GMAT Full Mock Test- 3


86 Questions MCQ Test GMAT Mock Test for Practice | GMAT Full Mock Test- 3


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This mock test of GMAT Full Mock Test- 3 for GMAT helps you for every GMAT entrance exam. This contains 86 Multiple Choice Questions for GMAT GMAT Full Mock Test- 3 (mcq) to study with solutions a complete question bank. The solved questions answers in this GMAT Full Mock Test- 3 quiz give you a good mix of easy questions and tough questions. GMAT students definitely take this GMAT Full Mock Test- 3 exercise for a better result in the exam. You can find other GMAT Full Mock Test- 3 extra questions, long questions & short questions for GMAT on EduRev as well by searching above.
QUESTION: 1

Government policies should ensure that network owners charge nondiscriminatory prices to any client who wants to use their home network to distribute information

Solution:

The pronoun there is inappropriate because it refersto the singular noun phrase: any client, and must be replaced by his.

QUESTION: 2

Common stocks, which are shares of ownership in a corporation, is the most direct way to participate in the fortunes of a company.

Solution:

The sentence has a plural subject, common stocks, therefore it needs the plural form of the verb: are.

QUESTION: 3

Organic farmers are looking for non-chemical methods to rid their crops of pests. Giving crops a slight electric shock has no ill effect on crops but rids them of caterpillars. This method should be employed by organic farmers all over the country.
Q.Which of the following, if true, most strongly supports the view that it would not be advisable to try to eradicate agricultural pests with the method mentioned above?

Solution:

If electrifying crops kills beneficial insects along with the pests, it may do as much or more harm than good.

QUESTION: 4

A study of business partnerships in which one partner’s management style differs from that of the other partner reveals that such partnerships are more likely be fraught with problems and to ultimately end in dissolution. Thus, mismatched management styles can seriously jeopardize a business partnership.
Q. Which of the following, if true, most seriously weakens the argument above?

Solution:

If partners who are considering dissolution have been found to express hostility by adopting a different management style from that of their partners, then the different management styles are the result and not the cause of the discordance between the partners.

QUESTION: 5

A report on the use of monosodium glutamate in food concluded, “Most Americans who consume monosodium glutamate regularly are not being harmed.” Critics of the report insist the conclusion be changed to, “Most Americans who consume monosodium glutamate do not show visible symptoms of harm by the substance, such as abnormal rashes or slower rates of metabolism.”
Q. Which of the following, if true, provides the best logical justification for the critics’ insistence that the report’s conclusion be changed?

Solution:

If there is a possibility that monosodium glutamate will cause long-term harm, then the absence of symptoms cannot be taken as proof that Americans who consume monosodium glutamate regularly are not being harmed.

QUESTION: 6

On May 5th, 1997, the European edition of Business Tech Magazine led with Hoffman’s cover story "Internet Communities: How They're Shaping Electronic Commerce". This cover story highlights the extent to which the term virtual community has become almost synonymous with various forms of group-CMC (computer-mediated communication), including email-list forums, chat-systems such as IRC, web-based discussion areas and UseNet news-groups. There was no debate in the Business Tech Magazine article as to whether the group-CMC discussions are really 'communities', rather how the community, as opposed to content, can be used to encourage people to return to a particular part of cyberspace for commercial gain. In a similar vein, Simpson and Armstrong in "Internet Gain" argue that ignoring virtual communities would be a great loss of a marketing tool for businesses. They define virtual communities as computer-mediated space where there is an integration of content and communication with an emphasis on member-generated content. Not all virtual community commentators agree with the Spartan position taken by Hoffman. Rheingold, one of the prime popularizers of the term virtual community, provides us with a more emotive definition in his book The Virtual Community: Homesteading on the Electronic Frontier. According to Rheingold, "virtual communities are social aggregations that emerge from the Net when enough people carry on those public discussions long enough, with sufficient human feeling, to form webs of personal relationships in cyberspace". Rheingold's definition is extremely popular and has been quoted in many discussions about virtual communities. As discussed below, for social scientists, particularly sociologists, Rheingold's definition raises many issues, especially concerning the notion of community. This is because Rheingold argues via a variety of analogies from the real world such as homesteading that virtual communities are indeed new forms of "community". In fact, Rheingold implies that virtual communities are actually "a kind of ultimate flowering of a community". Moreover, Rheingold maintains that whenever computer-mediated communications technology becomes available; people inevitably create communities with it. Rheingold can thus be labeled as a technological determinist as he holds that there is a predictable relationship between technology and people's behavior. The debate over the validity of Rheingold's position has raised doubts about the existence of virtual communities and the appropriate use of the term. Weinreich claims that the idea of virtual communities must be wrong because the community is a collective of kinship networks that share a common geographic region, a common history, and a shared value system, usually rooted in a common religion. In other words, Weinreich rejects the existence of virtual communities because group-CMC discussions cannot possibly meet his definition. In Weinreich's view, anyone with even a basic knowledge of sociology understands that information exchange in no way constitutes a community.
Q. The primary purpose of the passage is to

Solution:

The passage begins by presenting the viewpoint of those that believe that group-CMCs are true communities and continues by presenting an opposing view. D is incorrect because definitions, not hypotheses are discussed in the passage.

QUESTION: 7

On May 5th, 1997, the European edition of Business Tech Magazine led with Hoffman’s cover story "Internet Communities: How They're Shaping Electronic Commerce". This cover story highlights the extent to which the term virtual community has become almost synonymous with various forms of group-CMC (computer-mediated communication), including email-list forums, chat-systems such as IRC, web-based discussion areas and UseNet news-groups. There was no debate in the Business Tech Magazine article as to whether the group-CMC discussions are really 'communities', rather how the community, as opposed to content, can be used to encourage people to return to a particular part of cyberspace for commercial gain. In a similar vein, Simpson and Armstrong in "Internet Gain" argue that ignoring virtual communities would be a great loss of a marketing tool for businesses. They define virtual communities as computer-mediated space where there is an integration of content and communication with an emphasis on member-generated content. Not all virtual community commentators agree with the Spartan position taken by Hoffman. Rheingold, one of the prime popularizers of the term virtual community, provides us with a more emotive definition in his book The Virtual Community: Homesteading on the Electronic Frontier. According to Rheingold, "virtual communities are social aggregations that emerge from the Net when enough people carry on those public discussions long enough, with sufficient human feeling, to form webs of personal relationships in cyberspace". Rheingold's definition is extremely popular and has been quoted in many discussions about virtual communities. As discussed below, for social scientists, particularly sociologists, Rheingold's definition raises many issues, especially concerning the notion of community. This is because Rheingold argues via a variety of analogies from the real world such as homesteading that virtual communities are indeed new forms of "community". In fact, Rheingold implies that virtual communities are actually "a kind of ultimate flowering of a community". Moreover, Rheingold maintains that whenever computer-mediated communications technology becomes available; people inevitably create communities with it. Rheingold can thus be labeled as a technological determinist as he holds that there is a predictable relationship between technology and people's behavior. The debate over the validity of Rheingold's position has raised doubts about the existence of virtual communities and the appropriate use of the term. Weinreich claims that the idea of virtual communities must be wrong because the community is a collective of kinship networks that share a common geographic region, a common history, and a shared value system, usually rooted in a common religion. In other words, Weinreich rejects the existence of virtual communities because group-CMC discussions cannot possibly meet his definition. In Weinreich's view, anyone with even a basic knowledge of sociology understands that information exchange in no way constitutes a community.
​Q. According to Simpson and Armstrong, virtual communities

Solution:

According to Simpson and Armstrong ignoring virtual communities would be a loss. In other word, virtual communities are invaluable. The word invaluable means very useful.

QUESTION: 8

On May 5th, 1997, the European edition of Business Tech Magazine led with Hoffman’s cover story "Internet Communities: How They're Shaping Electronic Commerce". This cover story highlights the extent to which the term virtual community has become almost synonymous with various forms of group-CMC (computer-mediated communication), including email-list forums, chat-systems such as IRC, web-based discussion areas and UseNet news-groups. There was no debate in the Business Tech Magazine article as to whether the group-CMC discussions are really 'communities', rather how the community, as opposed to content, can be used to encourage people to return to a particular part of cyberspace for commercial gain. In a similar vein, Simpson and Armstrong in "Internet Gain" argue that ignoring virtual communities would be a great loss of a marketing tool for businesses. They define virtual communities as computer-mediated space where there is an integration of content and communication with an emphasis on member-generated content. Not all virtual community commentators agree with the Spartan position taken by Hoffman. Rheingold, one of the prime popularizers of the term virtual community, provides us with a more emotive definition in his book The Virtual Community: Homesteading on the Electronic Frontier. According to Rheingold, "virtual communities are social aggregations that emerge from the Net when enough people carry on those public discussions long enough, with sufficient human feeling, to form webs of personal relationships in cyberspace". Rheingold's definition is extremely popular and has been quoted in many discussions about virtual communities. As discussed below, for social scientists, particularly sociologists, Rheingold's definition raises many issues, especially concerning the notion of community. This is because Rheingold argues via a variety of analogies from the real world such as homesteading that virtual communities are indeed new forms of "community". In fact, Rheingold implies that virtual communities are actually "a kind of ultimate flowering of a community". Moreover, Rheingold maintains that whenever computer-mediated communications technology becomes available; people inevitably create communities with it. Rheingold can thus be labeled as a technological determinist as he holds that there is a predictable relationship between technology and people's behavior. The debate over the validity of Rheingold's position has raised doubts about the existence of virtual communities and the appropriate use of the term. Weinreich claims that the idea of virtual communities must be wrong because the community is a collective of kinship networks that share a common geographic region, a common history, and a shared value system, usually rooted in a common religion. In other words, Weinreich rejects the existence of virtual communities because group-CMC discussions cannot possibly meet his definition. In Weinreich's view, anyone with even a basic knowledge of sociology understands that information exchange in no way constitutes a community.
Q. Weinreich rejects Rheingold’s inclusion of virtual communities in the definition of communities for all of the following reasons EXCEPT

Solution:

The question asks you to identify what does NOT stop Weinreich from considering a virtual community a real community. An exchange of information is not problematic for Weinreich.

QUESTION: 9

On May 5th, 1997, the European edition of Business Tech Magazine led with Hoffman’s cover story "Internet Communities: How They're Shaping Electronic Commerce". This cover story highlights the extent to which the term virtual community has become almost synonymous with various forms of group-CMC (computer-mediated communication), including email-list forums, chat-systems such as IRC, web-based discussion areas and UseNet news-groups. There was no debate in the Business Tech Magazine article as to whether the group-CMC discussions are really 'communities', rather how the community, as opposed to content, can be used to encourage people to return to a particular part of cyberspace for commercial gain. In a similar vein, Simpson and Armstrong in "Internet Gain" argue that ignoring virtual communities would be a great loss of a marketing tool for businesses. They define virtual communities as computer-mediated space where there is an integration of content and communication with an emphasis on member-generated content. Not all virtual community commentators agree with the Spartan position taken by Hoffman. Rheingold, one of the prime popularizers of the term virtual community, provides us with a more emotive definition in his book The Virtual Community: Homesteading on the Electronic Frontier. According to Rheingold, "virtual communities are social aggregations that emerge from the Net when enough people carry on those public discussions long enough, with sufficient human feeling, to form webs of personal relationships in cyberspace". Rheingold's definition is extremely popular and has been quoted in many discussions about virtual communities. As discussed below, for social scientists, particularly sociologists, Rheingold's definition raises many issues, especially concerning the notion of community. This is because Rheingold argues via a variety of analogies from the real world such as homesteading that virtual communities are indeed new forms of "community". In fact, Rheingold implies that virtual communities are actually "a kind of ultimate flowering of a community". Moreover, Rheingold maintains that whenever computer-mediated communications technology becomes available; people inevitably create communities with it. Rheingold can thus be labeled as a technological determinist as he holds that there is a predictable relationship between technology and people's behavior. The debate over the validity of Rheingold's position has raised doubts about the existence of virtual communities and the appropriate use of the term. Weinreich claims that the idea of virtual communities must be wrong because the community is a collective of kinship networks that share a common geographic region, a common history, and a shared value system, usually rooted in a common religion. In other words, Weinreich rejects the existence of virtual communities because group-CMC discussions cannot possibly meet his definition. In Weinreich's view, anyone with even a basic knowledge of sociology understands that information exchange in no way constitutes a community.
Q. The author says ‘there was no debate in the Business Tech Magazine article’ to emphasize which of the following points?

Solution:

The passage discusses whether group-CMCs are communities. Business Tech Magazine does not debate this issue because it has already assumed that they are.

QUESTION: 10

We now have wireless computer networks, direct-broadcast satellite television, digital wireless cable television networks, global telephone service, and global positioning systems that can pinpoint an individual’s location to a few inches.

Solution:

Choices B and D are incorrect because in a few inches is unidiomatic. In C, D and E the pronoun which is incorrectly used for a non-restrictive relative clause

QUESTION: 11

To deal with this explosion of data, one can use the computer and communications technology to help us sort, store, transport, and most important, understand the information.

Solution:

The plural pronoun us was incorrect because it has the same referent as the pronoun one earlier in the sentence.

QUESTION: 12

It will improve education, make government at all levels more cost-effective and user friendly, reduce health-car costs while improving quality, and give communities new ways to address problems such as crime and pollution.

Solution:

The sentence makes correct use of a parallel structure. It will improve…, will make.., will reduce…, will give…
Until recently, most automobile manufacturers minimized the weight of their cars to maximize mileage. The safest chassis were heavy, so few manufacturers equipped their cars with the safest chassis. This year the chassis metal that has sold best to automobile manufacturers has been the safest one—a clear indication that manufacturers are assigning a higher priority to safety than to mileage.

QUESTION: 13

Until recently, most automobile manufacturers minimized the weight of their cars to maximize mileage. The safest chassis were heavy, so few manufacturers equipped their cars with the safest chassis. This year the chassis metal that has sold best to automobile manufacturers has been the safest one-a clear indication that manufacturers are assigning a higher priority to safety than to mileage.

Which of the following, if true, most seriously weakens the argument above?

Solution:

The conclusion is based on an assumption that the safest chassis are still the heaviest ones, as they have been in the past. Choice E proves this assumption to be erroneous.
The CEO of Black’s International has proposed replacing their Marmacil semiconductor manufacturing equipment with Fasttech equipment since it costs 30 percent less to train new staff on the Fasttech equipment. Those opposed to the change have pointed out the savings in training cost does not justify the change. Instead, they suggested that the company hire only people who already know how to use the Marmacil equipment.

QUESTION: 14

Which of the following, if true, most seriously undermines the objection to the replacement of Marmacil semiconductor manufacturing equipment with Fasttechs?

Solution:

Those objecting to the change claim that the advantage of Fasttech’s relatively low cost can be mitigated by hiring experience users of Marmacil semiconductor manufacturing equipment. However, if such people command much higher salaries as choice C states, doing so would not result in savings to the company.

QUESTION: 15

A pharmaceutical company developed a new diuretic reported to cause fewer side effects than their old diuretic, which was still being manufactured. During the first year that both were sold, the earlier medication far outsold the new one; the manufacturer thus concluded that reducing side effects was not the customers' primary consideration.
Q. Which of the following, if true, would most seriously weaken the manufacturer’s conclusion?

Solution:

The manufacture’s conclusion was that reducing side effects was not the customers' primary consideration. Choice B states that customers consider older medication a better safety risk, so those customers bought the older diuretic out of safety considerations.

QUESTION: 16

Republicans also benefited from the enthusiastic and well-organized support of conservative Christians concerning about social issues, including abortion.

Solution:

The word concerned modifies the noun Christians. The preposition that goes with it is about.

QUESTION: 17

Take a very commonplace, often discussed and critical topic: Are we detecting a greenhouse effect, and related to this, is it exacerbated by "homogenic factors," i.e., human actions? Most would be inclined to give a positive answer to both of these questions. But, if pushed, what would be the evidence, and how well grounded would it be for such affirmations? Within scientific communities and associated scientifically informed circles, the answers have to be somewhat more ambiguous, particularly when rigorous questions concerning evidence are raised. Were scientific truth to be a matter of consensus, and some argue that scientific truth often turns out to be just that, then it is clear that there is beginning to be a kind of majority consensus among many earth science practitioners that the temperature of the Earth, particularly of the oceans, is indeed rising and that this is a crucial indicator for a possible greenhouse effect. Most of these scientists admit that the mean oceanic temperature has risen globally in the last several decades. But this generalization depends upon how accurate measurements may be, not just for samples, but also for the whole Earth. Hot spots, for example the now four year old hot spot near New Guinea which is part of the El Niño cycle, does not count by itself because it might be balanced by cold spots elsewhere. And the fact of the matter is that "whole earth measurements" are still rare and primitive in the simple sense that we simply do not have enough thermometers out. Secondly, even if we had enough thermometers, a simply synchronic whole earth measurement over three decades is but a blip in the diachronic history of ice age cycles over the last tens of thousands of years. Thirdly, even if we know that the earth is now heating up, has an ever increasing ozone hole, and from this strange weather effects can be predicted, how much of this is due to homorganic factors, such as CFCs, CO2 increases, hydrocarbon burning, and the like? Is it really the case, as Science magazine claimed in l990, "24% of greenhouse encouraging gases are of homorganic origin"?
Q. In this passage the author is primarily interested in

Solution:

The author questions the claim that there is indeed a greenhouse effect that is made worse by human actions. (A) is too general an answer, while (D) is too specific. (D) is wrong because it is probing whether scientists agree, not whether there the phenomenon actually exists.

QUESTION: 18

Take a very commonplace, often discussed and critical topic: Are we detecting a greenhouse effect, and related to this, is it exacerbated by "homogenic factors," i.e., human actions? Most would be inclined to give a positive answer to both of these questions. But, if pushed, what would be the evidence, and how well grounded would it be for such affirmations? Within scientific communities and associated scientifically informed circles, the answers have to be somewhat more ambiguous, particularly when rigorous questions concerning evidence are raised. Were scientific truth to be a matter of consensus, and some argue that scientific truth often turns out to be just that, then it is clear that there is beginning to be a kind of majority consensus among many earth science practitioners that the temperature of the Earth, particularly of the oceans, is indeed rising and that this is a crucial indicator for a possible greenhouse effect. Most of these scientists admit that the mean oceanic temperature has risen globally in the last several decades. But this generalization depends upon how accurate measurements may be, not just for samples, but also for the whole Earth. Hot spots, for example the now four year old hot spot near New Guinea which is part of the El Niño cycle, does not count by itself because it might be balanced by cold spots elsewhere. And the fact of the matter is that "whole earth measurements" are still rare and primitive in the simple sense that we simply do not have enough thermometers out. Secondly, even if we had enough thermometers, a simply synchronic whole earth measurement over three decades is but a blip in the diachronic history of ice age cycles over the last tens of thousands of years. Thirdly, even if we know that the earth is now heating up, has an ever increasing ozone hole, and from this strange weather effects can be predicted, how much of this is due to homorganic factors, such as CFCs, CO2 increases, hydrocarbon burning, and the like? Is it really the case, as Science magazine claimed in l990, "24% of greenhouse encouraging gases are of homorganic origin"?
Q. The author of the passage would be most likely to agree with which of the following statements about the greenhouse effect?

Solution:

Scientists are basing their claims on global warning on rising ocean temperatures. One can tell if temperatures have in fact risen only by measuring them correctly.

QUESTION: 19

Take a very commonplace, often discussed and critical topic: Are we detecting a greenhouse effect, and related to this, is it exacerbated by "homogenic factors," i.e., human actions? Most would be inclined to give a positive answer to both of these questions. But, if pushed, what would be the evidence, and how well grounded would it be for such affirmations? Within scientific communities and associated scientifically informed circles, the answers have to be somewhat more ambiguous, particularly when rigorous questions concerning evidence are raised. Were scientific truth to be a matter of consensus, and some argue that scientific truth often turns out to be just that, then it is clear that there is beginning to be a kind of majority consensus among many earth science practitioners that the temperature of the Earth, particularly of the oceans, is indeed rising and that this is a crucial indicator for a possible greenhouse effect. Most of these scientists admit that the mean oceanic temperature has risen globally in the last several decades. But this generalization depends upon how accurate measurements may be, not just for samples, but also for the whole Earth. Hot spots, for example the now four year old hot spot near New Guinea which is part of the El Niño cycle, does not count by itself because it might be balanced by cold spots elsewhere. And the fact of the matter is that "whole earth measurements" are still rare and primitive in the simple sense that we simply do not have enough thermometers out. Secondly, even if we had enough thermometers, a simply synchronic whole earth measurement over three decades is but a blip in the diachronic history of ice age cycles over the last tens of thousands of years. Thirdly, even if we know that the earth is now heating up, has an ever increasing ozone hole, and from this strange weather effects can be predicted, how much of this is due to homorganic factors, such as CFCs, CO2 increases, hydrocarbon burning, and the like? Is it really the case, as Science magazine claimed in l990, "24% of greenhouse encouraging gases are of homorganic origin"?
Q. It can be inferred from the passage that

Solution:

The author is questioning the cause and effect relationship between the increasingly large ozone hole and global warming, as well as cause and effect relationship between global warming and strange weather effects.

QUESTION: 20

Take a very commonplace, often discussed and critical topic: Are we detecting a greenhouse effect, and related to this, is it exacerbated by "homogenic factors," i.e., human actions? Most would be inclined to give a positive answer to both of these questions. But, if pushed, what would be the evidence, and how well grounded would it be for such affirmations? Within scientific communities and associated scientifically informed circles, the answers have to be somewhat more ambiguous, particularly when rigorous questions concerning evidence are raised. Were scientific truth to be a matter of consensus, and some argue that scientific truth often turns out to be just that, then it is clear that there is beginning to be a kind of majority consensus among many earth science practitioners that the temperature of the Earth, particularly of the oceans, is indeed rising and that this is a crucial indicator for a possible greenhouse effect. Most of these scientists admit that the mean oceanic temperature has risen globally in the last several decades. But this generalization depends upon how accurate measurements may be, not just for samples, but also for the whole Earth. Hot spots, for example the now four year old hot spot near New Guinea which is part of the El Niño cycle, does not count by itself because it might be balanced by cold spots elsewhere. And the fact of the matter is that "whole earth measurements" are still rare and primitive in the simple sense that we simply do not have enough thermometers out. Secondly, even if we had enough thermometers, a simply synchronic whole earth measurement over three decades is but a blip in the diachronic history of ice age cycles over the last tens of thousands of years. Thirdly, even if we know that the earth is now heating up, has an ever increasing ozone hole, and from this strange weather effects can be predicted, how much of this is due to homorganic factors, such as CFCs, CO2 increases, hydrocarbon burning, and the like? Is it really the case, as Science magazine claimed in l990, "24% of greenhouse encouraging gases are of homorganic origin"?
Q. The author’s claim that, a simply synchronic whole earth measurement over three decades is but a blip in the diachronic history of ice age cycles over the last tens of thousands of years would be strengthened if the author

Solution:

If one knows that change can be detected only after much more than thirty years, then measurements taken over a thirty-year period is insignificant

QUESTION: 21

By necessary, munitions plants hired many young woman during the war; at least as much as 500,00 and more others who had not any previous experience in factory work of any kind.

Solution:

It is idiomatic, clear, and concise. Both A and B incorrectly use much rather than many. In A and C, not any is wordy and awkward. E redundantly uses at least and more.

QUESTION: 22

The expansion of the influence of the Gregorian calendar system in non-European regions can be traced from European colonies such as India and Egypt, and the independent countries, replacing traditional calendars at least for official purposes.

Solution:

The construction can be traced from x must be completed by to y, as in choice B.

QUESTION: 23

Canadian wheat farmers produced so much wheat over the last season that wheat prices plummeted. The government tried to boost wheat prices by offering farmers who agreed not to harvest 20 percent of their wheat field compensation up to a specified maximum per farm.
Q. The Canadian government's program, if successful, will not be a net burden on the budget. Which of the following, if true, is the best basis for an explanation of how this could be so?

Solution:

The program will not be a net burden on the budget because money spent on compensation can be made up by money collected through taxation of the farms

QUESTION: 24

Eclampsia in pregnancy is especially prevalent among women who are seriously malnourished. In order to achieve early detection of eclampsia in these individuals, public health officials distributed pamphlets explaining the importance of early detection of this potentially fatal disease
Q. Which of the following, if true, is the best criticism of the use of the pamphlet as a method of achieving the public health officials’ goal?

Solution:

The pamphlet is incapable of achieving the public health officials’ goal if it does not reach its target audience.

QUESTION: 25

Technological improvements have made electric cars far more cost-efficient in the last decade. However, the threshold of economic viability for electric cars (that is, the cost of running an electric car compared to a gasoline powered car) has remained unchanged.
Q. Which of the following, if true, does most to help explain why the increased cost-efficiency of electric cars has not decreased its threshold of economic viability?

Solution:

Improvements in electric cars have been matched by improvements in gasoline-powered cars so that their economic viability has not improved.

QUESTION: 26

It seemed that hardly any vote was cast on the Senate or House floor without some calculation as to how it might affect the midterm election.

Solution:

The construction as to is idiomatic. In d and E, the use of as alone or to alone is incorrect.

QUESTION: 27

The acrimony in Washington, communicated to the general public to a large degree in sound-bite epithets from the principals on evening television newscasts, contributed to a sour mood between the electorate.

Solution:

A and B are incorrect because of the use of between for more than two. B, D and E are incorrect because of the use of the gerund form of the word where the past form, contributed, is needed.

QUESTION: 28

Generally, marine biologists enter their field with the goal of doing important new research. They expect their colleagues to have similar goals. Therefore, when any marine biologist becomes a household name in the field of documentary nature films, most other scientists conclude that this biologist should no longer be regarded as a true colleague.
Q. The explanation offered above for the low esteem in which marine biologists who make documentary films are held by research scientists assumes that

Solution:

The conclusion that biologists who make documentaries should no longer be regarded as true colleagues is based on the assumption that such biologists will not longer do important new research

QUESTION: 29

An Australian group named Action Council on Smoking and Health (ACSH) has recently lobbied to make warnings on cigarette packets more graphic. The council proposed that striking visual photos of diseased organs should be put on at least 50% of outside packaging, in conjunction with health warnings outlining smoking hazards enumerated in a separate leaflet placed inside the cigarette packet. The ACSH claim that bland and ineffectual warnings like "Smoking is a health hazard" currently found on cigarette packets are not nearly sufficient. Substituting those inadequate admonitions with explicit photos will provide a powerful visual stimulus to help smokers relinquish their habit. The current cautions on cigarette packets have little or no impact on smokers who have grown immune to the warnings that focus on abstract tobacco related risks and illnesses from which smokers can easily disassociate themselves. The proposed new tactics would concentrate on the perspective of the individual smoker through a demonstration of what is occurring in his body each time he reaches for a cigarette, rather than a generic cautionary word of advice.
The ACSH cited the results of recent studies conducted by psychologists at McKean University confirming that evidence related to one's own experience is more effective at influencing future behavior than a presentation of facts and figures. An further rationale for the addition of pictures to cigarette packages is the finding that smokers handle their packets 20-30 times a day, on average, thus, if graphic pictures on cigarette packets were introduced, smoker would have 20-30 chances to face the harsh reality of what damage they are doing to themselves each time they light up. Even more essential than the pictures on the outside label, ACSH strongly advocate including warnings and helpful information in a leaflet inserted into the packet of cigarettes. Even an analgesic, ACSH adds, found in every bathroom cabinet has all possible side effects enumerated in the insert. How much more imperative is it then when the substance in question is tobacco, a dried weed that contains highly noxious nicotine that society still accepts even though it kills one of every two of its users. Fundamentally, what is at stake here is consumer rights. Smokers should know what substances they are inhaling, and what damage they are inflicting to their bodies, though surprisingly, even today, many do not. For this reason alone, the recommendation for more graphic pictures and warnings on cigarette packets, which many seem excessive, is being seriously considered.
Q. It can be inferred from the passage

Solution:

We do not have information about (A) (B) and (D) from the passage. (E) is incorrect because the passage claims that smokers have an opportunity to look at their cigarette packages, not that they actually do.

QUESTION: 30

An Australian group named Action Council on Smoking and Health (ACSH) has recently lobbied to make warnings on cigarette packets more graphic. The council proposed that striking visual photos of diseased organs should be put on at least 50% of outside packaging, in conjunction with health warnings outlining smoking hazards enumerated in a separate leaflet placed inside the cigarette packet. The ACSH claim that bland and ineffectual warnings like "Smoking is a health hazard" currently found on cigarette packets are not nearly sufficient. Substituting those inadequate admonitions with explicit photos will provide a powerful visual stimulus to help smokers relinquish their habit. The current cautions on cigarette packets have little or no impact on smokers who have grown immune to the warnings that focus on abstract tobacco related risks and illnesses from which smokers can easily disassociate themselves. The proposed new tactics would concentrate on the perspective of the individual smoker through a demonstration of what is occurring in his body each time he reaches for a cigarette, rather than a generic cautionary word of advice.
The ACSH cited the results of recent studies conducted by psychologists at McKean University confirming that evidence related to one's own experience is more effective at influencing future behavior than a presentation of facts and figures. An further rationale for the addition of pictures to cigarette packages is the finding that smokers handle their packets 20-30 times a day, on average, thus, if graphic pictures on cigarette packets were introduced, smoker would have 20-30 chances to face the harsh reality of what damage they are doing to themselves each time they light up. Even more essential than the pictures on the outside label, ACSH strongly advocate including warnings and helpful information in a leaflet inserted into the packet of cigarettes. Even an analgesic, ACSH adds, found in every bathroom cabinet has all possible side effects enumerated in the insert. How much more imperative is it then when the substance in question is tobacco, a dried weed that contains highly noxious nicotine that society still accepts even though it kills one of every two of its users. Fundamentally, what is at stake here is consumer rights. Smokers should know what substances they are inhaling, and what damage they are inflicting to their bodies, though surprisingly, even today, many do not. For this reason alone, the recommendation for more graphic pictures and warnings on cigarette packets, which many seem excessive, is being seriously considered.
Q. The author cites studies conducted at McKean University to account for why

Solution:

The author mentions the study as evidence presented by the ACSH to back their claim that visual pictures would be more effective than the present warning found on cigarette boxes.

QUESTION: 31

An Australian group named Action Council on Smoking and Health (ACSH) has recently lobbied to make warnings on cigarette packets more graphic. The council proposed that striking visual photos of diseased organs should be put on at least 50% of outside packaging, in conjunction with health warnings outlining smoking hazards enumerated in a separate leaflet placed inside the cigarette packet. The ACSH claim that bland and ineffectual warnings like "Smoking is a health hazard" currently found on cigarette packets are not nearly sufficient. Substituting those inadequate admonitions with explicit photos will provide a powerful visual stimulus to help smokers relinquish their habit. The current cautions on cigarette packets have little or no impact on smokers who have grown immune to the warnings that focus on abstract tobacco related risks and illnesses from which smokers can easily disassociate themselves. The proposed new tactics would concentrate on the perspective of the individual smoker through a demonstration of what is occurring in his body each time he reaches for a cigarette, rather than a generic cautionary word of advice.
The ACSH cited the results of recent studies conducted by psychologists at McKean University confirming that evidence related to one's own experience is more effective at influencing future behavior than a presentation of facts and figures. An further rationale for the addition of pictures to cigarette packages is the finding that smokers handle their packets 20-30 times a day, on average, thus, if graphic pictures on cigarette packets were introduced, smoker would have 20-30 chances to face the harsh reality of what damage they are doing to themselves each time they light up. Even more essential than the pictures on the outside label, ACSH strongly advocate including warnings and helpful information in a leaflet inserted into the packet of cigarettes. Even an analgesic, ACSH adds, found in every bathroom cabinet has all possible side effects enumerated in the insert. How much more imperative is it then when the substance in question is tobacco, a dried weed that contains highly noxious nicotine that society still accepts even though it kills one of every two of its users. Fundamentally, what is at stake here is consumer rights. Smokers should know what substances they are inhaling, and what damage they are inflicting to their bodies, though surprisingly, even today, many do not. For this reason alone, the recommendation for more graphic pictures and warnings on cigarette packets, which many seem excessive, is being seriously considered.
Q. Which of the following, if true, would be most useful in supporting the claims made by the ACSH?

Solution:

If smokers were more convinced of the dangers of smoker by pictures than by text, they would be more likely to be influenced by the pictures that the ACSH is proposing

QUESTION: 32

An Australian group named Action Council on Smoking and Health (ACSH) has recently lobbied to make warnings on cigarette packets more graphic. The council proposed that striking visual photos of diseased organs should be put on at least 50% of outside packaging, in conjunction with health warnings outlining smoking hazards enumerated in a separate leaflet placed inside the cigarette packet. The ACSH claim that bland and ineffectual warnings like "Smoking is a health hazard" currently found on cigarette packets are not nearly sufficient. Substituting those inadequate admonitions with explicit photos will provide a powerful visual stimulus to help smokers relinquish their habit. The current cautions on cigarette packets have little or no impact on smokers who have grown immune to the warnings that focus on abstract tobacco related risks and illnesses from which smokers can easily disassociate themselves. The proposed new tactics would concentrate on the perspective of the individual smoker through a demonstration of what is occurring in his body each time he reaches for a cigarette, rather than a generic cautionary word of advice.
The ACSH cited the results of recent studies conducted by psychologists at McKean University confirming that evidence related to one's own experience is more effective at influencing future behavior than a presentation of facts and figures. An further rationale for the addition of pictures to cigarette packages is the finding that smokers handle their packets 20-30 times a day, on average, thus, if graphic pictures on cigarette packets were introduced, smoker would have 20-30 chances to face the harsh reality of what damage they are doing to themselves each time they light up. Even more essential than the pictures on the outside label, ACSH strongly advocate including warnings and helpful information in a leaflet inserted into the packet of cigarettes. Even an analgesic, ACSH adds, found in every bathroom cabinet has all possible side effects enumerated in the insert. How much more imperative is it then when the substance in question is tobacco, a dried weed that contains highly noxious nicotine that society still accepts even though it kills one of every two of its users. Fundamentally, what is at stake here is consumer rights. Smokers should know what substances they are inhaling, and what damage they are inflicting to their bodies, though surprisingly, even today, many do not. For this reason alone, the recommendation for more graphic pictures and warnings on cigarette packets, which many seem excessive, is being seriously considered.
Q. The passage does NOT state which of the following about smoking warnings.

Solution:

The passage does not say that current graphic warnings are effective since there are currently no graphic warnings, only written ones.

QUESTION: 33

According to a recent survey, the establishment of natural parks to preserve existing plant and animal life in Colorado is still a priority of a majority of residents, like that of earlier test groups.

Solution:

The intended comparison should be completed by a clause beginning with as and containing a subject and verb that correspond to the subject and verb of the main clause.

QUESTION: 34

Named a member of the committee to draw up a Declaration of Independence, the basic draft was completed by Thomas Jefferson in a week.

Solution:

The sentence starts with the adjectival phrase, Named a member of the committee to draw up a Declaration of Independence. That phrase is supposed to modify the noun that comes immediately after it, making A, B, and C incorrect. E is incorrect because in a week incorrectly comes between the noun and verb.

QUESTION: 35

Dr. Kevorkian, the so-called suicide doctor, on November 5 was imprisoned in Wayne County Jail in Detroit for his alleged role in the suicides of two men, and he then began a hunger strike.

Solution:

B correctly removes on November 5 out from its incorrect place between the subject, Dr. Kevorkian, and the verb, was imprisoned

QUESTION: 36

New stores financed by investors have a much lower failure rate than stores financed by other means. Source of financing, therefore, must be a more important causative factor in the success of a new store than are such factors as the location of the store, the quality of the staff, or the choice of merchandise.
Q. Which of the following, if true, most seriously weakens the argument above?

Solution:

The argument is that source of financing must be a more important causative factor in the success of a new store than other factors. Choice E suggests that it is not the source of financing that makes the difference, rather that investors are more likely to finance new stores in which the other factors - good locations, good quality of staff etc. - are good.

QUESTION: 37

The proportion of Afro-American students enrolled in Gilmore Community College has increased over the past decades. This is partly shown by the fact that in 1965, only 6 percent of Afro-American between twenty and twenty-three in the town of Gilmore were enrolled in college, while in 1997, 13 percent of the Afro-Americans between twenty and twenty-three were enrolled in Gilmore Community College.
Q. To evaluate the argument above, it would be most useful to compare 1965 and 1997 with regard to which of the following characteristics?

Solution:

The argument presents a substantial increase in the proportion of Afro-Americans between twenty and twenty-three who were enrolled in Gilmore Community College as evidence that there was an increase in the proportion of Gilmore Community College students who were Afro-Americans. This evidence would lack force if a similar increase in college enrollment had occurred among students who are not Afro-American.

QUESTION: 38

When three Indian-owned trains purchased from Transcontinental Trains crashed within a two month time period, the Indian parliament ordered the acquisition of three new Transcontinental trains as replacements. This decision surprised many because it is customary for users to shun a product after it is involved in accidents.
Q. Which of the following, if true, provides the best indication that the decision of the Indian government was well supported?

Solution:

If the train crashes were caused by a factor that had nothing to do with the train itself, such as sabotage, and the quality of the train decreased the number of fatalities, then there is good reason to purchase additional trains from Transcontinental.

QUESTION: 39

The National Institute on Drug Abuse Warning Network reported an increase both in the number of admissions to hospital emergency rooms nationwide that involved drug abuse and a change in procedures used in rehabilitation clinics.

Solution:

Choice B correctly places the word both after the verb.

QUESTION: 40

Recently, a court ruled that current law allows tour operators that travel to potentially dangerous locations, such as the Amazon, to reject a potential customers if there is a 50 percent chance that the traveler would contract malaria on the trip. The presiding judge justified the ruling, saying that it protected both travelers and tour operators.
Q. This use of his court ruling as part of the law could not be effective if which of the following were true?

Solution:

The use of the court ruling as part of the law could not be effective if there were no accepted way of determining who the people susceptible to malaria were. Choice b states that there is no accepted method of calculating the risk of contracting malaria

QUESTION: 41

The World Bank, the only one of its kind, provides loans to developing member countries, gives technical assistance for development projects, and for projects from other public and private sources encourages co-financing.

Solution:

Choices A, B and C all violate parallelism by putting the indirect object ahead of the verb, and for project from other public and private sources… The use of but in choice E is incorrect because encourages is not contrast to provides and gives.

QUESTION: 42

Rehana is now 4 years older than Erik and half of that amount older than Iris. If in 2 years, Rehana will be twice as old as Erik, then in 2 years what would be Rehana’s age multiplied by Iris’s age?

Solution:

Translate piece by piece into numbers. R (Rehana) = Erik (E) + 4.The second equation: R = I (Iris) + 2.The third equation: R +7 = 2(E + 7). We have three equations with three variables.→ Rehana is 6, Iris is 4 and Erik is 2. In four years Erik would be 6 and Iris 8, the answer is

QUESTION: 43

An investment yields an interest payment of $228 each month. If the simple annual interest rate is 9%, what is the amount of the investment?

Solution:

Principal × percent interest × time = interest earned Principle × (0.09)× 1/12 = $228.Solve to find the principal (228 × 12)/0.09=$30,400.

QUESTION: 44

X, Y, Z, and W are integers. The expression X-Y-Z is even and the Expression Y-Z-W is odd. If X is even what must be true?

Solution:

The first expression is even and the second is odd, the only difference between the expressions is that the first expression has X and the second has W. So, if X is even W must be odd and

QUESTION: 45


X and Y are two sides of a triangle, is the area of the triangle an integer?
(1) X is a prime number.
(2) Y is an odd integer.

Solution:

The area of the triangle is XY/2.Statement (1) tells us that X is a prime number, that can be even (2) or odd (3, 5, 7, etc.). Statement (2) tells us that Y is an odd integer. The multiplication of X and Y can be an odd number or an even number, thus we cannot determine if the area of the triangle is an integer or not.

QUESTION: 46

Fuel tanker A can fill the underground reservoir in 12 minutes. How long will it take fuel tanker A and fuel tanker B to fill up the same reservoir together? (1) The reservoir contains 3000 liters of fuel. (2) Fuel tanker B alone will require the same number of hours to fill the same reservoir.

Solution:

Statement (1) is insufficient since the size of the reservoir is irrelevant. Statement (2) is sufficient since it tells us that the second tanker has the same work rate as the first. So, it will take them both half the time it took the first tanker alone.

QUESTION: 47

Q is a prime number bigger than 10. What is the smallest positive number (except 1) that 3Q can be divided by equally?

Solution:

3Q is a prime number so it can be divide equally by
3Q, by 1 and by the components 3 and Q. The
smallest number therefore is 3.

QUESTION: 48

In a box there are A green balls, 3A + 6 red balls and 2 yellow ones. If there are no other colors, what is the probability of taking out a green or a yellow ball?

Solution:

The number of green and yellow balls in the box is A+2.The total number of balls is 4A +8. The probability of taking out a green or a yellow ball is: 

QUESTION: 49

Kelly used to get a 30% discount on movie tickets. When the price of the movie ticket increased by   0%, the amount of discount in dollars remained the same. What is Kelly's discount with the new Ticket price in percent terms?

Solution:

The price of the ticket is unknown. It would be most convenient to plug in 100 as the price of the ticket. A 30% discount of 100 is $30, that amount remained the same after the price of a ticket increased by 50%. The new price of a ticket is $150, so 30/150 is 20%.

QUESTION: 50

Is the square root of A an integer?
(1) The last digit of A is 8
(2) A is divisible by 6

Solution:

If you square each digit {0, 1, 2,..., 8, 9}, you will see that the possible last digits for a square are 0, 1, 4, 5, 6 and 9. Thus, if the last digit of A is 8, A cannot be a square and the square root of A is not an integer. Statement (1) by itself is sufficient. Statement (2) by itself is insufficient since there are numbers that are divisible by 6 and have an integer square root and numbers divisible by 6 that do not have an integer square root.

QUESTION: 51

If Q and T are integers, what is the value of
Q?
(1) Q = 2T/7.
(2) 
 

Solution:

We want to find the number value of Q. In statement (1) we are given the ratio between Q and T, which is not sufficient. Statement (2) can be simplified:
We can see that the same ratio is given in statement (2) also and more data is required to answer the question. Both statements give the same information.

QUESTION: 52

In a psychology school the grade of the students is determined by the following method: At the end of the first year the grade equals to twice the age of the student. From then on, the grade is determined by twice the age of the student plus half of his grade from the previous year. If Joey’s grade at the end of the first year is 40, what will be his grade at the end of the third year?

Solution:

From the grade 40 at the end of the first year we learn that his age is 20.At the end of the second year, he will be 21 and his grade will be(21 x 2 + ½ x 40 = 62). At the end of the third year, he will be 22 and his grade will be (22 x 2 + ½ x 62 = 75).

QUESTION: 53

A is a prime number (A>2). If C = A3, by how many different integers can C be equally divided?

Solution:

Factorize C: C = A x A x A: C can be equally divided
into 1, A, A2, and A3 =C→ 4 numbers total.

QUESTION: 54

If X is a positive integer and (405) 4 is a multiple of 3X, what is the largest possible value of X?

Solution:

Find the factors of (405)4 and see what the largest
value of X can be.405 = 81 x 5 = 9 x 9 x 5 = 3 x 3 x 3 x 3
x 5→ (405)4 = (3 x 3 x 3 x 3 x 5)4 = 316 x 5The largest
possible value of 3X that is still a factor of (405) 4 is the
largest possible value of X and that is 316. X = 16.

QUESTION: 55

X, Y>0, If X3 = Y, is Y a fraction?
(1) X2 is a fraction.
(2) X > Y.

Solution:

Statement (1) is sufficient. If X2 is a fraction, X must also be a fraction. Meaning that X3 and Y will also be fractions. Statement (2) is sufficient. If X3 is a fraction
then X must be greater than X3, which is also equal to Y. We get that from X > Y, so X3 and Y are fractions

QUESTION: 56

A turtle is crossing a field, how many meters total did he pass?
(1) The average speed of the turtle is 2 meters per minute.
(2) Had the turtle walked 1 meter per minute faster than his average speed it would have finished the same path 40 minutes earlier.

Solution:

Statement (1) gives us the average speed of the turtle; this statement is insufficient since the time is not given. Statement (2) is also insufficient by itself since we don’t know what the average speed is. Both statements combined are sufficient since we can calculate the distance 2*T=D and 3(T-40) = D, solve to get D=240 meters

QUESTION: 57

The net value of a certain stock increased at a constant rate during the ten-year period between 1990 and 2000. What was the value of the stock in the year 1998?
(1) In 1991, the value of the stock was 130 U.S dollars.
(2) In 1992, the value of the stock was 149.5 U.S dollars.

Solution:

We are told that the stock increases its value by a constant rate and therefore we need to find some kind of pattern in order to know the value every year. Statements (1) and (2) taken together are sufficient since they give us the percent increase of the stock from 1991 to 1992, which is 15%. The value of the stock in 1998 can be easily calculated, add 15% every year until 1998.

QUESTION: 58

N is a prime number bigger than 5. Which of the following expressions must be even?

Solution:

Answer D is a multiplication of two consecutive numbers, therefore one of them must be even, and an even number multiplied by a different number is an even number

QUESTION: 59

The original price of a car was $25,200. Because the car owner thought he could get more money for the car, he increased the price of the car to 110% of its original price. After a week, the car had not sold, so the owner then discounted the price by 10%, and the car was finally sold. What price was the car sold for?

Solution:

25,200 x 1.1 = 27,720. 27,720 x 0.9 = 24,948.

QUESTION: 60

On a map, 1 inch represents 28 miles. How many inches would be necessary to represent a distance of 383.6 miles?

Solution:

Dividing the requested amount of miles by the reference amount would give us the answer in inches. 383.6 / 28 = 13.7 inches.

QUESTION: 61

15 Java programmers, working in a constant pace, finish a web page in 3 days. If after one day, 9 programmers quit, how many more days are needed to finish the remainder of the job?

Solution:

The total working days for finishing a web page are (15 x 3) 45. If after one day 9 programmers quit, only
15 working days are done and the rest of the programmers (6) Need to finish (45 – 15) 30 days of work. It will take them 5 more days

QUESTION: 62

Tim and Élan are 90 miles away from one another. They are starting to move towards each other simultaneously, Tim at a speed of 10 Mph and Élan at a speed of 5 Mph. If every hour they double their speeds, what is the distance that Tim will pass until he meets Élan?

Solution:

Tim is traveling at twice the speed of Élan, and so will be after they double their speeds. The ratio between their velocities will always be 2:1 and the ratio between the distances they will pass will also be 2:1 or 60 miles to 30 miles. Tim will go through 60 miles.

QUESTION: 63

A spaceship in orbit rotates around the planet Pluto. How many full rotations can the spaceship complete in 20 hours? 
(1) The radius of a single rotation is 21,000 miles.
(2) The spaceship travels at 35 miles per second.

Solution:

In order to calculate the time it would take to complete one rotation, you need the radius and the velocity. Statement (1)  rovides the radius of rotation and (2) provides the velocity .The distance the spaceship has to travel in  rder to complete one rotation is 2 . π . R = 2 .π. (21,000) and the speed is 35 miles per second. Divide the first by the second and you’ll get the time it would take the spaceship to
complete one rotation.

QUESTION: 64

Is X > Y?
(1) 12X = 4C.
(2) C = 3Y4.

Solution:

Since we need to compare between X and Y, look at both statements together. (1) and (2) state that: 12X = 4C = 12Y4→ X = Y4. Take Y=-1, X=1: X is bigger than Y. Take X=1 and Y=1: X is not bigger than Y. The answer is not distinct and therefore more data is
required in order to solve the question.

QUESTION: 65

What is the circumference of circle O?
(1) The circle inscribes a square.
(2) The perimeter of the square is 10.

Solution:

If a circle inscribers a square then the diagonal of the square is the diameter of the circle, which is sufficient to find the perimeter. Statement (1) tells us about the
square that is inscribed with out any further data. Statement (2) gives us the perimeter, which is equal to 4 times the side of the square. If we know the side of the square, we know its diagonal. Both statements, taken together, are sufficient.

QUESTION: 66

In a rectangular coordinate system, what is the area of a triangle whose vertices have the coordinates (4, 0), (6, 3), and (6, -3)?

Solution:

Draw the x and y-axes, then plot the points and connect them. The length of the base is 6 units [from
(6, 3) to (6, -3)] and the height is 2 units [from (6, 0) to (4, 0)].Area of a triangle = (base × height) / 2, so (6 × 2)/2 is 6.

QUESTION: 67

For every X, the action [X] is defined: [X] is the greatest integer less than or equal to X. What is the value of [6.5] x [2/3] + [2] x 7.2 + [8.4] – 6.6?

Solution:

[6.5] x [2/3] + [2] x 7.2 + [8.4] – 6.6 = 6 x 0 + 2 x 7.2 + 8 - 6.6 = 15.8

QUESTION: 68

What is the decimal equivalent of  

Solution:

QUESTION: 69

How many four-digit numbers that do not contain the digits 3 or 6 are there?

Solution:

The first digit has 7 possibilities (10 – 0,3 and 6). The other three digits have 8 possibilities each. 7*8*8*8= 3584

QUESTION: 70

How many of the girls in a group of 200 children have an average score of 80 in their final exams?
(1) 45% of the children have an average score
of 80 in their final exams.
(2) 50% of the children in the group are girls.

Solution:

From (1) by itself we can only earn that 90 kids have good grades. This statement is insufficient. From (2) we can learn that there are 100 girls in the group. Combining the statements doesn’t help much since we know nothing about the overlapping of (1)and (2) and more data is required. 

QUESTION: 71

A paint shop sells spray cans at a flat charge of  50 cents per can. If a customer bought 10 cans and the owner decided to give that customer a special discount on the last two cans, what was the price of the two discounted cans?
(1) The customer paid four dollars and twenty cents total for the ten cans.
(2) The customer bought the ten cans for an average price of 42 cents per can.

Solution:

Statement (1) tells us that 10 cans cost 4.2 dollars instead of 5 dollars and therefore the last two cans were sold for 20 cents. This  Statement is sufficient. Statement (2) also tells us that the entire amount of cans cost 4.2 and  therefore this statement is also
sufficient.

QUESTION: 72

Does the product of XYZW = 16?
(1) Y = 1.
(2) X = 4Y and ZW = 4Y2

Solution:

From (1) we know the value of Y only, which is 1. From (2) and (1) we know the value of all the other parameters, X = 4 and ZW = 4. Therefore, (1) and (2), together are sufficient.

QUESTION: 73

The telephone company wants to add an area code composed of 2 letters to every phone number. In order to do so, the company chose a special sign language containing 124 different signs. If the company used 122 of the signs fully and two remained unused, how many additional area codes can be created if the company uses all 124 signs?

Solution:

The phone company already created 122*122 area codes, now it can create 124*124. 1242-1222=(124+122)(124-122) = 246*2 = 492 additional codes.

QUESTION: 74

The average (arithmetic mean) of seven numbers is 12.2. If the sum of four of these numbers is 42.8, what is the average of the other 3 numbers?

Solution:

If the average of 7 numbers is 12.2, we can solve for their sum: 7 × 12.2 = 85.4. If four of these numbers total 42.8, then by subtracting 42.8 from 85.4, we get the sum of the other three numbers, 42.6. To find the average of these three numbers, we divide their sum by their number: 42.6/3 = 14.2.

QUESTION: 75

If A = 2B, is A4 > B4?
(1) A2 = 4B2.
(2) 2A + B < A/2 + B.

Solution:

Statement (1) is insufficient. Take A=0 and B=0, (1) is correct yet A4 is not bigger than B4.Take different numbers, A=6 and B=12 A4 is larger than B4.Statement (2) is sufficient. The only possible way that A will not be larger than B is if they are both zero. (2) Claims that A < 0 and therefore A cannot be zero and this statement is sufficient, A4 is bigger than B4.

QUESTION: 76

5 numbers are randomly chosen. If their average is 20, how many of the numbers are larger than 15? (1) One of the numbers is 15.
(2) The average of three of the numbers is 15.

Solution:

Lets look at two cases, where each one will give outdifferent results .One of the numbers is 15 and three more are 15, 15 and 15 (with an average of 15).The sum of all the numbers should be (20 x 5 = 100). The sum of the numbers we picked up is (15 x 4 = 60) and therefore the last number should be 40 which is greater than 15. The answer in this case is 1.Take another case: One of the numbers is 15 and three more are 14, 15 and 16 (with an average of 15). In this case there will be 2 numbers over 15. More data is required.

QUESTION: 77

A drawer holds 4 red hats and 4 blue hats. What is the probability of getting exactly three red hats or exactly three blue hats when taking out 4 hats randomly out of the drawer and immediately returning every hat to the drawer before taking out the next?

Solution:

Getting three red out of 4 that are taken out has 4 options (4!/(3!*1!)) each option has a probability of (1/2)4 since drawing a red or blue has a 50% chance. 4*1/16= ¼ to get three red hats. The same goes for three blue hats so ¼+¼ =1/2.

QUESTION: 78

If 4XZ + YW = 3 and XW + YZ = 6, what is the value of the expression (2X + Y)(2Z + W)?

Solution:

(2X + Y)(2Z + W) = 4XZ + 2XW + 2ZY + WY. No , plug in this data to get: 3 + 2 x 6 = 15.

QUESTION: 79



Q: The change in the overall earnings for non-farming jobs plus small businesses between 2000 and 2010

Solution:

The correct answer choice is the fourth one - cannot be determined. Don’t be tricked into just adding up the percentages. The charts give the relative portions of the rural economy made up by these 4 items, but nowhere are we told absolute amounts - what was the overall size of the economy in 2000 and in 2010? This is necessary to then calculate the overall earnings in these particular areas in 2000 versus in 2010. Since we don’t know in which year the overall economy was larger, or if they were the same, we cannot make this comparison.

QUESTION: 80



Q: The smallest proportional change in percent between 2000 and 2010 in any segment of the rural economy was in

Solution:

The charts give %s of the rural economy. This question asks about percent change in those percentages. The % of the economy taken up by small businesses nearly doubled in these 10 years, for a percent change of nearly 100%. The % of the economy taken up by remittances increased by nearly 6x in these 10 years, for a percent change of around 467%. 

So we can quickly eliminate those two. But agriculture and non-farming jobs both decreased by proportionally similar amounts. Which experienced the smaller percent change? Non-farming jobs decreased by 6/24, or 25%. Agriculture decreased by 20/60, or 1/3, or 33%. 

Put in these terms, clearly non-farming jobs experienced a smaller % change than non-farming jobs, since 25% is less than 33%. Select the second option: non-farming jobs.

QUESTION: 81


Assuming the trend in the graph stays the same over the range of workers per supervisor values, if the company were to employ 20 workers per supervisor they would likely be __________ productive than if the company were to employ 160 workers per supervisor.

Solution:

Taking a close look at our curve, we can see that it’s not exactly a bell-curve (with equal rates of decline on either side of the peak) - the rise on the left hand side of the curve is slower than the decline on the right-hand side of the curve. The peak takes place around 100 workers per supervisor, yet 40 workers per supervisor (60 away from the peak value) are just about equally productive as 140 workers per supervisor (40 away from the peak value). If we were to extend a line on the left side of the graph, we will find that at about 30 workers per supervisor, per worker daily production is zero. If we were to extend the trend on the right side of the graph, we will find that at about 155 workers per supervisor,per worker daily production is zero. This suggests that at 160 workers per supervisor, per worker daily production will be negative. Therefore, the company will likely be more productive at 30 workers per supervisor than at 160 workers per supervisor. Choose (B). 

Note that extrapolating beyond the range of the data is generally not a good idea and could lead to some nonsensical conclusions. However, since you were asked to assume that the trend stays the same over the range of workers per supervisor values, we can infer that the company will be more productive at 30 workers per supervisor than at 160 workers per supervisor.

QUESTION: 82


If it wanted to increase productivity, a company currently employing 115 workers per supervisor should consider

Solution:

At 115 workers per supervisor, we are on the sloping down side of the curve, suggesting that we need to have slightly fewer workers per supervisor. The question asks about which option would increase productivity (not necessarily maximize it, just increase it), and since only one option can be right, it must be that three of the options will not increase productivity and only one will. 

First option - Adding more workers will mean moving to the right on the curve - more workers per supervisor - which clearly has lower productivity. 

Second option - halving the number of supervisors would mean doubling the number of workers per supervisor, to 230, and as per the trend of the graph, this would presumably have lower productivity. 

Third option - doubling the number of supervisors would mean that the ratio of workers to supervisor would be halved, to around 57.5 workers per supervisor, which has a lower productivity rate than 115 workers per supervisor. 

Fourth option - with 25% fewer workers, the company would have around 87 workers per supervisor. Looking at the curve, although the difference is not huge, this is clearly a more productive ratio than 115 workers per supervisor. Select this final option.

QUESTION: 83


The above graph gives the values for 4 items measured by the police department. One represents the number of crimes reported, one represents the number of arrests made, one represents the number of police officers on staff, and one represents the budget surplus for the department (in $1000s).

Q. If the impact of a change enacted by the police department takes a month to register, then we can identify a negative linear relationship between B and

Solution:

If there is a negative linear relationship, that means that when one variable goes up, the other goes down, and vice versa. The new wrinkle introduced by this question is that there can be a one-month lag in seeing this effect. B and D are opposites - when one goes up, the other goes down. If we were to introduce a one-month lag then it’s possible they could correlate directly, not indirectly. With a one-month lag, B and A now seems to be have a negative relationship - when one goes up, the other goes down the following month, and vice versa. But is it a linear relationship - can it be expressed in the form A = mB +c, for some constant values m and c, given a month’s lagtime? You don’t have to do the math, just look at the graph - in the first month, B went up a lot, and in the second month, A went down a little. In the second month, B went down a little, yet in the third month A went up a lot. This is inconsistent - if there’s a linear relationship, then the relative sizes of the changes need to be consistent with each other. Even if you look at the lag in the reverse direction, you’ll notice this same inconsistency. 

At this point, you could mark C by process of elimination, but let’s just make sure it works. C shows a decrease in the first 2 months, while B constantly alternates between increases and decreases. So let C lag one month behind B. Between March and April, B has a big increase, and between April and May, C has a relatively large decrease. Between April and May, B has a smaller decrease, and between May and June, C has a smaller increase. Between May and June, B has an increase larger than the decrease but not as large as the first increase, and between June and July, C has a decrease larger than the previous increase but not as large as the first decrease. C is the correct option.

QUESTION: 84

Article 1

News article in an environmental publication.

July 19 – If current trends continue, fossil fuels will be exhausted by 2052. Industry and transportation and the inability of governments to put stricter emissions regulations in place means that there will be a greater demand for alternative energy sources. Additionally, recent concerns about the high-cost of implementing new systems such as public transportation in industrialized areas has led many voters to actually strike down propositions to subsidize alternative fuel research.
 

Article 2

Interview with a well-known scientist.

August 3 – Dr. Lisa Goodman, one of the team of architects behind several new battery-operated commercial vehicles, has criticized the government’s unwillingness to aggressively lobby voters to pass measures to reduce fossil fuel usage. She suggests that without a significant reduction in per-person fossil fuel consumption, the rate of global warming could soon increase threefold.

“I know that voters continue to reject costly measures to reduce widespread fossil fuel consumption such as large-scale public transportation projects, and that politicians are naturally going to avoid stumping for unpopular policies. However, if something isn’t done soon, by 2055, a barrel of gasoline may become a luxury that only the rich can afford.”

 

Article 3

Article from a weekly news magazine.

August 29 – The price of crude oil has jumped by 500% over the last decade as a decrease in supply has met with an increased demand. This demand has encouraged many new oil wells to launch in the Gulf of Mexico, and some American environmental groups have expressed concern that certain oil companies are not following the safest procedures, emphasizing that the companies are more concerned with the speed of extraction than the well-being of the ecosystem. Some scientists in the Gulf have called for an increase in safety regulations for oil companies drilling off the coast, but the companies warn that this may dramatically increase the cost of crude oil, at a time when many Americans are already struggling to pay the increased price.

Consider each of the following statements. Does the information in the three articles support the inference as stated?

Q. 
Politicians usually do not agree with one another on issues of global warming and fossil fuel consumption.

Solution:

The answer is No. The statement in question is not necessarily true, as we do not know what politicians “usually’ do, and therefore this is not a valid conclusion just based on the information provided.

QUESTION: 85

Article 1

News article in an environmental publication.

July 19 – If current trends continue, fossil fuels will be exhausted by 2052. Industry and transportation and the inability of governments to put stricter emissions regulations in place means that there will be a greater demand for alternative energy sources. Additionally, recent concerns about the high-cost of implementing new systems such as public transportation in industrialized areas has led many voters to actually strike down propositions to subsidize alternative fuel research.
 

Article 2

Interview with a well-known scientist.

August 3 – Dr. Lisa Goodman, one of the team of architects behind several new battery-operated commercial vehicles, has criticized the government’s unwillingness to aggressively lobby voters to pass measures to reduce fossil fuel usage. She suggests that without a significant reduction in per-person fossil fuel consumption, the rate of global warming could soon increase threefold.

“I know that voters continue to reject costly measures to reduce widespread fossil fuel consumption such as large-scale public transportation projects, and that politicians are naturally going to avoid stumping for unpopular policies. However, if something isn’t done soon, by 2055, a barrel of gasoline may become a luxury that only the rich can afford.”

 

Article 3

Article from a weekly news magazine.

August 29 – The price of crude oil has jumped by 500% over the last decade as a decrease in supply has met with an increased demand. This demand has encouraged many new oil wells to launch in the Gulf of Mexico, and some American environmental groups have expressed concern that certain oil companies are not following the safest procedures, emphasizing that the companies are more concerned with the speed of extraction than the well-being of the ecosystem. Some scientists in the Gulf have called for an increase in safety regulations for oil companies drilling off the coast, but the companies warn that this may dramatically increase the cost of crude oil, at a time when many Americans are already struggling to pay the increased price.

Consider each of the following statements. Does the information in the three articles support the inference as stated?

Q. 
An increase in worldwide demand for crude oil has made the oil companies' safety standards fall.

Solution:

The answer is No. In article 3, we are told that “environmental groups have expressed concern that certain oil companies are not following the safest procedures, emphasizing that the companies are more concerned with the speed of extraction than the well-being of the ecosystem.” However, if some oil companies are not following the safest procedures, we cannot infer that safety standards have fallen among oil companies due to the increase in worldwide demand. Perhaps those oil companies are choosing not to follow the safest procedures for other reasons.

QUESTION: 86

Article 1

News article in an environmental publication.

July 19 – If current trends continue, fossil fuels will be exhausted by 2052. Industry and transportation and the inability of governments to put stricter emissions regulations in place means that there will be a greater demand for alternative energy sources. Additionally, recent concerns about the high-cost of implementing new systems such as public transportation in industrialized areas has led many voters to actually strike down propositions to subsidize alternative fuel research.
 

Article 2

Interview with a well-known scientist.

August 3 – Dr. Lisa Goodman, one of the team of architects behind several new battery-operated commercial vehicles, has criticized the government’s unwillingness to aggressively lobby voters to pass measures to reduce fossil fuel usage. She suggests that without a significant reduction in per-person fossil fuel consumption, the rate of global warming could soon increase threefold.

“I know that voters continue to reject costly measures to reduce widespread fossil fuel consumption such as large-scale public transportation projects, and that politicians are naturally going to avoid stumping for unpopular policies. However, if something isn’t done soon, by 2055, a barrel of gasoline may become a luxury that only the rich can afford.”
 

Article 3

Article from a weekly news magazine.

August 29 – The price of crude oil has jumped by 500% over the last decade as a decrease in supply has met with an increased demand. This demand has encouraged many new oil wells to launch in the Gulf of Mexico, and some American environmental groups have expressed concern that certain oil companies are not following the safest procedures, emphasizing that the companies are more concerned with the speed of extraction than the well-being of the ecosystem. Some scientists in the Gulf have called for an increase in safety regulations for oil companies drilling off the coast, but the companies warn that this may dramatically increase the cost of crude oil, at a time when many Americans are already struggling to pay the increased price.

Consider each of the following statements. Does the information in the three articles support the inference as stated?

Q. 
Dr. Goodman would likely support a public referendum on whether to require the oil companies to have better safety and ecological regulations.

Solution:

The answer is No. In Article 2, Dr. Goodman is shown to have little faith in the public as the solution to the global warming issue, since the public has continually shot down measures it considered “costly.” Dr. Goodman is primarily interested in seeing a reduction in fossil fuel usage. However, we cannot infer based on the information in the article alone that she would also be interested or not interested in requiring oil companies to have better safety and ecological regulations.

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