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Science Practice Test - 3 - Class 5 MCQ


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20 Questions MCQ Test Science Class 5 - Science Practice Test - 3

Science Practice Test - 3 for Class 5 2024 is part of Science Class 5 preparation. The Science Practice Test - 3 questions and answers have been prepared according to the Class 5 exam syllabus.The Science Practice Test - 3 MCQs are made for Class 5 2024 Exam. Find important definitions, questions, notes, meanings, examples, exercises, MCQs and online tests for Science Practice Test - 3 below.
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Science Practice Test - 3 - Question 1

Study the seed below. By which method are   they most likely to be dispersed the farthest away from their parent plant?  

Science Practice Test - 3 - Question 2

Study the table given below. Which of these is incorrectly matched? 

Detailed Solution for Science Practice Test - 3 - Question 2

Leopard is a mammal with a skin.

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Science Practice Test - 3 - Question 3

Which are the organs that the rib bones protect?

Science Practice Test - 3 - Question 4

Which of following diseases spreads through contaminated food and water?             

Detailed Solution for Science Practice Test - 3 - Question 4
Diseases that spread through contaminated food and water:

  • Cholera: Cholera is a bacterial infection that spreads through contaminated food and water. It is caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae and is characterized by severe diarrhea and dehydration.


Other diseases that can also spread through contaminated food and water include:



  • Typhoid Fever: Typhoid fever is caused by the bacterium Salmonella typhi and is transmitted through contaminated food and water. It is characterized by high fever, headache, abdominal pain, and sometimes a rash.

  • Hepatitis A: Hepatitis A is a viral infection that affects the liver and is spread through contaminated food and water. It causes symptoms such as fatigue, nausea, abdominal pain, and jaundice.

  • Giardiasis: Giardiasis is an intestinal infection caused by the parasite Giardia lamblia. It spreads through contaminated food and water and can cause diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and bloating.

  • E. coli Infection: Escherichia coli (E. coli) is a bacterium that can cause foodborne illness when consumed through contaminated food and water. It can lead to symptoms such as diarrhea, abdominal pain, and vomiting.


It is important to practice proper hygiene, such as washing hands before handling food and drinking clean water, to prevent the spread of these diseases.

Science Practice Test - 3 - Question 5

What property of air can be proved from the given figures?

Science Practice Test - 3 - Question 6

The given figure shows the structure of a seed. Identify the parts and choose the correct answer.  

Science Practice Test - 3 - Question 7

By Ice is the ______ form of water.             

Detailed Solution for Science Practice Test - 3 - Question 7
Answer:
Introduction:
Water can exist in three different states: solid (ice), liquid, and gas (water vapor). The question asks for the state of water when it is in the form of ice.

The correct answer is A: solid. When water freezes, it turns into ice, which is the solid form of water. Here is a detailed explanation:
Ice:
- Ice is the solid form of water.
- When the temperature of water drops below its freezing point (0 degrees Celsius or 32 degrees Fahrenheit), water molecules slow down and start to arrange themselves into a crystalline structure, forming ice.
- Ice has a fixed shape and volume, and its molecules are held together by strong intermolecular forces.
- It is less dense than liquid water, which is why ice floats on the surface of water bodies.
- Ice can be found naturally in glaciers, icebergs, and frozen lakes, as well as artificially produced in freezers and refrigerators.
Liquid water:
- Liquid water is the state in which water exists at temperatures above its freezing point and below its boiling point (100 degrees Celsius or 212 degrees Fahrenheit at standard atmospheric pressure).
- It has a definite volume but no fixed shape, taking the shape of its container.
- Liquid water is essential for life and is the most common state of water on Earth.
Water vapor:
- Water vapor is the gaseous form of water.
- When water is heated above its boiling point, it turns into water vapor.
- Water vapor is colorless, odorless, and lighter than air.
- It can be found naturally in the atmosphere, especially in humid conditions.
- Water vapor can condense back into liquid water when it comes into contact with a cold surface or cools down.
Conclusion:
In conclusion, ice is the solid form of water. It is formed when water freezes below its freezing point, and its molecules arrange themselves into a crystalline structure.
Science Practice Test - 3 - Question 8

Each of these simple machines contains a ________   

Science Practice Test - 3 - Question 9

Pumice is formed when lava from a volcano cools. Which type of rock is pumice? 

Detailed Solution for Science Practice Test - 3 - Question 9
Pumice is an igneous rock
- Pumice is formed when lava from a volcano cools rapidly.
- It is a type of volcanic glass.
- The cooling process traps gas bubbles inside the rock, giving it a porous and lightweight texture.
- Pumice is known for its ability to float on water due to its low density.
- It is typically light-colored and has a frothy appearance.
- Pumice is commonly used as an abrasive in various industries, including construction, cosmetics, and personal care products.
- It is also used as a soil amendment in gardening and horticulture.
- Due to its unique properties, pumice is classified as an igneous rock.
Science Practice Test - 3 - Question 10

Which part of an onion can grow into a new plant?

Science Practice Test - 3 - Question 11

Which of the following has no back bone?

Science Practice Test - 3 - Question 12

Judith compared a set of four pictures.


From these pictures, she concluded that ___.      

Science Practice Test - 3 - Question 13

Typhoid, malaria and chicken pox are        

Detailed Solution for Science Practice Test - 3 - Question 13
Typhoid, malaria, and chickenpox are communicable diseases.
Communicable diseases are those that can be transmitted from one person to another or from animals to humans. They are caused by infectious agents such as bacteria, viruses, parasites, or fungi. Typhoid, malaria, and chickenpox all fall under this category because they can be spread through various modes of transmission, including:
1. Typhoid:
- Caused by the bacterium Salmonella typhi.
- Spread through contaminated food or water.
- Transmitted from person to person through the fecal-oral route.
2. Malaria:
- Caused by the Plasmodium parasite, which is transmitted through the bite of infected mosquitoes.
- Most commonly found in tropical and subtropical regions.
- Cannot be directly transmitted from person to person.
3. Chickenpox:
- Caused by the varicella-zoster virus.
- Highly contagious and primarily spreads through respiratory droplets or direct contact with the fluid from the blisters.
- Can also be transmitted through airborne particles.
These diseases can lead to significant public health concerns due to their ability to spread rapidly within communities. Effective prevention and control measures, such as vaccination, vector control, and hygiene practices, are essential in reducing the transmission of communicable diseases.
Science Practice Test - 3 - Question 14

The rabies virus is carried by                 

Detailed Solution for Science Practice Test - 3 - Question 14
Answer:
The rabies virus is primarily carried by dogs. Here is a detailed explanation:
1. Introduction:
Rabies is a viral disease that affects the central nervous system and is transmitted through the saliva of infected animals. Understanding the carriers of the virus is crucial for preventing its spread.
2. Rabies virus carriers:
The virus can be found in various species, but the main carriers are:
- Dogs: Dogs are the most significant carriers of the rabies virus. They are responsible for the majority of human rabies cases worldwide. Rabies in dogs can be transmitted to humans through bites or scratches.
- Wild animals: Various wild animals can also carry the rabies virus, including raccoons, foxes, bats, and skunks. These animals can transmit the virus to humans if they are bitten or come into contact with their saliva.
- Cats: Although cats can carry the rabies virus, they are less likely to transmit it to humans compared to dogs. However, it is still essential to vaccinate cats against rabies to protect both the animal and humans.
- Livestock: While less common, livestock animals such as cows, sheep, and horses can also carry the rabies virus. However, the risk of transmission from these animals to humans is relatively low.
3. Importance of vaccination:
Vaccination plays a crucial role in preventing the spread of rabies. Vaccinating domestic animals, particularly dogs and cats, is essential to protect both the animals and humans from this deadly virus. Vaccination programs help control the rabies epidemic and reduce the risk of transmission.
In conclusion, the rabies virus is primarily carried by dogs, although it can also be found in other animals such as wild animals and livestock. Vaccination and responsible pet ownership are key measures in preventing the spread of rabies and protecting public health.
Science Practice Test - 3 - Question 15

What is present all around us?             

Detailed Solution for Science Practice Test - 3 - Question 15
What is present all around us?
There are several elements and substances that are present all around us. The most common ones include:
1. Air:
- Air is a mixture of gases that surrounds the Earth.
- It is composed mainly of nitrogen (78%) and oxygen (21%), with small amounts of other gases such as carbon dioxide, argon, and trace amounts of water vapor.
- It is essential for the survival of all living organisms as it provides oxygen for respiration.
2. Water:
- Water is a transparent, tasteless, and odorless chemical substance that is essential for all forms of life.
- It covers about 71% of the Earth's surface and is found in various forms such as oceans, rivers, lakes, and in the atmosphere as water vapor.
- It is crucial for various biological processes, including hydration, transportation, and maintenance of temperature regulation.
3. Soil:
- Soil is the topmost layer of the Earth's crust made up of a mixture of minerals, organic matter, water, and air.
- It provides a medium for plant growth and is essential for agriculture and forestry.
- Soil also plays a crucial role in filtering and purifying water, regulating the Earth's temperature, and supporting various ecosystems.
4. Sand:
- Sand is a granular material composed of finely divided rock and mineral particles.
- It is primarily made up of silica (silicon dioxide) and can be found in coastal areas, deserts, and riverbeds.
- Sand is commonly used in construction, landscaping, and manufacturing of glass.
In conclusion, the substances that are present all around us include air, water, soil, and sand. These elements are vital for the existence and sustenance of life on Earth.
Science Practice Test - 3 - Question 16

Why does the moon look different at different Nr nights?

Detailed Solution for Science Practice Test - 3 - Question 16
Explanation:
The moon appears to look different at different nights due to the revolution of the moon around the Earth. Here's a detailed explanation:
Revolution of the Moon around the Earth:
- The moon orbits around the Earth in an elliptical path, completing one revolution in approximately 27.3 days.
- This revolution causes the moon to change its position relative to the Earth and the Sun, resulting in different phases of the moon being visible from the Earth.
- The moon's position in its orbit determines the amount of sunlight that reflects off its surface and towards the Earth, which in turn affects its appearance.
Phases of the Moon:
- The moon goes through eight different phases during its revolution around the Earth.
- These phases are New Moon, Waxing Crescent, First Quarter, Waxing Gibbous, Full Moon, Waning Gibbous, Third Quarter, and Waning Crescent.
- The appearance of the moon changes gradually as it moves through these phases.
New Moon:
- During the New Moon phase, the moon is positioned between the Earth and the Sun.
- The side of the moon facing the Earth is not illuminated, making it appear completely dark or invisible.
- This phase marks the beginning of the lunar cycle.
Waxing Crescent:
- As the moon continues its revolution, a small portion of its right side becomes illuminated by the Sun.
- This phase is called the Waxing Crescent, and the illuminated portion gradually increases over time.
- It appears as a thin crescent shape in the sky.
First Quarter:
- When the moon has completed approximately one-quarter of its revolution, it reaches the First Quarter phase.
- Half of the moon's right side is illuminated, making it appear as a half-moon shape.
Waxing Gibbous:
- The Waxing Gibbous phase occurs as the moon continues to move in its orbit.
- The illuminated portion of the moon grows larger, but it is not yet a full moon.
- It appears as a gibbous shape in the sky.
Full Moon:
- When the moon completes its revolution and is positioned directly opposite the Sun, it reaches the Full Moon phase.
- The entire side of the moon facing the Earth is illuminated, making it appear as a full circle.
- This is the phase where the moon is at its brightest and most visible.
Waning Gibbous:
- After the Full Moon phase, the moon begins to move towards its last quarter.
- The illuminated portion starts to decrease, resulting in a gibbous shape again.
Third Quarter:
- The Third Quarter phase occurs when the moon has completed approximately three-quarters of its revolution.
- Half of the moon's left side is illuminated, making it appear as a half-moon shape again.
Waning Crescent:
- The Waning Crescent phase is the final phase before the New Moon.
- The left side of the moon becomes smaller and smaller, appearing as a thin crescent shape.
Conclusion:
The moon's changing appearance at different nights is due to its revolution around the Earth, which causes different portions of the moon to be illuminated by the Sun. This results in various phases of the moon being visible from the Earth, including the New Moon, Waxing Crescent, First Quarter, Waxing
Science Practice Test - 3 - Question 17

The intermolecular space between molecules is maximum in a

Detailed Solution for Science Practice Test - 3 - Question 17

The intermolecular space refers to the space between molecules in a substance. The maximum intermolecular space indicates that the molecules are far apart from each other.
The intermolecular space between molecules is maximum in a gas. Here's why:
Explanation:
1. Gas: In a gas state, the molecules are loosely packed and have high kinetic energy. They move freely and randomly in all directions, and the attractive forces between molecules are very weak. As a result, the intermolecular space between gas molecules is maximum.
2. Liquid: In a liquid state, the molecules are closer together compared to a gas. The attractive forces between liquid molecules are stronger than in a gas, but not as strong as in a solid. Therefore, the intermolecular space in a liquid is less than in a gas.
3. Solid: In a solid state, the molecules are tightly packed and have strong attractive forces between them. The intermolecular space in a solid is minimal as the molecules are closely arranged in a rigid structure.
4. All of these: The answer option "All of these" is incorrect because the intermolecular space is not maximum in all three states of matter. It is only maximum in a gas.
In conclusion, the intermolecular space between molecules is maximum in a gas because the molecules are far apart and move freely.
Science Practice Test - 3 - Question 18

In second class lever

Detailed Solution for Science Practice Test - 3 - Question 18
In a second-class lever, the load is in the middle.
Explanation:
- A second-class lever is one of the three types of levers, along with first-class and third-class levers.
- In a second-class lever, the fulcrum is located at one end, the effort is applied at the other end, and the load is positioned in between.
- The fulcrum is the pivot point around which the lever rotates.
- The effort is the force applied to the lever to move the load.
- The load is the object being moved or lifted.
- In this type of lever, the load is positioned closer to the fulcrum than the effort.
- The load acts as a resistance that needs to be overcome by the effort applied to the lever.
- Examples of second-class levers include a wheelbarrow, a bottle opener, and a nutcracker.
- The load being in the middle of the lever provides mechanical advantage, making it easier to lift or move heavy objects.
- The effort applied by the person or machine is multiplied by the lever, enabling them to exert a greater force on the load.
- This configuration allows for more efficient use of force and is commonly used in various tools and machines.
Therefore, in a second-class lever, the load is positioned in the middle.
Science Practice Test - 3 - Question 19

Which of the following is NOT the safe place for the children to fly kites?                 

Detailed Solution for Science Practice Test - 3 - Question 19

To determine the safe place for children to fly kites, we need to analyze each option and identify the one that is not safe. Let's consider each option:
A: Open ground
- Open grounds are generally safe for flying kites as they provide ample space and minimal obstructions. Children can fly their kites without the risk of tangling or damaging them.
B: Open terrace (Not Safe)
- Open terraces may not be a safe place for children to fly kites due to several reasons:
- The height of the terrace can pose a risk if children accidentally fall off while flying kites.
- There might be obstacles like walls or trees nearby, which can lead to entanglement of the kite strings or cause damage to the kites.
- The wind conditions on a terrace can be unpredictable and stronger, making it difficult for children to control their kites.
C: Playground
- Playgrounds are generally safe for flying kites as they provide a spacious area for children to run and fly their kites without obstructions.
- However, it is important to ensure that there are no obstacles or hazards in the playground that can pose a risk to the children or their kites.
D: All of these
- This option is incorrect because all the other options (Open ground, Open terrace, Playground) are safe places for children to fly kites, except for the open terrace.
Therefore, the correct answer is B: Open terrace is not a safe place for children to fly kites.
Science Practice Test - 3 - Question 20

Which of the following rocks is formed by the metamorphosis of granite?          

Detailed Solution for Science Practice Test - 3 - Question 20
Answer:

The rock formed by the metamorphosis of granite is gneiss.


Explanation:

When granite, which is an igneous rock, undergoes metamorphism, it can transform into gneiss. This process involves the recrystallization of minerals within the granite due to high heat and pressure. Gneiss is characterized by its banded appearance, with alternating layers of light and dark minerals.


Other rocks formed by metamorphosis include:



  • Quartzite: Formed from the metamorphism of quartz-rich sandstone.

  • Marble: Formed from the metamorphism of limestone or dolomite.

  • Slate: Formed from the metamorphism of shale or mudstone.


It is important to note that the specific conditions of temperature and pressure during metamorphism can result in different types of rocks forming from the same parent rock. Therefore, while gneiss is one possible result of the metamorphosis of granite, other rocks such as migmatite or schist can also form depending on the specific conditions.

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