Comprehension Test MCQ - 1


20 Questions MCQ Test General English for Secondary Classes | Comprehension Test MCQ - 1


Description
This mock test of Comprehension Test MCQ - 1 for Teaching helps you for every Teaching entrance exam. This contains 20 Multiple Choice Questions for Teaching Comprehension Test MCQ - 1 (mcq) to study with solutions a complete question bank. The solved questions answers in this Comprehension Test MCQ - 1 quiz give you a good mix of easy questions and tough questions. Teaching students definitely take this Comprehension Test MCQ - 1 exercise for a better result in the exam. You can find other Comprehension Test MCQ - 1 extra questions, long questions & short questions for Teaching on EduRev as well by searching above.
QUESTION: 1

Directions (1-10) : Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases are given in underline to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

I was ten year old then , and my brother, Nick, was fourteen. For both of us this buying of a gift for our mother on Mother's day was a time of excitement and great importance.

It was our first gift to her. We were very poor. It was just after the first World War and we lived in difficult times of trouble. Our father worked now sometimes as a waiter. Birthday and Christmas gifts were taken care of by him as well as he could, but such a thing as a mother's day gift was out-of-the-ordinary luxury. But  we had been lucky, Nick and myself. A second hand furniture store had opened on the block, and deliveries were made by means of loading the furniture on a wobbly pushcart,  which we carefully pushed through traffic, to the customer's home. We got a nickel each and, perhaps, a tip.

I remember how Nick's thin, dark face lighted up with the joy of the present. He had first thought of it in shool; and the thought of surprise and giving grew in him, and myself, and we were highly excited. When we secretly told our father, he was very pleased. He stroked our heads proudly. "It's a fine idea", he said. "It will make your mother very happy." From his tone, we knew what he was thinking. He had given our mother very little in their life together. She worked all day, cooking and buying, looking after us in illness and stoking the stove in the kitchen with wood and coal to keep us warm in winter. She did her own washing of the family clothes in the bath tub. And she did all these things silently. She did not laugh much, but when she smiled at us it was a beautiful thing-well worth waiting for.

Q. How old is the narrator, the one who is telling you the story and how old is Nick?

Solution:
QUESTION: 2

I was ten year old then , and my brother, Nick, was fourteen. For both of us this buying of a gift for our mother on Mother's day was a time of excitement and great importance.

It was our first gift to her. We were very poor. It was just after the first World War and we lived in difficult times of trouble. Our father worked now sometimes as a waiter. Birthday and Christmas gifts were taken care of by him as well as he could, but such a thing as a mother's day gift was out-of-the-ordinary luxury. But  we had been lucky, Nick and myself. A second hand furniture store had opened on the block, and deliveries were made by means of loading the furniture on a wobbly pushcart,  which we carefully pushed through traffic, to the customer's home. We got a nickel each and, perhaps, a tip.

I remember how Nick's thin, dark face lighted up with the joy of the present. He had first thought of it in shool; and the thought of surprise and giving grew in him, and myself, and we were highly excited. When we secretly told our father, he was very pleased. He stroked our heads proudly. "It's a fine idea", he said. "It will make your mother very happy." From his tone, we knew what he was thinking. He had given our mother very little in their life together. She worked all day, cooking and buying, looking after us in illness and stoking the stove in the kitchen with wood and coal to keep us warm in winter. She did her own washing of the family clothes in the bath tub. And she did all these things silently. She did not laugh much, but when she smiled at us it was a beautiful thing-well worth waiting for.

Q. Why were the narrator and his brother excited?
(A) Because they were going to give a gift to their mother.
(B) It was their first gift.
(C) They were learning French.

Solution:
QUESTION: 3

I was ten year old then , and my brother, Nick, was fourteen. For both of us this buying of a gift for our mother on Mother's day was a time of excitement and great importance.

It was our first gift to her. We were very poor. It was just after the first World War and we lived in difficult times of trouble. Our father worked now sometimes as a waiter. Birthday and Christmas gifts were taken care of by him as well as he could, but such a thing as a mother's day gift was out-of-the-ordinary luxury. But  we had been lucky, Nick and myself. A second hand furniture store had opened on the block, and deliveries were made by means of loading the furniture on a wobbly pushcart,  which we carefully pushed through traffic, to the customer's home. We got a nickel each and, perhaps, a tip.

I remember how Nick's thin, dark face lighted up with the joy of the present. He had first thought of it in shool; and the thought of surprise and giving grew in him, and myself, and we were highly excited. When we secretly told our father, he was very pleased. He stroked our heads proudly. "It's a fine idea", he said. "It will make your mother very happy." From his tone, we knew what he was thinking. He had given our mother very little in their life together. She worked all day, cooking and buying, looking after us in illness and stoking the stove in the kitchen with wood and coal to keep us warm in winter. She did her own washing of the family clothes in the bath tub. And she did all these things silently. She did not laugh much, but when she smiled at us it was a beautiful thing-well worth waiting for.

Q. How do you know that the narrator's family was poor?

(A) they lived in difficult times
(B) father worked as a waiter
(C) father worked only some times
(D) giving gifts was a luxury

Solution:
QUESTION: 4

I was ten year old then , and my brother, Nick, was fourteen. For both of us this buying of a gift for our mother on Mother's day was a time of excitement and great importance.

It was our first gift to her. We were very poor. It was just after the first World War and we lived in difficult times of trouble. Our father worked now sometimes as a waiter. Birthday and Christmas gifts were taken care of by him as well as he could, but such a thing as a mother's day gift was out-of-the-ordinary luxury. But  we had been lucky, Nick and myself. A second hand furniture store had opened on the block, and deliveries were made by means of loading the furniture on a wobbly pushcart,  which we carefully pushed through traffic, to the customer's home. We got a nickel each and, perhaps, a tip.

I remember how Nick's thin, dark face lighted up with the joy of the present. He had first thought of it in shool; and the thought of surprise and giving grew in him, and myself, and we were highly excited. When we secretly told our father, he was very pleased. He stroked our heads proudly. "It's a fine idea", he said. "It will make your mother very happy." From his tone, we knew what he was thinking. He had given our mother very little in their life together. She worked all day, cooking and buying, looking after us in illness and stoking the stove in the kitchen with wood and coal to keep us warm in winter. She did her own washing of the family clothes in the bath tub. And she did all these things silently. She did not laugh much, but when she smiled at us it was a beautiful thing-well worth waiting for.

Q. According to the given passage, what work did the father do?

Solution:
QUESTION: 5

I was ten year old then , and my brother, Nick, was fourteen. For both of us this buying of a gift for our mother on Mother's day was a time of excitement and great importance.

It was our first gift to her. We were very poor. It was just after the first World War and we lived in difficult times of trouble. Our father worked now sometimes as a waiter. Birthday and Christmas gifts were taken care of by him as well as he could, but such a thing as a mother's day gift was out-of-the-ordinary luxury. But  we had been lucky, Nick and myself. A second hand furniture store had opened on the block, and deliveries were made by means of loading the furniture on a wobbly pushcart,  which we carefully pushed through traffic, to the customer's home. We got a nickel each and, perhaps, a tip.

I remember how Nick's thin, dark face lighted up with the joy of the present. He had first thought of it in shool; and the thought of surprise and giving grew in him, and myself, and we were highly excited. When we secretly told our father, he was very pleased. He stroked our heads proudly. "It's a fine idea", he said. "It will make your mother very happy." From his tone, we knew what he was thinking. He had given our mother very little in their life together. She worked all day, cooking and buying, looking after us in illness and stoking the stove in the kitchen with wood and coal to keep us warm in winter. She did her own washing of the family clothes in the bath tub. And she did all these things silently. She did not laugh much, but when she smiled at us it was a beautiful thing-well worth waiting for.

Q. Which sentence tells us that Nick was very happy at the thought of giving his mother a gift?

Solution:
QUESTION: 6

I was ten year old then , and my brother, Nick, was fourteen. For both of us this buying of a gift for our mother on Mother's day was a time of excitement and great importance.

It was our first gift to her. We were very poor. It was just after the first World War and we lived in difficult times of trouble. Our father worked now sometimes as a waiter. Birthday and Christmas gifts were taken care of by him as well as he could, but such a thing as a mother's day gift was out-of-the-ordinary luxury. But  we had been lucky, Nick and myself. A second hand furniture store had opened on the block, and deliveries were made by means of loading the furniture on a wobbly pushcart,  which we carefully pushed through traffic, to the customer's home. We got a nickel each and, perhaps, a tip.

I remember how Nick's thin, dark face lighted up with the joy of the present. He had first thought of it in shool; and the thought of surprise and giving grew in him, and myself, and we were highly excited. When we secretly told our father, he was very pleased. He stroked our heads proudly. "It's a fine idea", he said. "It will make your mother very happy." From his tone, we knew what he was thinking. He had given our mother very little in their life together. She worked all day, cooking and buying, looking after us in illness and stoking the stove in the kitchen with wood and coal to keep us warm in winter. She did her own washing of the family clothes in the bath tub. And she did all these things silently. She did not laugh much, but when she smiled at us it was a beautiful thing-well worth waiting for.

Q. Which of the following is NOT TRUE?

Solution:
QUESTION: 7

Directions (7-8) : Choose the word/group of words which is most nearly the SAME in meaning as the word given in CAPITALS as used in the passage.

I was ten year old then , and my brother, Nick, was fourteen. For both of us this buying of a gift for our mother on Mother's day was a time of excitement and great importance.

It was our first gift to her. We were very poor. It was just after the first World War and we lived in difficult times of trouble. Our father worked now sometimes as a waiter. Birthday and Christmas gifts were taken care of by him as well as he could, but such a thing as a mother's day gift was out-of-the-ordinary luxury. But  we had been lucky, Nick and myself. A second hand furniture store had opened on the block, and deliveries were made by means of loading the furniture on a wobbly pushcart,  which we carefully pushed through traffic, to the customer's home. We got a nickel each and, perhaps, a tip.

I remember how Nick's thin, dark face lighted up with the joy of the present. He had first thought of it in shool; and the thought of surprise and giving grew in him, and myself, and we were highly excited. When we secretly told our father, he was very pleased. He stroked our heads proudly. "It's a fine idea", he said. "It will make your mother very happy." From his tone, we knew what he was thinking. He had given our mother very little in their life together. She worked all day, cooking and buying, looking after us in illness and stoking the stove in the kitchen with wood and coal to keep us warm in winter. She did her own washing of the family clothes in the bath tub. And she did all these things silently. She did not laugh much, but when she smiled at us it was a beautiful thing-well worth waiting for.

Q. OUT-OF THE ORDINARY LUXURY

Solution:
QUESTION: 8

I was ten year old then , and my brother, Nick, was fourteen. For both of us this buying of a gift for our mother on Mother's day was a time of excitement and great importance.

It was our first gift to her. We were very poor. It was just after the first World War and we lived in difficult times of trouble. Our father worked now sometimes as a waiter. Birthday and Christmas gifts were taken care of by him as well as he could, but such a thing as a mother's day gift was out-of-the-ordinary luxury. But  we had been lucky, Nick and myself. A second hand furniture store had opened on the block, and deliveries were made by means of loading the furniture on a wobbly pushcart,  which we carefully pushed through traffic, to the customer's home. We got a nickel each and, perhaps, a tip.

I remember how Nick's thin, dark face lighted up with the joy of the present. He had first thought of it in shool; and the thought of surprise and giving grew in him, and myself, and we were highly excited. When we secretly told our father, he was very pleased. He stroked our heads proudly. "It's a fine idea", he said. "It will make your mother very happy." From his tone, we knew what he was thinking. He had given our mother very little in their life together. She worked all day, cooking and buying, looking after us in illness and stoking the stove in the kitchen with wood and coal to keep us warm in winter. She did her own washing of the family clothes in the bath tub. And she did all these things silently. She did not laugh much, but when she smiled at us it was a beautiful thing-well worth waiting for.

Q. STROKED​

Solution:
QUESTION: 9

Directions (9-10) : Choose the word which is most nearly OPPOSITE in meaning of the word given in CAPITALS​ as used in the passage.

I was ten year old then , and my brother, Nick, was fourteen. For both of us this buying of a gift for our mother on Mother's day was a time of excitement and great importance.

It was our first gift to her. We were very poor. It was just after the first World War and we lived in difficult times of trouble. Our father worked now sometimes as a waiter. Birthday and Christmas gifts were taken care of by him as well as he could, but such a thing as a mother's day gift was out-of-the-ordinary luxury. But  we had been lucky, Nick and myself. A second hand furniture store had opened on the block, and deliveries were made by means of loading the furniture on a wobbly pushcart,  which we carefully pushed through traffic, to the customer's home. We got a nickel each and, perhaps, a tip.

I remember how Nick's thin, dark face lighted up with the joy of the present. He had first thought of it in shool; and the thought of surprise and giving grew in him, and myself, and we were highly excited. When we secretly told our father, he was very pleased. He stroked our heads proudly. "It's a fine idea", he said. "It will make your mother very happy." From his tone, we knew what he was thinking. He had given our mother very little in their life together. She worked all day, cooking and buying, looking after us in illness and stoking the stove in the kitchen with wood and coal to keep us warm in winter. She did her own washing of the family clothes in the bath tub. And she did all these things silently. She did not laugh much, but when she smiled at us it was a beautiful thing-well worth waiting for.

Q. SECRETLY

Solution:
QUESTION: 10

I was ten year old then , and my brother, Nick, was fourteen. For both of us this buying of a gift for our mother on Mother's day was a time of excitement and great importance.

It was our first gift to her. We were very poor. It was just after the first World War and we lived in difficult times of trouble. Our father worked now sometimes as a waiter. Birthday and Christmas gifts were taken care of by him as well as he could, but such a thing as a mother's day gift was out-of-the-ordinary luxury. But  we had been lucky, Nick and myself. A second hand furniture store had opened on the block, and deliveries were made by means of loading the furniture on a wobbly pushcart,  which we carefully pushed through traffic, to the customer's home. We got a nickel each and, perhaps, a tip.

I remember how Nick's thin, dark face lighted up with the joy of the present. He had first thought of it in shool; and the thought of surprise and giving grew in him, and myself, and we were highly excited. When we secretly told our father, he was very pleased. He stroked our heads proudly. "It's a fine idea", he said. "It will make your mother very happy." From his tone, we knew what he was thinking. He had given our mother very little in their life together. She worked all day, cooking and buying, looking after us in illness and stoking the stove in the kitchen with wood and coal to keep us warm in winter. She did her own washing of the family clothes in the bath tub. And she did all these things silently. She did not laugh much, but when she smiled at us it was a beautiful thing-well worth waiting for.

Q. SILENTLY

Solution:
QUESTION: 11

Directions (11–20) : Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/expressions are given in underline in the passage to help you locate them while answering some of the questions. 

“My god, it speaks” uttered the Emperor of Brazil and the receiver of the Telephone slipped from his hand and banged aground. At the other end Alexander Graham Bell was still on line.

The incident goes back to 1876 when at an exhibition in Philadelphia (USA), Alexander Graham Bell was giving a demonstration of his invention. This strange instrument known as Telephone was to revolutionize life in the years to come. 

Bell was born at Edinborough, Scotland. He was a teacher and, was dedicated to the noble cause of teaching the deaf and the dumb. Due to severe illness, Bell was sent to Canada in 1870, where too he got engaged in helping the dumb-deaf to hear and speak. Thereafter, he shifted to the USA but continued with his work by opening a school for deaf and dumb. 

Bell was fond of scientific inventions and was ever engaged in making some machines in his spare time. While at Boston, he tried to communicate through metal wire. His companion in this work was Watson. One day while experimenting with his instrument, Bell spoke to Watson standing at a distance, Watson was taken by a pleasant surprise as he had heard Bell clearly through his instrument. The instrument was a success and Bell patented it. 

Graham Bell had some sterling qualities of head and heart. Apart from being an artist, he was a kind human being, ready to help the needy. He established an institution for the deaf and dumb children. He died in 1922 in Canada. The entire northern America paid him a tribute by hanging up their telephones for a while during his funeral.

Q. What according to the passage was the contribution of invention of telephone ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 12

“My god, it speaks” uttered the Emperor of Brazil and the receiver of the Telephone slipped from his hand and banged aground. At the other end Alexander Graham Bell was still on line.

The incident goes back to 1876 when at an exhibition in Philadelphia (USA), Alexander Graham Bell was giving a demonstration of his invention. This strange instrument known as Telephone was to revolutionize life in the years to come. 

Bell was born at Edinborough, Scotland. He was a teacher and, was dedicated to the noble cause of teaching the deaf and the dumb. Due to severe illness, Bell was sent to Canada in 1870, where too he got engaged in helping the dumb-deaf to hear and speak. Thereafter, he shifted to the USA but continued with his work by opening a school for deaf and dumb. 

Bell was fond of scientific inventions and was ever engaged in making some machines in his spare time. While at Boston, he tried to communicate through metal wire. His companion in this work was Watson. One day while experimenting with his instrument, Bell spoke to Watson standing at a distance, Watson was taken by a pleasant surprise as he had heard Bell clearly through his instrument. The instrument was a success and Bell patented it. 

Graham Bell had some sterling qualities of head and heart. Apart from being an artist, he was a kind human being, ready to help the needy. He established an institution for the deaf and dumb children. He died in 1922 in Canada. The entire northern America paid him a tribute by hanging up their telephones for a while during his funeral.

Q. Which of the following made Bell to invent telephone?

Solution:
QUESTION: 13

“My god, it speaks” uttered the Emperor of Brazil and the receiver of the Telephone slipped from his hand and banged aground. At the other end Alexander Graham Bell was still on line.

The incident goes back to 1876 when at an exhibition in Philadelphia (USA), Alexander Graham Bell was giving a demonstration of his invention. This strange instrument known as Telephone was to revolutionize life in the years to come. 

Bell was born at Edinborough, Scotland. He was a teacher and, was dedicated to the noble cause of teaching the deaf and the dumb. Due to severe illness, Bell was sent to Canada in 1870, where too he got engaged in helping the dumb-deaf to hear and speak. Thereafter, he shifted to the USA but continued with his work by opening a school for deaf and dumb. 

Bell was fond of scientific inventions and was ever engaged in making some machines in his spare time. While at Boston, he tried to communicate through metal wire. His companion in this work was Watson. One day while experimenting with his instrument, Bell spoke to Watson standing at a distance, Watson was taken by a pleasant surprise as he had heard Bell clearly through his instrument. The instrument was a success and Bell patented it. 

Graham Bell had some sterling qualities of head and heart. Apart from being an artist, he was a kind human being, ready to help the needy. He established an institution for the deaf and dumb children. He died in 1922 in Canada. The entire northern America paid him a tribute by hanging up their telephones for a while during his funeral.

Q. The teaching activity undertaken by Bell was considered ‘noble’ particularly because _____ 

Solution:
QUESTION: 14

“My god, it speaks” uttered the Emperor of Brazil and the receiver of the Telephone slipped from his hand and banged aground. At the other end Alexander Graham Bell was still on line.

The incident goes back to 1876 when at an exhibition in Philadelphia (USA), Alexander Graham Bell was giving a demonstration of his invention. This strange instrument known as Telephone was to revolutionize life in the years to come. 

Bell was born at Edinborough, Scotland. He was a teacher and, was dedicated to the noble cause of teaching the deaf and the dumb. Due to severe illness, Bell was sent to Canada in 1870, where too he got engaged in helping the dumb-deaf to hear and speak. Thereafter, he shifted to the USA but continued with his work by opening a school for deaf and dumb. 

Bell was fond of scientific inventions and was ever engaged in making some machines in his spare time. While at Boston, he tried to communicate through metal wire. His companion in this work was Watson. One day while experimenting with his instrument, Bell spoke to Watson standing at a distance, Watson was taken by a pleasant surprise as he had heard Bell clearly through his instrument. The instrument was a success and Bell patented it. 

Graham Bell had some sterling qualities of head and heart. Apart from being an artist, he was a kind human being, ready to help the needy. He established an institution for the deaf and dumb children. He died in 1922 in Canada. The entire northern America paid him a tribute by hanging up their telephones for a while during his funeral.

Q. Graham Bell made the telephone call of his invention to the Emperor from the city of ____

Solution:
QUESTION: 15

“My god, it speaks” uttered the Emperor of Brazil and the receiver of the Telephone slipped from his hand and banged aground. At the other end Alexander Graham Bell was still on line.

The incident goes back to 1876 when at an exhibition in Philadelphia (USA), Alexander Graham Bell was giving a demonstration of his invention. This strange instrument known as Telephone was to revolutionize life in the years to come. 

Bell was born at Edinborough, Scotland. He was a teacher and, was dedicated to the noble cause of teaching the deaf and the dumb. Due to severe illness, Bell was sent to Canada in 1870, where too he got engaged in helping the dumb-deaf to hear and speak. Thereafter, he shifted to the USA but continued with his work by opening a school for deaf and dumb. 

Bell was fond of scientific inventions and was ever engaged in making some machines in his spare time. While at Boston, he tried to communicate through metal wire. His companion in this work was Watson. One day while experimenting with his instrument, Bell spoke to Watson standing at a distance, Watson was taken by a pleasant surprise as he had heard Bell clearly through his instrument. The instrument was a success and Bell patented it. 

Graham Bell had some sterling qualities of head and heart. Apart from being an artist, he was a kind human being, ready to help the needy. He established an institution for the deaf and dumb children. He died in 1922 in Canada. The entire northern America paid him a tribute by hanging up their telephones for a while during his funeral.

Q. The words uttered by the Emperor of Brazil suggest that he was extremely_____

Solution:
QUESTION: 16

“My god, it speaks” uttered the Emperor of Brazil and the receiver of the Telephone slipped from his hand and banged aground. At the other end Alexander Graham Bell was still on line.

The incident goes back to 1876 when at an exhibition in Philadelphia (USA), Alexander Graham Bell was giving a demonstration of his invention. This strange instrument known as Telephone was to revolutionize life in the years to come. 

Bell was born at Edinborough, Scotland. He was a teacher and, was dedicated to the noble cause of teaching the deaf and the dumb. Due to severe illness, Bell was sent to Canada in 1870, where too he got engaged in helping the dumb-deaf to hear and speak. Thereafter, he shifted to the USA but continued with his work by opening a school for deaf and dumb. 

Bell was fond of scientific inventions and was ever engaged in making some machines in his spare time. While at Boston, he tried to communicate through metal wire. His companion in this work was Watson. One day while experimenting with his instrument, Bell spoke to Watson standing at a distance, Watson was taken by a pleasant surprise as he had heard Bell clearly through his instrument. The instrument was a success and Bell patented it. 

Graham Bell had some sterling qualities of head and heart. Apart from being an artist, he was a kind human being, ready to help the needy. He established an institution for the deaf and dumb children. He died in 1922 in Canada. The entire northern America paid him a tribute by hanging up their telephones for a while during his funeral.

Q. Which of the following is Not mentioned in the passage as a quality of Graham Bell ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 17

Directions (17–18) : Choose the word or group of words which is MOST NEARLY THE SAME in meaning as the word printed in underline.

“My god, it speaks” uttered the Emperor of Brazil and the receiver of the Telephone slipped from his hand and banged aground. At the other end Alexander Graham Bell was still on line.

The incident goes back to 1876 when at an exhibition in Philadelphia (USA), Alexander Graham Bell was giving a demonstration of his invention. This strange instrument known as Telephone was to revolutionize life in the years to come. 

Bell was born at Edinborough, Scotland. He was a teacher and, was dedicated to the noble cause of teaching the deaf and the dumb. Due to severe illness, Bell was sent to Canada in 1870, where too he got engaged in helping the dumb-deaf to hear and speak. Thereafter, he shifted to the USA but continued with his work by opening a school for deaf and dumb. 

Bell was fond of scientific inventions and was ever engaged in making some machines in his spare time. While at Boston, he tried to communicate through metal wire. His companion in this work was Watson. One day while experimenting with his instrument, Bell spoke to Watson standing at a distance, Watson was taken by a pleasant surprise as he had heard Bell clearly through his instrument. The instrument was a success and Bell patented it. 

Graham Bell had some sterling qualities of head and heart. Apart from being an artist, he was a kind human being, ready to help the needy. He established an institution for the deaf and dumb children. He died in 1922 in Canada. The entire northern America paid him a tribute by hanging up their telephones for a while during his funeral.

Q. Dedicated 

Solution:
QUESTION: 18

“My god, it speaks” uttered the Emperor of Brazil and the receiver of the Telephone slipped from his hand and banged aground. At the other end Alexander Graham Bell was still on line.

The incident goes back to 1876 when at an exhibition in Philadelphia (USA), Alexander Graham Bell was giving a demonstration of his invention. This strange instrument known as Telephone was to revolutionize life in the years to come. 

Bell was born at Edinborough, Scotland. He was a teacher and, was dedicated to the noble cause of teaching the deaf and the dumb. Due to severe illness, Bell was sent to Canada in 1870, where too he got engaged in helping the dumb-deaf to hear and speak. Thereafter, he shifted to the USA but continued with his work by opening a school for deaf and dumb. 

Bell was fond of scientific inventions and was ever engaged in making some machines in his spare time. While at Boston, he tried to communicate through metal wire. His companion in this work was Watson. One day while experimenting with his instrument, Bell spoke to Watson standing at a distance, Watson was taken by a pleasant surprise as he had heard Bell clearly through his instrument. The instrument was a success and Bell patented it. 

Graham Bell had some sterling qualities of head and heart. Apart from being an artist, he was a kind human being, ready to help the needy. He established an institution for the deaf and dumb children. He died in 1922 in Canada. The entire northern America paid him a tribute by hanging up their telephones for a while during his funeral.

Q. Apart from

Solution:
QUESTION: 19

Directions (19–20) : Choose the word which is MOST OPPOSITE in meaning of the word in underline. 

“My god, it speaks” uttered the Emperor of Brazil and the receiver of the Telephone slipped from his hand and banged aground. At the other end Alexander Graham Bell was still on line.

The incident goes back to 1876 when at an exhibition in Philadelphia (USA), Alexander Graham Bell was giving a demonstration of his invention. This strange instrument known as Telephone was to revolutionize life in the years to come. 

Bell was born at Edinborough, Scotland. He was a teacher and, was dedicated to the noble cause of teaching the deaf and the dumb. Due to severe illness, Bell was sent to Canada in 1870, where too he got engaged in helping the dumb-deaf to hear and speak. Thereafter, he shifted to the USA but continued with his work by opening a school for deaf and dumb. 

Bell was fond of scientific inventions and was ever engaged in making some machines in his spare time. While at Boston, he tried to communicate through metal wire. His companion in this work was Watson. One day while experimenting with his instrument, Bell spoke to Watson standing at a distance, Watson was taken by a pleasant surprise as he had heard Bell clearly through his instrument. The instrument was a success and Bell patented it. 

Graham Bell had some sterling qualities of head and heart. Apart from being an artist, he was a kind human being, ready to help the needy. He established an institution for the deaf and dumb children. He died in 1922 in Canada. The entire northern America paid him a tribute by hanging up their telephones for a while during his funeral.

Q. Pleasant

Solution:
QUESTION: 20

“My god, it speaks” uttered the Emperor of Brazil and the receiver of the Telephone slipped from his hand and banged aground. At the other end Alexander Graham Bell was still on line.

The incident goes back to 1876 when at an exhibition in Philadelphia (USA), Alexander Graham Bell was giving a demonstration of his invention. This strange instrument known as Telephone was to revolutionize life in the years to come. 

Bell was born at Edinborough, Scotland. He was a teacher and, was dedicated to the noble cause of teaching the deaf and the dumb. Due to severe illness, Bell was sent to Canada in 1870, where too he got engaged in helping the dumb-deaf to hear and speak. Thereafter, he shifted to the USA but continued with his work by opening a school for deaf and dumb. 

Bell was fond of scientific inventions and was ever engaged in making some machines in his spare time. While at Boston, he tried to communicate through metal wire. His companion in this work was Watson. One day while experimenting with his instrument, Bell spoke to Watson standing at a distance, Watson was taken by a pleasant surprise as he had heard Bell clearly through his instrument. The instrument was a success and Bell patented it. 

Graham Bell had some sterling qualities of head and heart. Apart from being an artist, he was a kind human being, ready to help the needy. He established an institution for the deaf and dumb children. He died in 1922 in Canada. The entire northern America paid him a tribute by hanging up their telephones for a while during his funeral.

Q. Strange 

Solution:

Similar Content

Related tests