NABARD Manager Full Length Mock Test 10


200 Questions MCQ Test NABARD Manager - Mock Tests & Previous Year Papers | NABARD Manager Full Length Mock Test 10


Description
This mock test of NABARD Manager Full Length Mock Test 10 for Banking Exams helps you for every Banking Exams entrance exam. This contains 200 Multiple Choice Questions for Banking Exams NABARD Manager Full Length Mock Test 10 (mcq) to study with solutions a complete question bank. The solved questions answers in this NABARD Manager Full Length Mock Test 10 quiz give you a good mix of easy questions and tough questions. Banking Exams students definitely take this NABARD Manager Full Length Mock Test 10 exercise for a better result in the exam. You can find other NABARD Manager Full Length Mock Test 10 extra questions, long questions & short questions for Banking Exams on EduRev as well by searching above.
QUESTION: 1

For the two given equations I and II.

I. p2 + 5p + 6 = 0
II. q2 + 3q + 2 = 0

Solution:
QUESTION: 2

For the two given equations I and II.

I. p2 = 4
II. q2 + 4q = - 4

Solution:

I. p = ± 2
II. q2 + 2q + 2q + 4 = 0
⇒ q(q + 2) + 2(q + 2) = 0
⇒ (q + 2) (q + 2) = 0
⇒ q = -2
p ≥ q

QUESTION: 3

Consider a circle with unit radius. There are seven adjacent sectors ,S1,S2,S3 ,.... S1,. in the circle such that their total area is 1818 of the area of the circle .Further ,the area of the jth sector is twice that of the (j-1) th sector ,for j = 2.....7. What is the angle ,in radians, subtented by the arc of S1 at the centre of the circle ?

Solution:

Now area of 1st sector = π × r2 × x/360 where x-angle subtended at center
Now the next sector will have 2x as the angle, and similarly angles will be in GP with ratio = 2
Sum of areas of all 7 sectors = which is equal to
We get x =
Now if converted in radians we get x =π/508

QUESTION: 4

Study the following graph carefuly and answer the questions given below it.

Q. How many districts in Himachal Pradesh were visitedby more than 10% of the total Indian tourists ?

Solution:

Total Indian tourists = 540 + 220 + 130 + 535 + 140 = 1565 thousand
10% of Indian tourists = = 156.5 thousand

QUESTION: 5

Study the following graph carefuly and answer the questions given below it.

Q. By what percentage the Indian tourists visiting Chamba were less than those visiting Shimla ?

Solution:

QUESTION: 6

Study the following graph carefuly and answer the questions given below it.

Q. Approximately what percentage was shared by total foreign tourists among all the tourists visiting Himachal Pradesh ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 7

 In a mixture of 60 litres, the ratio of milk and water is 2:1. If the ratio of the milk and water is to be 1:2,then the amount of water to be further added is

Solution:
QUESTION: 8

Choose the correct alternative that will continue the same pattern and fill in the blank.
8, 43, 11, 41, __, 39, 17

Solution:

This is a simple alternating addition and subtraction series. The first series begins with 8 and adds 3; the second begins with 43 and subtracts 2.

QUESTION: 9

Choose the correct alternative that will continue the same pattern and fill in the blank. 
1, 1, 3, 9, 6, 36, 10, 100, (....), 225

Solution:

QUESTION: 10

Choose the correct alternative that will continue the same pattern and fill in the blank. 
3, 8, 13, 24, 41, (....)

Solution:

The pattern followed is :
nth term + (n + 1) th term + (n + 1) = (n + 2) th term.
Thus, 1st term + 2nd term + 2 = 3rd term;
2nd term + 3rd term + 3 = 4th term and so on.
∴ Missing term = 6th term = 4th term + 5th term + 5
= 24 + 41 + 5 = 70.

QUESTION: 11

A bag contains 600 pens of brand A and 1200 pens of brand B.If 12% of brand A pens and 25% of brand B pens are removed,then what is the approximate percentage of total pens removed from the bag?Options

Solution:
QUESTION: 12

The information and quantities in column-A and column-B are given below.
Compare the quantities.

Solution:
QUESTION: 13

 The information and quantities in column A and column B are given below.
Compare the quantities.

Solution:
QUESTION: 14

The information and quantities in column-A and column-B are given below. 
Compare the quantities.

Solution:
QUESTION: 15

A sum fetched a total simple interest of Rs. 4016.25 at the rate of 9 p.c.p.a. in 5 years. What is the sum?

Solution:

QUESTION: 16

Read the following information carefully and answer the questions based on it.
In 6 educational years, number of students taking admission and leaving from the 5 different school which are founded in 1990 are given below 


Q. What is the average number of students studying in all the five schools in 1992 ?

Solution:

Total no. of students studying in all schools in 1992
= (1025 + 230 + 190 + 950 + 350 + 225 + 1100 + 320 + 300 + 1500 + 340 + 300 + 1450 + 250 + 280) - (120 + 110 + 150 + 115 + 130 + 150 + 150 + 160 + 125 + 130)
= 8810 - 1340 = 7470
∴ Average = 7470/5 =1494

QUESTION: 17

Read the following information carefully and answer the questions based on it.
In 6 educational years, number of students taking admission and leaving from the 5 different school which are founded in 1990 are given below 


Q. What was the number of students studying in School B in 1994 ?

Solution:

Number of students studying in school B in 1994
= 950 + (350 - 150) + (225 - 115) + (185 - 110) + (200 - 90)
= 950 + 200 + 110 + 75 + 110 = 1445

QUESTION: 18

Read the following information carefully and answer the questions based on it.
In 6 educational years, number of students taking admission and leaving from the 5 different school which are founded in 1990 are given below 


Q. Number of students leaving School C from the year 1990 to 1995 is approximately what percentage of number of students taking admission in the same second and in the same year ?

Solution:

Number of students leaving school C from 1990 to 1995
= 130 + 150 + 125 + 140 + 180 = 725
Number of students admitted during the period
= 1100 + 320 + 300 + 260 + 240 + 310 = 2530
∴ Required percentage =725/2530× 100 ≈ 29%

QUESTION: 19

Three machines, individually, can do a certain job in 4,5 and 6 hours, respectively. What is the greatest part of the job that can be done in one hour by two of the machines working together at their respective rates?

Solution:

The two fastest machines will be able to do the greatest part of the job in one hour
The fastest machine, which can do the whole job in 4 hours, can do 1/4of the job in one hour
The next fastest machine, which can do the whole job in 5 hours, can do 1/5of the job in one hours Together, these machines can do  of the job in one hour

QUESTION: 20

In a mixture of 60 litres, the ratio of milk and water is 2:1. If the ratio of the milk and water is to be 1:2,then the amount of water to be further added isOptions

Solution:
QUESTION: 21

In these questions, relationships between different elements is shown in the statements. These statements are followed by two conclusions. 
Give answer (1) if only conclusion I follows. 
Give answer (2) if only conclusion II follows. 
Give answer (3) if either conclusion I or conclusion II follows. 
Give answer (4) if neither conclusion I nor conclusion II follows. 
Give answer (5) if both conclusions I and II follow.

21. Statements :N ≥ O ≥ P = Q > R 
Conclusions :
I. N > R 
II. R = N

Solution:

Conclusions:
I. N > R → follow
II. R = N → Not follow {∵ N > R}

QUESTION: 22

In these questions, relationships between different elements is shown in the statements. These statements are followed by two conclusions. 
Give answer (1) if only conclusion I follows. 
Give answer (2) if only conclusion II follows. 
Give answer (3) if either conclusion I or conclusion II follows. 
Give answer (4) if neither conclusion I nor conclusion II follows. 
Give answer (5) if both conclusions I and II follow.

Statements : W ≤ X < Y = Z > A; W < B
Conclusions :
I. B > Z 
II. W < A

Solution:

Conclusions:
I. B > Z → Not follow {∵ Relationship not exist}
II. W < A → Not follow {∵ Relationship not exist}

QUESTION: 23

In these questions, relationships between different elements is shown in the statements. These statements are followed by two conclusions. 
Give answer (1) if only conclusion I follows. 
Give answer (2) if only conclusion II follows. 
Give answer (3) if either conclusion I or conclusion II follows. 
Give answer (4) if neither conclusion I nor conclusion II follows. 
Give answer (5) if both conclusions I and II follow.

Statements : H > I > J > K; L < M < K
Conclusions :
I. I > M 
II. L < H

Solution:

Conclusions:
I. I > M → follow
II. L < H → follow

QUESTION: 24

Eight friends A, B, C, D, E, F, G and H are sitting around a circle (not necessarily in the same order) facing the centre.
- B sits third to left of F.
- E is an immediate neighbour of both B and H. Only one person sits between A and H.
- C and G are immediate neighbours of each other. Neither C nor G is an immediate neighbour of B.
- Only one person sits between C and D.

Q. Who amongst the following is an immediate neighbour of both A and H ?

Solution:

QUESTION: 25

Eight friends A, B, C, D, E, F, G and H are sitting around a circle (not necessarily in the same order) facing the centre.
- B sits third to left of F.
- E is an immediate neighbour of both B and H. Only one person sits between A and H.
- C and G are immediate neighbours of each other. Neither C nor G is an immediate neighbour of B.
- Only one person sits between C and D.

Q. 'F' is related to 'D' in a certain way based on the seating positions in the given arrangement. Similarly 'C' is related to 'E' in the same way. To whom amongst the following is 'H' related to following the same pattern ?

Solution:

QUESTION: 26

Eight friends A, B, C, D, E, F, G and H are sitting around a circle (not necessarily in the same order) facing the centre.
- B sits third to left of F.
- E is an immediate neighbour of both B and H. Only one person sits between A and H.
- C and G are immediate neighbours of each other. Neither C nor G is an immediate neighbour of B.
- Only one person sits between C and D.

Q. Which of the following represents the correct position of A ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 27

Each question below consists of two statements numbered I and II . You have to decide whether the data provided in the statements are sufficient to answer the questions.
Give answer (1) if the statement I alone is sufficient to answer the question, but the statement II alone is not sufficient.
Give answer (2) if the statement II alone is sufficient to answer the question, but the statement I alone is not sufficient.
Give answer (3) if both statements I and II together are needed to answer the question.
Give answer (4) if either the statement I alone or statement II alone is sufficient to answer the question.
Give answer (5) if you cannot get the answer from the statement I and II together, but need even more data.

Q. Is the child holding a yellow coloured flower?
I. When the thorn of the flower pricked his finger, the colour of the blood matched that of the flower.
II. The child is carrying a rose in his hand.

Solution:
QUESTION: 28

Each question below consists of two statements numbered I and II . You have to decide whether the data provided in the statements are sufficient to answer the questions.
Give answer (1) if the statement I alone is sufficient to answer the question, but the statement II alone is not sufficient.
Give answer (2) if the statement II alone is sufficient to answer the question, but the statement I alone is not sufficient.
Give answer (3) if both statements I and II together are needed to answer the question.
Give answer (4) if either the statement I alone or statement II alone is sufficient to answer the question.
Give answer (5) if you cannot get the answer from the statement I and II together, but need even more data.

Q. Who among M, N, P and R is facing North?
I. Only one among the four faces North.
II. M and N face West while P is facing South.

Solution:
QUESTION: 29

Each question below consists of two statements numbered I and II . You have to decide whether the data provided in the statements are sufficient to answer the questions.
Give answer (1) if the statement I alone is sufficient to answer the question, but the statement II alone is not sufficient.
Give answer (2) if the statement II alone is sufficient to answer the question, but the statement I alone is not sufficient.
Give answer (3) if both statements I and II together are needed to answer the question.
Give answer (4) if either the statement I alone or statement II alone is sufficient to answer the question.
Give answer (5) if you cannot get the answer from the statement I and II together, but need even more data.

Q. Is it afternoon in Delhi?
I. The weather is bright, humid and hot in Delhi.
II. Thirteen hours ago it was midnight in Delhi.

Solution:
QUESTION: 30

Five girls are sitting on a bench to be photographed. Seema is to the left of Rani and to the right of Bindu. Mary is to the right of Rani. Reeta is between Rani and Mary.

Q. Who is sitting immediate right to Reeta ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 31

Five girls are sitting on a bench to be photographed. Seema is to the left of Rani and to the right of Bindu. Mary is to the right of Rani. Reeta is between Rani and Mary.

Q. Who is in the middle of the photograph ?

Solution:

QUESTION: 32

Y has been believed to cause Z. A new report, noting that Y and Z are often observed to be preceded by X, suggests that X, not Y, may be the cause of Z. 
Which of the following further observations would best support the new report's suggestion?

Solution:
QUESTION: 33

Editor: Many candidates say that if elected they will reduce governmental intrusion into voters’ lives. But voters actually elect politicians who instead promise that the government will provide assistance to solve their most pressing problems. Governmental assistance, however, costs money, and money can come only from taxes, which can be considered a form of governmental intrusion. Thus, governmental intrusion into the lives of voters will rarely be substantially reduced over time in a democracy.Which one of the following, if true, would most strengthen the editor’s argument?

Solution:
QUESTION: 34

 Hospital executive: At a recent conference on nonprofit management, several computer experts maintained that the most significant threat faced by large institutions such as universities and hospitals is unauthorized access to confidential data. In light of this testimony, we should make the protection of our clients’ confidentiality our highest priority.The hospital executive’s argument is most vulnerable to which one of the following objections?

Solution:
QUESTION: 35

An electronic device when fed with the numbers, rearranges them in a particular order following certain rules. The following is a step-by-step process of rearrangement for the given input of numbers.
Input :- 85 16 36 04 19 97 63 09
Step I :- 97 85 16 36 04 19 63 09
Step II :- 97 85 63 16 36 04 19 09
Step III :- 97 85 63 36 16 04 19 09
Step IV :- 97 85 63 36 19 16 04 09
Step V :- 97 85 63 36 19 16 09 04
(for the given input step V is the last step).

1. Which of the following will be Step V for the given input ? 
Input : 25 08 35 11 88 67 23

Solution:

In the given arrangement, the numbers have been arranged in descending order in a sequence, altering the position of only one number in each step
Input :- 25 08 35 11 88 67 23
Step I :- 88 25 08 35 11 67 23
Step II :- 88 67 25 08 35 11 23
Step III :- 88 67 35 25 08 11 23
Step IV :- 88 67 35 25 23 08 11
Step V :- 88 67 35 25 23 11 08

QUESTION: 36

An electronic device when fed with the numbers, rearranges them in a particular order following certain rules. The following is a step-by-step process of rearrangement for the given input of numbers.
Input :- 85 16 36 04 19 97 63 09
Step I :- 97 85 16 36 04 19 63 09
Step II :- 97 85 63 16 36 04 19 09
Step III :- 97 85 63 36 16 04 19 09
Step IV :- 97 85 63 36 19 16 04 09
Step V :- 97 85 63 36 19 16 09 04
(for the given input step V is the last step).

Which of the following will be Step III for the given input ? 
Input :- 09 25 16 30 32 19 17 06

Solution:

In the given arrangement, the numbers have been arranged in descending order in a sequence, altering the position of only one number in each step
Input :- 09 25 16 30 32 19 17 06
Step I :- 32 09 25 16 30 19 17 06
Step II :- 32 30 09 25 16 19 17 06
Step III :- 32 30 25 09 16 19 17 06

QUESTION: 37

An electronic device when fed with the numbers, rearranges them in a particular order following certain rules. The following is a step-by-step process of rearrangement for the given input of numbers.
Input :- 85 16 36 04 19 97 63 09
Step I :- 97 85 16 36 04 19 63 09
Step II :- 97 85 63 16 36 04 19 09
Step III :- 97 85 63 36 16 04 19 09
Step IV :- 97 85 63 36 19 16 04 09
Step V :- 97 85 63 36 19 16 09 04
(for the given input step V is the last step).

Q. Which of the following will be the last step for the given input ? 
Input : 16 09 25 27 06 05

Solution:

In the given arrangement, the numbers have been arranged in descending order in a sequence, altering the position of only one number in each step
Input :- 16 09 25 27 06 05
Step I :- 27 16 09 25 06 05
Step II :- 27 25 16 09 06 05
Since all the numbers in the given input have been arranged in descending order uptil Step II, so it is the last step.

QUESTION: 38

Below are the statements followed by four conclusions numbered I, II,III and IV. You have to consider the statements and the following conclusions and decide which of the conclusion(s) follows the statement(s).

Statements : 
a. Some films are clouds.
b. All rats are clouds.
c. Some clouds are chairs. 
Conclusions : 
I. No film is chair. 
II. Some rats are films. 
III. Some clouds are rats. 
IV. Some chairs are rats.

Solution:

QUESTION: 39

Below are the statements followed by four conclusions numbered I, II,III and IV. You have to consider the statements and the following conclusions and decide which of the conclusion(s) follows the statement(s).

Statements : 
a. Some lice are slates. 
b.All slates are apples.
c. No apple is car. 
Conclusions : 
I. Some cars are slates. 
II. Some lice are cars. 
III. Some apples are lice. 
IV. No car is lice.

Solution:


Statement:
I) False
II) True when (IV) is false & vice versa
III) True
IV) True when (II) is false & vice versa

QUESTION: 40

Below are the statements followed by four conclusions numbered I, II,III and IV. You have to consider the statements and the following conclusions and decide which of the conclusion(s) follows the statement(s).

Statements : 
a.All fans are tubelights.
b.No pen is a bulb.
c.Some bulbs are fans.
Conclusions:
I.Some pens are tubelights.
II.No pens are tubelights.
III. Some tubelights are fans.
IV. All tubelights are fans.

Solution:

Some bulbs are fans + All fans are tubelights = Some bulbs are tube lights ....
(a) [I + A = I]. Now, statement (II) + (a) gives: Some tube lights are not pens.
Hence conclusions I and II can’t be established.
III follows from first statement on conversion.
But IV does not. But I and II make a complementary pair [I-E pair].
Hence either I or II follows

QUESTION: 41

Fill in the blanks with appropriate word . 

After ten years of ___B1___ inflation, prices have spiked 7.5% in the third week of July. This looks scary-after all, Indian had got used to prices crawling up by 2% in the last two years, and a 10-year average inflation rate of about 5%-but but you shouldn’t worry. This burst of inflation is the result of three factors that have come together unexpectedly, are unlikely to ___B2___ for long and are unlikely to ___B3___ up together again. A ___B4___ rise in global oil prices, a monsoon that arrived late and a spike in global metal prices. North Sea crude has crossed $42 per barrel, driven up by low petroleum ___B5___ and soaring demand in the US as war production heats up. Oil markets are also spooked by the ___B6___of Russian oil supplies falling on the back of the Yukos-Sibneft probe. There‘s little that the government can do to ___B7___ users form soaring oil prices-indeed, it shouldn’t if it wants to ___B8___ efficiency. Higher transport costs have pushed up rates of vegetables and fruits; farm produce could also get affected by rains that arrived too late for kharif sowing. China is ___B9___ up steel and other metals form all over the world to ___B10___ a construction boom ahead of the 2008 Olympics, making metal prices soar all over the world, and sparking inflation in India.

Q. Appropriate word at B1 is

Solution:
QUESTION: 42

Fill in the blanks with appropriate word . 

After ten years of ___B1___ inflation, prices have spiked 7.5% in the third week of July. This looks scary-after all, Indian had got used to prices crawling up by 2% in the last two years, and a 10-year average inflation rate of about 5%-but but you shouldn’t worry. This burst of inflation is the result of three factors that have come together unexpectedly, are unlikely to ___B2___ for long and are unlikely to ___B3___ up together again. A ___B4___ rise in global oil prices, a monsoon that arrived late and a spike in global metal prices. North Sea crude has crossed $42 per barrel, driven up by low petroleum ___B5___ and soaring demand in the US as war production heats up. Oil markets are also spooked by the ___B6___of Russian oil supplies falling on the back of the Yukos-Sibneft probe. There‘s little that the government can do to ___B7___ users form soaring oil prices-indeed, it shouldn’t if it wants to ___B8___ efficiency. Higher transport costs have pushed up rates of vegetables and fruits; farm produce could also get affected by rains that arrived too late for kharif sowing. China is ___B9___ up steel and other metals form all over the world to ___B10___ a construction boom ahead of the 2008 Olympics, making metal prices soar all over the world, and sparking inflation in India.

Q. Appropriate word at B2 is

Solution:
QUESTION: 43

Fill in the blanks with appropriate word . 

After ten years of ___B1___ inflation, prices have spiked 7.5% in the third week of July. This looks scary-after all, Indian had got used to prices crawling up by 2% in the last two years, and a 10-year average inflation rate of about 5%-but but you shouldn’t worry. This burst of inflation is the result of three factors that have come together unexpectedly, are unlikely to ___B2___ for long and are unlikely to ___B3___ up together again. A ___B4___ rise in global oil prices, a monsoon that arrived late and a spike in global metal prices. North Sea crude has crossed $42 per barrel, driven up by low petroleum ___B5___ and soaring demand in the US as war production heats up. Oil markets are also spooked by the ___B6___of Russian oil supplies falling on the back of the Yukos-Sibneft probe. There‘s little that the government can do to ___B7___ users form soaring oil prices-indeed, it shouldn’t if it wants to ___B8___ efficiency. Higher transport costs have pushed up rates of vegetables and fruits; farm produce could also get affected by rains that arrived too late for kharif sowing. China is ___B9___ up steel and other metals form all over the world to ___B10___ a construction boom ahead of the 2008 Olympics, making metal prices soar all over the world, and sparking inflation in India.

Q. Appropriate word at B3 is

Solution:
QUESTION: 44

Fill in the blanks with appropriate word . 

After ten years of ___B1___ inflation, prices have spiked 7.5% in the third week of July. This looks scary-after all, Indian had got used to prices crawling up by 2% in the last two years, and a 10-year average inflation rate of about 5%-but but you shouldn’t worry. This burst of inflation is the result of three factors that have come together unexpectedly, are unlikely to ___B2___ for long and are unlikely to ___B3___ up together again. A ___B4___ rise in global oil prices, a monsoon that arrived late and a spike in global metal prices. North Sea crude has crossed $42 per barrel, driven up by low petroleum ___B5___ and soaring demand in the US as war production heats up. Oil markets are also spooked by the ___B6___of Russian oil supplies falling on the back of the Yukos-Sibneft probe. There‘s little that the government can do to ___B7___ users form soaring oil prices-indeed, it shouldn’t if it wants to ___B8___ efficiency. Higher transport costs have pushed up rates of vegetables and fruits; farm produce could also get affected by rains that arrived too late for kharif sowing. China is ___B9___ up steel and other metals form all over the world to ___B10___ a construction boom ahead of the 2008 Olympics, making metal prices soar all over the world, and sparking inflation in India.

Q. Appropriate word at B4 is

Solution:
QUESTION: 45

Fill in the blanks with appropriate word . 

After ten years of ___B1___ inflation, prices have spiked 7.5% in the third week of July. This looks scary-after all, Indian had got used to prices crawling up by 2% in the last two years, and a 10-year average inflation rate of about 5%-but but you shouldn’t worry. This burst of inflation is the result of three factors that have come together unexpectedly, are unlikely to ___B2___ for long and are unlikely to ___B3___ up together again. A ___B4___ rise in global oil prices, a monsoon that arrived late and a spike in global metal prices. North Sea crude has crossed $42 per barrel, driven up by low petroleum ___B5___ and soaring demand in the US as war production heats up. Oil markets are also spooked by the ___B6___of Russian oil supplies falling on the back of the Yukos-Sibneft probe. There‘s little that the government can do to ___B7___ users form soaring oil prices-indeed, it shouldn’t if it wants to ___B8___ efficiency. Higher transport costs have pushed up rates of vegetables and fruits; farm produce could also get affected by rains that arrived too late for kharif sowing. China is ___B9___ up steel and other metals form all over the world to ___B10___ a construction boom ahead of the 2008 Olympics, making metal prices soar all over the world, and sparking inflation in India.

Q. Appropriate word at B5 is

Solution:
QUESTION: 46

Fill in the blanks with appropriate word . 

After ten years of ___B1___ inflation, prices have spiked 7.5% in the third week of July. This looks scary-after all, Indian had got used to prices crawling up by 2% in the last two years, and a 10-year average inflation rate of about 5%-but but you shouldn’t worry. This burst of inflation is the result of three factors that have come together unexpectedly, are unlikely to ___B2___ for long and are unlikely to ___B3___ up together again. A ___B4___ rise in global oil prices, a monsoon that arrived late and a spike in global metal prices. North Sea crude has crossed $42 per barrel, driven up by low petroleum ___B5___ and soaring demand in the US as war production heats up. Oil markets are also spooked by the ___B6___of Russian oil supplies falling on the back of the Yukos-Sibneft probe. There‘s little that the government can do to ___B7___ users form soaring oil prices-indeed, it shouldn’t if it wants to ___B8___ efficiency. Higher transport costs have pushed up rates of vegetables and fruits; farm produce could also get affected by rains that arrived too late for kharif sowing. China is ___B9___ up steel and other metals form all over the world to ___B10___ a construction boom ahead of the 2008 Olympics, making metal prices soar all over the world, and sparking inflation in India.

Q. Appropriate word at B6 is

Solution:
QUESTION: 47

Fill in the blanks with appropriate word . 

After ten years of ___B1___ inflation, prices have spiked 7.5% in the third week of July. This looks scary-after all, Indian had got used to prices crawling up by 2% in the last two years, and a 10-year average inflation rate of about 5%-but but you shouldn’t worry. This burst of inflation is the result of three factors that have come together unexpectedly, are unlikely to ___B2___ for long and are unlikely to ___B3___ up together again. A ___B4___ rise in global oil prices, a monsoon that arrived late and a spike in global metal prices. North Sea crude has crossed $42 per barrel, driven up by low petroleum ___B5___ and soaring demand in the US as war production heats up. Oil markets are also spooked by the ___B6___of Russian oil supplies falling on the back of the Yukos-Sibneft probe. There‘s little that the government can do to ___B7___ users form soaring oil prices-indeed, it shouldn’t if it wants to ___B8___ efficiency. Higher transport costs have pushed up rates of vegetables and fruits; farm produce could also get affected by rains that arrived too late for kharif sowing. China is ___B9___ up steel and other metals form all over the world to ___B10___ a construction boom ahead of the 2008 Olympics, making metal prices soar all over the world, and sparking inflation in India.

Q. Appropriate word at B7 is

Solution:
QUESTION: 48

Fill in the blanks with appropriate word . 

After ten years of ___B1___ inflation, prices have spiked 7.5% in the third week of July. This looks scary-after all, Indian had got used to prices crawling up by 2% in the last two years, and a 10-year average inflation rate of about 5%-but but you shouldn’t worry. This burst of inflation is the result of three factors that have come together unexpectedly, are unlikely to ___B2___ for long and are unlikely to ___B3___ up together again. A ___B4___ rise in global oil prices, a monsoon that arrived late and a spike in global metal prices. North Sea crude has crossed $42 per barrel, driven up by low petroleum ___B5___ and soaring demand in the US as war production heats up. Oil markets are also spooked by the ___B6___of Russian oil supplies falling on the back of the Yukos-Sibneft probe. There‘s little that the government can do to ___B7___ users form soaring oil prices-indeed, it shouldn’t if it wants to ___B8___ efficiency. Higher transport costs have pushed up rates of vegetables and fruits; farm produce could also get affected by rains that arrived too late for kharif sowing. China is ___B9___ up steel and other metals form all over the world to ___B10___ a construction boom ahead of the 2008 Olympics, making metal prices soar all over the world, and sparking inflation in India.

Q. Appropriate word at B8 is

Solution:
QUESTION: 49

Fill in the blanks with appropriate word . 

After ten years of ___B1___ inflation, prices have spiked 7.5% in the third week of July. This looks scary-after all, Indian had got used to prices crawling up by 2% in the last two years, and a 10-year average inflation rate of about 5%-but but you shouldn’t worry. This burst of inflation is the result of three factors that have come together unexpectedly, are unlikely to ___B2___ for long and are unlikely to ___B3___ up together again. A ___B4___ rise in global oil prices, a monsoon that arrived late and a spike in global metal prices. North Sea crude has crossed $42 per barrel, driven up by low petroleum ___B5___ and soaring demand in the US as war production heats up. Oil markets are also spooked by the ___B6___of Russian oil supplies falling on the back of the Yukos-Sibneft probe. There‘s little that the government can do to ___B7___ users form soaring oil prices-indeed, it shouldn’t if it wants to ___B8___ efficiency. Higher transport costs have pushed up rates of vegetables and fruits; farm produce could also get affected by rains that arrived too late for kharif sowing. China is ___B9___ up steel and other metals form all over the world to ___B10___ a construction boom ahead of the 2008 Olympics, making metal prices soar all over the world, and sparking inflation in India.

Q. Appropriate word at B9 is

Solution:
QUESTION: 50

Fill in the blanks with appropriate word . 

After ten years of ___B1___ inflation, prices have spiked 7.5% in the third week of July. This looks scary-after all, Indian had got used to prices crawling up by 2% in the last two years, and a 10-year average inflation rate of about 5%-but but you shouldn’t worry. This burst of inflation is the result of three factors that have come together unexpectedly, are unlikely to ___B2___ for long and are unlikely to ___B3___ up together again. A ___B4___ rise in global oil prices, a monsoon that arrived late and a spike in global metal prices. North Sea crude has crossed $42 per barrel, driven up by low petroleum ___B5___ and soaring demand in the US as war production heats up. Oil markets are also spooked by the ___B6___of Russian oil supplies falling on the back of the Yukos-Sibneft probe. There‘s little that the government can do to ___B7___ users form soaring oil prices-indeed, it shouldn’t if it wants to ___B8___ efficiency. Higher transport costs have pushed up rates of vegetables and fruits; farm produce could also get affected by rains that arrived too late for kharif sowing. China is ___B9___ up steel and other metals form all over the world to ___B10___ a construction boom ahead of the 2008 Olympics, making metal prices soar all over the world, and sparking inflation in India.

Q. Appropriate word at B10 is

Solution:
QUESTION: 51

When times are hard, doomsayers are aplenty. The problem is that if you listen too carefully, you tend to overlook the most obvious signs of change. 2011 was a bad year. Can 2012 be any worse? Doomsday forecasts are the easiest to make these days. So let's try a contrarian's forecast instead.
Let's start with the global economy. We have seen a steady flow of good news from the US. The employment situation seems to be improving rapidly and consumer sentiment, reflected in retail expenditures on discretionary items like electronics and clothes, has picked up. If these trends sustain, the US might post better growth numbers for 2012 than the 1.5 - 1.8 per cent being forecast currently.
Japan is likely to pull out of a recession in 2012 as post-earthquake reconstruction efforts gather momentum and the fiscal stimulus announced in 2011 begins to pay off. The consensus estimate for growth in Japan is a respectable 2 per cent for 2012.
The "hard-landing" scenario for China remains and will remain a myth. Growth might decelerate further from the 9 per cent that it expected to clock in 2011 but is unlikely to drop below 8-8.5 percent in 2012. Europe is certainly in a spot of trouble. It is perhaps already in recession and for 2012 it is likely to post mildly negative growth. The risk of implosion has dwindled over the last few months - peripheral economies like Greece, Italy and Spain have new governments in place and have made progress towards genuine economic reform.
Even with some of these positive factors in place, we have to accept the fact that global growth in 2012 will be tepid. But there is a flipside to this. Softer growth means lower demand for commodities and this is likely to drive a correction in commodity prices. Lower commodity inflation will enable emerging market central banks to reverse their monetary stance. China, for instance, has already reversed its stance and has pared its reserve ratio twice. The RBI also seems poised for a reversal in its rate cycle as headline inflation seems well on its way to its target of 7 per cent for March 2012. That said, oil might be an exception to the general trend in commodities. Rising geopolitical tensions, particularly the continuing face-off between Iran and the US, might lead to a spurt in prices. It might make sense for our oil companies to hedge this risk instead of buying oil in the spot market. As inflation fears abate and emerging market central banks begin to cut rates, two things could happen. Lower commodity inflation would mean lower interest rates and better credit availability. This could set a floor to growth and slowly reverse the business cycle within these economies. Second, as the fear of untamed, runaway inflation in these economies abates, the global investor's comfort levels with their markets will increase.
Which of the emerging markets will outperform and who will get left behind ? In an environment in which global growth is likely to be weak, economies like India that have a powerful domestic consumption dynamic should lead; those dependent on exports should, prima facie, fall behind. Specifically for India, a fall in the exchange rate could not have come at a better time. It will help Indian exporters gain market share even if global trade remains depressed. More importantly, it could lead to massive import substitution that favours domestic producers.
Let’s now focus on India and start with a caveat. It is important not to confuse a short-run cyclical dip with a permanent de-rating of its long-term structural potential. The arithmetic is simple. Our growth rate can be in the range of 7-10 per cent depending on policy action. Ten per cent if we get everything right, 7 per cent it we get it all wrong. Which policies and reforms are critical to taking us to our 10 per cent potential? In judging this, let's again be careful. Let's not go by the laundry list of reforms that FIls like to wave: increase in foreign equity limits in foreign shareholding, greater voting rights for institutional shareholders in banks, FDI in retail, etc. These can have an impact only at the margin. We need not bend over backwards to appease the FIIs through these reforms - they will invest in our markets when momentum picks up and will be the first to exit when the momentum flags, reforms or not. The reforms that we need are the ones that can actually raise out sustainable long-term growth rate. These have to come in areas like better targeting of subsidies, making projects in infrastructure viable so that they draw capital, raising the productivity of agriculture, improving healthcare and education, bringing the parallel economy under the tax net, implementing fundamental reforms in taxation like GST and the direct tax code and finally easing the myriad rules and regulations that make doing business in India such a nightmare. A number of these things do not require new legislation and can be done through executive order.

Q. Which of the following is NOT TRUE according to the passage?

Solution:
QUESTION: 52

When times are hard, doomsayers are aplenty. The problem is that if you listen too carefully, you tend to overlook the most obvious signs of change. 2011 was a bad year. Can 2012 be any worse? Doomsday forecasts are the easiest to make these days. So let's try a contrarian's forecast instead.
Let's start with the global economy. We have seen a steady flow of good news from the US. The employment situation seems to be improving rapidly and consumer sentiment, reflected in retail expenditures on discretionary items like electronics and clothes, has picked up. If these trends sustain, the US might post better growth numbers for 2012 than the 1.5 - 1.8 per cent being forecast currently.
Japan is likely to pull out of a recession in 2012 as post-earthquake reconstruction efforts gather momentum and the fiscal stimulus announced in 2011 begins to pay off. The consensus estimate for growth in Japan is a respectable 2 per cent for 2012.
The "hard-landing" scenario for China remains and will remain a myth. Growth might decelerate further from the 9 per cent that it expected to clock in 2011 but is unlikely to drop below 8-8.5 percent in 2012. Europe is certainly in a spot of trouble. It is perhaps already in recession and for 2012 it is likely to post mildly negative growth. The risk of implosion has dwindled over the last few months - peripheral economies like Greece, Italy and Spain have new governments in place and have made progress towards genuine economic reform.
Even with some of these positive factors in place, we have to accept the fact that global growth in 2012 will be tepid. But there is a flipside to this. Softer growth means lower demand for commodities and this is likely to drive a correction in commodity prices. Lower commodity inflation will enable emerging market central banks to reverse their monetary stance. China, for instance, has already reversed its stance and has pared its reserve ratio twice. The RBI also seems poised for a reversal in its rate cycle as headline inflation seems well on its way to its target of 7 per cent for March 2012. That said, oil might be an exception to the general trend in commodities. Rising geopolitical tensions, particularly the continuing face-off between Iran and the US, might lead to a spurt in prices. It might make sense for our oil companies to hedge this risk instead of buying oil in the spot market. As inflation fears abate and emerging market central banks begin to cut rates, two things could happen. Lower commodity inflation would mean lower interest rates and better credit availability. This could set a floor to growth and slowly reverse the business cycle within these economies. Second, as the fear of untamed, runaway inflation in these economies abates, the global investor's comfort levels with their markets will increase.
Which of the emerging markets will outperform and who will get left behind ? In an environment in which global growth is likely to be weak, economies like India that have a powerful domestic consumption dynamic should lead; those dependent on exports should, prima facie, fall behind. Specifically for India, a fall in the exchange rate could not have come at a better time. It will help Indian exporters gain market share even if global trade remains depressed. More importantly, it could lead to massive import substitution that favours domestic producers.
Let’s now focus on India and start with a caveat. It is important not to confuse a short-run cyclical dip with a permanent de-rating of its long-term structural potential. The arithmetic is simple. Our growth rate can be in the range of 7-10 per cent depending on policy action. Ten per cent if we get everything right, 7 per cent it we get it all wrong. Which policies and reforms are critical to taking us to our 10 per cent potential? In judging this, let's again be careful. Let's not go by the laundry list of reforms that FIls like to wave: increase in foreign equity limits in foreign shareholding, greater voting rights for institutional shareholders in banks, FDI in retail, etc. These can have an impact only at the margin. We need not bend over backwards to appease the FIIs through these reforms - they will invest in our markets when momentum picks up and will be the first to exit when the momentum flags, reforms or not. The reforms that we need are the ones that can actually raise out sustainable long-term growth rate. These have to come in areas like better targeting of subsidies, making projects in infrastructure viable so that they draw capital, raising the productivity of agriculture, improving healthcare and education, bringing the parallel economy under the tax net, implementing fundamental reforms in taxation like GST and the direct tax code and finally easing the myriad rules and regulations that make doing business in India such a nightmare. A number of these things do not require new legislation and can be done through executive order.

Which of the following will possibly be a result of softer growth estimated for the year 2012?
(A) Prices of oil will not increase.
(B) Credit availability would be lesser.
(C) Commodity inflation would be lesser.

Solution:
QUESTION: 53

When times are hard, doomsayers are aplenty. The problem is that if you listen too carefully, you tend to overlook the most obvious signs of change. 2011 was a bad year. Can 2012 be any worse? Doomsday forecasts are the easiest to make these days. So let's try a contrarian's forecast instead.
Let's start with the global economy. We have seen a steady flow of good news from the US. The employment situation seems to be improving rapidly and consumer sentiment, reflected in retail expenditures on discretionary items like electronics and clothes, has picked up. If these trends sustain, the US might post better growth numbers for 2012 than the 1.5 - 1.8 per cent being forecast currently.
Japan is likely to pull out of a recession in 2012 as post-earthquake reconstruction efforts gather momentum and the fiscal stimulus announced in 2011 begins to pay off. The consensus estimate for growth in Japan is a respectable 2 per cent for 2012.
The "hard-landing" scenario for China remains and will remain a myth. Growth might decelerate further from the 9 per cent that it expected to clock in 2011 but is unlikely to drop below 8-8.5 percent in 2012. Europe is certainly in a spot of trouble. It is perhaps already in recession and for 2012 it is likely to post mildly negative growth. The risk of implosion has dwindled over the last few months - peripheral economies like Greece, Italy and Spain have new governments in place and have made progress towards genuine economic reform.
Even with some of these positive factors in place, we have to accept the fact that global growth in 2012 will be tepid. But there is a flipside to this. Softer growth means lower demand for commodities and this is likely to drive a correction in commodity prices. Lower commodity inflation will enable emerging market central banks to reverse their monetary stance. China, for instance, has already reversed its stance and has pared its reserve ratio twice. The RBI also seems poised for a reversal in its rate cycle as headline inflation seems well on its way to its target of 7 per cent for March 2012. That said, oil might be an exception to the general trend in commodities. Rising geopolitical tensions, particularly the continuing face-off between Iran and the US, might lead to a spurt in prices. It might make sense for our oil companies to hedge this risk instead of buying oil in the spot market. As inflation fears abate and emerging market central banks begin to cut rates, two things could happen. Lower commodity inflation would mean lower interest rates and better credit availability. This could set a floor to growth and slowly reverse the business cycle within these economies. Second, as the fear of untamed, runaway inflation in these economies abates, the global investor's comfort levels with their markets will increase.
Which of the emerging markets will outperform and who will get left behind ? In an environment in which global growth is likely to be weak, economies like India that have a powerful domestic consumption dynamic should lead; those dependent on exports should, prima facie, fall behind. Specifically for India, a fall in the exchange rate could not have come at a better time. It will help Indian exporters gain market share even if global trade remains depressed. More importantly, it could lead to massive import substitution that favours domestic producers.
Let’s now focus on India and start with a caveat. It is important not to confuse a short-run cyclical dip with a permanent de-rating of its long-term structural potential. The arithmetic is simple. Our growth rate can be in the range of 7-10 per cent depending on policy action. Ten per cent if we get everything right, 7 per cent it we get it all wrong. Which policies and reforms are critical to taking us to our 10 per cent potential? In judging this, let's again be careful. Let's not go by the laundry list of reforms that FIls like to wave: increase in foreign equity limits in foreign shareholding, greater voting rights for institutional shareholders in banks, FDI in retail, etc. These can have an impact only at the margin. We need not bend over backwards to appease the FIIs through these reforms - they will invest in our markets when momentum picks up and will be the first to exit when the momentum flags, reforms or not. The reforms that we need are the ones that can actually raise out sustainable long-term growth rate. These have to come in areas like better targeting of subsidies, making projects in infrastructure viable so that they draw capital, raising the productivity of agriculture, improving healthcare and education, bringing the parallel economy under the tax net, implementing fundamental reforms in taxation like GST and the direct tax code and finally easing the myriad rules and regulations that make doing business in India such a nightmare. A number of these things do not require new legislation and can be done through executive order.

Q. Which of the following can be said about the present status of the US economy?

Solution:
QUESTION: 54

When times are hard, doomsayers are aplenty. The problem is that if you listen too carefully, you tend to overlook the most obvious signs of change. 2011 was a bad year. Can 2012 be any worse? Doomsday forecasts are the easiest to make these days. So let's try a contrarian's forecast instead.
Let's start with the global economy. We have seen a steady flow of good news from the US. The employment situation seems to be improving rapidly and consumer sentiment, reflected in retail expenditures on discretionary items like electronics and clothes, has picked up. If these trends sustain, the US might post better growth numbers for 2012 than the 1.5 - 1.8 per cent being forecast currently.
Japan is likely to pull out of a recession in 2012 as post-earthquake reconstruction efforts gather momentum and the fiscal stimulus announced in 2011 begins to pay off. The consensus estimate for growth in Japan is a respectable 2 per cent for 2012.
The "hard-landing" scenario for China remains and will remain a myth. Growth might decelerate further from the 9 per cent that it expected to clock in 2011 but is unlikely to drop below 8-8.5 percent in 2012. Europe is certainly in a spot of trouble. It is perhaps already in recession and for 2012 it is likely to post mildly negative growth. The risk of implosion has dwindled over the last few months - peripheral economies like Greece, Italy and Spain have new governments in place and have made progress towards genuine economic reform.
Even with some of these positive factors in place, we have to accept the fact that global growth in 2012 will be tepid. But there is a flipside to this. Softer growth means lower demand for commodities and this is likely to drive a correction in commodity prices. Lower commodity inflation will enable emerging market central banks to reverse their monetary stance. China, for instance, has already reversed its stance and has pared its reserve ratio twice. The RBI also seems poised for a reversal in its rate cycle as headline inflation seems well on its way to its target of 7 per cent for March 2012. That said, oil might be an exception to the general trend in commodities. Rising geopolitical tensions, particularly the continuing face-off between Iran and the US, might lead to a spurt in prices. It might make sense for our oil companies to hedge this risk instead of buying oil in the spot market. As inflation fears abate and emerging market central banks begin to cut rates, two things could happen. Lower commodity inflation would mean lower interest rates and better credit availability. This could set a floor to growth and slowly reverse the business cycle within these economies. Second, as the fear of untamed, runaway inflation in these economies abates, the global investor's comfort levels with their markets will increase.
Which of the emerging markets will outperform and who will get left behind ? In an environment in which global growth is likely to be weak, economies like India that have a powerful domestic consumption dynamic should lead; those dependent on exports should, prima facie, fall behind. Specifically for India, a fall in the exchange rate could not have come at a better time. It will help Indian exporters gain market share even if global trade remains depressed. More importantly, it could lead to massive import substitution that favours domestic producers.
Let’s now focus on India and start with a caveat. It is important not to confuse a short-run cyclical dip with a permanent de-rating of its long-term structural potential. The arithmetic is simple. Our growth rate can be in the range of 7-10 per cent depending on policy action. Ten per cent if we get everything right, 7 per cent it we get it all wrong. Which policies and reforms are critical to taking us to our 10 per cent potential? In judging this, let's again be careful. Let's not go by the laundry list of reforms that FIls like to wave: increase in foreign equity limits in foreign shareholding, greater voting rights for institutional shareholders in banks, FDI in retail, etc. These can have an impact only at the margin. We need not bend over backwards to appease the FIIs through these reforms - they will invest in our markets when momentum picks up and will be the first to exit when the momentum flags, reforms or not. The reforms that we need are the ones that can actually raise out sustainable long-term growth rate. These have to come in areas like better targeting of subsidies, making projects in infrastructure viable so that they draw capital, raising the productivity of agriculture, improving healthcare and education, bringing the parallel economy under the tax net, implementing fundamental reforms in taxation like GST and the direct tax code and finally easing the myriad rules and regulations that make doing business in India such a nightmare. A number of these things do not require new legislation and can be done through executive order.

Q. Which of the following is possibly the most appropriate title for the passage?

Solution:
QUESTION: 55

When times are hard, doomsayers are aplenty. The problem is that if you listen too carefully, you tend to overlook the most obvious signs of change. 2011 was a bad year. Can 2012 be any worse? Doomsday forecasts are the easiest to make these days. So let's try a contrarian's forecast instead.
Let's start with the global economy. We have seen a steady flow of good news from the US. The employment situation seems to be improving rapidly and consumer sentiment, reflected in retail expenditures on discretionary items like electronics and clothes, has picked up. If these trends sustain, the US might post better growth numbers for 2012 than the 1.5 - 1.8 per cent being forecast currently.
Japan is likely to pull out of a recession in 2012 as post-earthquake reconstruction efforts gather momentum and the fiscal stimulus announced in 2011 begins to pay off. The consensus estimate for growth in Japan is a respectable 2 per cent for 2012.
The "hard-landing" scenario for China remains and will remain a myth. Growth might decelerate further from the 9 per cent that it expected to clock in 2011 but is unlikely to drop below 8-8.5 percent in 2012. Europe is certainly in a spot of trouble. It is perhaps already in recession and for 2012 it is likely to post mildly negative growth. The risk of implosion has dwindled over the last few months - peripheral economies like Greece, Italy and Spain have new governments in place and have made progress towards genuine economic reform.
Even with some of these positive factors in place, we have to accept the fact that global growth in 2012 will be tepid. But there is a flipside to this. Softer growth means lower demand for commodities and this is likely to drive a correction in commodity prices. Lower commodity inflation will enable emerging market central banks to reverse their monetary stance. China, for instance, has already reversed its stance and has pared its reserve ratio twice. The RBI also seems poised for a reversal in its rate cycle as headline inflation seems well on its way to its target of 7 per cent for March 2012. That said, oil might be an exception to the general trend in commodities. Rising geopolitical tensions, particularly the continuing face-off between Iran and the US, might lead to a spurt in prices. It might make sense for our oil companies to hedge this risk instead of buying oil in the spot market. As inflation fears abate and emerging market central banks begin to cut rates, two things could happen. Lower commodity inflation would mean lower interest rates and better credit availability. This could set a floor to growth and slowly reverse the business cycle within these economies. Second, as the fear of untamed, runaway inflation in these economies abates, the global investor's comfort levels with their markets will increase.
Which of the emerging markets will outperform and who will get left behind ? In an environment in which global growth is likely to be weak, economies like India that have a powerful domestic consumption dynamic should lead; those dependent on exports should, prima facie, fall behind. Specifically for India, a fall in the exchange rate could not have come at a better time. It will help Indian exporters gain market share even if global trade remains depressed. More importantly, it could lead to massive import substitution that favours domestic producers.
Let’s now focus on India and start with a caveat. It is important not to confuse a short-run cyclical dip with a permanent de-rating of its long-term structural potential. The arithmetic is simple. Our growth rate can be in the range of 7-10 per cent depending on policy action. Ten per cent if we get everything right, 7 per cent it we get it all wrong. Which policies and reforms are critical to taking us to our 10 per cent potential? In judging this, let's again be careful. Let's not go by the laundry list of reforms that FIls like to wave: increase in foreign equity limits in foreign shareholding, greater voting rights for institutional shareholders in banks, FDI in retail, etc. These can have an impact only at the margin. We need not bend over backwards to appease the FIIs through these reforms - they will invest in our markets when momentum picks up and will be the first to exit when the momentum flags, reforms or not. The reforms that we need are the ones that can actually raise out sustainable long-term growth rate. These have to come in areas like better targeting of subsidies, making projects in infrastructure viable so that they draw capital, raising the productivity of agriculture, improving healthcare and education, bringing the parallel economy under the tax net, implementing fundamental reforms in taxation like GST and the direct tax code and finally easing the myriad rules and regulations that make doing business in India such a nightmare. A number of these things do not require new legislation and can be done through executive order.

55. According to the author, which of the following would characterise Indian growth scenario in 2012?
(A) Domestic producers will take a hit because of depressed global trade scenario.
(B) On account of its high domestic consumption, India will lead.
(C) Indian exporters will have a hard time in gaining market share.

Solution:
QUESTION: 56

When times are hard, doomsayers are aplenty. The problem is that if you listen too carefully, you tend to overlook the most obvious signs of change. 2011 was a bad year. Can 2012 be any worse? Doomsday forecasts are the easiest to make these days. So let's try a contrarian's forecast instead.
Let's start with the global economy. We have seen a steady flow of good news from the US. The employment situation seems to be improving rapidly and consumer sentiment, reflected in retail expenditures on discretionary items like electronics and clothes, has picked up. If these trends sustain, the US might post better growth numbers for 2012 than the 1.5 - 1.8 per cent being forecast currently.
Japan is likely to pull out of a recession in 2012 as post-earthquake reconstruction efforts gather momentum and the fiscal stimulus announced in 2011 begins to pay off. The consensus estimate for growth in Japan is a respectable 2 per cent for 2012.
The "hard-landing" scenario for China remains and will remain a myth. Growth might decelerate further from the 9 per cent that it expected to clock in 2011 but is unlikely to drop below 8-8.5 percent in 2012. Europe is certainly in a spot of trouble. It is perhaps already in recession and for 2012 it is likely to post mildly negative growth. The risk of implosion has dwindled over the last few months - peripheral economies like Greece, Italy and Spain have new governments in place and have made progress towards genuine economic reform.
Even with some of these positive factors in place, we have to accept the fact that global growth in 2012 will be tepid. But there is a flipside to this. Softer growth means lower demand for commodities and this is likely to drive a correction in commodity prices. Lower commodity inflation will enable emerging market central banks to reverse their monetary stance. China, for instance, has already reversed its stance and has pared its reserve ratio twice. The RBI also seems poised for a reversal in its rate cycle as headline inflation seems well on its way to its target of 7 per cent for March 2012. That said, oil might be an exception to the general trend in commodities. Rising geopolitical tensions, particularly the continuing face-off between Iran and the US, might lead to a spurt in prices. It might make sense for our oil companies to hedge this risk instead of buying oil in the spot market. As inflation fears abate and emerging market central banks begin to cut rates, two things could happen. Lower commodity inflation would mean lower interest rates and better credit availability. This could set a floor to growth and slowly reverse the business cycle within these economies. Second, as the fear of untamed, runaway inflation in these economies abates, the global investor's comfort levels with their markets will increase.
Which of the emerging markets will outperform and who will get left behind ? In an environment in which global growth is likely to be weak, economies like India that have a powerful domestic consumption dynamic should lead; those dependent on exports should, prima facie, fall behind. Specifically for India, a fall in the exchange rate could not have come at a better time. It will help Indian exporters gain market share even if global trade remains depressed. More importantly, it could lead to massive import substitution that favours domestic producers.
Let’s now focus on India and start with a caveat. It is important not to confuse a short-run cyclical dip with a permanent de-rating of its long-term structural potential. The arithmetic is simple. Our growth rate can be in the range of 7-10 per cent depending on policy action. Ten per cent if we get everything right, 7 per cent it we get it all wrong. Which policies and reforms are critical to taking us to our 10 per cent potential? In judging this, let's again be careful. Let's not go by the laundry list of reforms that FIls like to wave: increase in foreign equity limits in foreign shareholding, greater voting rights for institutional shareholders in banks, FDI in retail, etc. These can have an impact only at the margin. We need not bend over backwards to appease the FIIs through these reforms - they will invest in our markets when momentum picks up and will be the first to exit when the momentum flags, reforms or not. The reforms that we need are the ones that can actually raise out sustainable long-term growth rate. These have to come in areas like better targeting of subsidies, making projects in infrastructure viable so that they draw capital, raising the productivity of agriculture, improving healthcare and education, bringing the parallel economy under the tax net, implementing fundamental reforms in taxation like GST and the direct tax code and finally easing the myriad rules and regulations that make doing business in India such a nightmare. A number of these things do not require new legislation and can be done through executive order.

Q. Why does tha author not recommend taking up the reforms suggested by Flls?

Solution:
QUESTION: 57

When times are hard, doomsayers are aplenty. The problem is that if you listen too carefully, you tend to overlook the most obvious signs of change. 2011 was a bad year. Can 2012 be any worse? Doomsday forecasts are the easiest to make these days. So let's try a contrarian's forecast instead.
Let's start with the global economy. We have seen a steady flow of good news from the US. The employment situation seems to be improving rapidly and consumer sentiment, reflected in retail expenditures on discretionary items like electronics and clothes, has picked up. If these trends sustain, the US might post better growth numbers for 2012 than the 1.5 - 1.8 per cent being forecast currently.
Japan is likely to pull out of a recession in 2012 as post-earthquake reconstruction efforts gather momentum and the fiscal stimulus announced in 2011 begins to pay off. The consensus estimate for growth in Japan is a respectable 2 per cent for 2012.
The "hard-landing" scenario for China remains and will remain a myth. Growth might decelerate further from the 9 per cent that it expected to clock in 2011 but is unlikely to drop below 8-8.5 percent in 2012. Europe is certainly in a spot of trouble. It is perhaps already in recession and for 2012 it is likely to post mildly negative growth. The risk of implosion has dwindled over the last few months - peripheral economies like Greece, Italy and Spain have new governments in place and have made progress towards genuine economic reform.
Even with some of these positive factors in place, we have to accept the fact that global growth in 2012 will be tepid. But there is a flipside to this. Softer growth means lower demand for commodities and this is likely to drive a correction in commodity prices. Lower commodity inflation will enable emerging market central banks to reverse their monetary stance. China, for instance, has already reversed its stance and has pared its reserve ratio twice. The RBI also seems poised for a reversal in its rate cycle as headline inflation seems well on its way to its target of 7 per cent for March 2012. That said, oil might be an exception to the general trend in commodities. Rising geopolitical tensions, particularly the continuing face-off between Iran and the US, might lead to a spurt in prices. It might make sense for our oil companies to hedge this risk instead of buying oil in the spot market. As inflation fears abate and emerging market central banks begin to cut rates, two things could happen. Lower commodity inflation would mean lower interest rates and better credit availability. This could set a floor to growth and slowly reverse the business cycle within these economies. Second, as the fear of untamed, runaway inflation in these economies abates, the global investor's comfort levels with their markets will increase.
Which of the emerging markets will outperform and who will get left behind ? In an environment in which global growth is likely to be weak, economies like India that have a powerful domestic consumption dynamic should lead; those dependent on exports should, prima facie, fall behind. Specifically for India, a fall in the exchange rate could not have come at a better time. It will help Indian exporters gain market share even if global trade remains depressed. More importantly, it could lead to massive import substitution that favours domestic producers.
Let’s now focus on India and start with a caveat. It is important not to confuse a short-run cyclical dip with a permanent de-rating of its long-term structural potential. The arithmetic is simple. Our growth rate can be in the range of 7-10 per cent depending on policy action. Ten per cent if we get everything right, 7 per cent it we get it all wrong. Which policies and reforms are critical to taking us to our 10 per cent potential? In judging this, let's again be careful. Let's not go by the laundry list of reforms that FIls like to wave: increase in foreign equity limits in foreign shareholding, greater voting rights for institutional shareholders in banks, FDI in retail, etc. These can have an impact only at the margin. We need not bend over backwards to appease the FIIs through these reforms - they will invest in our markets when momentum picks up and will be the first to exit when the momentum flags, reforms or not. The reforms that we need are the ones that can actually raise out sustainable long-term growth rate. These have to come in areas like better targeting of subsidies, making projects in infrastructure viable so that they draw capital, raising the productivity of agriculture, improving healthcare and education, bringing the parallel economy under the tax net, implementing fundamental reforms in taxation like GST and the direct tax code and finally easing the myriad rules and regulations that make doing business in India such a nightmare. A number of these things do not require new legislation and can be done through executive order.

Q. Which of the following is TRUE as per the scenario presented in the passage?

Solution:
QUESTION: 58

When times are hard, doomsayers are aplenty. The problem is that if you listen too carefully, you tend to overlook the most obvious signs of change. 2011 was a bad year. Can 2012 be any worse? Doomsday forecasts are the easiest to make these days. So let's try a contrarian's forecast instead.
Let's start with the global economy. We have seen a steady flow of good news from the US. The employment situation seems to be improving rapidly and consumer sentiment, reflected in retail expenditures on discretionary items like electronics and clothes, has picked up. If these trends sustain, the US might post better growth numbers for 2012 than the 1.5 - 1.8 per cent being forecast currently.
Japan is likely to pull out of a recession in 2012 as post-earthquake reconstruction efforts gather momentum and the fiscal stimulus announced in 2011 begins to pay off. The consensus estimate for growth in Japan is a respectable 2 per cent for 2012.
The "hard-landing" scenario for China remains and will remain a myth. Growth might decelerate further from the 9 per cent that it expected to clock in 2011 but is unlikely to drop below 8-8.5 percent in 2012. Europe is certainly in a spot of trouble. It is perhaps already in recession and for 2012 it is likely to post mildly negative growth. The risk of implosion has dwindled over the last few months - peripheral economies like Greece, Italy and Spain have new governments in place and have made progress towards genuine economic reform.
Even with some of these positive factors in place, we have to accept the fact that global growth in 2012 will be tepid. But there is a flipside to this. Softer growth means lower demand for commodities and this is likely to drive a correction in commodity prices. Lower commodity inflation will enable emerging market central banks to reverse their monetary stance. China, for instance, has already reversed its stance and has pared its reserve ratio twice. The RBI also seems poised for a reversal in its rate cycle as headline inflation seems well on its way to its target of 7 per cent for March 2012. That said, oil might be an exception to the general trend in commodities. Rising geopolitical tensions, particularly the continuing face-off between Iran and the US, might lead to a spurt in prices. It might make sense for our oil companies to hedge this risk instead of buying oil in the spot market. As inflation fears abate and emerging market central banks begin to cut rates, two things could happen. Lower commodity inflation would mean lower interest rates and better credit availability. This could set a floor to growth and slowly reverse the business cycle within these economies. Second, as the fear of untamed, runaway inflation in these economies abates, the global investor's comfort levels with their markets will increase.
Which of the emerging markets will outperform and who will get left behind ? In an environment in which global growth is likely to be weak, economies like India that have a powerful domestic consumption dynamic should lead; those dependent on exports should, prima facie, fall behind. Specifically for India, a fall in the exchange rate could not have come at a better time. It will help Indian exporters gain market share even if global trade remains depressed. More importantly, it could lead to massive import substitution that favours domestic producers.
Let’s now focus on India and start with a caveat. It is important not to confuse a short-run cyclical dip with a permanent de-rating of its long-term structural potential. The arithmetic is simple. Our growth rate can be in the range of 7-10 per cent depending on policy action. Ten per cent if we get everything right, 7 per cent it we get it all wrong. Which policies and reforms are critical to taking us to our 10 per cent potential? In judging this, let's again be careful. Let's not go by the laundry list of reforms that FIls like to wave: increase in foreign equity limits in foreign shareholding, greater voting rights for institutional shareholders in banks, FDI in retail, etc. These can have an impact only at the margin. We need not bend over backwards to appease the FIIs through these reforms - they will invest in our markets when momentum picks up and will be the first to exit when the momentum flags, reforms or not. The reforms that we need are the ones that can actually raise out sustainable long-term growth rate. These have to come in areas like better targeting of subsidies, making projects in infrastructure viable so that they draw capital, raising the productivity of agriculture, improving healthcare and education, bringing the parallel economy under the tax net, implementing fundamental reforms in taxation like GST and the direct tax code and finally easing the myriad rules and regulations that make doing business in India such a nightmare. A number of these things do not require new legislation and can be done through executive order.

Q. According to the author, which of the following reform/s is/are needed to ensure long term growth in India?
(A) Improving healthcare and educational facilities.
(B) Bringing about reforms in taxation.
(C) Improving agricultural productivity.

Solution:
QUESTION: 59

When times are hard, doomsayers are aplenty. The problem is that if you listen too carefully, you tend to overlook the most obvious signs of change. 2011 was a bad year. Can 2012 be any worse? Doomsday forecasts are the easiest to make these days. So let's try a contrarian's forecast instead.
Let's start with the global economy. We have seen a steady flow of good news from the US. The employment situation seems to be improving rapidly and consumer sentiment, reflected in retail expenditures on discretionary items like electronics and clothes, has picked up. If these trends sustain, the US might post better growth numbers for 2012 than the 1.5 - 1.8 per cent being forecast currently.
Japan is likely to pull out of a recession in 2012 as post-earthquake reconstruction efforts gather momentum and the fiscal stimulus announced in 2011 begins to pay off. The consensus estimate for growth in Japan is a respectable 2 per cent for 2012.
The "hard-landing" scenario for China remains and will remain a myth. Growth might decelerate further from the 9 per cent that it expected to clock in 2011 but is unlikely to drop below 8-8.5 percent in 2012. Europe is certainly in a spot of trouble. It is perhaps already in recession and for 2012 it is likely to post mildly negative growth. The risk of implosion has dwindled over the last few months - peripheral economies like Greece, Italy and Spain have new governments in place and have made progress towards genuine economic reform.
Even with some of these positive factors in place, we have to accept the fact that global growth in 2012 will be tepid. But there is a flipside to this. Softer growth means lower demand for commodities and this is likely to drive a correction in commodity prices. Lower commodity inflation will enable emerging market central banks to reverse their monetary stance. China, for instance, has already reversed its stance and has pared its reserve ratio twice. The RBI also seems poised for a reversal in its rate cycle as headline inflation seems well on its way to its target of 7 per cent for March 2012. That said, oil might be an exception to the general trend in commodities. Rising geopolitical tensions, particularly the continuing face-off between Iran and the US, might lead to a spurt in prices. It might make sense for our oil companies to hedge this risk instead of buying oil in the spot market. As inflation fears abate and emerging market central banks begin to cut rates, two things could happen. Lower commodity inflation would mean lower interest rates and better credit availability. This could set a floor to growth and slowly reverse the business cycle within these economies. Second, as the fear of untamed, runaway inflation in these economies abates, the global investor's comfort levels with their markets will increase.
Which of the emerging markets will outperform and who will get left behind ? In an environment in which global growth is likely to be weak, economies like India that have a powerful domestic consumption dynamic should lead; those dependent on exports should, prima facie, fall behind. Specifically for India, a fall in the exchange rate could not have come at a better time. It will help Indian exporters gain market share even if global trade remains depressed. More importantly, it could lead to massive import substitution that favours domestic producers.
Let’s now focus on India and start with a caveat. It is important not to confuse a short-run cyclical dip with a permanent de-rating of its long-term structural potential. The arithmetic is simple. Our growth rate can be in the range of 7-10 per cent depending on policy action. Ten per cent if we get everything right, 7 per cent it we get it all wrong. Which policies and reforms are critical to taking us to our 10 per cent potential? In judging this, let's again be careful. Let's not go by the laundry list of reforms that FIls like to wave: increase in foreign equity limits in foreign shareholding, greater voting rights for institutional shareholders in banks, FDI in retail, etc. These can have an impact only at the margin. We need not bend over backwards to appease the FIIs through these reforms - they will invest in our markets when momentum picks up and will be the first to exit when the momentum flags, reforms or not. The reforms that we need are the ones that can actually raise out sustainable long-term growth rate. These have to come in areas like better targeting of subsidies, making projects in infrastructure viable so that they draw capital, raising the productivity of agriculture, improving healthcare and education, bringing the parallel economy under the tax net, implementing fundamental reforms in taxation like GST and the direct tax code and finally easing the myriad rules and regulations that make doing business in India such a nightmare. A number of these things do not require new legislation and can be done through executive order.

Q. Find the synonym of DRAW

Solution:
QUESTION: 60

When times are hard, doomsayers are aplenty. The problem is that if you listen too carefully, you tend to overlook the most obvious signs of change. 2011 was a bad year. Can 2012 be any worse? Doomsday forecasts are the easiest to make these days. So let's try a contrarian's forecast instead.
Let's start with the global economy. We have seen a steady flow of good news from the US. The employment situation seems to be improving rapidly and consumer sentiment, reflected in retail expenditures on discretionary items like electronics and clothes, has picked up. If these trends sustain, the US might post better growth numbers for 2012 than the 1.5 - 1.8 per cent being forecast currently.
Japan is likely to pull out of a recession in 2012 as post-earthquake reconstruction efforts gather momentum and the fiscal stimulus announced in 2011 begins to pay off. The consensus estimate for growth in Japan is a respectable 2 per cent for 2012.
The "hard-landing" scenario for China remains and will remain a myth. Growth might decelerate further from the 9 per cent that it expected to clock in 2011 but is unlikely to drop below 8-8.5 percent in 2012. Europe is certainly in a spot of trouble. It is perhaps already in recession and for 2012 it is likely to post mildly negative growth. The risk of implosion has dwindled over the last few months - peripheral economies like Greece, Italy and Spain have new governments in place and have made progress towards genuine economic reform.
Even with some of these positive factors in place, we have to accept the fact that global growth in 2012 will be tepid. But there is a flipside to this. Softer growth means lower demand for commodities and this is likely to drive a correction in commodity prices. Lower commodity inflation will enable emerging market central banks to reverse their monetary stance. China, for instance, has already reversed its stance and has pared its reserve ratio twice. The RBI also seems poised for a reversal in its rate cycle as headline inflation seems well on its way to its target of 7 per cent for March 2012. That said, oil might be an exception to the general trend in commodities. Rising geopolitical tensions, particularly the continuing face-off between Iran and the US, might lead to a spurt in prices. It might make sense for our oil companies to hedge this risk instead of buying oil in the spot market. As inflation fears abate and emerging market central banks begin to cut rates, two things could happen. Lower commodity inflation would mean lower interest rates and better credit availability. This could set a floor to growth and slowly reverse the business cycle within these economies. Second, as the fear of untamed, runaway inflation in these economies abates, the global investor's comfort levels with their markets will increase.
Which of the emerging markets will outperform and who will get left behind ? In an environment in which global growth is likely to be weak, economies like India that have a powerful domestic consumption dynamic should lead; those dependent on exports should, prima facie, fall behind. Specifically for India, a fall in the exchange rate could not have come at a better time. It will help Indian exporters gain market share even if global trade remains depressed. More importantly, it could lead to massive import substitution that favours domestic producers.
Let’s now focus on India and start with a caveat. It is important not to confuse a short-run cyclical dip with a permanent de-rating of its long-term structural potential. The arithmetic is simple. Our growth rate can be in the range of 7-10 per cent depending on policy action. Ten per cent if we get everything right, 7 per cent it we get it all wrong. Which policies and reforms are critical to taking us to our 10 per cent potential? In judging this, let's again be careful. Let's not go by the laundry list of reforms that FIls like to wave: increase in foreign equity limits in foreign shareholding, greater voting rights for institutional shareholders in banks, FDI in retail, etc. These can have an impact only at the margin. We need not bend over backwards to appease the FIIs through these reforms - they will invest in our markets when momentum picks up and will be the first to exit when the momentum flags, reforms or not. The reforms that we need are the ones that can actually raise out sustainable long-term growth rate. These have to come in areas like better targeting of subsidies, making projects in infrastructure viable so that they draw capital, raising the productivity of agriculture, improving healthcare and education, bringing the parallel economy under the tax net, implementing fundamental reforms in taxation like GST and the direct tax code and finally easing the myriad rules and regulations that make doing business in India such a nightmare. A number of these things do not require new legislation and can be done through executive order.

60. Find the synonym of CLOCK

Solution:
QUESTION: 61

Fill in the blank with appropriate word. 
His interest in the study of human behaviour is indeed very......

Solution:
QUESTION: 62

Fill in the blank with appropriate word.
The joint entrace examination is an ______ system of selecting the highly motivated students for specialising in science and technology.

Solution:
QUESTION: 63

Fill in the blank with appropriate word. 
You're coming to the movie.......?

Solution:
QUESTION: 64

Fill in the blank with appropriate word.

Though in acting circles he has a reputation of being a consummate professional, at times he can be quite ...... on the stage.

Solution:
QUESTION: 65

Fill in the blank with appropriate word.

Q. Because a comprehensive ...... has yet to be done on the effects of radiation from computer monitors, we don't even know the amount of time the typical office worker spends at a computer monitor.

Solution:
QUESTION: 66

Rearrange the following sentences (P), (Q), (R), (S), (T) and (U) into a meaningful paragraph and then answer the questions given below it. 
(P) To address these issues Indian corporate are increasingly turning eco-friendly. 
(Q) At present however there are only a dozen green buildings in the private sector. 
(R) However though an eco-friendly building may cost more upfront however it is cost effective because of lower operating costs in the long run. 
(S) Today there is growing concern about global warming, energy and water crises. 
(T) The reason is the construction cost of an eco-friendly building is 15% to 20% more than putting up a conventional building. 
(U)Planting trees, using energy saving lighting systems and constructing eco-friendly green buildings are some of the measures they are taking.

Q. Which of the following will be the FIRST sentence after rearrangement?

Solution:
QUESTION: 67

Rearrange the following sentences (P), (Q), (R), (S), (T) and (U) into a meaningful paragraph and then answer the questions given below it. 
(P) To address these issues Indian corporate are increasingly turning eco-friendly. 
(Q) At present however there are only a dozen green buildings in the private sector. 
(R) However though an eco-friendly building may cost more upfront however it is cost effective because of lower operating costs in the long run. 
(S) Today there is growing concern about global warming, energy and water crises. 
(T) The reason is the construction cost of an eco-friendly building is 15% to 20% more than putting up a conventional building. 
(U)Planting trees, using energy saving lighting systems and constructing eco-friendly green buildings are some of the measures they are taking.

Q. Which of the following will be the SECOND sentence after rearrangement?

Solution:
QUESTION: 68

Rearrange the following sentences (P), (Q), (R), (S), (T) and (U) into a meaningful paragraph and then answer the questions given below it. 
(P) To address these issues Indian corporate are increasingly turning eco-friendly. 
(Q) At present however there are only a dozen green buildings in the private sector. 
(R) However though an eco-friendly building may cost more upfront however it is cost effective because of lower operating costs in the long run. 
(S) Today there is growing concern about global warming, energy and water crises. 
(T) The reason is the construction cost of an eco-friendly building is 15% to 20% more than putting up a conventional building. 
(U)Planting trees, using energy saving lighting systems and constructing eco-friendly green buildings are some of the measures they are taking.

Q. Which of the following will be the THIRD sentence after rearrangement?

Solution:
QUESTION: 69

Rearrange the following sentences (P), (Q), (R), (S), (T) and (U) into a meaningful paragraph and then answer the questions given below it. 
(P) To address these issues Indian corporate are increasingly turning eco-friendly. 
(Q) At present however there are only a dozen green buildings in the private sector. 
(R) However though an eco-friendly building may cost more upfront however it is cost effective because of lower operating costs in the long run. 
(S) Today there is growing concern about global warming, energy and water crises. 
(T) The reason is the construction cost of an eco-friendly building is 15% to 20% more than putting up a conventional building. 
(U)Planting trees, using energy saving lighting systems and constructing eco-friendly green buildings are some of the measures they are taking.

Q. Which of the following will be the FIFTH sentence after rearrangement?

Solution:
QUESTION: 70

Rearrange the following sentences (P), (Q), (R), (S), (T) and (U) into a meaningful paragraph and then answer the questions given below it. 
(P) To address these issues Indian corporate are increasingly turning eco-friendly. 
(Q) At present however there are only a dozen green buildings in the private sector. 
(R) However though an eco-friendly building may cost more upfront however it is cost effective because of lower operating costs in the long run. 
(S) Today there is growing concern about global warming, energy and water crises. 
(T) The reason is the construction cost of an eco-friendly building is 15% to 20% more than putting up a conventional building. 
(U)Planting trees, using energy saving lighting systems and constructing eco-friendly green buildings are some of the measures they are taking.

Q. Which of the following will be the SIXTH (LAST) sentence after rearrangement?

Solution:
QUESTION: 71

Improve the sentence by choosing best alternative for capitalised part of the sentence.

Q. Having finished the book, IT WAS PUT AWAY BY HIM.

Solution:
QUESTION: 72

Improve the sentence by choosing best alternative for capitalised part of the sentence.

Q. When it was feared that the serfs might go too far and gain their freedom from serfdom, the Protestant leaders joined the princes AT CRUSHING them.

Solution:
QUESTION: 73

Improve the sentence by choosing best alternative for capitalised part of the sentence.

Q. It is EASY FOR CHILDERN THAN for adults to learn a new language.

Solution:
QUESTION: 74

Improve the sentence by choosing best alternative for capitalised part of the sentence.

Q. The company goes to great length to ensure that employees CAN BE COMFORTABLE in their work environment.

Solution:
QUESTION: 75

Improve the sentence by choosing best alternative for capitalised part of the sentence.

Q. When a man has to give evidence he must HAVE A CLEAN BREAST of the whole matter.

Solution:
QUESTION: 76

Spot the error.

Solution:
QUESTION: 77

Spot the error.

Solution:
QUESTION: 78

Spot the error.

Solution:
QUESTION: 79

Spot the error

Solution:
QUESTION: 80

Spot the error.

Solution:

That can be deleted.
Hence, the correct statement is 'millions of farmers will be'

QUESTION: 81

For routine office corresponds, you need :

Solution:
QUESTION: 82

Following performs modulation/demodulation-

Solution:
QUESTION: 83

 How many bits are there in ASCII codes

Solution:
QUESTION: 84

Audio response is

Solution:
QUESTION: 85

A decision box checks following conditions:

Solution:
QUESTION: 86

APL is

Solution:
QUESTION: 87

The ______ can be programmed one time by either the manufacturer or the computer user. Once programmed, it cannot be modified.

Solution:
QUESTION: 88

A processing complex consisting of two or more interconnected computers

Solution:
QUESTION: 89

The issues that deal with the collection and use of data about individuals is

Solution:
QUESTION: 90

Program promised by publisher but never released-

Solution:
QUESTION: 91

Which of the following is a database management system ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 92

First Generation computers could do :

Solution:
QUESTION: 93

 Which of the following is true about future computers?

Solution:
QUESTION: 94

 Following is not referred as input device-

Solution:
QUESTION: 95

The first page that you normally view at a Web site is its

Solution:
QUESTION: 96

 Following are the Microsoft Windows versions-

Solution:
QUESTION: 97

DPI stands for :

Solution:
QUESTION: 98

Which of the following companies is a leader in manufacturing of Hard Disk Drives?

Solution:
QUESTION: 99

 All are advantages of indexed file organisation, except :

Solution:
QUESTION: 100

 Hybrid computer are-

Solution:
QUESTION: 101

Which of the following is/are functions of the RBI?
I. Acts as the currency authority.
II. Controls money supply and credit.
III. Manages foreign exchange.
IV Serves as a banker to the government.
Select the correct answer using the codes given below

Solution:
QUESTION: 102

Crime and Punishment'was written by

Solution:
QUESTION: 103

"A Passage to England" was written by:

Solution:
QUESTION: 104

The American Constitution came into effect in :

Solution:
QUESTION: 105

The ‘Humanity Star’, recently in the news, is

Solution:
QUESTION: 106

 The Clean Air Campaign was jointly launched recently in Delhi by

Solution:
QUESTION: 107

The prime objective of the ‘Sagarmala project’ is toOptions

Solution:
QUESTION: 108

‘Global Temperature Potential’ is, most appropriately, a measure of

Solution:
QUESTION: 109

Consider the following statements about Price Stabilization Fund (PSF)
1. It regulates the price volatility of important agri-horticultural commodities
2. It is under the Department of Agriculture, Cooperation & Famers Welfare (DAC & FW)
Select the correct statements

Solution:
QUESTION: 110

 Along with which other territory(ies) was Goa constituted as a union territory by the 12th Constitution Amendment Act, 1962?

Solution:
QUESTION: 111

Under the Preventive Detention a person can be detained without trial for:

Solution:
QUESTION: 112

 Present disadvantages of using renewable energy alternatives are that they are:

Solution:
QUESTION: 113

Whose political maneuverings through strong policies of appeasement disgusted Hitler and further lowered his respect for the 'democratic' powers?

Solution:
QUESTION: 114

National Police Academy is located at

Solution:
QUESTION: 115

Which South American city's name literally means River of January in Spanish?

Solution:
QUESTION: 116

Silver Tanka' and 'Copper Jital' were introduced by -

Solution:
QUESTION: 117

 Hargobind Khurana is credited for the discovery of

Solution:
QUESTION: 118

Who was the twenty-third Jain Thirthankara?

Solution:
QUESTION: 119

Kamlesh Mehta has distinguished himself in which of the following games/sports?

Solution:
QUESTION: 120

Which of the following international organisations has started the scheme 'Partnership for Peace' for a group of nations?

Solution:
QUESTION: 121

 NRE deposits is.....

Solution:
QUESTION: 122

RBI generally reviews the Monetary Policy after every

Solution:
QUESTION: 123

The gilt-edged market refers to the market for 
I. government securities.
II. semi-government securities. 
III. corporate securities. 
Select the correct answer using the codes given below

Solution:
QUESTION: 124

Capital market is a market which deals in

Solution:
QUESTION: 125

A consortium of commercial banks has joined hands to float a new company which will collect data related to frauds and security risks. Which of the following is the name of the company?

Solution:
QUESTION: 126

Central Statistics Office (CSO) has announced the first advance estimates of National Income 2017-18 and stated that growth in India’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP) during 2017-18 is estimated at ____% ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 127

 Which State Government signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with the Indian Oil Corporation (IOC) to set up bio-gas and bio-CNG plants in the state?

Solution:
QUESTION: 128

The world’s largest refinery off the gas cracker (ROGC) complex has recently been commissioned by the Reliance Industries Limited (RIL) in which state?

Solution:
QUESTION: 129

As per data collected through National Family and Health Survey (NFHS-4) 2015-16, which is the richest and the poorest state in India?

Solution:
QUESTION: 130

In a bid to boost outreach of subscribers under Atal Pension Yojana (APY), the government of India has decided to include which group of entity as a new channel of distribution of the APY scheme?

Solution:
QUESTION: 131

 In its Budget speech last year, the Union Government had announced its intention to eliminate which disease by December 2017 which could not be met?

Solution:
QUESTION: 132

 What is the expected growth rate of India’s GDP for the year 2018-19 according to the latest HSBC report?​

Solution:
QUESTION: 133

 What is the rank of India in the 2018 Global Intellectual Property (IP) index?

Solution:
QUESTION: 134

Central Government has sanctioned the construction of 14460 individual and community bunkers at a cost of Rs 415.73 crore for people living along the Line of Control (LoC) and International Border (IB) in Jammu & Kashmir. What will be the Size of individual bunkers and the community bunkers?

Solution:
QUESTION: 135

 In an effort to have better network connectivity in the Northeast region of India, the Centre has sanctioned projects over Rs __________ crore

Solution:
QUESTION: 136

The concept of supply curve as it is used in economic theory is relevant only for the case of-

Solution:
QUESTION: 137

Which of the following schemes has NOT been merged with the Swarna Jayanti Gram Sewa-Rozgar Yojana?

Solution:
QUESTION: 138

The outlines of second five year plan was made by—

Solution:
QUESTION: 139

"Open market operation" is a part of- 

Solution:
QUESTION: 140

Which company is providing mobile service with name ‘Cell one’ to the consumers ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 141

The demand curve for a given good is-

Solution:
QUESTION: 142

CENVAT is related to

Solution:
QUESTION: 143

The break even point is where-

Solution:
QUESTION: 144

Poverty in less developed country is largely due to-

Solution:
QUESTION: 145

Who manages a joint stock company ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 146

To know whether the rich are getting richer and the poor getting poorer, it is necessary to compare :

Solution:
QUESTION: 147

Consider the following :
1. Currency with the public
2. Demand deposits with banks 
3. Time deposits with banks. 
Which of these are included in Board Money (M3) in India ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 148

Which sector in India has got maximum amount (US $ million) of external commercial borrowing approvals as for 2003-04 ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 149

The economist who pointed attention to relationship between economic growth and structural changes was

Solution:
QUESTION: 150

A redistribution of income in a country can be best brought about through

Solution:
QUESTION: 151

Consider the following statements : 
Net Economic Policy has greater relevence to the rural sector in the context of 
1. Farm subsidies 
2. Bio-technological innovations 
3. Trade liberalization 
4. Increasing input to agriculture 
Of these statements

Solution:
QUESTION: 152

Which one of the following statements holds good for Indian economy ?