NABARD English Language Practice: 2


30 Questions MCQ Test NABARD Assistant Manager Grade A Mock Test Series | NABARD English Language Practice: 2


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This mock test of NABARD English Language Practice: 2 for Banking Exams helps you for every Banking Exams entrance exam. This contains 30 Multiple Choice Questions for Banking Exams NABARD English Language Practice: 2 (mcq) to study with solutions a complete question bank. The solved questions answers in this NABARD English Language Practice: 2 quiz give you a good mix of easy questions and tough questions. Banking Exams students definitely take this NABARD English Language Practice: 2 exercise for a better result in the exam. You can find other NABARD English Language Practice: 2 extra questions, long questions & short questions for Banking Exams on EduRev as well by searching above.
QUESTION: 1

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words are given in underline to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

Public sector banks are back in focus, not for the steep rise in bad loans, but for customer complaints against them. At first glance, the Reserve Bank of India’s annual report on the Banking Ombudsman Scheme reveals that customers of PSBs had a litany of grievances, while patrons of private and foreign banks were quite content with the services offered to them. But one reason why PSBs account for about 65 per cent of the complaints is that these banks have a lion’s share — about three-fourths — of the loans and deposits in the banking system. If we consider the number of complaints per account or branch, nationalised banks, surprisingly, have fewer complaints than their private and foreign counterparts. Complaints from the rural and semi-urban population have witnessed an increase, implying the wider participation from these segments. But there is a lack of awareness about the ombudsman scheme or lack of access to it in these regions. While they account for about two-thirds of the bank branches in India, less than 30 per cent of the complaints were lodged from here.
Reporting such numbers only scratches the surface of the problem. The ombudsman scheme, which was launched two decades ago to provide a free grievance redress system in the face of rising complaints against banks, will now have to use the data to improve its functioning. Both the Centre and the regulator also need to act on longstanding grievances. For years now, debit/credit card operations (21 per cent of complaints) and unfair banking practices (29 per cent) have made up a large chunk of the complaints. Customers have had a laundry list of woes regarding failure of withdrawals from ATMs, issue of unsolicited cards and insurance policies, and banks’ non-adherence to ‘fair practices’ or BCSBI (Banking Codes and Standards Board of India) codes. The BCSBI was set up a decade ago to supplement the ombudsman scheme. Hence, the wide non-adherence to these codes on the part of banks is inexcusable. What it highlights is the need for the RBI to follow up more stringently on ensuring that banks conform to norms.
Reviewing the scope of the ombudsman scheme and educating customers on the procedures to lodge complaints, will ensure that grievances that do find their way into the redressal system get resolved effectively. While the report shows that the scheme disposed 96 per cent of the complaints in 2014-15, rejections were as high as around two-thirds, because the solution to many of the grievances fell outside the jurisdiction of the banking ombudsman. The RBI advisory that banks have an internal redress mechanism to deal with the issue first-hand will work only if the process is streamlined for better results.

Q. What could be the best title for the above passage?

Solution:

Beyond just numbers is the best title of the passage.

QUESTION: 2

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words are given in underline to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

Public sector banks are back in focus, not for the steep rise in bad loans, but for customer complaints against them. At first glance, the Reserve Bank of India’s annual report on the Banking Ombudsman Scheme reveals that customers of PSBs had a litany of grievances, while patrons of private and foreign banks were quite content with the services offered to them. But one reason why PSBs account for about 65 per cent of the complaints is that these banks have a lion’s share — about three-fourths — of the loans and deposits in the banking system. If we consider the number of complaints per account or branch, nationalised banks, surprisingly, have fewer complaints than their private and foreign counterparts. Complaints from the rural and semi-urban population have witnessed an increase, implying the wider participation from these segments. But there is a lack of awareness about the ombudsman scheme or lack of access to it in these regions. While they account for about two-thirds of the bank branches in India, less than 30 per cent of the complaints were lodged from here.
Reporting such numbers only scratches the surface of the problem. The ombudsman scheme, which was launched two decades ago to provide a free grievance redress system in the face of rising complaints against banks, will now have to use the data to improve its functioning. Both the Centre and the regulator also need to act on longstanding grievances. For years now, debit/credit card operations (21 per cent of complaints) and unfair banking practices (29 per cent) have made up a large chunk of the complaints. Customers have had a laundry list of woes regarding failure of withdrawals from ATMs, issue of unsolicited cards and insurance policies, and banks’ non-adherence to ‘fair practices’ or BCSBI (Banking Codes and Standards Board of India) codes. The BCSBI was set up a decade ago to supplement the ombudsman scheme. Hence, the wide non-adherence to these codes on the part of banks is inexcusable. What it highlights is the need for the RBI to follow up more stringently on ensuring that banks conform to norms.
Reviewing the scope of the ombudsman scheme and educating customers on the procedures to lodge complaints, will ensure that grievances that do find their way into the redressal system get resolved effectively. While the report shows that the scheme disposed 96 per cent of the complaints in 2014-15, rejections were as high as around two-thirds, because the solution to many of the grievances fell outside the jurisdiction of the banking ombudsman. The RBI advisory that banks have an internal redress mechanism to deal with the issue first-hand will work only if the process is streamlined for better results.

Q. Which of the following is NOT True according to the passage?
I.Rural population is participating more in banking
II.Banking ombudsman scheme disposed more than 50 percent of the complaints in 2014-2015
III.Unfair banking practices lead to large number of complaints

Solution:

All the statements are true according to the passage.

QUESTION: 3

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words are given in underline to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

Public sector banks are back in focus, not for the steep rise in bad loans, but for customer complaints against them. At first glance, the Reserve Bank of India’s annual report on the Banking Ombudsman Scheme reveals that customers of PSBs had a litany of grievances, while patrons of private and foreign banks were quite content with the services offered to them. But one reason why PSBs account for about 65 per cent of the complaints is that these banks have a lion’s share — about three-fourths — of the loans and deposits in the banking system. If we consider the number of complaints per account or branch, nationalised banks, surprisingly, have fewer complaints than their private and foreign counterparts. Complaints from the rural and semi-urban population have witnessed an increase, implying the wider participation from these segments. But there is a lack of awareness about the ombudsman scheme or lack of access to it in these regions. While they account for about two-thirds of the bank branches in India, less than 30 per cent of the complaints were lodged from here.
Reporting such numbers only scratches the surface of the problem. The ombudsman scheme, which was launched two decades ago to provide a free grievance redress system in the face of rising complaints against banks, will now have to use the data to improve its functioning. Both the Centre and the regulator also need to act on longstanding grievances. For years now, debit/credit card operations (21 per cent of complaints) and unfair banking practices (29 per cent) have made up a large chunk of the complaints. Customers have had a laundry list of woes regarding failure of withdrawals from ATMs, issue of unsolicited cards and insurance policies, and banks’ non-adherence to ‘fair practices’ or BCSBI (Banking Codes and Standards Board of India) codes. The BCSBI was set up a decade ago to supplement the ombudsman scheme. Hence, the wide non-adherence to these codes on the part of banks is inexcusable. What it highlights is the need for the RBI to follow up more stringently on ensuring that banks conform to norms.
Reviewing the scope of the ombudsman scheme and educating customers on the procedures to lodge complaints, will ensure that grievances that do find their way into the redressal system get resolved effectively. While the report shows that the scheme disposed 96 per cent of the complaints in 2014-15, rejections were as high as around two-thirds, because the solution to many of the grievances fell outside the jurisdiction of the banking ombudsman. The RBI advisory that banks have an internal redress mechanism to deal with the issue first-hand will work only if the process is streamlined for better results.

Q. What would be the best way to resolve complaints effectively?
I. Debit/credit card operations should be limited
II. Banks should adhere to fair practices
III. customers should be educated on the procedures to lodge complaints.

Solution:

Reviewing the scope of the ombudsman scheme and educating customers on the procedures to lodge complaints, will ensure that grievances that do find their way into the redressal system get resolved effectively.”

QUESTION: 4

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words are given in underline to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

Public sector banks are back in focus, not for the steep rise in bad loans, but for customer complaints against them. At first glance, the Reserve Bank of India’s annual report on the Banking Ombudsman Scheme reveals that customers of PSBs had a litany of grievances, while patrons of private and foreign banks were quite content with the services offered to them. But one reason why PSBs account for about 65 per cent of the complaints is that these banks have a lion’s share — about three-fourths — of the loans and deposits in the banking system. If we consider the number of complaints per account or branch, nationalised banks, surprisingly, have fewer complaints than their private and foreign counterparts. Complaints from the rural and semi-urban population have witnessed an increase, implying the wider participation from these segments. But there is a lack of awareness about the ombudsman scheme or lack of access to it in these regions. While they account for about two-thirds of the bank branches in India, less than 30 per cent of the complaints were lodged from here.
Reporting such numbers only scratches the surface of the problem. The ombudsman scheme, which was launched two decades ago to provide a free grievance redress system in the face of rising complaints against banks, will now have to use the data to improve its functioning. Both the Centre and the regulator also need to act on longstanding grievances. For years now, debit/credit card operations (21 per cent of complaints) and unfair banking practices (29 per cent) have made up a large chunk of the complaints. Customers have had a laundry list of woes regarding failure of withdrawals from ATMs, issue of unsolicited cards and insurance policies, and banks’ non-adherence to ‘fair practices’ or BCSBI (Banking Codes and Standards Board of India) codes. The BCSBI was set up a decade ago to supplement the ombudsman scheme. Hence, the wide non-adherence to these codes on the part of banks is inexcusable. What it highlights is the need for the RBI to follow up more stringently on ensuring that banks conform to norms.
Reviewing the scope of the ombudsman scheme and educating customers on the procedures to lodge complaints, will ensure that grievances that do find their way into the redressal system get resolved effectively. While the report shows that the scheme disposed 96 per cent of the complaints in 2014-15, rejections were as high as around two-thirds, because the solution to many of the grievances fell outside the jurisdiction of the banking ombudsman. The RBI advisory that banks have an internal redress mechanism to deal with the issue first-hand will work only if the process is streamlined for better results.

Q. Which of the following is TRUE according to the passage?

Solution:

Customers have had a laundry list of woes regarding failure of withdrawals from ATMs, issue of unsolicited cards and insurance policies, and banks’ non-adherence to ‘fair practices’ or BCSBI (Banking Codes and Standards Board of India) codes.”

QUESTION: 5

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words are given in underline to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

Public sector banks are back in focus, not for the steep rise in bad loans, but for customer complaints against them. At first glance, the Reserve Bank of India’s annual report on the Banking Ombudsman Scheme reveals that customers of PSBs had a litany of grievances, while patrons of private and foreign banks were quite content with the services offered to them. But one reason why PSBs account for about 65 per cent of the complaints is that these banks have a lion’s share — about three-fourths — of the loans and deposits in the banking system. If we consider the number of complaints per account or branch, nationalised banks, surprisingly, have fewer complaints than their private and foreign counterparts. Complaints from the rural and semi-urban population have witnessed an increase, implying the wider participation from these segments. But there is a lack of awareness about the ombudsman scheme or lack of access to it in these regions. While they account for about two-thirds of the bank branches in India, less than 30 per cent of the complaints were lodged from here.
Reporting such numbers only scratches the surface of the problem. The ombudsman scheme, which was launched two decades ago to provide a free grievance redress system in the face of rising complaints against banks, will now have to use the data to improve its functioning. Both the Centre and the regulator also need to act on longstanding grievances. For years now, debit/credit card operations (21 per cent of complaints) and unfair banking practices (29 per cent) have made up a large chunk of the complaints. Customers have had a laundry list of woes regarding failure of withdrawals from ATMs, issue of unsolicited cards and insurance policies, and banks’ non-adherence to ‘fair practices’ or BCSBI (Banking Codes and Standards Board of India) codes. The BCSBI was set up a decade ago to supplement the ombudsman scheme. Hence, the wide non-adherence to these codes on the part of banks is inexcusable. What it highlights is the need for the RBI to follow up more stringently on ensuring that banks conform to norms.
Reviewing the scope of the ombudsman scheme and educating customers on the procedures to lodge complaints, will ensure that grievances that do find their way into the redressal system get resolved effectively. While the report shows that the scheme disposed 96 per cent of the complaints in 2014-15, rejections were as high as around two-thirds, because the solution to many of the grievances fell outside the jurisdiction of the banking ombudsman. The RBI advisory that banks have an internal redress mechanism to deal with the issue first-hand will work only if the process is streamlined for better results.

Q. Choose the word which is most SIMILAR in meaning of the word printed in underline as used in the passage.
Steep

Solution:

Steep means rising or falling sharply. So, abrupt is the word which is similar in meaning to it.

QUESTION: 6

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words are given in underline to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

Public sector banks are back in focus, not for the steep rise in bad loans, but for customer complaints against them. At first glance, the Reserve Bank of India’s annual report on the Banking Ombudsman Scheme reveals that customers of PSBs had a litany of grievances, while patrons of private and foreign banks were quite content with the services offered to them. But one reason why PSBs account for about 65 per cent of the complaints is that these banks have a lion’s share — about three-fourths — of the loans and deposits in the banking system. If we consider the number of complaints per account or branch, nationalised banks, surprisingly, have fewer complaints than their private and foreign counterparts. Complaints from the rural and semi-urban population have witnessed an increase, implying the wider participation from these segments. But there is a lack of awareness about the ombudsman scheme or lack of access to it in these regions. While they account for about two-thirds of the bank branches in India, less than 30 per cent of the complaints were lodged from here.
Reporting such numbers only scratches the surface of the problem. The ombudsman scheme, which was launched two decades ago to provide a free grievance redress system in the face of rising complaints against banks, will now have to use the data to improve its functioning. Both the Centre and the regulator also need to act on longstanding grievances. For years now, debit/credit card operations (21 per cent of complaints) and unfair banking practices (29 per cent) have made up a large chunk of the complaints. Customers have had a laundry list of woes regarding failure of withdrawals from ATMs, issue of unsolicited cards and insurance policies, and banks’ non-adherence to ‘fair practices’ or BCSBI (Banking Codes and Standards Board of India) codes. The BCSBI was set up a decade ago to supplement the ombudsman scheme. Hence, the wide non-adherence to these codes on the part of banks is inexcusable. What it highlights is the need for the RBI to follow up more stringently on ensuring that banks conform to norms.
Reviewing the scope of the ombudsman scheme and educating customers on the procedures to lodge complaints, will ensure that grievances that do find their way into the redressal system get resolved effectively. While the report shows that the scheme disposed 96 per cent of the complaints in 2014-15, rejections were as high as around two-thirds, because the solution to many of the grievances fell outside the jurisdiction of the banking ombudsman. The RBI advisory that banks have an internal redress mechanism to deal with the issue first-hand will work only if the process is streamlined for better results.

Q. Choose the word which is most SIMILAR in meaning of the word printed in underline as used in the passage.
Redress

Solution:

Redress means remedy or set right. So, compensation is the word which is similar in meaning to it.

QUESTION: 7

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words are given in underline to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

Public sector banks are back in focus, not for the steep rise in bad loans, but for customer complaints against them. At first glance, the Reserve Bank of India’s annual report on the Banking Ombudsman Scheme reveals that customers of PSBs had a litany of grievances, while patrons of private and foreign banks were quite content with the services offered to them. But one reason why PSBs account for about 65 per cent of the complaints is that these banks have a lion’s share — about three-fourths — of the loans and deposits in the banking system. If we consider the number of complaints per account or branch, nationalised banks, surprisingly, have fewer complaints than their private and foreign counterparts. Complaints from the rural and semi-urban population have witnessed an increase, implying the wider participation from these segments. But there is a lack of awareness about the ombudsman scheme or lack of access to it in these regions. While they account for about two-thirds of the bank branches in India, less than 30 per cent of the complaints were lodged from here.
Reporting such numbers only scratches the surface of the problem. The ombudsman scheme, which was launched two decades ago to provide a free grievance redress system in the face of rising complaints against banks, will now have to use the data to improve its functioning. Both the Centre and the regulator also need to act on longstanding grievances. For years now, debit/credit card operations (21 per cent of complaints) and unfair banking practices (29 per cent) have made up a large chunk of the complaints. Customers have had a laundry list of woes regarding failure of withdrawals from ATMs, issue of unsolicited cards and insurance policies, and banks’ non-adherence to ‘fair practices’ or BCSBI (Banking Codes and Standards Board of India) codes. The BCSBI was set up a decade ago to supplement the ombudsman scheme. Hence, the wide non-adherence to these codes on the part of banks is inexcusable. What it highlights is the need for the RBI to follow up more stringently on ensuring that banks conform to norms.
Reviewing the scope of the ombudsman scheme and educating customers on the procedures to lodge complaints, will ensure that grievances that do find their way into the redressal system get resolved effectively. While the report shows that the scheme disposed 96 per cent of the complaints in 2014-15, rejections were as high as around two-thirds, because the solution to many of the grievances fell outside the jurisdiction of the banking ombudsman. The RBI advisory that banks have an internal redress mechanism to deal with the issue first-hand will work only if the process is streamlined for better results.

Q. Choose the word which is most SIMILAR in meaning of the word printed in underline as used in the passage.
Longstanding

Solution:

Longstanding means having existed or continued for a long time. So, abiding is the word which is similar in meaning to it.

QUESTION: 8

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words are given in underline to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

Public sector banks are back in focus, not for the steep rise in bad loans, but for customer complaints against them. At first glance, the Reserve Bank of India’s annual report on the Banking Ombudsman Scheme reveals that customers of PSBs had a litany of grievances, while patrons of private and foreign banks were quite content with the services offered to them. But one reason why PSBs account for about 65 per cent of the complaints is that these banks have a lion’s share — about three-fourths — of the loans and deposits in the banking system. If we consider the number of complaints per account or branch, nationalised banks, surprisingly, have fewer complaints than their private and foreign counterparts. Complaints from the rural and semi-urban population have witnessed an increase, implying the wider participation from these segments. But there is a lack of awareness about the ombudsman scheme or lack of access to it in these regions. While they account for about two-thirds of the bank branches in India, less than 30 per cent of the complaints were lodged from here.
Reporting such numbers only scratches the surface of the problem. The ombudsman scheme, which was launched two decades ago to provide a free grievance redress system in the face of rising complaints against banks, will now have to use the data to improve its functioning. Both the Centre and the regulator also need to act on longstanding grievances. For years now, debit/credit card operations (21 per cent of complaints) and unfair banking practices (29 per cent) have made up a large chunk of the complaints. Customers have had a laundry list of woes regarding failure of withdrawals from ATMs, issue of unsolicited cards and insurance policies, and banks’ non-adherence to ‘fair practices’ or BCSBI (Banking Codes and Standards Board of India) codes. The BCSBI was set up a decade ago to supplement the ombudsman scheme. Hence, the wide non-adherence to these codes on the part of banks is inexcusable. What it highlights is the need for the RBI to follow up more stringently on ensuring that banks conform to norms.
Reviewing the scope of the ombudsman scheme and educating customers on the procedures to lodge complaints, will ensure that grievances that do find their way into the redressal system get resolved effectively. While the report shows that the scheme disposed 96 per cent of the complaints in 2014-15, rejections were as high as around two-thirds, because the solution to many of the grievances fell outside the jurisdiction of the banking ombudsman. The RBI advisory that banks have an internal redress mechanism to deal with the issue first-hand will work only if the process is streamlined for better results

Q. Choose the word which is most OPPOSITE in meaning of the word printed in underline as used in the passage.
Ensure

Solution:

Ensure means make certain that (something) will occur or be the case. So, endanger is the word which is opposite in meaning to it.

QUESTION: 9

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words are given in underline to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.​

Public sector banks are back in focus, not for the steep rise in bad loans, but for customer complaints against them. At first glance, the Reserve Bank of India’s annual report on the Banking Ombudsman Scheme reveals that customers of PSBs had a litany of grievances, while patrons of private and foreign banks were quite content with the services offered to them. But one reason why PSBs account for about 65 per cent of the complaints is that these banks have a lion’s share — about three-fourths — of the loans and deposits in the banking system. If we consider the number of complaints per account or branch, nationalised banks, surprisingly, have fewer complaints than their private and foreign counterparts. Complaints from the rural and semi-urban population have witnessed an increase, implying the wider participation from these segments. But there is a lack of awareness about the ombudsman scheme or lack of access to it in these regions. While they account for about two-thirds of the bank branches in India, less than 30 per cent of the complaints were lodged from here.
Reporting such numbers only scratches the surface of the problem. The ombudsman scheme, which was launched two decades ago to provide a free grievance redress system in the face of rising complaints against banks, will now have to use the data to improve its functioning. Both the Centre and the regulator also need to act on longstanding grievances. For years now, debit/credit card operations (21 per cent of complaints) and unfair banking practices (29 per cent) have made up a large chunk of the complaints. Customers have had a laundry list of woes regarding failure of withdrawals from ATMs, issue of unsolicited cards and insurance policies, and banks’ non-adherence to ‘fair practices’ or BCSBI (Banking Codes and Standards Board of India) codes. The BCSBI was set up a decade ago to supplement the ombudsman scheme. Hence, the wide non-adherence to these codes on the part of banks is inexcusable. What it highlights is the need for the RBI to follow up more stringently on ensuring that banks conform to norms.
Reviewing the scope of the ombudsman scheme and educating customers on the procedures to lodge complaints, will ensure that grievances that do find their way into the redressal system get resolved effectively. While the report shows that the scheme disposed 96 per cent of the complaints in 2014-15, rejections were as high as around two-thirds, because the solution to many of the grievances fell outside the jurisdiction of the banking ombudsman. The RBI advisory that banks have an internal redress mechanism to deal with the issue first-hand will work only if the process is streamlined for better results.

Q. Choose the word which is most OPPOSITE in meaning of the word printed in underline as used in the passage.
Stringent

Solution:

Stringent means strict, precise, and exacting. So, easy going is the word which is opposite in meaning to it.

QUESTION: 10

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words are given in underline to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.​

Public sector banks are back in focus, not for the steep rise in bad loans, but for customer complaints against them. At first glance, the Reserve Bank of India’s annual report on the Banking Ombudsman Scheme reveals that customers of PSBs had a litany of grievances, while patrons of private and foreign banks were quite content with the services offered to them. But one reason why PSBs account for about 65 per cent of the complaints is that these banks have a lion’s share — about three-fourths — of the loans and deposits in the banking system. If we consider the number of complaints per account or branch, nationalised banks, surprisingly, have fewer complaints than their private and foreign counterparts. Complaints from the rural and semi-urban population have witnessed an increase, implying the wider participation from these segments. But there is a lack of awareness about the ombudsman scheme or lack of access to it in these regions. While they account for about two-thirds of the bank branches in India, less than 30 per cent of the complaints were lodged from here.
Reporting such numbers only scratches the surface of the problem. The ombudsman scheme, which was launched two decades ago to provide a free grievance redress system in the face of rising complaints against banks, will now have to use the data to improve its functioning. Both the Centre and the regulator also need to act on longstanding grievances. For years now, debit/credit card operations (21 per cent of complaints) and unfair banking practices (29 per cent) have made up a large chunk of the complaints. Customers have had a laundry list of woes regarding failure of withdrawals from ATMs, issue of unsolicited cards and insurance policies, and banks’ non-adherence to ‘fair practices’ or BCSBI (Banking Codes and Standards Board of India) codes. The BCSBI was set up a decade ago to supplement the ombudsman scheme. Hence, the wide non-adherence to these codes on the part of banks is inexcusable. What it highlights is the need for the RBI to follow up more stringently on ensuring that banks conform to norms.
Reviewing the scope of the ombudsman scheme and educating customers on the procedures to lodge complaints, will ensure that grievances that do find their way into the redressal system get resolved effectively. While the report shows that the scheme disposed 96 per cent of the complaints in 2014-15, rejections were as high as around two-thirds, because the solution to many of the grievances fell outside the jurisdiction of the banking ombudsman. The RBI advisory that banks have an internal redress mechanism to deal with the issue first-hand will work only if the process is streamlined for better results.

Q. Choose the word which is most OPPOSITE in meaning of the word printed in underline as used in the passage.
Chunk

Solution:

Chunk means piece of something. So, whole is the word which is opposite in meaning to it.

QUESTION: 11

Pick out the most effective word from the given words to fill in the blanks to make the sentence meaningfully complete.
Q. It is ______to the tolerance of our country's religion based-majority society that it hosts several ______ communities of other faiths.

Solution:

‘testament , flourishing’ is the correct use.
Testament- something that serves as a sign or evidence of a specified fact, event, or quality.
Flourishing- developing rapidly and successfully

QUESTION: 12

Pick out the most effective word from the given words to fill in the blanks to make the sentence meaningfully complete.

Q. Acting is an _______ passion that can only be ____ and humanized by its brutal confrontation with reality.

Solution:

‘Insatiable, digested’ is the correct use.
Insatiable- impossible to satisfy.

QUESTION: 13

Pick out the most effective word from the given words to fill in the blanks to make the sentence meaningfully complete.

Q. Our engineers are currently examining ______to build the country's first ecological city with buildings ______ private and public heated by burning shells.

Solution:

‘Plans, both’ is the correct use.

QUESTION: 14

Pick out the most effective word from the given words to fill in the blanks to make the sentence meaningfully complete.
Q. Public would do well to ______ at this point that for the last 10 years we have ________ a single coalition governing at the centre without a break.

Solution:

‘Recall, had’ is the correct use.

QUESTION: 15

Pick out the most effective word from the given words to fill in the blanks to make the sentence meaningfully complete.
​Q. This is one of the most plausible and _____ arguments, I have ____ in a while.

Solution:

‘Cynical, heard’ is the correct use.
Cynical- concerned only with one's own interests and typically disregarding accepted standards in order to achieve them.

QUESTION: 16

 Which of the phrases (A), (B), (C), (D) given below each sentence should replace the phrase printed in underline type to make the sentence grammatically correct? If the sentence is correct as it is mark (E) i.e. ‘No correction required’ as the answer.
Q. When it come to alternate modes of transport, the Delhi Metro tops the list.

Solution:

Replace ‘come to alternate’ with ‘comes to alternate’

QUESTION: 17

Which of the phrases (A), (B), (C), (D) given below each sentence should replace the phrase printed in underline type to make the sentence grammatically correct? If the sentence is correct as it is mark (E) i.e. ‘No correction required’ as the answer.
Q. The actor may have spent as many as 146 days on parole or furlough.

Solution:
QUESTION: 18

Which of the phrases (A), (B), (C), (D) given below each sentence should replace the phrase printed in underline type to make the sentence grammatically correct? If the sentence is correct as it is mark (E) i.e. ‘No correction required’ as the answer.
Q. An honest introspection should reveal the need for utilise public infrastructure budgets more effectively.

Solution:

Replace ‘need for utilise’ with ‘need to utilise’.

QUESTION: 19

Which of the phrases (A), (B), (C), (D) given below each sentence should replace the phrase printed in underline type to make the sentence grammatically correct? If the sentence is correct as it is mark (E) i.e. ‘No correction required’ as the answer.
​Q. Despite public investments have started to gain traction, this is yet to reflect in the performance of investment-linked sectors.

Solution:

Replace ‘Despite public’ with ‘though public’.

QUESTION: 20

Which of the phrases (A), (B), (C), (D) given below each sentence should replace the phrase printed in underline type to make the sentence grammatically correct? If the sentence is correct as it is mark (E) i.e. ‘No correction required’ as the answer.
Q. Another six months or so were spent in working out the amount of Central fund.

Solution:

No correction required.

QUESTION: 21

Rearrange the following six sentences (A), (B), (C), (D), (E) and (F) in the proper sequence to form a meaningful paragraph; then answer the questions given below them.
(A) The policy makers in most of the developing economies recognise this importance and have been implementing a host of programmes and measures to achieve rural development objectives.
(B) While some of these countries have achieved impressive results from those programmes and measures, others have failed to make a significant dent ' in the problem of persistent rural underdevelopment.
(C) The socio-economic disparities between rural and urban areas are widening and creating tremendous pressure on the social and economic fabric of many such developing economies.
(D) These factors, among many others, tend to highlight the importance of rural development.
(E) Although millions of rural people have escaped poverty as a result of rural development in many Asian countries, a large majority of rural people continue to suffer from persistent poverty.

Q. Which of the following should be the THIRD sentence after rearrangement?

Solution:
QUESTION: 22

Rearrange the following six sentences (A), (B), (C), (D), (E) and (F) in the proper sequence to form a meaningful paragraph; then answer the questions given below them.

(A) The policy makers in most of the developing economies recognise this importance and have been implementing a host of programmes and measures to achieve rural development objectives.
(B) While some of these countries have achieved impressive results from those programmes and measures, others have failed to make a significant dent ' in the problem of persistent rural underdevelopment.
(C) The socio-economic disparities between rural and urban areas are widening and creating tremendous pressure on the social and economic fabric of many such developing economies.
(D) These factors, among many others, tend to highlight the importance of rural development.
(E) Although millions of rural people have escaped poverty as a result of rural development in many Asian countries, a large majority of rural people continue to suffer from persistent poverty.

Q. Which of the following should be the LAST (FIFTH) sentence after rearrangement?

Solution:
QUESTION: 23

Rearrange the following six sentences (A), (B), (C), (D), (E) and (F) in the proper sequence to form a meaningful paragraph; then answer the questions given below them.

(A) The policy makers in most of the developing economies recognise this importance and have been implementing a host of programmes and measures to achieve rural development objectives.
(B) While some of these countries have achieved impressive results from those programmes and measures, others have failed to make a significant dent ' in the problem of persistent rural underdevelopment.
(C) The socio-economic disparities between rural and urban areas are widening and creating tremendous pressure on the social and economic fabric of many such developing economies.
(D) These factors, among many others, tend to highlight the importance of rural development.
(E) Although millions of rural people have escaped poverty as a result of rural development in many Asian countries, a large majority of rural people continue to suffer from persistent poverty.

​Q. Which of the following should be the FOURTH sentence after rearrangement?

Solution:
QUESTION: 24

Rearrange the following six sentences (A), (B), (C), (D), (E) and (F) in the proper sequence to form a meaningful paragraph; then answer the questions given below them.
(A) The policy makers in most of the developing economies recognise this importance and have been implementing a host of programmes and measures to achieve rural development objectives.
(B) While some of these countries have achieved impressive results from those programmes and measures, others have failed to make a significant dent ' in the problem of persistent rural underdevelopment.
(C) The socio-economic disparities between rural and urban areas are widening and creating tremendous pressure on the social and economic fabric of many such developing economies.
(D) These factors, among many others, tend to highlight the importance of rural development.
(E) Although millions of rural people have escaped poverty as a result of rural development in many Asian countries, a large majority of rural people continue to suffer from persistent poverty.
Q. Which of the following should be the FIRST sentence after rearrangement?

Solution:
QUESTION: 25

Rearrange the following six sentences (A), (B), (C), (D), (E) and (F) in the proper sequence to form a meaningful paragraph; then answer the questions given below them.

(A) The policy makers in most of the developing economies recognise this importance and have been implementing a host of programmes and measures to achieve rural development objectives.
(B) While some of these countries have achieved impressive results from those programmes and measures, others have failed to make a significant dent ' in the problem of persistent rural underdevelopment.
(C) The socio-economic disparities between rural and urban areas are widening and creating tremendous pressure on the social and economic fabric of many such developing economies.
(D) These factors, among many others, tend to highlight the importance of rural development.
(E) Although millions of rural people have escaped poverty as a result of rural development in many Asian countries, a large majority of rural people continue to suffer from persistent poverty.

​Q. Which of the following should be the SECOND sentence after rearrangement?

Solution:
QUESTION: 26

In the following passage some of the words have been left out each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraphs meaningfully complete.

The (26) functioning of the world economy should be allowed to (27) instead of destroying it with a war-like (28) created by the US and Britain which is uncalled for. Iraq has learnt (29) lessons after a decade of economic embargo and (30) of so many lives.

Solution:
QUESTION: 27

In the following passage some of the words have been left out each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraphs meaningfully complete.
The (26) functioning of the world economy should be allowed to (27) instead of destroying it with a war-like (28) created by the US and Britain which is uncalled for. Iraq has learnt (29) lessons after a decade of economic embargo and (30) of so many lives.

Solution:
QUESTION: 28

In the following passage some of the words have been left out each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraphs meaningfully complete.
The (26) functioning of the world economy should be allowed to (27) instead of destroying it with a war-like (28) created by the US and Britain which is uncalled for. Iraq has learnt (29) lessons after a decade of economic embargo and (30) of so many lives.

Solution:
QUESTION: 29

In the following passage some of the words have been left out each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraphs meaningfully complete.
The (26) functioning of the world economy should be allowed to (27) instead of destroying it with a war-like (28) created by the US and Britain which is uncalled for. Iraq has learnt (29) lessons after a decade of economic embargo and (30) of so many lives.

Solution:
QUESTION: 30

In the following passage some of the words have been left out each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraphs meaningfully complete.
The (26) functioning of the world economy should be allowed to (27) instead of destroying it with a war-like (28) created by the US and Britain which is uncalled for. Iraq has learnt (29) lessons after a decade of economic embargo and (30) of so many lives.

Solution: