CTET Mock Test - 8


150 Questions MCQ Test CTET ( Central Teacher Eligibility Test ) Mock Test Series | CTET Mock Test - 8


Description
This mock test of CTET Mock Test - 8 for Teaching helps you for every Teaching entrance exam. This contains 150 Multiple Choice Questions for Teaching CTET Mock Test - 8 (mcq) to study with solutions a complete question bank. The solved questions answers in this CTET Mock Test - 8 quiz give you a good mix of easy questions and tough questions. Teaching students definitely take this CTET Mock Test - 8 exercise for a better result in the exam. You can find other CTET Mock Test - 8 extra questions, long questions & short questions for Teaching on EduRev as well by searching above.
QUESTION: 1

Answer the following questions by selecting the most appropriate option.

Q. When a child with a disability first comes to school, the teacher should

Solution:
QUESTION: 2

Which of the following is not included in the educational system? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 3

Rule of learning is

Solution:
QUESTION: 4

Which of the following describes the best way to deal with at primary stage? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 5

Which is considered as the most important quality of a teacher at primary level? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 6

Which is the least important factor in teaching? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 7

Human development is divided into which of the following domain? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 8

There are four below average students in a class. Which one of the following strategies will be most effective to bring them par with the other students? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 9

The greatest important cause of failure in the beginning of a teacher lies in the area of 

Solution:
QUESTION: 10

An effective teacher adopts the norms of the 

Solution:
QUESTION: 11

The emphasis from teaching to learning can be shifted to 

Solution:
QUESTION: 12

When a child ‘fails’, it means 

Solution:
QUESTION: 13

In the context of education, socialisation means 

Solution:
QUESTION: 14

Which of the following is the most important single factor in underlying the success of beginning a teacher? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 15

“Educational Psychology is a systematic study of educational growth”. This definition of educational psychology is given by - 

Solution:
QUESTION: 16

If a child’s chronological age is 12 years, and he can take the intelligence test meant for 15 years old child, then his I.Q. will be - 

Solution:
QUESTION: 17

The method of personality measurement, which is used to study the individual’s unconscious mind is- 

Solution:
QUESTION: 18

Which of the following intelligence refers to the ability to adapt changing environment? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 19

Teachers use aid to make learning more 

Solution:
QUESTION: 20

The early identification of special children is important to- 

Solution:
QUESTION: 21

Effective teaching, by and large, is a function of 

Solution:
QUESTION: 22

Which of the following is a better way of teaching? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 23

Learning which involves motor organ is called 

Solution:
QUESTION: 24

Knowledge of_______will be most significant for a teacher dealing with a class comprising students of mixed age groups. 

Solution:
QUESTION: 25

Which of the following is an actual classroom teaching stage? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 26

What is the purpose of questioning? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 27

What are the principles of audio-visual aids? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 28

Charts, diagrams, picture and posters are examples of 

Solution:
QUESTION: 29

While teaching single parent child, a teacher should 

Solution:
QUESTION: 30

While teaching a complex thing, which of the following will be the best way to do it? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 31

Two angles are complementary and one is 10° more than the other. Find the angles. 

Solution:

QUESTION: 32

The value of 

Solution:

 

QUESTION: 33

Find the CP of a table which when sold for Rs. 784 brought a profit of 12%. 

Solution:

 

QUESTION: 34

Find the amount that Ram will pay for Rs. 8000 at the rate of 10% per annum compounded annually for  yr 

Solution:

QUESTION: 35

What is the prime factorisation of 37800? 

Solution:

37800 = 2 x 2 x 2 x 3 x 3 x 3 x 5 x 5 x 7

QUESTION: 36

Harsha is 40 yr old and Ritu is 60 yr old. How many years ago was the ratio of their ages 3 : 5? 

Solution:

QUESTION: 37

The sum of the two numbers is 11 and their product is 30, then the numbers are 

Solution:

QUESTION: 38

If x varies as y and x = 8, when y = 15, then the value of x when y = 10 is 

Solution:

QUESTION: 39

The HCF of two numbers is 38 and their LCM is 98154. If one of the number is 1558. The other number is 

Solution:

 

QUESTION: 40

What is the approximate value of 275.0003 × 3.005? 

Solution:

=275x3=825

 

QUESTION: 41

Professor BS Bloom is associated with 

Solution:
QUESTION: 42

Proceed from analysis to synthesis is a 

Solution:
QUESTION: 43

Who gave the concept of ‘Cone Experiences? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 44

Thought provoking questions are asked to develop 

Solution:
QUESTION: 45

RCEM approach is used to write the objectives of 

Solution:
QUESTION: 46

Micro-teaching helps in 

Solution:
QUESTION: 47

The main component of introduction skill is 

Solution:
QUESTION: 48

Which is the teacher-centred method? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 49

A lesson plan develops the possibilities of 

Solution:
QUESTION: 50

What must be added to each term of the ratio 7 : 11, so as to make it equal to 3 : 4? 

Solution:

QUESTION: 51

Introductory questions are asked 

Solution:
QUESTION: 52

How much is the area of the shaded portion in the following figure? 

Solution:

(3x1+7x1) sq.cm=10 sq.cm

QUESTION: 53

Three persons walk from place A to place B. Their speeds are in the ratio 4 : 3 : 5. The ratio of the times taken by them to reach B will be 

Solution:

QUESTION: 54

A sweet seller declares that he sells sweets at the cost price. However, he uses a weight of 450 g instead of 500 g. His percentage profit is 

Solution:

QUESTION: 55

In an examination, there were 640 boys and 360 girls. 60% of boys and 80% of girls were successful. The percentage of failure was 

Solution:

 

QUESTION: 56

A student was asked to find 5/16 of a number. By mistake he found 5/6 of that number. His answer was 250 more than the correct answer. Find the given number. 

Solution:

QUESTION: 57

A train covers a distance between A and B in 48 minutes. The another train having speed 6 km/hr. less than the first train covers the distance B to A in 60 minutes. Find the distance between A and B? 

Solution:

QUESTION: 58

A book vendor sold a book at a loss of 20%. Had he sold it for Rs. 108 more, he would have earned a profit of 30%. Find the cost price of the book? 

Solution:

QUESTION: 59

In an election, every voter has to cast his vote for two candidates. Half of the total voters give one vote to A and other vote to B, C and D in the ratio 3 : 2 : 1. The half of the rest votes give one vote to B and other vote to C and D in the ratio 2 : 1. The half of the remaining voters give equal votes to C and D. Other 840 voters did not cast their votes. Find the number of votes received by C. 

Solution:

Let total voter=200 (every voter cost two vote

QUESTION: 60

A and B can do a job together in 12 days. A is 2 times as efficient as B. In how many days can B alone complete the work? 

Solution:

QUESTION: 61

Genetics is the branch of science that deals with the study of— 

Solution:
QUESTION: 62

A plant cell is distinguished from an animal cell by the presence of— 

Solution:
QUESTION: 63

The largest wind power producer in the world is 

Solution:
QUESTION: 64

The ultimate source of all energy is 

Solution:
QUESTION: 65

Respiratory system of living organism is deeply affected by 

Solution:
QUESTION: 66

The substance that makes up about 80% of cytoplasm— 

Solution:
QUESTION: 67

Which is the outermost atmosphere? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 68

The type of relationship in which one organism is benefited while there is no effect on other is— 

Solution:
QUESTION: 69

The name of the bio-pesticides producing tree is 

Solution:
QUESTION: 70

Which of the following gas is responsible for global warming? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 71

Afforestation plays an important role in reducing 

Solution:
QUESTION: 72

A plant leaf appears to be green because it— 

Solution:
QUESTION: 73

Food energy is measured in 

Solution:
QUESTION: 74

The molecules responsible for storing the genetic code are— 

Solution:
QUESTION: 75

What is the name of the substance that is toxic to plants, used to destroy unwanted vegetation.? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 76

Dogger Bank is famous for what? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 77

Who has written the book ‘Population Bomb? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 78

Who is known as a waterman in India? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 79

The byproduct of biogas plant is used as 

Solution:
QUESTION: 80

The Kaziranga Wildlife Sanctuary is located in which state? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 81

Environmental issues are ___________. 

Solution:
QUESTION: 82

We can integrate Environmental studies with other subjects while teaching. 

Solution:
QUESTION: 83

Which of these is not an environmental issue? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 84

In schools, it is important to teach environmental education because 

Solution:
QUESTION: 85

Environmental Studies should be taught to the students 

Solution:
QUESTION: 86

A guardian never comes to see the child in school. As a teacher, you will 

Solution:
QUESTION: 87

It is advantageous to give homework to the student to 

Solution:
QUESTION: 88

Essay type tests are not reliable because 

Solution:
QUESTION: 89

Women are better teacher at primary level because 

Solution:
QUESTION: 90

What is the important factor while writing on the board? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 91

Read the poem given below and answer the questions that follow by choosing the most appropriate option.

If I held a bird in hand 
Soft as ever could be, 
I’d listen to her racing heart 
And set her forever free 
No joy can ever be as great 
Than the freedom of her song, 
No matter she may never return 
And take her song along. 
Still I love to hold few birds 
And keep on setting them free, 
Or feed them if they choose to stay 
And share their joys with me 

Q. The poet’s main topic is 

Solution:
QUESTION: 92

Read the poem given below and answer the questions that follow by choosing the most appropriate option.

If I held a bird in hand 
Soft as ever could be, 
I’d listen to her racing heart 
And set her forever free 
No joy can ever be as great 
Than the freedom of her song, 
No matter she may never return 
And take her song along. 
Still I love to hold few birds 
And keep on setting them free, 
Or feed them if they choose to stay 
And share their joys with me 

Q.The poet wants to 

Solution:
QUESTION: 93

Read the poem given below and answer the questions that follow by choosing the most appropriate option.

If I held a bird in hand 
Soft as ever could be, 
I’d listen to her racing heart 
And set her forever free 
No joy can ever be as great 
Than the freedom of her song, 
No matter she may never return 
And take her song along. 
Still I love to hold few birds 
And keep on setting them free, 
Or feed them if they choose to stay 
And share their joys with me 

Q. ‘No joy can ever be as great’ means 

Solution:
QUESTION: 94

Read the poem given below and answer the questions that follow by choosing the most appropriate option.

If I held a bird in hand 
Soft as ever could be, 
I’d listen to her racing heart 
And set her forever free 
No joy can ever be as great 
Than the freedom of her song, 
No matter she may never return 
And take her song along. 
Still I love to hold few birds 
And keep on setting them free, 
Or feed them if they choose to stay 
And share their joys with me 

Q.‘No matter she may never return. ‘Here she’ refers to 

Solution:
QUESTION: 95

Read the poem given below and answer the questions that follow by choosing the most appropriate option.

If I held a bird in hand 
Soft as ever could be, 
I’d listen to her racing heart 
And set her forever free 
No joy can ever be as great 
Than the freedom of her song, 
No matter she may never return 
And take her song along. 
Still I love to hold few birds 
And keep on setting them free, 
Or feed them if they choose to stay 
And share their joys with me 

Q. The most suitable title will be 

Solution:
QUESTION: 96

Read the poem given below and answer the questions that follow by choosing the most appropriate option.

If I held a bird in hand 
Soft as ever could be, 
I’d listen to her racing heart 
And set her forever free 
No joy can ever be as great 
Than the freedom of her song, 
No matter she may never return 
And take her song along. 
Still I love to hold few birds 
And keep on setting them free, 
Or feed them if they choose to stay 
And share their joys with me 

Q. Without freedom all luxuries are 

Solution:
QUESTION: 97

Read the following passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the five given alternatives.

To teach is to create a space in which obedience to truth is practiced. Space may sound like a vague, poetic metaphor until we realize that it describes experiences of everyday life. We know what it means to be in a green and open field; we know what it means to be on a crowded rush hour bus. These experiences of physical space have parallels in our relations with others. On our jobs, we know what it is to be pressed and crowded, our working space diminished by the urgency of deadlines and competitiveness of colleagues. But then there are times when deadlines disappear and colleagues cooperate, when everyone has space to move, invent and produce with energy and enthusiasm. With family and friends, we know how it feels to have unreasonable demands placed upon us, to be boxed in the expectations of those nearest to us. But then there are times when we feel accepted for who we are (or forgiven for who we are not), times when a spouse or a child or a friend gives us the space both to be and to become.
Similar experiences of crowding and space are found in education. To sit in a class where the teacher stuffs our minds with information, organizes it with finality, insists on having the answer while being utterly uninterested in our views, and forces us into a grim competition for grades-to sit in such a class is to experience a lack of space for learning. But to study with a teacher who not only speaks but also listens, who not only gives answers but asks questions and welcomes our insights, who provides information and theories that do not close doors but open new ones, who encourages students to help each other learn-to study with such a teacher is to know the power of a learning space. 
A learning space has three essential dimensions: openness, boundaries and an air of hospitality. To create open learning space is to remove the impediments to learning that we find around and within us: we often create them ourselves to evade the challenge of truth and transformation. One source of such impediments is our fear of appearing ignorant to others or to ourselves. The openness of a space is created by the firmness of its boundaries. A learning space cannot extend indefinitely; if it did, it would not be a structure for learning but an invitation for confusion and chaos. When space boundaries are violated, the quality of space suffers. The teacher who wants to create an open learning space must define and defend its boundaries with care, because the pursuit of truth can often be painful and discomforting, the learning space must be hospitable. Hospitality means receiving each other, our struggles, our new-born ideas with openness and care. It means creating an ethos in which the community of truth can form and the pain of its transformation be borne. A learning space needs to be hospitable not to make learning painless, but to make painful things possible, things without which no learning can occur-things like exposing ignorance, testing tentative hypotheses, challenging false or partial information, and mutual criticism of thought.
The task of creating learning space with qualities of openness, boundaries and hospitality can be approached at several levels. The most basic level is the physical arrangement of the classroom. Consider the traditional classroom setting with row upon row of chairs facing the lectern where learning space is confined to the narrow alley of attention between each student and teacher. In this space, there is no community of truth, hospitality or room for students to relate to the thoughts of each other. Contrast it with the chairs placed in a circular arrangement, creating an open space within which learners can interconnect. At another level, the teacher can create conceptual space-with words, in two ways. One is through assigned reading; the other is through lecturing. Assigned reading, not in the form of speed reading several hundred pages, but contemplative reading which opens, not fills, our learning space. A teacher can also create a learning space by means of lectures. By providing critical information and a framework of interpretation a lecturer can lay down the boundaries within which learning occurs. 
We also create learning space through the kind of speech we utter and the silence from which true speech emanates. Speech is a precious gift and a vital tool, but often our speaking is an evasion of truth, a way of buttressing our self-serving reconstructions of reality. Silence must therefore be an integral part of learning space. In silence, more than in arguments, our mind-made world falls away and must also create emotional space in the classroom, space that allow feeling to arise and be dealt with because submerged feelings can undermine learning. In an emotionally honest learning space, one created by a teacher who does not fear dealing with feelings, the community of truth can flourish between us and we can flourish in it. 

Q.Which of the following statements best describes the author’s conception of learning space? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 98

Read the following passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the five given alternatives.

To teach is to create a space in which obedience to truth is practiced. Space may sound like a vague, poetic metaphor until we realize that it describes experiences of everyday life. We know what it means to be in a green and open field; we know what it means to be on a crowded rush hour bus. These experiences of physical space have parallels in our relations with others. On our jobs, we know what it is to be pressed and crowded, our working space diminished by the urgency of deadlines and competitiveness of colleagues. But then there are times when deadlines disappear and colleagues cooperate, when everyone has space to move, invent and produce with energy and enthusiasm. With family and friends, we know how it feels to have unreasonable demands placed upon us, to be boxed in the expectations of those nearest to us. But then there are times when we feel accepted for who we are (or forgiven for who we are not), times when a spouse or a child or a friend gives us the space both to be and to become.
Similar experiences of crowding and space are found in education. To sit in a class where the teacher stuffs our minds with information, organizes it with finality, insists on having the answer while being utterly uninterested in our views, and forces us into a grim competition for grades-to sit in such a class is to experience a lack of space for learning. But to study with a teacher who not only speaks but also listens, who not only gives answers but asks questions and welcomes our insights, who provides information and theories that do not close doors but open new ones, who encourages students to help each other learn-to study with such a teacher is to know the power of a learning space. 
A learning space has three essential dimensions: openness, boundaries and an air of hospitality. To create open learning space is to remove the impediments to learning that we find around and within us: we often create them ourselves to evade the challenge of truth and transformation. One source of such impediments is our fear of appearing ignorant to others or to ourselves. The openness of a space is created by the firmness of its boundaries. A learning space cannot extend indefinitely; if it did, it would not be a structure for learning but an invitation for confusion and chaos. When space boundaries are violated, the quality of space suffers. The teacher who wants to create an open learning space must define and defend its boundaries with care, because the pursuit of truth can often be painful and discomforting, the learning space must be hospitable. Hospitality means receiving each other, our struggles, our new-born ideas with openness and care. It means creating an ethos in which the community of truth can form and the pain of its transformation be borne. A learning space needs to be hospitable not to make learning painless, but to make painful things possible, things without which no learning can occur-things like exposing ignorance, testing tentative hypotheses, challenging false or partial information, and mutual criticism of thought.
The task of creating learning space with qualities of openness, boundaries and hospitality can be approached at several levels. The most basic level is the physical arrangement of the classroom. Consider the traditional classroom setting with row upon row of chairs facing the lectern where learning space is confined to the narrow alley of attention between each student and teacher. In this space, there is no community of truth, hospitality or room for students to relate to the thoughts of each other. Contrast it with the chairs placed in a circular arrangement, creating an open space within which learners can interconnect. At another level, the teacher can create conceptual space-with words, in two ways. One is through assigned reading; the other is through lecturing. Assigned reading, not in the form of speed reading several hundred pages, but contemplative reading which opens, not fills, our learning space. A teacher can also create a learning space by means of lectures. By providing critical information and a framework of interpretation a lecturer can lay down the boundaries within which learning occurs. 
We also create learning space through the kind of speech we utter and the silence from which true speech emanates. Speech is a precious gift and a vital tool, but often our speaking is an evasion of truth, a way of buttressing our self-serving reconstructions of reality. Silence must therefore be an integral part of learning space. In silence, more than in arguments, our mind-made world falls away and must also create emotional space in the classroom, space that allow feeling to arise and be dealt with because submerged feelings can undermine learning. In an emotionally honest learning space, one created by a teacher who does not fear dealing with feelings, the community of truth can flourish between us and we can flourish in it.

Q.The statements ‘the openness of a space is created by the firmness of its boundaries’ appears contradictory. 
Which of the following statements provides the best justification for the proposition? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 99

Read the following passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the five given alternatives.

To teach is to create a space in which obedience to truth is practiced. Space may sound like a vague, poetic metaphor until we realize that it describes experiences of everyday life. We know what it means to be in a green and open field; we know what it means to be on a crowded rush-hour bus. These experiences of physical space have parallels in our relations with others. On our jobs, we know what it is to be pressed and crowded, our working space diminished by the urgency of deadlines and competitiveness of colleagues. But then there are times when deadlines disappear and colleagues cooperate when everyone has space to move, invent and produce with energy and enthusiasm. With family and friends, we know how it feels to have unreasonable demands placed upon us, to be boxed in the expectations of those nearest to us. But then there are times when we feel accepted for who we are (or forgiven for who we are not), times when a spouse or a child or a friend gives us space both to be and to become.

Similar experiences of crowding and space are found in education. To sit in a class where the teacher stuffs our minds with information, organizes it with finality, insists on having the answer while being utterly uninterested in our views, and forces us into a grim competition for grades-to sit in such a class is to experience a lack of space for learning. But to study with a teacher who not only speaks but also listens, who not only gives answers but asks questions and welcomes our insights, who provides information and theories that do not close doors but open new ones, who encourages students to help each other learn-to study with such a teacher is to know the power of a learning space. 
A learning space has three essential dimensions: openness, boundaries and an air of hospitality. To create an open learning space is to remove the impediments to learning that we find around and within us: we often create them ourselves to evade the challenge of truth and transformation. One source of such impediments is our fear of appearing ignorant to others or to ourselves. The openness of a space is created by the firmness of its boundaries. A learning space cannot extend indefinitely; if it did, it would not be a structure for learning but an invitation for confusion and chaos. When space boundaries are violated, the quality of space suffers. The teacher who wants to create an open learning space must define and defend its boundaries with care because the pursuit of truth can often be painful and discomforting, the learning space must be hospitable. Hospitality means receiving each other, our struggles, our new-born ideas with openness and care. It means creating an ethos in which the community of truth can form and the pain of its transformation be borne. A learning space needs to be hospitable not to make learning painless, but to make painful things possible, things without which no learning can occur-things like exposing ignorance, testing tentative hypotheses, challenging false or partial information, and mutual criticism of thought. 

The task of creating a learning space with qualities of openness, boundaries, and hospitality can be approached at several levels. The most basic level is the physical arrangement of the classroom. Consider the traditional classroom setting with row upon row of chairs facing the lectern where learning space is confined to the narrow alley of attention between each student and teacher. In this space, there is no community of truth, hospitality or room for students to relate to the thoughts of each other. Contrast it with the chairs placed in a circular arrangement, creating an open space within which learners can interconnect. At another level, the teacher can create conceptual space-with words, in two ways. One is through assigned reading; the other is through lecturing. Assigned reading, not in the form of speed reading several hundred pages, but contemplative reading which opens, not fills, our learning space. A teacher can also create a learning space by means of lectures. By providing critical information and a framework of interpretation a lecturer can lay down the boundaries within which learning occurs. 
We also create learning space through the kind of speech we utter and the silence from which true speech emanates. Speech is a precious gift and a vital tool, but often our speaking is an evasion of truth, a way of buttressing our self-serving reconstructions of reality. Silence must, therefore, be an integral part of the learning space. In silence, more than in arguments, our mind-made world falls away and must also create emotional space in the classroom, space that allows feeling to arise and be dealt with because submerged feelings can undermine learning. In an emotionally honest learning space, one created by a teacher who does not fear to deal with feelings, the community of truth can flourish between us and we can flourish in it. 

Q. According to the author, learning is a painful process because:

Solution:
QUESTION: 100

Read the following passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the five given alternatives.

To teach is to create a space in which obedience to truth is practiced. Space may sound like a vague, poetic metaphor until we realize that it describes experiences of everyday life. We know what it means to be in a green and open field; we know what it means to be on a crowded rush-hour bus. These experiences of physical space have parallels in our relations with others. On our jobs, we know what it is to be pressed and crowded, our working space diminished by the urgency of deadlines and competitiveness of colleagues. But then there are times when deadlines disappear and colleagues cooperate when everyone has space to move, invent and produce with energy and enthusiasm. With family and friends, we know how it feels to have unreasonable demands placed upon us, to be boxed in the expectations of those nearest to us. But then there are times when we feel accepted for who we are (or forgiven for who we are not), times when a spouse or a child or a friend gives us space both to be and to become.

Similar experiences of crowding and space are found in education. To sit in a class where the teacher stuffs our minds with information, organizes it with finality, insists on having the answer while being utterly uninterested in our views, and forces us into a grim competition for grades-to sit in such a class is to experience a lack of space for learning. But to study with a teacher who not only speaks but also listens, who not only gives answers but asks questions and welcomes our insights, who provides information and theories that do not close doors but open new ones, who encourages students to help each other learn-to study with such a teacher is to know the power of a learning space. 
A learning space has three essential dimensions: openness, boundaries and an air of hospitality. To create an open learning space is to remove the impediments to learning that we find around and within us: we often create them ourselves to evade the challenge of truth and transformation. One source of such impediments is our fear of appearing ignorant to others or to ourselves. The openness of a space is created by the firmness of its boundaries. A learning space cannot extend indefinitely; if it did, it would not be a structure for learning but an invitation for confusion and chaos. When space boundaries are violated, the quality of space suffers. The teacher who wants to create an open learning space must define and defend its boundaries with care because the pursuit of truth can often be painful and discomforting, the learning space must be hospitable. Hospitality means receiving each other, our struggles, our new-born ideas with openness and care. It means creating an ethos in which the community of truth can form and the pain of its transformation be borne. A learning space needs to be hospitable not to make learning painless, but to make painful things possible, things without which no learning can occur-things like exposing ignorance, testing tentative hypotheses, challenging false or partial information, and mutual criticism of thought. 

The task of creating a learning space with qualities of openness, boundaries, and hospitality can be approached at several levels. The most basic level is the physical arrangement of the classroom. Consider the traditional classroom setting with row upon row of chairs facing the lectern where learning space is confined to the narrow alley of attention between each student and teacher. In this space, there is no community of truth, hospitality or room for students to relate to the thoughts of each other. Contrast it with the chairs placed in a circular arrangement, creating an open space within which learners can interconnect. At another level, the teacher can create conceptual space-with words, in two ways. One is through assigned reading; the other is through lecturing. Assigned reading, not in the form of speed reading several hundred pages, but contemplative reading which opens, not fills, our learning space. A teacher can also create a learning space by means of lectures. By providing critical information and a framework of interpretation a lecturer can lay down the boundaries within which learning occurs. 
We also create learning space through the kind of speech we utter and the silence from which true speech emanates. Speech is a precious gift and a vital tool, but often our speaking is an evasion of truth, a way of buttressing our self-serving reconstructions of reality. Silence must, therefore, be an integral part of the learning space. In silence, more than in arguments, our mind-made world falls away and must also create emotional space in the classroom, space that allows feeling to arise and be dealt with because submerged feelings can undermine learning. In an emotionally honest learning space, one created by a teacher who does not fear to deal with feelings, the community of truth can flourish between us and we can flourish in it. 

Q. The task of creating a learning space with qualities of openness, boundaries, and hospitality is multidimensional. It involves operating at: 

Solution:
QUESTION: 101

Read the following passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the five given alternatives.

To teach is to create a space in which obedience to truth is practiced. Space may sound like a vague, poetic metaphor until we realize that it describes experiences of everyday life. We know what it means to be in a green and open field; we know what it means to be on a crowded rush-hour bus. These experiences of physical space have parallels in our relations with others. On our jobs, we know what it is to be pressed and crowded, our working space diminished by the urgency of deadlines and competitiveness of colleagues. But then there are times when deadlines disappear and colleagues cooperate when everyone has space to move, invent and produce with energy and enthusiasm. With family and friends, we know how it feels to have unreasonable demands placed upon us, to be boxed in the expectations of those nearest to us. But then there are times when we feel accepted for who we are (or forgiven for who we are not), times when a spouse or a child or a friend gives us space both to be and to become.

Similar experiences of crowding and space are found in education. To sit in a class where the teacher stuffs our minds with information, organizes it with finality, insists on having the answer while being utterly uninterested in our views, and forces us into a grim competition for grades-to sit in such a class is to experience a lack of space for learning. But to study with a teacher who not only speaks but also listens, who not only gives answers but asks questions and welcomes our insights, who provides information and theories that do not close doors but open new ones, who encourages students to help each other learn-to study with such a teacher is to know the power of a learning space. 
A learning space has three essential dimensions: openness, boundaries and an air of hospitality. To create an open learning space is to remove the impediments to learning that we find around and within us: we often create them ourselves to evade the challenge of truth and transformation. One source of such impediments is our fear of appearing ignorant to others or to ourselves. The openness of a space is created by the firmness of its boundaries. A learning space cannot extend indefinitely; if it did, it would not be a structure for learning but an invitation for confusion and chaos. When space boundaries are violated, the quality of space suffers. The teacher who wants to create an open learning space must define and defend its boundaries with care because the pursuit of truth can often be painful and discomforting, the learning space must be hospitable. Hospitality means receiving each other, our struggles, our new-born ideas with openness and care. It means creating an ethos in which the community of truth can form and the pain of its transformation be borne. A learning space needs to be hospitable not to make learning painless, but to make painful things possible, things without which no learning can occur-things like exposing ignorance, testing tentative hypotheses, challenging false or partial information, and mutual criticism of thought. 

The task of creating a learning space with qualities of openness, boundaries, and hospitality can be approached at several levels. The most basic level is the physical arrangement of the classroom. Consider the traditional classroom setting with row upon row of chairs facing the lectern where learning space is confined to the narrow alley of attention between each student and teacher. In this space, there is no community of truth, hospitality or room for students to relate to the thoughts of each other. Contrast it with the chairs placed in a circular arrangement, creating an open space within which learners can interconnect. At another level, the teacher can create conceptual space-with words, in two ways. One is through assigned reading; the other is through lecturing. Assigned reading, not in the form of speed reading several hundred pages, but contemplative reading which opens, not fills, our learning space. A teacher can also create a learning space by means of lectures. By providing critical information and a framework of interpretation a lecturer can lay down the boundaries within which learning occurs. 
We also create learning space through the kind of speech we utter and the silence from which true speech emanates. Speech is a precious gift and a vital tool, but often our speaking is an evasion of truth, a way of buttressing our self-serving reconstructions of reality. Silence must, therefore, be an integral part of the learning space. In silence, more than in arguments, our mind-made world falls away and must also create emotional space in the classroom, space that allows feeling to arise and be dealt with because submerged feelings can undermine learning. In an emotionally honest learning space, one created by a teacher who does not fear to deal with feelings, the community of truth can flourish between us and we can flourish in it. 

Q. According to the author, silence must be an integral part of learning space because: 

Solution:
QUESTION: 102

Read the following passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the five given alternatives.

To teach is to create a space in which obedience to truth is practiced. Space may sound like a vague, poetic metaphor until we realize that it describes experiences of everyday life. We know what it means to be in a green and open field; we know what it means to be on a crowded rush-hour bus. These experiences of physical space have parallels in our relations with others. On our jobs, we know what it is to be pressed and crowded, our working space diminished by the urgency of deadlines and competitiveness of colleagues. But then there are times when deadlines disappear and colleagues cooperate when everyone has space to move, invent and produce with energy and enthusiasm. With family and friends, we know how it feels to have unreasonable demands placed upon us, to be boxed in the expectations of those nearest to us. But then there are times when we feel accepted for who we are (or forgiven for who we are not), times when a spouse or a child or a friend gives us space both to be and to become.

Similar experiences of crowding and space are found in education. To sit in a class where the teacher stuffs our minds with information, organizes it with finality, insists on having the answer while being utterly uninterested in our views, and forces us into a grim competition for grades-to sit in such a class is to experience a lack of space for learning. But to study with a teacher who not only speaks but also listens, who not only gives answers but asks questions and welcomes our insights, who provides information and theories that do not close doors but open new ones, who encourages students to help each other learn-to study with such a teacher is to know the power of a learning space. 
A learning space has three essential dimensions: openness, boundaries and an air of hospitality. To create an open learning space is to remove the impediments to learning that we find around and within us: we often create them ourselves to evade the challenge of truth and transformation. One source of such impediments is our fear of appearing ignorant to others or to ourselves. The openness of a space is created by the firmness of its boundaries. A learning space cannot extend indefinitely; if it did, it would not be a structure for learning but an invitation for confusion and chaos. When space boundaries are violated, the quality of space suffers. The teacher who wants to create an open learning space must define and defend its boundaries with care because the pursuit of truth can often be painful and discomforting, the learning space must be hospitable. Hospitality means receiving each other, our struggles, our new-born ideas with openness and care. It means creating an ethos in which the community of truth can form and the pain of its transformation be borne. A learning space needs to be hospitable not to make learning painless, but to make painful things possible, things without which no learning can occur-things like exposing ignorance, testing tentative hypotheses, challenging false or partial information, and mutual criticism of thought. 

The task of creating a learning space with qualities of openness, boundaries, and hospitality can be approached at several levels. The most basic level is the physical arrangement of the classroom. Consider the traditional classroom setting with row upon row of chairs facing the lectern where learning space is confined to the narrow alley of attention between each student and teacher. In this space, there is no community of truth, hospitality or room for students to relate to the thoughts of each other. Contrast it with the chairs placed in a circular arrangement, creating an open space within which learners can interconnect. At another level, the teacher can create conceptual space-with words, in two ways. One is through assigned reading; the other is through lecturing. Assigned reading, not in the form of speed reading several hundred pages, but contemplative reading which opens, not fills, our learning space. A teacher can also create a learning space by means of lectures. By providing critical information and a framework of interpretation a lecturer can lay down the boundaries within which learning occurs. 
We also create learning space through the kind of speech we utter and the silence from which true speech emanates. Speech is a precious gift and a vital tool, but often our speaking is an evasion of truth, a way of buttressing our self-serving reconstructions of reality. Silence must, therefore, be an integral part of the learning space. In silence, more than in arguments, our mind-made world falls away and must also create emotional space in the classroom, space that allows feeling to arise and be dealt with because submerged feelings can undermine learning. In an emotionally honest learning space, one created by a teacher who does not fear to deal with feelings, the community of truth can flourish between us and we can flourish in it.

Q. According to the author, an effective teacher does not allow 

Solution:
QUESTION: 103

Read the following passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the five given alternatives.

To teach is to create a space in which obedience to truth is practiced. Space may sound like a vague, poetic metaphor until we realize that it describes experiences of everyday life. We know what it means to be in a green and open field; we know what it means to be on a crowded rush-hour bus. These experiences of physical space have parallels in our relations with others. On our jobs, we know what it is to be pressed and crowded, our working space diminished by the urgency of deadlines and competitiveness of colleagues. But then there are times when deadlines disappear and colleagues cooperate when everyone has space to move, invent and produce with energy and enthusiasm. With family and friends, we know how it feels to have unreasonable demands placed upon us, to be boxed in the expectations of those nearest to us. But then there are times when we feel accepted for who we are (or forgiven for who we are not), times when a spouse or a child or a friend gives us space both to be and to become.

Similar experiences of crowding and space are found in education. To sit in a class where the teacher stuffs our minds with information, organizes it with finality, insists on having the answer while being utterly uninterested in our views, and forces us into a grim competition for grades-to sit in such a class is to experience a lack of space for learning. But to study with a teacher who not only speaks but also listens, who not only gives answers but asks questions and welcomes our insights, who provides information and theories that do not close doors but open new ones, who encourages students to help each other learn-to study with such a teacher is to know the power of a learning space. 
A learning space has three essential dimensions: openness, boundaries and an air of hospitality. To create an open learning space is to remove the impediments to learning that we find around and within us: we often create them ourselves to evade the challenge of truth and transformation. One source of such impediments is our fear of appearing ignorant to others or to ourselves. The openness of a space is created by the firmness of its boundaries. A learning space cannot extend indefinitely; if it did, it would not be a structure for learning but an invitation for confusion and chaos. When space boundaries are violated, the quality of space suffers. The teacher who wants to create an open learning space must define and defend its boundaries with care because the pursuit of truth can often be painful and discomforting, the learning space must be hospitable. Hospitality means receiving each other, our struggles, our new-born ideas with openness and care. It means creating an ethos in which the community of truth can form and the pain of its transformation be borne. A learning space needs to be hospitable not to make learning painless, but to make painful things possible, things without which no learning can occur-things like exposing ignorance, testing tentative hypotheses, challenging false or partial information, and mutual criticism of thought. 

The task of creating a learning space with qualities of openness, boundaries, and hospitality can be approached at several levels. The most basic level is the physical arrangement of the classroom. Consider the traditional classroom setting with row upon row of chairs facing the lectern where learning space is confined to the narrow alley of attention between each student and teacher. In this space, there is no community of truth, hospitality or room for students to relate to the thoughts of each other. Contrast it with the chairs placed in a circular arrangement, creating an open space within which learners can interconnect. At another level, the teacher can create conceptual space-with words, in two ways. One is through assigned reading; the other is through lecturing. Assigned reading, not in the form of speed reading several hundred pages, but contemplative reading which opens, not fills, our learning space. A teacher can also create a learning space by means of lectures. By providing critical information and a framework of interpretation a lecturer can lay down the boundaries within which learning occurs. 
We also create learning space through the kind of speech we utter and the silence from which true speech emanates. Speech is a precious gift and a vital tool, but often our speaking is an evasion of truth, a way of buttressing our self-serving reconstructions of reality. Silence must, therefore, be an integral part of the learning space. In silence, more than in arguments, our mind-made world falls away and must also create emotional space in the classroom, space that allows feeling to arise and be dealt with because submerged feelings can undermine learning. In an emotionally honest learning space, one created by a teacher who does not fear to deal with feelings, the community of truth can flourish between us and we can flourish in it. 

Q. Understanding the notion of space in our relations with others is: 

Solution:
QUESTION: 104

Read the following passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the five given alternatives.

To teach is to create a space in which obedience to truth is practiced. Space may sound like a vague, poetic metaphor until we realize that it describes experiences of everyday life. We know what it means to be in a green and open field; we know what it means to be on a crowded rush-hour bus. These experiences of physical space have parallels in our relations with others. On our jobs, we know what it is to be pressed and crowded, our working space diminished by the urgency of deadlines and competitiveness of colleagues. But then there are times when deadlines disappear and colleagues cooperate when everyone has space to move, invent and produce with energy and enthusiasm. With family and friends, we know how it feels to have unreasonable demands placed upon us, to be boxed in the expectations of those nearest to us. But then there are times when we feel accepted for who we are (or forgiven for who we are not), times when a spouse or a child or a friend gives us space both to be and to become.

Similar experiences of crowding and space are found in education. To sit in a class where the teacher stuffs our minds with information, organizes it with finality, insists on having the answer while being utterly uninterested in our views, and forces us into a grim competition for grades-to sit in such a class is to experience a lack of space for learning. But to study with a teacher who not only speaks but also listens, who not only gives answers but asks questions and welcomes our insights, who provides information and theories that do not close doors but open new ones, who encourages students to help each other learn-to study with such a teacher is to know the power of a learning space. 
A learning space has three essential dimensions: openness, boundaries and an air of hospitality. To create an open learning space is to remove the impediments to learning that we find around and within us: we often create them ourselves to evade the challenge of truth and transformation. One source of such impediments is our fear of appearing ignorant to others or to ourselves. The openness of a space is created by the firmness of its boundaries. A learning space cannot extend indefinitely; if it did, it would not be a structure for learning but an invitation for confusion and chaos. When space boundaries are violated, the quality of space suffers. The teacher who wants to create an open learning space must define and defend its boundaries with care because the pursuit of truth can often be painful and discomforting, the learning space must be hospitable. Hospitality means receiving each other, our struggles, our new-born ideas with openness and care. It means creating an ethos in which the community of truth can form and the pain of its transformation be borne. A learning space needs to be hospitable not to make learning painless, but to make painful things possible, things without which no learning can occur-things like exposing ignorance, testing tentative hypotheses, challenging false or partial information, and mutual criticism of thought. 

The task of creating a learning space with qualities of openness, boundaries, and hospitality can be approached at several levels. The most basic level is the physical arrangement of the classroom. Consider the traditional classroom setting with row upon row of chairs facing the lectern where learning space is confined to the narrow alley of attention between each student and teacher. In this space, there is no community of truth, hospitality or room for students to relate to the thoughts of each other. Contrast it with the chairs placed in a circular arrangement, creating an open space within which learners can interconnect. At another level, the teacher can create conceptual space-with words, in two ways. One is through assigned reading; the other is through lecturing. Assigned reading, not in the form of speed reading several hundred pages, but contemplative reading which opens, not fills, our learning space. A teacher can also create a learning space by means of lectures. By providing critical information and a framework of interpretation a lecturer can lay down the boundaries within which learning occurs. 
We also create learning space through the kind of speech we utter and the silence from which true speech emanates. Speech is a precious gift and a vital tool, but often our speaking is an evasion of truth, a way of buttressing our self-serving reconstructions of reality. Silence must, therefore, be an integral part of the learning space. In silence, more than in arguments, our mind-made world falls away and must also create emotional space in the classroom, space that allows feeling to arise and be dealt with because submerged feelings can undermine learning. In an emotionally honest learning space, one created by a teacher who does not fear to deal with feelings, the community of truth can flourish between us and we can flourish in it.

Q. Another way of describing the author’s notion of learning space can be summarized in the following manner. 

Solution:
QUESTION: 105

Read the following passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the five given alternatives.

To teach is to create a space in which obedience to truth is practiced. Space may sound like a vague, poetic metaphor until we realize that it describes experiences of everyday life. We know what it means to be in a green and open field; we know what it means to be on a crowded rush-hour bus. These experiences of physical space have parallels in our relations with others. On our jobs, we know what it is to be pressed and crowded, our working space diminished by the urgency of deadlines and competitiveness of colleagues. But then there are times when deadlines disappear and colleagues cooperate when everyone has space to move, invent and produce with energy and enthusiasm. With family and friends, we know how it feels to have unreasonable demands placed upon us, to be boxed in the expectations of those nearest to us. But then there are times when we feel accepted for who we are (or forgiven for who we are not), times when a spouse or a child or a friend gives us space both to be and to become.

Similar experiences of crowding and space are found in education. To sit in a class where the teacher stuffs our minds with information, organizes it with finality, insists on having the answer while being utterly uninterested in our views, and forces us into a grim competition for grades-to sit in such a class is to experience a lack of space for learning. But to study with a teacher who not only speaks but also listens, who not only gives answers but asks questions and welcomes our insights, who provides information and theories that do not close doors but open new ones, who encourages students to help each other learn-to study with such a teacher is to know the power of a learning space. 
A learning space has three essential dimensions: openness, boundaries and an air of hospitality. To create an open learning space is to remove the impediments to learning that we find around and within us: we often create them ourselves to evade the challenge of truth and transformation. One source of such impediments is our fear of appearing ignorant to others or to ourselves. The openness of a space is created by the firmness of its boundaries. A learning space cannot extend indefinitely; if it did, it would not be a structure for learning but an invitation for confusion and chaos. When space boundaries are violated, the quality of space suffers. The teacher who wants to create an open learning space must define and defend its boundaries with care because the pursuit of truth can often be painful and discomforting, the learning space must be hospitable. Hospitality means receiving each other, our struggles, our new-born ideas with openness and care. It means creating an ethos in which the community of truth can form and the pain of its transformation be borne. A learning space needs to be hospitable not to make learning painless, but to make painful things possible, things without which no learning can occur-things like exposing ignorance, testing tentative hypotheses, challenging false or partial information, and mutual criticism of thought. 

The task of creating a learning space with qualities of openness, boundaries, and hospitality can be approached at several levels. The most basic level is the physical arrangement of the classroom. Consider the traditional classroom setting with row upon row of chairs facing the lectern where learning space is confined to the narrow alley of attention between each student and teacher. In this space, there is no community of truth, hospitality or room for students to relate to the thoughts of each other. Contrast it with the chairs placed in a circular arrangement, creating an open space within which learners can interconnect. At another level, the teacher can create conceptual space-with words, in two ways. One is through assigned reading; the other is through lecturing. Assigned reading, not in the form of speed reading several hundred pages, but contemplative reading which opens, not fills, our learning space. A teacher can also create a learning space by means of lectures. By providing critical information and a framework of interpretation a lecturer can lay down the boundaries within which learning occurs. 
We also create learning space through the kind of speech we utter and the silence from which true speech emanates. Speech is a precious gift and a vital tool, but often our speaking is an evasion of truth, a way of buttressing our self-serving reconstructions of reality. Silence must, therefore, be an integral part of the learning space. In silence, more than in arguments, our mind-made world falls away and must also create emotional space in the classroom, space that allows feeling to arise and be dealt with because submerged feelings can undermine learning. In an emotionally honest learning space, one created by a teacher who does not fear to deal with feelings, the community of truth can flourish between us and we can flourish in it. 

Q.Conceptual space with words can be created by

Solution:
QUESTION: 106

Answer the following questions by selecting the most appropriate option. 

Q. Atmosphere for learning should be 

Solution:
QUESTION: 107

Answer the following questions by selecting the most appropriate option.

Q. The main principle of co-curricular activities is the 

Solution:
QUESTION: 108

Answer the following questions by selecting the most appropriate option.

Q. The instructions in the class is most effective when 

Solution:
QUESTION: 109

Answer the following questions by selecting the most appropriate option.

Q.The teacher should prepare teaching points as these help him 

Solution:
QUESTION: 110

Answer the following questions by selecting the most appropriate option. 

Q. Which one of the following is most likely to enhance learner performance? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 111

Answer the following questions by selecting the most appropriate option.

Q.Mentally retarded children are generally more 

Solution:
QUESTION: 112

Answer the following questions by selecting the most appropriate option.

Q. Some students are weak in studies. The most probable reason for this can be 

Solution:
QUESTION: 113

Answer the following questions by selecting the most appropriate option.

Q. Basic education is 

Solution:
QUESTION: 114

Answer the following questions by selecting the most appropriate option.

Q. When the reasoning proceeds from the general to the particular, it is called 

Solution:
QUESTION: 115

Answer the following questions by selecting the most appropriate option.

Q. Micro teaching is useful to students of 

Solution:
QUESTION: 116

Answer the following questions by selecting the most appropriate option.

Q.Teaching-learning environment in the school will suffer if 

Solution:
QUESTION: 117

Answer the following questions by selecting the most appropriate option.

Q. Community participation in school education is mainly required for 

Solution:
QUESTION: 118

Answer the following questions by selecting the most appropriate option.

Q.The term ‘School Curriculum’ refers to 

Solution:
QUESTION: 119

Answer the following questions by selecting the most appropriate option.

Q.The importance of Parent-Teacher Association is that 

Solution:
QUESTION: 120

Answer the following questions by selecting the most appropriate option.

Q. In your view, teaching is 

Solution:
QUESTION: 121

निम्नलिखित प्रश्नों को ध्यानपर्वूक पढ़िए और उचितविकल्प का चयन कीजिए।

Q..........व्यवहार में संशोधन करने की प्रक्रिया है 

Solution:
QUESTION: 122

निम्नलिखित प्रश्नों को ध्यानपर्वूक पढ़िए और उचितविकल्प का चयन कीजिए।

Q. निम्न में से मातृभाषा शिक्षण का ज्ञानात्मक उद्देश्यनहीं है 

Solution:
QUESTION: 123

निम्नलिखित प्रश्नों को ध्यानपर्वूक पढ़िए और उचितविकल्प का चयन कीजिए।

Q. त्रि-भाषा सूत्र में उच्च प्राथमिक स्तर पर किस भाषा के शिक्षण को प्राथमिकता दी जाती है? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 124

निम्नलिखित प्रश्नों को ध्यानपर्वूक पढ़िए और उचितविकल्प का चयन कीजिए।

Q. बच्चों में सीखने से होने वाला प्रभावपूर्ण परिवर्तन है 

Solution:
QUESTION: 125

निम्नलिखित प्रश्नों को ध्यानपर्वूक पढ़िए और उचितविकल्प का चयन कीजिए।

Q. प्राथमिक स्तर पर रचना शिक्षण के लिए सर्वाधिक उपयुक्त विधि है 

Solution:
QUESTION: 126

निम्नलिखित प्रश्नों को ध्यानपर्वूक पढ़िए और उचितविकल्प का चयन कीजिए।

Q. भारतीय बालक को भाषा सीखनी होती है 

Solution:
QUESTION: 127

निम्नलिखित प्रश्नों को ध्यानपर्वूक पढ़िए और उचितविकल्प का चयन कीजिए।

Q. बलोद्यान पद्धति के प्रवर्तक हैं 

Solution:
QUESTION: 128

निम्नलिखित प्रश्नों को ध्यानपर्वूक पढ़िए और उचितविकल्प का चयन कीजिए।

Q. भाषा की पाठ्य-पुस्तकों में हिन्दीतर भाषाओं को भी जगह मिलनी चाहिए। इस कथन के समर्थन में कौन-सा तर्क काम करेगा? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 129

निम्नलिखित प्रश्नों को ध्यानपर्वूक पढ़िए और उचितविकल्प का चयन कीजिए।

Q. कक्षा में किसी वस्तु का वास्तविक स्वरूप चित्र द्वारा स्पष्ट किया जाना सम्भव न होने की स्थिति में प्रयोग करना उचित होगा 

Solution:
QUESTION: 130

निम्नलिखित प्रश्नों को ध्यानपर्वूक पढ़िए और उचितविकल्प का चयन कीजिए।

Q. “हर व्यक्ति को मैंने ही सच्चाई दिखाई।” वाक्य पर चर्चा करने का उद्देश्य है 

Solution:
QUESTION: 131

निम्नलिखित प्रश्नों को ध्यानपर्वूक पढ़िए और उचितविकल्प का चयन कीजिए।

Q. हिन्दी भाषा के मौखिक व्यवहार में, शब्दों के शुद्ध उच्चारण निर्भर करते हैं? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 132

निम्नलिखित प्रश्नों को ध्यानपर्वूक पढ़िए और उचितविकल्प का चयन कीजिए।

Q. एक समावेशी कक्षा में ‘भाषा शिक्षण’ की समस्या का कारण 

Solution:
QUESTION: 133

निम्नलिखित प्रश्नों को ध्यानपर्वूक पढ़िए और उचितविकल्प का चयन कीजिए।

Q. व्याकरण शिक्षण का भेद (प्रकार) है 

Solution:
QUESTION: 134

निम्नलिखित प्रश्नों को ध्यानपर्वूक पढ़िए और उचितविकल्प का चयन कीजिए। 

Q. भाषा की कक्षा को एक समावेशी कक्षा बनाने के लिए यह आवश्यक है कि 

Solution:
QUESTION: 135

निम्नलिखित प्रश्नों को ध्यानपर्वूक पढ़िए और उचितविकल्प का चयन कीजिए।

Q. भाषा शिक्षण में व्यापक उपचारात्मक शिक्षण हेतु सर्वाधिक उपयुक्त उपाय है 

Solution:
QUESTION: 136

निम्नलिखित पद्यांश को ध्यानपूर्वक पढ़कर नीचे दिए गए प्रश्नों के उत्तर दीजिए।

हमारी आन का झण्डा, भरा अभिमान है इसमें 
हमारे प्राण का झण्डा, भरा बलिदान है इसमें। 
हमारी प्रेरणा का बल, सबल यह राष्ट्र का गौरव। 
इसी हित शंख फूँका था, हिमालयश्रृंगसे भैरव। 
हरा है देश का अंचल, भरा है धवल गंगाजल। 
राष्ट्र के केसरी हैं हम, अशोक चक्र के संबल। 
अंहिसा, सत्य, निष्ठा का तिंरगा मर्म बतलाता 
उचित है देश-सेवा और समन्वय कर्म, समझाता। 
कभी दुनिया में औरों का नही हम छीन कर खाएँ 
हमारे देश का झण्डा कभी झुक नहीं पाए। 

Q. ‘कभी दुनिया में औरों का नही हम छीनकर खाएँ’ पंक्ति का आशय है

Solution:
QUESTION: 137

निम्नलिखित पद्यांश को ध्यानपूर्वक पढ़कर नीचे दिए गए प्रश्नों के उत्तर दीजिए।

हमारी आन का झण्डा, भरा अभिमान है इसमें 
हमारे प्राण का झण्डा, भरा बलिदान है इसमें। 
हमारी प्रेरणा का बल, सबल यह राष्ट्र का गौरव। 
इसी हित शंख फूँका था, हिमालयश्रृंगसे भैरव। 
हरा है देश का अंचल, भरा है धवल गंगाजल। 
राष्ट्र के केसरी हैं हम, अशोक चक्र के संबल। 
अंहिसा, सत्य, निष्ठा का तिंरगा मर्म बतलाता 
उचित है देश-सेवा और समन्वय कर्म, समझाता। 
कभी दुनिया में औरों का नही हम छीन कर खाएँ 
हमारे देश का झण्डा कभी झुक नहीं पाए।

Q. ‘गौरव’ शब्द का पर्यायवाची शब्द है 

Solution:
QUESTION: 138

निम्नलिखित पद्यांश को ध्यानपूर्वक पढ़कर नीचे दिए गए प्रश्नों के उत्तर दीजिए।

हमारी आन का झण्डा, भरा अभिमान है इसमें 
हमारे प्राण का झण्डा, भरा बलिदान है इसमें। 
हमारी प्रेरणा का बल, सबल यह राष्ट्र का गौरव। 
इसी हित शंख फूँका था, हिमालयश्रृंगसे भैरव। 
हरा है देश का अंचल, भरा है धवल गंगाजल। 
राष्ट्र के केसरी हैं हम, अशोक चक्र के संबल। 
अंहिसा, सत्य, निष्ठा का तिंरगा मर्म बतलाता 
उचित है देश-सेवा और समन्वय कर्म, समझाता। 
कभी दुनिया में औरों का नही हम छीन कर खाएँ 
हमारे देश का झण्डा कभी झुक नहीं पाए।

Q.राष्ट्रीय झण्डा प्रतीक नहीं है

Solution:
QUESTION: 139

निम्नलिखित पद्यांश को ध्यानपूर्वक पढ़कर नीचे दिए गए प्रश्नों के उत्तर दीजिए।

हमारी आन का झण्डा, भरा अभिमान है इसमें 
हमारे प्राण का झण्डा, भरा बलिदान है इसमें। 
हमारी प्रेरणा का बल, सबल यह राष्ट्र का गौरव। 
इसी हित शंख फूँका था, हिमालयश्रृंगसे भैरव। 
हरा है देश का अंचल, भरा है धवल गंगाजल। 
राष्ट्र के केसरी हैं हम, अशोक चक्र के संबल। 
अंहिसा, सत्य, निष्ठा का तिंरगा मर्म बतलाता 
उचित है देश-सेवा और समन्वय कर्म, समझाता। 
कभी दुनिया में औरों का नही हम छीन कर खाएँ 
हमारे देश का झण्डा कभी झुक नहीं पाए।

Q. झण्डे को प्रेरणा का बल किसलिए कहा गया है? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 140

निम्नलिखित पद्यांश को ध्यानपूर्वक पढ़कर नीचे दिए गए प्रश्नों के उत्तर दीजिए।

हमारी आन का झण्डा, भरा अभिमान है इसमें 
हमारे प्राण का झण्डा, भरा बलिदान है इसमें। 
हमारी प्रेरणा का बल, सबल यह राष्ट्र का गौरव। 
इसी हित शंख फूँका था, हिमालयश्रृंगसे भैरव। 
हरा है देश का अंचल, भरा है धवल गंगाजल। 
राष्ट्र के केसरी हैं हम, अशोक चक्र के संबल। 
अंहिसा, सत्य, निष्ठा का तिंरगा मर्म बतलाता 
उचित है देश-सेवा और समन्वय कर्म, समझाता। 
कभी दुनिया में औरों का नही हम छीन कर खाएँ 
हमारे देश का झण्डा कभी झुक नहीं पाए। 

Q. ‘हरा है देश का अंचल’पंक्ति में ‘हरा’ शब्द वाचक है 

Solution:
QUESTION: 141

निम्नलिखित पद्यांश को ध्यानपूर्वक पढ़कर नीचे दिए गए प्रश्नों के उत्तर दीजिए।

हमारी आन का झण्डा, भरा अभिमान है इसमें 
हमारे प्राण का झण्डा, भरा बलिदान है इसमें। 
हमारी प्रेरणा का बल, सबल यह राष्ट्र का गौरव। 
इसी हित शंख फूँका था, हिमालयश्रृंगसे भैरव। 
हरा है देश का अंचल, भरा है धवल गंगाजल। 
राष्ट्र के केसरी हैं हम, अशोक चक्र के संबल। 
अंहिसा, सत्य, निष्ठा का तिंरगा मर्म बतलाता 
उचित है देश-सेवा और समन्वय कर्म, समझाता। 
कभी दुनिया में औरों का नही हम छीन कर खाएँ 
हमारे देश का झण्डा कभी झुक नहीं पाए। 

Q. संबल में उपसर्ग है 

Solution:
QUESTION: 142

निम्नलिखित गद्यांश को ध्यानपूर्वक पढ़कर नीचे दिए गए प्रश्नों के उत्तर दीजिए।

तुम सुबह से रात तक अपने आस-पास अनेक परिवर्तन होते हुए देखते हो। ये परिवर्तन तुम्हें घर, विद्यालय, खेल के मैदान अथवा किसी अन्य स्थान पर दिखाई देते हैं। उदाहरण के लिए, तुम्हें कुछ ऐसे परिवर्तन दिखाई देते है जैसे मौसम में आकस्मिक परिवर्तन, वर्षा, पौधों पर फूल आना, बीजों का अंकुरित होना, फूलों का पकना, वस्त्रों का सूखना, दिन-रात में परिवर्तन, बर्फ का पिघलना, पानी का भाप बनना, ईंधन का जलना, चावल को पकाना, चपाती बनाना, दूध से दही का बनना, लोहे में जंग लगना, आतिशबाजी का जलना आदि। परिवर्तन में वस्तुओं में विभिन्न प्रकार के प्रत्यावर्तन भी हो सकते है; जैसे स्थिति, आकृति, आकार, रंग, अवस्था, तापमान, बनावट तथा संरचना में बदलाव। परिवर्तन का सदैव कोई-न-कोई कारण होता है। 

Q. उपरोक्त गद्यांश के लिए कौन-सा शीर्षक सबसे अधिक उपयुक्त है? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 143

निम्नलिखित गद्यांश को ध्यानपूर्वक पढ़कर नीचे दिए गए प्रश्नों के उत्तर दीजिए।

तुम सुबह से रात तक अपने आस-पास अनेक परिवर्तन होते हुए देखते हो। ये परिवर्तन तुम्हें घर, विद्यालय, खेल के मैदान अथवा किसी अन्य स्थान पर दिखाई देते हैं। उदाहरण के लिए, तुम्हें कुछ ऐसे परिवर्तन दिखाई देते है जैसे मौसम में आकस्मिक परिवर्तन, वर्षा, पौधों पर फूल आना, बीजों का अंकुरित होना, फूलों का पकना, वस्त्रों का सूखना, दिन-रात में परिवर्तन, बर्फ का पिघलना, पानी का भाप बनना, ईंधन का जलना, चावल को पकाना, चपाती बनाना, दूध से दही का बनना, लोहे में जंग लगना, आतिशबाजी का जलना आदि। परिवर्तन में वस्तुओं में विभिन्न प्रकार के प्रत्यावर्तन भी हो सकते है; जैसे स्थिति, आकृति, आकार, रंग, अवस्था, तापमान, बनावट तथा संरचना में बदलाव। परिवर्तन का सदैव कोई-न-कोई कारण होता है। 

Q.‘विद्यालय’ शब्द में प्रयुक्त समास है 

Solution:
QUESTION: 144

निम्नलिखित गद्यांश को ध्यानपूर्वक पढ़कर नीचे दिए गए प्रश्नों के उत्तर दीजिए।

तुम सुबह से रात तक अपने आस-पास अनेक परिवर्तन होते हुए देखते हो। ये परिवर्तन तुम्हें घर, विद्यालय, खेल के मैदान अथवा किसी अन्य स्थान पर दिखाई देते हैं। उदाहरण के लिए, तुम्हें कुछ ऐसे परिवर्तन दिखाई देते है जैसे मौसम में आकस्मिक परिवर्तन, वर्षा, पौधों पर फूल आना, बीजों का अंकुरित होना, फूलों का पकना, वस्त्रों का सूखना, दिन-रात में परिवर्तन, बर्फ का पिघलना, पानी का भाप बनना, ईंधन का जलना, चावल को पकाना, चपाती बनाना, दूध से दही का बनना, लोहे में जंग लगना, आतिशबाजी का जलना आदि। परिवर्तन में वस्तुओं में विभिन्न प्रकार के प्रत्यावर्तन भी हो सकते है; जैसे स्थिति, आकृति, आकार, रंग, अवस्था, तापमान, बनावट तथा संरचना में बदलाव। परिवर्तन का सदैव कोई-न-कोई कारण होता है। 

Q. ‘दिन-रात’ में प्रयुक्त समास है 

Solution:
QUESTION: 145

निम्नलिखित गद्यांश को ध्यानपूर्वक पढ़कर नीचे दिए गए प्रश्नों के उत्तर दीजिए।

तुम सुबह से रात तक अपने आस-पास अनेक परिवर्तन होते हुए देखते हो। ये परिवर्तन तुम्हें घर, विद्यालय, खेल के मैदान अथवा किसी अन्य स्थान पर दिखाई देते हैं। उदाहरण के लिए, तुम्हें कुछ ऐसे परिवर्तन दिखाई देते है जैसे मौसम में आकस्मिक परिवर्तन, वर्षा, पौधों पर फूल आना, बीजों का अंकुरित होना, फूलों का पकना, वस्त्रों का सूखना, दिन-रात में परिवर्तन, बर्फ का पिघलना, पानी का भाप बनना, ईंधन का जलना, चावल को पकाना, चपाती बनाना, दूध से दही का बनना, लोहे में जंग लगना, आतिशबाजी का जलना आदि। परिवर्तन में वस्तुओं में विभिन्न प्रकार के प्रत्यावर्तन भी हो सकते है; जैसे स्थिति, आकृति, आकार, रंग, अवस्था, तापमान, बनावट तथा संरचना में बदलाव। परिवर्तन का सदैव कोई-न-कोई कारण होता है।

Q. दूध का पर्यायवाची है 

Solution:
QUESTION: 146

निम्नलिखित गद्यांश को ध्यानपूर्वक पढ़कर नीचे दिए गए प्रश्नों के उत्तर दीजिए।

तुम सुबह से रात तक अपने आस-पास अनेक परिवर्तन होते हुए देखते हो। ये परिवर्तन तुम्हें घर, विद्यालय, खेल के मैदान अथवा किसी अन्य स्थान पर दिखाई देते हैं। उदाहरण के लिए, तुम्हें कुछ ऐसे परिवर्तन दिखाई देते है जैसे मौसम में आकस्मिक परिवर्तन, वर्षा, पौधों पर फूल आना, बीजों का अंकुरित होना, फूलों का पकना, वस्त्रों का सूखना, दिन-रात में परिवर्तन, बर्फ का पिघलना, पानी का भाप बनना, ईंधन का जलना, चावल को पकाना, चपाती बनाना, दूध से दही का बनना, लोहे में जंग लगना, आतिशबाजी का जलना आदि। परिवर्तन में वस्तुओं में विभिन्न प्रकार के प्रत्यावर्तन भी हो सकते है; जैसे स्थिति, आकृति, आकार, रंग, अवस्था, तापमान, बनावट तथा संरचना में बदलाव। परिवर्तन का सदैव कोई-न-कोई कारण होता है।

Q. अचानक घटित होने वाला 

Solution:
QUESTION: 147

निम्नलिखित गद्यांश को ध्यानपूर्वक पढ़कर नीचे दिए गए प्रश्नों के उत्तर दीजिए।

तुम सुबह से रात तक अपने आस-पास अनेक परिवर्तन होते हुए देखते हो। ये परिवर्तन तुम्हें घर, विद्यालय, खेल के मैदान अथवा किसी अन्य स्थान पर दिखाई देते हैं। उदाहरण के लिए, तुम्हें कुछ ऐसे परिवर्तन दिखाई देते है जैसे मौसम में आकस्मिक परिवर्तन, वर्षा, पौधों पर फूल आना, बीजों का अंकुरित होना, फूलों का पकना, वस्त्रों का सूखना, दिन-रात में परिवर्तन, बर्फ का पिघलना, पानी का भाप बनना, ईंधन का जलना, चावल को पकाना, चपाती बनाना, दूध से दही का बनना, लोहे में जंग लगना, आतिशबाजी का जलना आदि। परिवर्तन में वस्तुओं में विभिन्न प्रकार के प्रत्यावर्तन भी हो सकते है; जैसे स्थिति, आकृति, आकार, रंग, अवस्था, तापमान, बनावट तथा संरचना में बदलाव। परिवर्तन का सदैव कोई-न-कोई कारण होता है।

Q.तुम अपने आस-पास अनेक परिवर्तन देखते हो।” इस वाक्य में ‘अपने आस-पास से तात्पर्य है 

Solution:
QUESTION: 148

निम्नलिखित गद्यांश को ध्यानपूर्वक पढ़कर नीचे दिए गए प्रश्नों के उत्तर दीजिए।

तुम सुबह से रात तक अपने आस-पास अनेक परिवर्तन होते हुए देखते हो। ये परिवर्तन तुम्हें घर, विद्यालय, खेल के मैदान अथवा किसी अन्य स्थान पर दिखाई देते हैं। उदाहरण के लिए, तुम्हें कुछ ऐसे परिवर्तन दिखाई देते है जैसे मौसम में आकस्मिक परिवर्तन, वर्षा, पौधों पर फूल आना, बीजों का अंकुरित होना, फूलों का पकना, वस्त्रों का सूखना, दिन-रात में परिवर्तन, बर्फ का पिघलना, पानी का भाप बनना, ईंधन का जलना, चावल को पकाना, चपाती बनाना, दूध से दही का बनना, लोहे में जंग लगना, आतिशबाजी का जलना आदि। परिवर्तन में वस्तुओं में विभिन्न प्रकार के प्रत्यावर्तन भी हो सकते है; जैसे स्थिति, आकृति, आकार, रंग, अवस्था, तापमान, बनावट तथा संरचना में बदलाव। परिवर्तन का सदैव कोई-न-कोई कारण होता है।

Q. इस गद्यांश में जिन परिवर्तनों का उल्लेख किया गया है उनमें ऐसे कारकों को सम्मिलित नहीं किया है; जैसे 

Solution:
QUESTION: 149

निम्नलिखित गद्यांश को ध्यानपूर्वक पढ़कर नीचे दिए गए प्रश्नों के उत्तर दीजिए।

तुम सुबह से रात तक अपने आस-पास अनेक परिवर्तन होते हुए देखते हो। ये परिवर्तन तुम्हें घर, विद्यालय, खेल के मैदान अथवा किसी अन्य स्थान पर दिखाई देते हैं। उदाहरण के लिए, तुम्हें कुछ ऐसे परिवर्तन दिखाई देते है जैसे मौसम में आकस्मिक परिवर्तन, वर्षा, पौधों पर फूल आना, बीजों का अंकुरित होना, फूलों का पकना, वस्त्रों का सूखना, दिन-रात में परिवर्तन, बर्फ का पिघलना, पानी का भाप बनना, ईंधन का जलना, चावल को पकाना, चपाती बनाना, दूध से दही का बनना, लोहे में जंग लगना, आतिशबाजी का जलना आदि। परिवर्तन में वस्तुओं में विभिन्न प्रकार के प्रत्यावर्तन भी हो सकते है; जैसे स्थिति, आकृति, आकार, रंग, अवस्था, तापमान, बनावट तथा संरचना में बदलाव। परिवर्तन का सदैव कोई-न-कोई कारण होता है।

Q. परिवर्तन सम्भव नही है