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Test: Our Environment & Natural Calamities - 2 - Class 5 MCQ


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20 Questions MCQ Test Science Class 5 - Test: Our Environment & Natural Calamities - 2

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Test: Our Environment & Natural Calamities - 2 - Question 1

A person who studies earthquakes is called:

Detailed Solution for Test: Our Environment & Natural Calamities - 2 - Question 1
Question: A person who studies earthquakes is called:

A: Physicist

B: Sociologist

C: Archaeologist

D: Seismologist

E: None of these
Answer:
The correct answer is D: Seismologist.
Explanation:
Seismology is the scientific study of earthquakes and the propagation of elastic waves through the Earth. Seismologists are scientists who specialize in this field and study various aspects of earthquakes, including their causes, effects, and behavior. They use a range of techniques and instruments to collect data and analyze seismic activity. Here are some key points to understand:
- Seismology: The scientific study of earthquakes and seismic waves.
- Seismologist: A person who specializes in studying earthquakes and seismic activity.
- Role: Seismologists are responsible for monitoring and analyzing seismic data to understand earthquake behavior, predict future earthquakes, and assess the impact on society and infrastructure.
- Techniques: Seismologists use seismographs, accelerometers, and other instruments to record and measure seismic waves. They also analyze historical records, conduct field surveys, and use computer models to study earthquake patterns.
- Collaboration: Seismologists collaborate with geologists, geophysicists, engineers, and other experts to gain a comprehensive understanding of earthquakes and their effects.
- Practical applications: The findings of seismologists are crucial for earthquake hazard assessment, designing earthquake-resistant structures, and developing early warning systems.
In conclusion, a person who studies earthquakes is called a seismologist.
Test: Our Environment & Natural Calamities - 2 - Question 2

____ is an opening in earth's surface which allows hot molten rock to escape.

Detailed Solution for Test: Our Environment & Natural Calamities - 2 - Question 2
Volcano
- A volcano is an opening in the earth's surface.
- It allows hot molten rock, called magma, to escape from beneath the Earth's crust.
- Volcanoes can be found on land or underwater.
- When magma erupts from a volcano, it is called lava.
- Volcanic eruptions can be explosive or relatively calm, depending on the type of volcano and the characteristics of the magma.
- The lava and ash expelled during an eruption can cause significant damage to the surrounding areas.
- Volcanoes are often found near tectonic plate boundaries, where the Earth's crust is more likely to crack and create openings.
- Some famous volcanoes include Mount Vesuvius in Italy, Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines, and Mount St. Helens in the United States.
- Volcanoes are an important part of the Earth's geology and can have both positive and negative effects on the environment.
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Test: Our Environment & Natural Calamities - 2 - Question 3

 Strong vibration on the surface of earth are also known as:

Detailed Solution for Test: Our Environment & Natural Calamities - 2 - Question 3
Answer:


Strong vibrations on the surface of the earth are also known as earthquakes.


The correct answer is option D: Earthquake. Here is a detailed explanation:


Definition:
- An earthquake is a sudden and violent shaking of the ground caused by the movement of tectonic plates beneath the Earth's surface.
- It is characterized by strong vibrations or seismic waves that propagate through the Earth's crust.
- Earthquakes can occur along plate boundaries or within the interior of tectonic plates.


Key Points:
- Tsunamis are large ocean waves caused by underwater earthquakes or volcanic eruptions, but they are not the same as earthquakes themselves.
- Cyclones and typhoons are powerful tropical storms characterized by rotating winds, but they are not related to earthquakes.


Conclusion:
- The term "strong vibrations on the surface of the earth" refers to earthquakes.
- Therefore, the correct answer is D: Earthquake.
Test: Our Environment & Natural Calamities - 2 - Question 4

The waves generated by earthquake are detected with the help of:

Detailed Solution for Test: Our Environment & Natural Calamities - 2 - Question 4
Seismograph

A seismograph is used to detect the waves generated by an earthquake. It is an instrument that measures the motion of the ground during an earthquake.


How a Seismograph Works

  • The seismograph consists of a base that is securely anchored to the ground.

  • On top of the base, there is a heavy weight or pendulum suspended by a spring or set of springs.

  • When an earthquake occurs, the ground shakes and moves the base of the seismograph.

  • This motion is transmitted to the suspended weight, causing it to remain stationary due to inertia.

  • However, the base continues to move, causing the weight to record the relative motion between the base and the weight.

  • This relative motion is recorded on a rotating drum or a digital display, creating a seismogram.


Interpreting Seismograms

  • Seismograms provide valuable information about the earthquake, such as its magnitude, duration, and distance from the seismograph station.

  • They can also help determine the location of the earthquake's epicenter.

  • By analyzing the amplitude, frequency, and arrival times of different waves recorded on the seismogram, seismologists can classify the earthquake and study its characteristics.


Therefore, a seismograph is the correct instrument used to detect the waves generated by an earthquake.

Test: Our Environment & Natural Calamities - 2 - Question 5

Which area will be more prone to cyclone?

Detailed Solution for Test: Our Environment & Natural Calamities - 2 - Question 5

Which area will be more prone to cyclone?


A: Desert area


B: Coastal area


C: Barren area


D: All the above


E: None of these


Answer: B


Explanation:


Cyclones are intense low-pressure systems that form over warm ocean waters. They are characterized by strong winds, heavy rainfall, and storm surges. The areas most prone to cyclones are coastal regions. Here's why:


1. Warm Ocean Waters:



  • Cyclones derive their energy from warm ocean waters.

  • Coastal areas have direct access to warm ocean waters, providing the necessary fuel for cyclone formation.


2. Favorable Atmospheric Conditions:



  • Coastal areas often experience favorable atmospheric conditions for cyclone formation due to proximity to warm ocean currents and prevailing wind patterns.

  • These conditions include low wind shear, high humidity, and the presence of a pre-existing disturbance or low-pressure system.


3. Interaction with Land:



  • When cyclones make landfall, they can weaken due to the absence of warm ocean waters.

  • However, coastal areas are still more prone to cyclones because they are the first points of contact with the storm.

  • Coastal areas may experience storm surge, intense rainfall, and strong winds as the cyclone approaches and makes landfall.


Conclusion:


Coastal areas are more prone to cyclones due to their access to warm ocean waters, favorable atmospheric conditions, and the direct interaction with the storm as it makes landfall. Desert areas and barren areas, on the other hand, lack the necessary conditions for cyclone formation and are therefore less prone to cyclones.

Test: Our Environment & Natural Calamities - 2 - Question 6

Barren island is which type of volcano?

Detailed Solution for Test: Our Environment & Natural Calamities - 2 - Question 6

The barren island is the only active volcano in the Indian subcontinent. It is located in the Andaman and Nicobar Islands.

Test: Our Environment & Natural Calamities - 2 - Question 7

Which among the following is not a part of a volcano?              

Detailed Solution for Test: Our Environment & Natural Calamities - 2 - Question 7

The correct answer is D: Tidal wave. A tidal wave is not a part of a volcano.
Explanation:
A volcano is a geological formation characterized by the eruption of molten rock, ash, and gases from the Earth's crust. It consists of several key components, but a tidal wave is not one of them. The components of a volcano include:
1. Crater: A large, bowl-shaped depression at the top of the volcano, formed by the eruption or collapse of the volcano's summit.
2. Vent: An opening or fissure in the Earth's crust through which volcanic material, such as lava and gases, are emitted.
3. Lava: Molten rock that erupts from a volcano and flows down its slopes. It is a key component of volcanic activity.
4. Tidal wave: A tidal wave, also known as a tsunami, is a large ocean wave usually caused by an underwater earthquake or volcanic eruption. While it can be associated with the effects of a volcanic eruption, it is not a direct part of the volcano itself.
Therefore, the correct answer is D: Tidal wave, as it is not a part of a volcano.
Test: Our Environment & Natural Calamities - 2 - Question 8

The study of earthquakes is called _______.

Detailed Solution for Test: Our Environment & Natural Calamities - 2 - Question 8
The study of earthquakes is called Seismology.
Seismology is the scientific study of earthquakes and the propagation of elastic waves through the Earth or through other planet-like bodies. It involves the study of the causes, effects, and characteristics of earthquakes and seismic waves.
Here are some key points about seismology:
- Seismology is a branch of geophysics that focuses specifically on earthquakes and seismic activity.
- Seismologists use various methods and techniques to study earthquakes, including seismographs, which record the motion of the ground during an earthquake.
- By analyzing seismic data, seismologists can determine the location, magnitude, and depth of an earthquake, as well as the nature of the seismic waves it produces.
- Seismology also helps in understanding the Earth's internal structure and the processes that occur within it.
- The field of seismology is crucial for earthquake hazard assessment, earthquake engineering, and earthquake prediction.
- Seismologists work closely with other disciplines such as geology, physics, and engineering to gain a comprehensive understanding of earthquakes and their impact.
In summary, seismology is the scientific study of earthquakes, and it plays a vital role in understanding and mitigating the risks associated with seismic activity.
Test: Our Environment & Natural Calamities - 2 - Question 9

Name the vertical tunnel through which magma rushes upwards in a volcano.

Detailed Solution for Test: Our Environment & Natural Calamities - 2 - Question 9
Vertical tunnel through which magma rushes upwards in a volcano:
The correct answer is A: Vent.
Explanation:
A volcano is a geological feature that occurs when magma, gases, and other materials erupt through the Earth's surface. The vertical tunnel through which magma rushes upwards in a volcano is called a vent. Here is a detailed explanation:
- Vent: A vent is a fissure or opening in the Earth's crust through which volcanic materials, including magma, are ejected during volcanic eruptions. It is the main conduit through which magma rises from the magma chamber to the surface.
- Magma: Magma is molten rock located beneath the Earth's surface. It is a mixture of molten rock, crystals, and dissolved gases. As pressure builds up in the magma chamber, it forces the magma to rise towards the surface through the vent.
- Crater: A crater is a depression or bowl-shaped cavity at the top of a volcano. It is formed by the explosive eruption or collapse of the volcano's summit. While a crater is a visible feature on the surface, it is not the vertical tunnel through which magma rushes upwards.
- Tremor: A tremor refers to the shaking or vibrating movement of the ground caused by seismic activity. While volcanic activity can generate tremors, it is not specifically related to the vertical tunnel through which magma rises.
In conclusion, the vertical tunnel through which magma rushes upwards in a volcano is called a vent.
Test: Our Environment & Natural Calamities - 2 - Question 10

Dormant volcano are volcanoes:

Detailed Solution for Test: Our Environment & Natural Calamities - 2 - Question 10
Dormant Volcanoes
Dormant volcanoes are volcanoes that have not erupted for several years but could erupt in the future. Here is a detailed explanation:
Definition of Dormant Volcanoes:
A dormant volcano is a volcano that is currently inactive but has the potential to erupt again in the future. It is different from an extinct volcano, which is a volcano that is not expected to erupt again.
Characteristics of Dormant Volcanoes:
- Dormant volcanoes have not erupted for several years, but they still have a live magma chamber beneath the surface.
- They have a history of past eruptions, indicating their potential for future activity.
- They may show signs of minor volcanic activity such as gas emissions, hot springs, or ground deformation.
- The duration of dormancy varies for each volcano, ranging from a few years to several centuries.
Importance of Monitoring Dormant Volcanoes:
- Monitoring dormant volcanoes is crucial for assessing the potential risk and mitigating the impact of future eruptions.
- Volcanic monitoring techniques include seismic monitoring, gas emission measurements, and ground deformation measurements.
- This data helps scientists and authorities make informed decisions regarding evacuation plans and hazard assessments.
Conclusion:
Dormant volcanoes are volcanoes that have not erupted for several years but still have the potential to erupt in the future. Monitoring and studying these volcanoes is essential for understanding volcanic activity and ensuring the safety of nearby populations.
Test: Our Environment & Natural Calamities - 2 - Question 11

Which one of the following are the causes of drought?

Detailed Solution for Test: Our Environment & Natural Calamities - 2 - Question 11
Causes of Drought


There are several factors that can contribute to the occurrence of drought. These include:
1. Less rainfall:
- Insufficient precipitation is one of the primary causes of drought.
- When there is a significant decrease in the amount of rainfall over an extended period, it can lead to water scarcity and drought conditions.
2. High temperature:
- Increased temperatures can intensify the evaporation rate, leading to the drying out of water bodies, soil, and vegetation.
- When temperatures rise above average, it can cause moisture to evaporate more quickly, exacerbating drought conditions.
3. Dry winds:
- Dry winds, also known as hot and dry winds, can worsen drought conditions.
- These winds have low humidity and high temperatures, causing moisture to evaporate rapidly from soil and vegetation, leading to increased aridity.
Therefore, the correct answer is D: All of the above. All the mentioned factors contribute to the occurrence and severity of drought.
Test: Our Environment & Natural Calamities - 2 - Question 12

Hot magma when reaches on earth's surface is known as:

Detailed Solution for Test: Our Environment & Natural Calamities - 2 - Question 12
Hot magma when reaches on earth's surface is known as:
The correct answer is Lava.
Explanation:
When hot magma, which is molten rock beneath the Earth's surface, reaches the Earth's surface, it is known as lava. Lava is typically associated with volcanic eruptions and is expelled from a volcano or volcanic vent.
Here are some key points to understand about lava:
1. Lava Composition: Lava is primarily composed of molten rock, gases, and other materials such as minerals and crystals.
2. Types of Lava: Lava can have different compositions, resulting in different types. The two main types of lava are:
- Basaltic Lava: This type of lava is low in silica content and has a relatively low viscosity, allowing it to flow easily. It often forms extensive lava flows and is commonly found in shield volcanoes.
- Rhyolitic Lava: This type of lava is high in silica content and has a high viscosity, making it more sticky and slow-moving. It tends to form domes and short, stubby lava flows.
3. Lava Characteristics: Lava can range in temperature from around 700 to 1,200 degrees Celsius. It can flow slowly or rapidly depending on its viscosity and slope of the terrain. The color of lava can vary depending on the minerals present, ranging from black to red or even blue in some cases.
4. Effects of Lava: Lava flows can cause significant damage to surrounding areas, including destruction of vegetation, infrastructure, and homes. However, lava flows also contribute to the formation of new land and can create fertile soil over time.
In conclusion, when hot magma reaches the Earth's surface, it is known as lava. Lava is a molten rock that can flow from volcanoes or volcanic vents during eruptions. Understanding the characteristics and types of lava is important in studying volcanic activity and its impact on the Earth's surface.
Test: Our Environment & Natural Calamities - 2 - Question 13

The point on the earth s surface which is above the point where an earthquake originates.

Detailed Solution for Test: Our Environment & Natural Calamities - 2 - Question 13

Explanation:



  • Question: The point on the earth's surface which is above the point where an earthquake originates.

  • Answer: Epicentre


An earthquake originates underground, at a specific point called the focus. The point on the earth's surface that is directly above the focus is known as the epicentre. It is the location where the seismic waves, generated by the earthquake, reach the surface first. The epicentre is often the area where the earthquake's effects are most strongly felt. It is determined by analyzing the arrival times of the seismic waves at different seismograph stations.

Test: Our Environment & Natural Calamities - 2 - Question 14

is a natural disaster caused by undersea earthquakes.

Detailed Solution for Test: Our Environment & Natural Calamities - 2 - Question 14
Explanation:
The correct answer is C: Tsunami. Here is the detailed explanation:
- Definition: A tsunami is a natural disaster that is caused by undersea earthquakes. It is a series of large ocean waves that can cause widespread destruction when they reach the coast.
- Tsunami Formation: When an undersea earthquake occurs, it can cause the seafloor to uplift or subside, displacing a large amount of water. This displacement creates a series of waves that radiate outward from the epicenter of the earthquake.
- Characteristics of Tsunamis: Tsunamis can travel across the ocean at high speeds, reaching coastal areas with little warning. They can cause devastating damage to buildings, infrastructure, and natural habitats. The height and strength of a tsunami wave can vary depending on the size and location of the earthquake that triggered it.
- Other Causes: While earthquakes are the most common cause of tsunamis, other natural events such as volcanic eruptions, landslides, or even meteorite impacts can also generate tsunamis.
- Prevention and Preparedness: Due to the unpredictable nature of tsunamis, it is important for coastal communities to have early warning systems in place and to educate residents about evacuation procedures. Tsunami drills and emergency response plans can help mitigate the impact of these disasters.
In summary, a tsunami is a natural disaster that is caused by undersea earthquakes. It is important to be aware of the signs and risks associated with tsunamis in order to protect lives and property in vulnerable coastal areas.
Test: Our Environment & Natural Calamities - 2 - Question 15

Match the following:

Test: Our Environment & Natural Calamities - 2 - Question 16

Which among the following diseases can be caused due to effects of floods?

Detailed Solution for Test: Our Environment & Natural Calamities - 2 - Question 16
Effects of floods on diseases:
Floods can have a significant impact on public health and can lead to the spread of various diseases. The following diseases can be caused due to the effects of floods:
Cholera:
- Floods can contaminate water sources with fecal matter, leading to the spread of cholera.
- Cholera is an infectious disease caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae, which is often present in contaminated water.
Malaria:
- Floods can create stagnant water pools that serve as breeding grounds for mosquitoes, which transmit malaria.
- Malaria is a mosquito-borne infectious disease caused by the parasite Plasmodium.
Typhoid:
- Floods can contaminate water supplies with sewage, increasing the risk of typhoid transmission.
- Typhoid is a bacterial infection caused by Salmonella typhi, which is often spread through contaminated food and water.
All the above:
- All three of these diseases can be caused or exacerbated by the effects of floods.
- The contamination of water sources and the proliferation of disease-carrying vectors like mosquitoes contribute to the spread of cholera, malaria, and typhoid during flood situations.
Therefore, the correct answer is D: All the above.
Test: Our Environment & Natural Calamities - 2 - Question 17

Which among the following crops can be grown in area having less rainfall1

Detailed Solution for Test: Our Environment & Natural Calamities - 2 - Question 17
Answer:
Suitable Crops for Areas with Less Rainfall:
- Sorghum: Sorghum is a crop that can be grown in areas with less rainfall. It is a drought-tolerant crop and can survive in arid and semi-arid regions with low water availability.
- Millets: Millets, such as pearl millet, finger millet, and foxtail millet, are also suitable crops for areas with less rainfall. They have a high tolerance to drought conditions and can thrive with limited water resources.
- Maize: Maize is another crop that can be grown in areas with less rainfall. While it requires a moderate amount of water, certain varieties of maize have been developed to withstand dry conditions and can be cultivated in regions with low rainfall.
- All the above: All the crops mentioned above, including sorghum, millets, and maize, can be grown in areas with less rainfall. These crops have adapted to survive in water-limited environments and can provide a source of food and income for farmers in such regions.
- None of these: None of the crops mentioned above are suitable for areas with less rainfall. However, this statement is not correct as sorghum, millets, and maize are all crops that can be grown in regions with limited water availability.
Therefore, the correct answer is Option D: All the above.
Test: Our Environment & Natural Calamities - 2 - Question 18

Name the smaller quakes which continue after first big earthquake.

Detailed Solution for Test: Our Environment & Natural Calamities - 2 - Question 18
Explanation:
Aftershocks are the smaller quakes that occur after a larger earthquake. They are caused by the adjustment of the earth's crust after the main shock and can continue for days, weeks, or even months following the initial earthquake. Here is a detailed explanation:
Aftershocks:
- Aftershocks are smaller earthquakes that occur in the same region as the main earthquake.
- They are caused by the movement of the Earth's crust as it adjusts to the stress changes caused by the main shock.
- Aftershocks can range in magnitude, with some being barely noticeable while others can be strong enough to cause additional damage.
- The frequency and intensity of aftershocks generally decrease over time, but they can continue for an extended period.
- Aftershocks are typically located near the epicenter of the main earthquake but can also occur along nearby faults.
Other options:
- Focus: Focus refers to the point within the Earth where an earthquake originates. It is not related to the occurrence of smaller quakes after the main earthquake.
- Epicenter: The epicenter is the point on the Earth's surface directly above the focus of an earthquake. While aftershocks can occur near the epicenter, the term "epicenter" does not specifically refer to the smaller quakes that continue after the main earthquake.
- Postquakes: This term is not commonly used in seismology to describe the smaller quakes that follow a larger earthquake. It is not a recognized term in the field.
Therefore, the correct answer is B: Aftershocks.
Test: Our Environment & Natural Calamities - 2 - Question 19

Which among the following statements is not correct?

Detailed Solution for Test: Our Environment & Natural Calamities - 2 - Question 19
Answer:
The correct option is B: Tsunami occurs mostly near a desert area. This statement is not correct because tsunamis are usually caused by underwater earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, or landslides, and they typically occur in coastal areas, not desert areas.
Explanation:
- Statement A: Natural disasters cause great loss of life and property. This statement is correct as natural disasters such as earthquakes, hurricanes, floods, and wildfires can result in significant loss of life and destruction of property.
- Statement B: Tsunami occurs mostly near a desert area. This statement is incorrect. Tsunamis are usually generated by underwater disturbances and occur in coastal areas with significant bodies of water, such as oceans and seas.
- Statement C: Floods mostly occur at river bank areas. This statement is correct. Floods often occur in areas near rivers, as heavy rainfall or melting snow can cause the water levels in rivers to rise and overflow, leading to flooding in nearby areas.
- Statement D: All the above. This statement is incorrect because option B is not correct.
- Statement E: None of these. This statement is incorrect as the correct answer is option B.
Test: Our Environment & Natural Calamities - 2 - Question 20

Olympus Mons is a:

Detailed Solution for Test: Our Environment & Natural Calamities - 2 - Question 20
Olympus Mons is a Volcanic Mountain

Olympus Mons is the largest volcano in the solar system and is located on the planet Mars. Here are some key points to support the answer:



  • Size: Olympus Mons is about 13.6 miles (22 kilometers) high and has a diameter of about 370 miles (600 kilometers), making it the tallest volcano in the solar system.

  • Volcanic Origin: The mountain was formed by volcanic activity, specifically shield volcanism. Shield volcanoes are characterized by their broad, gentle slopes and are built up by repeated lava flows over time.

  • Lava Flows: Olympus Mons has extensive lava flows that cover its surface, indicating its volcanic nature.

  • No Evidence of Tsunami, Cyclone, or Flood: There is no evidence to suggest that Olympus Mons is related to tsunamis, cyclones, or floods. These natural phenomena are typically associated with bodies of water, which are not present on Mars in significant quantities.


Therefore, based on its size, volcanic origin, and lack of evidence for other natural phenomena, it can be concluded that Olympus Mons is a volcanic mountain.

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