the verge of tightening credit led to Shanghai stocks plunging 5%. Yet many economists believe that, "there is close to a zero possibility that the Chinese government will do anything this year that constitutes tightening." And without a major shift in thinking the easy money conditions will stay in place. In a global economy that has produced more dramatic ups and downs than anyone thought possible over the past two years. Asia may be heading for another disheartening plunge.

Q. Why does the author doubt the current resurgence of Asian economics?

Solution:
QUESTION: 19

The great fear in Asia a short while ago was that the region would suffer through the wealth destruction already taking place in the U.S. as a result of the financial crisis. Stock markets tumbled as exports plunged and economic growth deteriorated. Lofty property prices in China and elsewhere looked set to bust as credit tightened and buyers evaporated. But with surprising speed, fear in Asia swung back to greed as the region shows signs of recovery and property and stock prices are soaring in many parts of Asia.
Why should the sharp Asian turnaround be greeted with scepticism? Higher asset prices mean households feel wealthier and better able to spend, which could further fuel the region's nascent rebound. But just as easily, Asia could soon find itself saddled with overheated markets similar to the U.S. housing market. In short the world has not changed, it has just moved places.
The incipient bubble is being created by government policy. In response to the global credit crunch of 2008, policy makers in Asia slashed interest rates and flooded financial sectors with cash in frantic attempts to keep loans flowing and economies growing. These steps were logical for central bankers striving to reverse a deepening economic crisis. But there's evidence that there is too much easy money around. It's winding up in stocks and real estate, pushing prices up too far and too fast for the underlying economic fundamentals.
Much of the concern is focused on China, where government stimulus efforts have been large and effective. Money in China has been especially easy to find. Aggregate new bank lending surged 201% in the first half of 2009 from the same period a year earlier, to nearly $ 1.1 trillion.
Exuberance over a quick recovery-which was given a boost by China's surprisingly strong 7.9% GDP growth in the second quarter-has buoyed investor sentiment not just for stocks but also for real estate.
Former U.S. Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan argued that bubbles could only be recognised in hindsight. But investors-who have been well schooled in the dangers of bubbles over the past decade are increasingly wary that price have risen too far, and that the slightest bit of negative economic news could knock markets for a loop. These fears are compounded by the possibility that Asia's central bankers will being taking steps to shut off the money. Rumours that Beijing was on the verge of tightening credit led to Shanghai stocks plunging 5%. Yet many economists believe that, "there is close to a zero possibility that the Chinese government will do anything this year that constitutes tightening." And without a major shift in thinking the easy money conditions will stay in place. In a global economy that has produced more dramatic ups and downs than anyone thought possible over the past two years. Asia may be heading for another disheartening plunge.

Q. Which of the following can be inferred from the passage?
(I) All Asian economies are recovering at the same pace
(II) Experts are apprehensive about the state of Asian economies reforms as Asian ones

Solution:
QUESTION: 20

The great fear in Asia a short while ago was that the region would suffer through the wealth destruction already taking place in the U.S. as a result of the financial crisis. Stock markets tumbled as exports plunged and economic growth deteriorated. Lofty property prices in China and elsewhere looked set to bust as credit tightened and buyers evaporated. But with surprising speed, fear in Asia swung back to greed as the region shows signs of recovery and property and stock prices are soaring in many parts of Asia.
Why should the sharp Asian turnaround be greeted with scepticism? Higher asset prices mean households feel wealthier and better able to spend, which could further fuel the region's nascent rebound. But just as easily, Asia could soon find itself saddled with overheated markets similar to the U.S. housing market. In short the world has not changed, it has just moved places.
The incipient bubble is being created by government policy. In response to the global credit crunch of 2008, policy makers in Asia slashed interest rates and flooded financial sectors with cash in frantic attempts to keep loans flowing and economies growing. These steps were logical for central bankers striving to reverse a deepening economic crisis. But there's evidence that there is too much easy money around. It's winding up in stocks and real estate, pushing prices up too far and too fast for the underlying economic fundamentals.
Much of the concern is focused on China, where government stimulus efforts have been large and effective. Money in China has been especially easy to find. Aggregate new bank lending surged 201% in the first half of 2009 from the same period a year earlier, to nearly $ 1.1 trillion.
Exuberance over a quick recovery-which was given a boost by China's surprisingly strong 7.9% GDP growth in the second quarter-has buoyed investor sentiment not just for stocks but also for real estate.
Former U.S. Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan argued that bubbles could only be recognised in hindsight. But investors-who have been well schooled in the dangers of bubbles over the past decade are increasingly wary that price have risen too far, and that the slightest bit of negative economic news could knock markets for a loop. These fears are compounded by the possibility that Asia's central bankers will being taking steps to shut off the money. Rumours that Beijing was on the verge of tightening credit led to Shanghai stocks plunging 5%. Yet many economists believe that, "there is close to a zero possibility that the Chinese government will do anything this year that constitutes tightening." And without a major shift in thinking the easy money conditions will stay in place. In a global economy that has produced more dramatic ups and downs than anyone thought possible over the past two years. Asia may be heading for another disheartening plunge.

Q. According to the passage, which of the following factor(s) has/have had a negative impact on the Asian stock markets?
(I) Abrupt drop in exports by Asian countries
(II) Extravagant disbursement of housing loans in 2009
(III) Raising of interest rates by the Central Bank

Solution:
QUESTION: 21

Fill in the blank with appropriate word. 
Soft minded individuals are........to embrace all kinds of superstitions.

Solution:
QUESTION: 22

Fill in the blank with appropriate word. 
Even in today's modern society, people.....god to bring rains.

Solution:
QUESTION: 23

Fill in the blank with appropriate word. 
Eight scientists have.....the national awards for outstanding contribution and dedication to the profession.

Solution:
QUESTION: 24

Fill in the blank with appropriate word. 
You will have to face some practical problems when you start.........this plan.

Solution:
QUESTION: 25

Fill in the blank with appropriate word. 
I listened, but I had no idea what he was ........about.

Solution:
QUESTION: 26

Arrange the sentences in their proper order so that they make a logically meaningful paragraph.

P. He felt justified in bypassing Congress altogether on a variety of moves. 
Q. At time he was fighting the entire Congress.
R. Bush felt he had a mission to resore power to the presidency.
S. Bush was not fighting just the democrats. 
T. Representative democracy is a messy business, and a CEO of the White House does not like a legislature of second guessers and time wasters.

Solution:

'R' is the opening statement as it introduces the topic of the paragraph
Statement 'T' presents the problem that he must tackle i.e., a legislature of second guessers and time wasters.
'P' tells us what Bush did not tackle the problem
'SQ' tells us that the wansn't merely fighting the entire Congress. Hence RTPSQ.

QUESTION: 27

Arrange the sentences in their proper order so that they make a logically meaningful paragraph.

P. The two neighbours never fought each other. 
Q. Fights involving three male fiddler crabs have been recorded, but the status of the participants was unknown.
R. They pushed or grappled only with the intruder.
S. We recorded 17 cases in which a resident that was fighting an intruder was joined by an immediate neighbour, an ally.
T. We therefore tracked 268 intruder males until we saw them fighting a resident male.

Solution:

'Q' opens the paragraph. 
'T' should follow it i.e., the words "we therefore tracked .........." continue the idea in 'Q'.
The words 'resident male' in 'T' find a continuation in 'S'.
The words 'the two neighbourws' and 'they' in 'P' and 'R' respectively are linked. Hence QTSPR.

QUESTION: 28

Arrange the sentences in their proper order so that they make a logically meaningful paragraph.

P. In the west, Allied Forces had fought their way through southern Italy as far as Rome. 
Q. In June 1944 Germany's military position in World War Two appeared hopeless.
R. In Britain, task of amassing the men and materials for the liberation of northern Europe had been completed.
S. The Red Army was poised to drive the Nazis back through Poland.
T. The situation on the eastern front was catastrophic.

Solution:

'Q' opens the paragraph
The word 'catastrophic' in 'T' gives continuation to the idea expressed in 'Q'.
'S' talks about Poland and 'P' talks about the western front. Hence TSP go togehter. Finally R concludes.

QUESTION: 29

Arrange the sentences in their proper order so that they make a logically meaningful paragraph.

P. But this does not mean that death was the Egyptians only preoccupation.
Q. Even papyri come mainly from pyramid temples. 
R. Most of our traditional sources of information about the Old Kingdom are monuments of the rich like pyramids and tombs.
S. Houses in which ordinary Egyptians lived have not been preserved, and when most people died they were buried in simple graves.
T. We know infinitely more about the wealthy people of Egypt than we do about the ordinary people, as most monuments were made for the rich.

Solution:

The paragraph starts with 'T' as it launches the topic of how much is know about the rich and the poor in Egypt.
The sentence ends with the statement that 'mounments were made for the rich'.
Hence 'S' should follow. 
Then the discussion moves on to sources of information.
Hence TSR. 'Papyri' in 'Q' and 'sources of information' in 'R' are linked.
'P' rounds up the discussion by stating that notwithstanding the discussion in the preceding statements. Hence TSRQP.

QUESTION: 30

Arrange the sentences in their proper order so that they make a logically meaningful paragraph.

P. Experts such as Larry Burns, head of research at GM, reckon that only such a full hearted leap will allow the world to cope with the mass motorisation that will one day come or India.
Q. But once hydrogen is being produced from biomass or extracted from underground coal or made from water, using nuclear or renewable electricity, the way will be open for a huge reduction in carbon emissions from the whole system.
R. In theory, once all the bugs have been stored out, fuel cells deliver better total fuel economy than any existing engines.
S. That is twice as good as the internal combustion engine, but only five percentage points better than a diesel hybrid.
T. Allowing for the resources needed to extract hydrogen from hydrocarbon, oil, coal or gas, the fuel cell has an efficiency of 30%.

Solution:

'R' begins the paragraph. 'T' continues the idea of 'total fuel economy' which is expressed in 'R'.
'S' is the continuation as it says that the 30% efficiency is twice as good as the efficiency of the internal combustion engine.
Hence RTS. 'Q' introduces another facet i.e., reducing carbon emissions. 'P' continues, as it talks about a full - hearted leap, which is a reference to what is mentioned in 'Q'. Hence RTSQP.

QUESTION: 31

Improve the sentence by choosing best alternative for capitalised part of the sentence.

Q. When the solider returned home after the war was over, his wife received him WITH OPEN HANDS.

Solution:
QUESTION: 32

Improve the sentence by choosing best alternative for capitalised part of the sentence.

Q. Sri Pashupatinath is a WORTH SEEING TEMPLE in Kathmandu.

Solution:
QUESTION: 33

Improve the sentence by choosing best alternative for capitalised part of the sentence.

Q. Even the people in authority agree that corruption has become TODAY'S ORDER.

Solution:
QUESTION: 34

Improve the sentence by choosing best alternative for capitalised part of the sentence.

Q. Being a handicapped youth, he WAS PUT HARD TO complete his military course.

Solution:
QUESTION: 35

Improve the sentence by choosing best alternative for capitalised part of the sentence.

Q. According to the Planning Commission estimates, by the year 2000, India WILL HAVE BECOME self-sufficient in petroleum products.

Solution:
QUESTION: 36

Spot the error.

Solution:
QUESTION: 37

Spot the error.

Solution:
QUESTION: 38

Spot the error.

Solution:
QUESTION: 39

Spot the error.

Solution:
QUESTION: 40

Spot the error.

Solution:

'It is not only our duty' instead of 'Not only it is our duty'

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