NABARD English Language Practice: 3


30 Questions MCQ Test NABARD Assistant Manager Grade A Mock Test Series | NABARD English Language Practice: 3


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This mock test of NABARD English Language Practice: 3 for Banking Exams helps you for every Banking Exams entrance exam. This contains 30 Multiple Choice Questions for Banking Exams NABARD English Language Practice: 3 (mcq) to study with solutions a complete question bank. The solved questions answers in this NABARD English Language Practice: 3 quiz give you a good mix of easy questions and tough questions. Banking Exams students definitely take this NABARD English Language Practice: 3 exercise for a better result in the exam. You can find other NABARD English Language Practice: 3 extra questions, long questions & short questions for Banking Exams on EduRev as well by searching above.
QUESTION: 1

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been printed in underline to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

In February 2010 the Medical Council of India announced a major change in the regulation governing the establishment of medical colleges. With this change, corporate entities were permitted to open medical colleges. The new regulation also carried the following warning: “permission shall be with-drawn if the colleges resort to commercialization”. Since the regulation does not elaborate on what constitutes “resorting to commercialisation”, this will presumably be a matter left to the discretion of the Government.
A basic requirement for a new medical college is a pre-existing hospital that will serve as a teaching hospital. Corporate entities have hospitals in the major metros and that is where they will have to locate medical colleges. The earlier mandated land requirement for a medical college cam-pus, minimum of 25 acres of contiguous land, cannot be fulfilled in the metros. Not surprisingly, yet another tweak has been made in the regulation, prescribing 10 acres as the new mini-mum campus size for 9 cities including the main metros. With this, the stage is set for corporate entities to enter the medical education market.
Until now, medical education in India has been projected as a not for profit activity to be organised for the public good. While private bodies can run medical colleges, these can only be societies or trusts, legally non-profit organizations. In opening the door to corporate colleges, thus, a major policy change has been effected without changing the law or even a discussion in Parliament, but by simply getting a compliant MCI to change the regulation on establishment of medical colleges. This and other changes have been justified in the name of addressing the shortage of doctors. At the same time, over 50, existing medical colleges, including 15 run by the government, have been prohibited from admitting students in 2010 for having failed to meet the basic standards prescribed. Ninety per cent of these colleges have come up in the last 5 years. Particularly shocking is the phenomenon of government colleges falling short of standards approved by the Government. Why are state government institutions not able to meet the requirements that have been approved by the central government? A severe problem faced by government-run institutions is attracting and retaining teaching faculty, and this is likely to be among the major reasons for these colleges failing to satisfy the MCI norms. The crisis building up on the faculty front has been flagged by various commissions looking Into problems of medical education over the years.
An indicator of the crisis is the attempt to conjure up faculty when MCI carries out inspections of new colleges, one of its regulatory functions. Judging by news reports, the practice of presenting fake faculty-students or private medical practitioners hired for the day -during MCI inspections in private colleges is common. What is interesting is that even government colleges are adopting unscrupulous methods. An-other indicator is the extraordinary scheme, verging on the ridiculous that is being put in place by the MCI to make inspections ‘foolproof. Faculty in all medical colleges are to be issued an RFID based smart card by the MCI with a unique Faculty Number. The card, it is argued, will eliminate the possibility of a teacher being shown on the faculty of more than one college and establish if the qualifications of a teacher are genuine. In the future it is projected that biometric RFID readers will be in-stalled in the colleges that will enable a Faculty Identification, Tracking and Monitoring System to monitor faculty from within the college and even remotely from MCI headquarters.
The picture above does not even start to reveal the true and pathetic situation of medical care especially in rural India. Only a fraction of the doctors and nursing professionals serve rural areas where 70 per cent of our population lives. The Health Ministry, with the help of the MCI, has been active in proposing yet another ‘innovative’ solution to the problem of lack of doctors in the rural areas. The proposal is for a three-and-a-half year course to obtain the degree of Bachelor of Rural Medicine and Surgery (BRMS). Only rural candidates would be able to join this course. The study and training would happen at two different levels -Community Health Centers for 18 months, and sub-divisional hospitals for a further period of 2 years -and be conducted by retired professors. After completion of training, they would only be able to serve in their own state in district hospitals, community health centres, and primary health centres.
The BRMS proposal has invited sharp criticism from some doctors’ organisations on the grounds that it is discriminatory to have two different standards of health care one for urban and the other for rural areas, and that the health care provided by such graduates will be compromised. At the other end is the opinion expressed by some that “something is better than nothing”, that since doctors do not want to serve in rural areas, the government may as well create a new cadre of medics who will be obliged to serve there. The debate will surely pick up after the government formally lays out its plans. What is apparent is that neither this proposal nor the various stopgap measures adopted so far address the root of the problem of health care. The far larger issue is government policy, the low priority attached by the government to the social sector as a whole and the health sector in particular, evidenced in the paltry allocations for maintaining and upgrading medical infrastructure and medical education and for looking after precious human resources.

​Q. What solution is being offered by the Health Ministry for the shortage of doctors in rural areas ?

Solution:

“The proposal is for a three-and-a-half year course to obtain the degree of Bachelor of Rural Medicine and Surgery (BRMS).”

QUESTION: 2

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been printed in underline to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

In February 2010 the Medical Council of India announced a major change in the regulation governing the establishment of medical colleges. With this change, corporate entities were permitted to open medical colleges. The new regulation also carried the following warning: “permission shall be with-drawn if the colleges resort to commercialization”. Since the regulation does not elaborate on what constitutes “resorting to commercialisation”, this will presumably be a matter left to the discretion of the Government.
A basic requirement for a new medical college is a pre-existing hospital that will serve as a teaching hospital. Corporate entities have hospitals in the major metros and that is where they will have to locate medical colleges. The earlier mandated land requirement for a medical college cam-pus, minimum of 25 acres of contiguous land, cannot be fulfilled in the metros. Not surprisingly, yet another tweak has been made in the regulation, prescribing 10 acres as the new mini-mum campus size for 9 cities including the main metros. With this, the stage is set for corporate entities to enter the medical education market.
Until now, medical education in India has been projected as a not for profit activity to be organised for the public good. While private bodies can run medical colleges, these can only be societies or trusts, legally non-profit organizations. In opening the door to corporate colleges, thus, a major policy change has been effected without changing the law or even a discussion in Parliament, but by simply getting a compliant MCI to change the regulation on establishment of medical colleges. This and other changes have been justified in the name of addressing the shortage of doctors. At the same time, over 50, existing medical colleges, including 15 run by the government, have been prohibited from admitting students in 2010 for having failed to meet the basic standards prescribed. Ninety per cent of these colleges have come up in the last 5 years. Particularly shocking is the phenomenon of government colleges falling short of standards approved by the Government. Why are state government institutions not able to meet the requirements that have been approved by the central government? A severe problem faced by government-run institutions is attracting and retaining teaching faculty, and this is likely to be among the major reasons for these colleges failing to satisfy the MCI norms. The crisis building up on the faculty front has been flagged by various commissions looking Into problems of medical education over the years.
An indicator of the crisis is the attempt to conjure up faculty when MCI carries out inspections of new colleges, one of its regulatory functions. Judging by news reports, the practice of presenting fake faculty-students or private medical practitioners hired for the day -during MCI inspections in private colleges is common. What is interesting is that even government colleges are adopting unscrupulous methods. An-other indicator is the extraordinary scheme, verging on the ridiculous that is being put in place by the MCI to make inspections ‘foolproof. Faculty in all medical colleges are to be issued an RFID based smart card by the MCI with a unique Faculty Number. The card, it is argued, will eliminate the possibility of a teacher being shown on the faculty of more than one college and establish if the qualifications of a teacher are genuine. In the future it is projected that biometric RFID readers will be in-stalled in the colleges that will enable a Faculty Identification, Tracking and Monitoring System to monitor faculty from within the college and even remotely from MCI headquarters.
The picture above does not even start to reveal the true and pathetic situation of medical care especially in rural India. Only a fraction of the doctors and nursing professionals serve rural areas where 70 per cent of our population lives. The Health Ministry, with the help of the MCI, has been active in proposing yet another ‘innovative’ solution to the problem of lack of doctors in the rural areas. The proposal is for a three-and-a-half year course to obtain the degree of Bachelor of Rural Medicine and Surgery (BRMS). Only rural candidates would be able to join this course. The study and training would happen at two different levels -Community Health Centers for 18 months, and sub-divisional hospitals for a further period of 2 years -and be conducted by retired professors. After completion of training, they would only be able to serve in their own state in district hospitals, community health centres, and primary health centres.
The BRMS proposal has invited sharp criticism from some doctors’ organisations on the grounds that it is discriminatory to have two different standards of health care one for urban and the other for rural areas, and that the health care provided by such graduates will be compromised. At the other end is the opinion expressed by some that “something is better than nothing”, that since doctors do not want to serve in rural areas, the government may as well create a new cadre of medics who will be obliged to serve there. The debate will surely pick up after the government formally lays out its plans. What is apparent is that neither this proposal nor the various stopgap measures adopted so far address the root of the problem of health care. The far larger issue is government policy, the low priority attached by the government to the social sector as a whole and the health sector in particular, evidenced in the paltry allocations for maintaining and upgrading medical infrastructure and medical education and for looking after precious human resources.

​Q. Why have some existing medical colleges been prohibited from admitting students ?

Solution:

Refer to first paragraph of the passage.

QUESTION: 3

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been printed in underline to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

In February 2010 the Medical Council of India announced a major change in the regulation governing the establishment of medical colleges. With this change, corporate entities were permitted to open medical colleges. The new regulation also carried the following warning: “permission shall be with-drawn if the colleges resort to commercialization”. Since the regulation does not elaborate on what constitutes “resorting to commercialisation”, this will presumably be a matter left to the discretion of the Government.
A basic requirement for a new medical college is a pre-existing hospital that will serve as a teaching hospital. Corporate entities have hospitals in the major metros and that is where they will have to locate medical colleges. The earlier mandated land requirement for a medical college cam-pus, minimum of 25 acres of contiguous land, cannot be fulfilled in the metros. Not surprisingly, yet another tweak has been made in the regulation, prescribing 10 acres as the new mini-mum campus size for 9 cities including the main metros. With this, the stage is set for corporate entities to enter the medical education market.
Until now, medical education in India has been projected as a not for profit activity to be organised for the public good. While private bodies can run medical colleges, these can only be societies or trusts, legally non-profit organizations. In opening the door to corporate colleges, thus, a major policy change has been effected without changing the law or even a discussion in Parliament, but by simply getting a compliant MCI to change the regulation on establishment of medical colleges. This and other changes have been justified in the name of addressing the shortage of doctors. At the same time, over 50, existing medical colleges, including 15 run by the government, have been prohibited from admitting students in 2010 for having failed to meet the basic standards prescribed. Ninety per cent of these colleges have come up in the last 5 years. Particularly shocking is the phenomenon of government colleges falling short of standards approved by the Government. Why are state government institutions not able to meet the requirements that have been approved by the central government? A severe problem faced by government-run institutions is attracting and retaining teaching faculty, and this is likely to be among the major reasons for these colleges failing to satisfy the MCI norms. The crisis building up on the faculty front has been flagged by various commissions looking Into problems of medical education over the years.
An indicator of the crisis is the attempt to conjure up faculty when MCI carries out inspections of new colleges, one of its regulatory functions. Judging by news reports, the practice of presenting fake faculty-students or private medical practitioners hired for the day -during MCI inspections in private colleges is common. What is interesting is that even government colleges are adopting unscrupulous methods. An-other indicator is the extraordinary scheme, verging on the ridiculous that is being put in place by the MCI to make inspections ‘foolproof. Faculty in all medical colleges are to be issued an RFID based smart card by the MCI with a unique Faculty Number. The card, it is argued, will eliminate the possibility of a teacher being shown on the faculty of more than one college and establish if the qualifications of a teacher are genuine. In the future it is projected that biometric RFID readers will be in-stalled in the colleges that will enable a Faculty Identification, Tracking and Monitoring System to monitor faculty from within the college and even remotely from MCI headquarters.
The picture above does not even start to reveal the true and pathetic situation of medical care especially in rural India. Only a fraction of the doctors and nursing professionals serve rural areas where 70 per cent of our population lives. The Health Ministry, with the help of the MCI, has been active in proposing yet another ‘innovative’ solution to the problem of lack of doctors in the rural areas. The proposal is for a three-and-a-half year course to obtain the degree of Bachelor of Rural Medicine and Surgery (BRMS). Only rural candidates would be able to join this course. The study and training would happen at two different levels -Community Health Centers for 18 months, and sub-divisional hospitals for a further period of 2 years -and be conducted by retired professors. After completion of training, they would only be able to serve in their own state in district hospitals, community health centres, and primary health centres.
The BRMS proposal has invited sharp criticism from some doctors’ organisations on the grounds that it is discriminatory to have two different standards of health care one for urban and the other for rural areas, and that the health care provided by such graduates will be compromised. At the other end is the opinion expressed by some that “something is better than nothing”, that since doctors do not want to serve in rural areas, the government may as well create a new cadre of medics who will be obliged to serve there. The debate will surely pick up after the government formally lays out its plans. What is apparent is that neither this proposal nor the various stopgap measures adopted so far address the root of the problem of health care. The far larger issue is government policy, the low priority attached by the government to the social sector as a whole and the health sector in particular, evidenced in the paltry allocations for maintaining and upgrading medical infrastructure and medical education and for looking after precious human resources.

Q. Which of the following is/are the change/s announced by the MCI in the regulation governing the establishment of medical colleges?
(A)Allowing the commercialisation of medical colleges.
(B)Reducing the earlier mandated land requirement for a medical college campus for metros.
(C)Allowing corporate bodies to open medical colleges.

Solution:

Refer to last two sentences of second paragraph.

QUESTION: 4

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been printed in underline to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

In February 2010 the Medical Council of India announced a major change in the regulation governing the establishment of medical colleges. With this change, corporate entities were permitted to open medical colleges. The new regulation also carried the following warning: “permission shall be with-drawn if the colleges resort to commercialization”. Since the regulation does not elaborate on what constitutes “resorting to commercialisation”, this will presumably be a matter left to the discretion of the Government.
A basic requirement for a new medical college is a pre-existing hospital that will serve as a teaching hospital. Corporate entities have hospitals in the major metros and that is where they will have to locate medical colleges. The earlier mandated land requirement for a medical college cam-pus, minimum of 25 acres of contiguous land, cannot be fulfilled in the metros. Not surprisingly, yet another tweak has been made in the regulation, prescribing 10 acres as the new mini-mum campus size for 9 cities including the main metros. With this, the stage is set for corporate entities to enter the medical education market.
Until now, medical education in India has been projected as a not for profit activity to be organised for the public good. While private bodies can run medical colleges, these can only be societies or trusts, legally non-profit organizations. In opening the door to corporate colleges, thus, a major policy change has been effected without changing the law or even a discussion in Parliament, but by simply getting a compliant MCI to change the regulation on establishment of medical colleges. This and other changes have been justified in the name of addressing the shortage of doctors. At the same time, over 50, existing medical colleges, including 15 run by the government, have been prohibited from admitting students in 2010 for having failed to meet the basic standards prescribed. Ninety per cent of these colleges have come up in the last 5 years. Particularly shocking is the phenomenon of government colleges falling short of standards approved by the Government. Why are state government institutions not able to meet the requirements that have been approved by the central government? A severe problem faced by government-run institutions is attracting and retaining teaching faculty, and this is likely to be among the major reasons for these colleges failing to satisfy the MCI norms. The crisis building up on the faculty front has been flagged by various commissions looking Into problems of medical education over the years.
An indicator of the crisis is the attempt to conjure up faculty when MCI carries out inspections of new colleges, one of its regulatory functions. Judging by news reports, the practice of presenting fake faculty-students or private medical practitioners hired for the day -during MCI inspections in private colleges is common. What is interesting is that even government colleges are adopting unscrupulous methods. An-other indicator is the extraordinary scheme, verging on the ridiculous that is being put in place by the MCI to make inspections ‘foolproof. Faculty in all medical colleges are to be issued an RFID based smart card by the MCI with a unique Faculty Number. The card, it is argued, will eliminate the possibility of a teacher being shown on the faculty of more than one college and establish if the qualifications of a teacher are genuine. In the future it is projected that biometric RFID readers will be in-stalled in the colleges that will enable a Faculty Identification, Tracking and Monitoring System to monitor faculty from within the college and even remotely from MCI headquarters.
The picture above does not even start to reveal the true and pathetic situation of medical care especially in rural India. Only a fraction of the doctors and nursing professionals serve rural areas where 70 per cent of our population lives. The Health Ministry, with the help of the MCI, has been active in proposing yet another ‘innovative’ solution to the problem of lack of doctors in the rural areas. The proposal is for a three-and-a-half year course to obtain the degree of Bachelor of Rural Medicine and Surgery (BRMS). Only rural candidates would be able to join this course. The study and training would happen at two different levels -Community Health Centers for 18 months, and sub-divisional hospitals for a further period of 2 years -and be conducted by retired professors. After completion of training, they would only be able to serve in their own state in district hospitals, community health centres, and primary health centres.
The BRMS proposal has invited sharp criticism from some doctors’ organisations on the grounds that it is discriminatory to have two different standards of health care one for urban and the other for rural areas, and that the health care provided by such graduates will be compromised. At the other end is the opinion expressed by some that “something is better than nothing”, that since doctors do not want to serve in rural areas, the government may as well create a new cadre of medics who will be obliged to serve there. The debate will surely pick up after the government formally lays out its plans. What is apparent is that neither this proposal nor the various stopgap measures adopted so far address the root of the problem of health care. The far larger issue is government policy, the low priority attached by the government to the social sector as a whole and the health sector in particular, evidenced in the paltry allocations for maintaining and upgrading medical infrastructure and medical education and for looking after precious human resources.

Q. Which of the following are the different opinions regarding the BRMS proposal ?
1. At least a small step has been taken to improve the healthcare facilities in the rural areas through this proposal.

2. There should be uniform healthcare facilities available for people living in both rural and urban areas.

3. The healthcare providers through this proposal would not be up to the mark.

Solution:

Refer to last paragraph of the passage.

QUESTION: 5

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been printed in underline to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

In February 2010 the Medical Council of India announced a major change in the regulation governing the establishment of medical colleges. With this change, corporate entities were permitted to open medical colleges. The new regulation also carried the following warning: “permission shall be with-drawn if the colleges resort to commercialization”. Since the regulation does not elaborate on what constitutes “resorting to commercialisation”, this will presumably be a matter left to the discretion of the Government.
A basic requirement for a new medical college is a pre-existing hospital that will serve as a teaching hospital. Corporate entities have hospitals in the major metros and that is where they will have to locate medical colleges. The earlier mandated land requirement for a medical college cam-pus, minimum of 25 acres of contiguous land, cannot be fulfilled in the metros. Not surprisingly, yet another tweak has been made in the regulation, prescribing 10 acres as the new mini-mum campus size for 9 cities including the main metros. With this, the stage is set for corporate entities to enter the medical education market.
Until now, medical education in India has been projected as a not for profit activity to be organised for the public good. While private bodies can run medical colleges, these can only be societies or trusts, legally non-profit organizations. In opening the door to corporate colleges, thus, a major policy change has been effected without changing the law or even a discussion in Parliament, but by simply getting a compliant MCI to change the regulation on establishment of medical colleges. This and other changes have been justified in the name of addressing the shortage of doctors. At the same time, over 50, existing medical colleges, including 15 run by the government, have been prohibited from admitting students in 2010 for having failed to meet the basic standards prescribed. Ninety per cent of these colleges have come up in the last 5 years. Particularly shocking is the phenomenon of government colleges falling short of standards approved by the Government. Why are state government institutions not able to meet the requirements that have been approved by the central government? A severe problem faced by government-run institutions is attracting and retaining teaching faculty, and this is likely to be among the major reasons for these colleges failing to satisfy the MCI norms. The crisis building up on the faculty front has been flagged by various commissions looking Into problems of medical education over the years.
An indicator of the crisis is the attempt to conjure up faculty when MCI carries out inspections of new colleges, one of its regulatory functions. Judging by news reports, the practice of presenting fake faculty-students or private medical practitioners hired for the day -during MCI inspections in private colleges is common. What is interesting is that even government colleges are adopting unscrupulous methods. An-other indicator is the extraordinary scheme, verging on the ridiculous that is being put in place by the MCI to make inspections ‘foolproof. Faculty in all medical colleges are to be issued an RFID based smart card by the MCI with a unique Faculty Number. The card, it is argued, will eliminate the possibility of a teacher being shown on the faculty of more than one college and establish if the qualifications of a teacher are genuine. In the future it is projected that biometric RFID readers will be in-stalled in the colleges that will enable a Faculty Identification, Tracking and Monitoring System to monitor faculty from within the college and even remotely from MCI headquarters.
The picture above does not even start to reveal the true and pathetic situation of medical care especially in rural India. Only a fraction of the doctors and nursing professionals serve rural areas where 70 per cent of our population lives. The Health Ministry, with the help of the MCI, has been active in proposing yet another ‘innovative’ solution to the problem of lack of doctors in the rural areas. The proposal is for a three-and-a-half year course to obtain the degree of Bachelor of Rural Medicine and Surgery (BRMS). Only rural candidates would be able to join this course. The study and training would happen at two different levels -Community Health Centers for 18 months, and sub-divisional hospitals for a further period of 2 years -and be conducted by retired professors. After completion of training, they would only be able to serve in their own state in district hospitals, community health centres, and primary health centres.
The BRMS proposal has invited sharp criticism from some doctors’ organisations on the grounds that it is discriminatory to have two different standards of health care one for urban and the other for rural areas, and that the health care provided by such graduates will be compromised. At the other end is the opinion expressed by some that “something is better than nothing”, that since doctors do not want to serve in rural areas, the government may as well create a new cadre of medics who will be obliged to serve there. The debate will surely pick up after the government formally lays out its plans. What is apparent is that neither this proposal nor the various stopgap measures adopted so far address the root of the problem of health care. The far larger issue is government policy, the low priority attached by the government to the social sector as a whole and the health sector in particular, evidenced in the paltry allocations for maintaining and upgrading medical infrastructure and medical education and for looking after precious human resources.

Q. What is the idea behind the MCI putting in place the RFID-based smart card ?
(A)To monitor and track faculty from MCI headquarters in the future.
(B)To put a stop to the practice of colleges of presenting fake faculty members.
(C)To verify the authenticity of faculty member qualifications.

Solution:

“The card, it is argued, will eliminate the possibility of a teacher being shown on the faculty of more than one college and establish if the qualifications of a teacher are genuine.”

QUESTION: 6

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been printed in underline to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

In February 2010 the Medical Council of India announced a major change in the regulation governing the establishment of medical colleges. With this change, corporate entities were permitted to open medical colleges. The new regulation also carried the following warning: “permission shall be with-drawn if the colleges resort to commercialization”. Since the regulation does not elaborate on what constitutes “resorting to commercialisation”, this will presumably be a matter left to the discretion of the Government.
A basic requirement for a new medical college is a pre-existing hospital that will serve as a teaching hospital. Corporate entities have hospitals in the major metros and that is where they will have to locate medical colleges. The earlier mandated land requirement for a medical college cam-pus, minimum of 25 acres of contiguous land, cannot be fulfilled in the metros. Not surprisingly, yet another tweak has been made in the regulation, prescribing 10 acres as the new mini-mum campus size for 9 cities including the main metros. With this, the stage is set for corporate entities to enter the medical education market.
Until now, medical education in India has been projected as a not for profit activity to be organised for the public good. While private bodies can run medical colleges, these can only be societies or trusts, legally non-profit organizations. In opening the door to corporate colleges, thus, a major policy change has been effected without changing the law or even a discussion in Parliament, but by simply getting a compliant MCI to change the regulation on establishment of medical colleges. This and other changes have been justified in the name of addressing the shortage of doctors. At the same time, over 50, existing medical colleges, including 15 run by the government, have been prohibited from admitting students in 2010 for having failed to meet the basic standards prescribed. Ninety per cent of these colleges have come up in the last 5 years. Particularly shocking is the phenomenon of government colleges falling short of standards approved by the Government. Why are state government institutions not able to meet the requirements that have been approved by the central government? A severe problem faced by government-run institutions is attracting and retaining teaching faculty, and this is likely to be among the major reasons for these colleges failing to satisfy the MCI norms. The crisis building up on the faculty front has been flagged by various commissions looking Into problems of medical education over the years.
An indicator of the crisis is the attempt to conjure up faculty when MCI carries out inspections of new colleges, one of its regulatory functions. Judging by news reports, the practice of presenting fake faculty-students or private medical practitioners hired for the day -during MCI inspections in private colleges is common. What is interesting is that even government colleges are adopting unscrupulous methods. An-other indicator is the extraordinary scheme, verging on the ridiculous that is being put in place by the MCI to make inspections ‘foolproof. Faculty in all medical colleges are to be issued an RFID based smart card by the MCI with a unique Faculty Number. The card, it is argued, will eliminate the possibility of a teacher being shown on the faculty of more than one college and establish if the qualifications of a teacher are genuine. In the future it is projected that biometric RFID readers will be in-stalled in the colleges that will enable a Faculty Identification, Tracking and Monitoring System to monitor faculty from within the college and even remotely from MCI headquarters.
The picture above does not even start to reveal the true and pathetic situation of medical care especially in rural India. Only a fraction of the doctors and nursing professionals serve rural areas where 70 per cent of our population lives. The Health Ministry, with the help of the MCI, has been active in proposing yet another ‘innovative’ solution to the problem of lack of doctors in the rural areas. The proposal is for a three-and-a-half year course to obtain the degree of Bachelor of Rural Medicine and Surgery (BRMS). Only rural candidates would be able to join this course. The study and training would happen at two different levels -Community Health Centers for 18 months, and sub-divisional hospitals for a further period of 2 years -and be conducted by retired professors. After completion of training, they would only be able to serve in their own state in district hospitals, community health centres, and primary health centres.
The BRMS proposal has invited sharp criticism from some doctors’ organisations on the grounds that it is discriminatory to have two different standards of health care one for urban and the other for rural areas, and that the health care provided by such graduates will be compromised. At the other end is the opinion expressed by some that “something is better than nothing”, that since doctors do not want to serve in rural areas, the government may as well create a new cadre of medics who will be obliged to serve there. The debate will surely pick up after the government formally lays out its plans. What is apparent is that neither this proposal nor the various stopgap measures adopted so far address the root of the problem of health care. The far larger issue is government policy, the low priority attached by the government to the social sector as a whole and the health sector in particular, evidenced in the paltry allocations for maintaining and upgrading medical infrastructure and medical education and for looking after precious human resources.

Q. What is the author's main intention behind writing this passage?

Solution:

Refer to last passage of the paragraph.

QUESTION: 7

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been printed in underline to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

In February 2010 the Medical Council of India announced a major change in the regulation governing the establishment of medical colleges. With this change, corporate entities were permitted to open medical colleges. The new regulation also carried the following warning: “permission shall be with-drawn if the colleges resort to commercialization”. Since the regulation does not elaborate on what constitutes “resorting to commercialisation”, this will presumably be a matter left to the discretion of the Government.
A basic requirement for a new medical college is a pre-existing hospital that will serve as a teaching hospital. Corporate entities have hospitals in the major metros and that is where they will have to locate medical colleges. The earlier mandated land requirement for a medical college cam-pus, minimum of 25 acres of contiguous land, cannot be fulfilled in the metros. Not surprisingly, yet another tweak has been made in the regulation, prescribing 10 acres as the new mini-mum campus size for 9 cities including the main metros. With this, the stage is set for corporate entities to enter the medical education market.
Until now, medical education in India has been projected as a not for profit activity to be organised for the public good. While private bodies can run medical colleges, these can only be societies or trusts, legally non-profit organizations. In opening the door to corporate colleges, thus, a major policy change has been effected without changing the law or even a discussion in Parliament, but by simply getting a compliant MCI to change the regulation on establishment of medical colleges. This and other changes have been justified in the name of addressing the shortage of doctors. At the same time, over 50, existing medical colleges, including 15 run by the government, have been prohibited from admitting students in 2010 for having failed to meet the basic standards prescribed. Ninety per cent of these colleges have come up in the last 5 years. Particularly shocking is the phenomenon of government colleges falling short of standards approved by the Government. Why are state government institutions not able to meet the requirements that have been approved by the central government? A severe problem faced by government-run institutions is attracting and retaining teaching faculty, and this is likely to be among the major reasons for these colleges failing to satisfy the MCI norms. The crisis building up on the faculty front has been flagged by various commissions looking Into problems of medical education over the years.
An indicator of the crisis is the attempt to conjure up faculty when MCI carries out inspections of new colleges, one of its regulatory functions. Judging by news reports, the practice of presenting fake faculty-students or private medical practitioners hired for the day -during MCI inspections in private colleges is common. What is interesting is that even government colleges are adopting unscrupulous methods. An-other indicator is the extraordinary scheme, verging on the ridiculous that is being put in place by the MCI to make inspections ‘foolproof. Faculty in all medical colleges are to be issued an RFID based smart card by the MCI with a unique Faculty Number. The card, it is argued, will eliminate the possibility of a teacher being shown on the faculty of more than one college and establish if the qualifications of a teacher are genuine. In the future it is projected that biometric RFID readers will be in-stalled in the colleges that will enable a Faculty Identification, Tracking and Monitoring System to monitor faculty from within the college and even remotely from MCI headquarters.
The picture above does not even start to reveal the true and pathetic situation of medical care especially in rural India. Only a fraction of the doctors and nursing professionals serve rural areas where 70 per cent of our population lives. The Health Ministry, with the help of the MCI, has been active in proposing yet another ‘innovative’ solution to the problem of lack of doctors in the rural areas. The proposal is for a three-and-a-half year course to obtain the degree of Bachelor of Rural Medicine and Surgery (BRMS). Only rural candidates would be able to join this course. The study and training would happen at two different levels -Community Health Centers for 18 months, and sub-divisional hospitals for a further period of 2 years -and be conducted by retired professors. After completion of training, they would only be able to serve in their own state in district hospitals, community health centres, and primary health centres.
The BRMS proposal has invited sharp criticism from some doctors’ organisations on the grounds that it is discriminatory to have two different standards of health care one for urban and the other for rural areas, and that the health care provided by such graduates will be compromised. At the other end is the opinion expressed by some that “something is better than nothing”, that since doctors do not want to serve in rural areas, the government may as well create a new cadre of medics who will be obliged to serve there. The debate will surely pick up after the government formally lays out its plans. What is apparent is that neither this proposal nor the various stopgap measures adopted so far address the root of the problem of health care. The far larger issue is government policy, the low priority attached by the government to the social sector as a whole and the health sector in particular, evidenced in the paltry allocations for maintaining and upgrading medical infrastructure and medical education and for looking after precious human resources.

Q. Choose the word/group of words which is most similar in meaning to the word/ group of words printed in underline as used in the passage.
PERMITTED

Solution:

PERMITTED means to allow somebody to do something or to allow something to open. So, allowed is the word which is similar in meaning to it.

QUESTION: 8

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been printed in underline to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

In February 2010 the Medical Council of India announced a major change in the regulation governing the establishment of medical colleges. With this change, corporate entities were permitted to open medical colleges. The new regulation also carried the following warning: “permission shall be with-drawn if the colleges resort to commercialization”. Since the regulation does not elaborate on what constitutes “resorting to commercialisation”, this will presumably be a matter left to the discretion of the Government.
A basic requirement for a new medical college is a pre-existing hospital that will serve as a teaching hospital. Corporate entities have hospitals in the major metros and that is where they will have to locate medical colleges. The earlier mandated land requirement for a medical college cam-pus, minimum of 25 acres of contiguous land, cannot be fulfilled in the metros. Not surprisingly, yet another tweak has been made in the regulation, prescribing 10 acres as the new mini-mum campus size for 9 cities including the main metros. With this, the stage is set for corporate entities to enter the medical education market.
Until now, medical education in India has been projected as a not for profit activity to be organised for the public good. While private bodies can run medical colleges, these can only be societies or trusts, legally non-profit organizations. In opening the door to corporate colleges, thus, a major policy change has been effected without changing the law or even a discussion in Parliament, but by simply getting a compliant MCI to change the regulation on establishment of medical colleges. This and other changes have been justified in the name of addressing the shortage of doctors. At the same time, over 50, existing medical colleges, including 15 run by the government, have been prohibited from admitting students in 2010 for having failed to meet the basic standards prescribed. Ninety per cent of these colleges have come up in the last 5 years. Particularly shocking is the phenomenon of government colleges falling short of standards approved by the Government. Why are state government institutions not able to meet the requirements that have been approved by the central government? A severe problem faced by government-run institutions is attracting and retaining teaching faculty, and this is likely to be among the major reasons for these colleges failing to satisfy the MCI norms. The crisis building up on the faculty front has been flagged by various commissions looking Into problems of medical education over the years.
An indicator of the crisis is the attempt to conjure up faculty when MCI carries out inspections of new colleges, one of its regulatory functions. Judging by news reports, the practice of presenting fake faculty-students or private medical practitioners hired for the day -during MCI inspections in private colleges is common. What is interesting is that even government colleges are adopting unscrupulous methods. An-other indicator is the extraordinary scheme, verging on the ridiculous that is being put in place by the MCI to make inspections ‘foolproof. Faculty in all medical colleges are to be issued an RFID based smart card by the MCI with a unique Faculty Number. The card, it is argued, will eliminate the possibility of a teacher being shown on the faculty of more than one college and establish if the qualifications of a teacher are genuine. In the future it is projected that biometric RFID readers will be in-stalled in the colleges that will enable a Faculty Identification, Tracking and Monitoring System to monitor faculty from within the college and even remotely from MCI headquarters.
The picture above does not even start to reveal the true and pathetic situation of medical care especially in rural India. Only a fraction of the doctors and nursing professionals serve rural areas where 70 per cent of our population lives. The Health Ministry, with the help of the MCI, has been active in proposing yet another ‘innovative’ solution to the problem of lack of doctors in the rural areas. The proposal is for a three-and-a-half year course to obtain the degree of Bachelor of Rural Medicine and Surgery (BRMS). Only rural candidates would be able to join this course. The study and training would happen at two different levels -Community Health Centers for 18 months, and sub-divisional hospitals for a further period of 2 years -and be conducted by retired professors. After completion of training, they would only be able to serve in their own state in district hospitals, community health centres, and primary health centres.
The BRMS proposal has invited sharp criticism from some doctors’ organisations on the grounds that it is discriminatory to have two different standards of health care one for urban and the other for rural areas, and that the health care provided by such graduates will be compromised. At the other end is the opinion expressed by some that “something is better than nothing”, that since doctors do not want to serve in rural areas, the government may as well create a new cadre of medics who will be obliged to serve there. The debate will surely pick up after the government formally lays out its plans. What is apparent is that neither this proposal nor the various stopgap measures adopted so far address the root of the problem of health care. The far larger issue is government policy, the low priority attached by the government to the social sector as a whole and the health sector in particular, evidenced in the paltry allocations for maintaining and upgrading medical infrastructure and medical education and for looking after precious human resources.

Q. Choose the word/group of words which is most similar in meaning to the word/ group of words printed in underline as used in the passage.

SHOCKING

Solution:

SHOCKING means very bad; that offends or upsets people; that is morally wrong. So, appalling is the word which is similar in meaning to it.

QUESTION: 9

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been printed in underline to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

In February 2010 the Medical Council of India announced a major change in the regulation governing the establishment of medical colleges. With this change, corporate entities were permitted to open medical colleges. The new regulation also carried the following warning: “permission shall be with-drawn if the colleges resort to commercialization”. Since the regulation does not elaborate on what constitutes “resorting to commercialisation”, this will presumably be a matter left to the discretion of the Government.
A basic requirement for a new medical college is a pre-existing hospital that will serve as a teaching hospital. Corporate entities have hospitals in the major metros and that is where they will have to locate medical colleges. The earlier mandated land requirement for a medical college cam-pus, minimum of 25 acres of contiguous land, cannot be fulfilled in the metros. Not surprisingly, yet another tweak has been made in the regulation, prescribing 10 acres as the new mini-mum campus size for 9 cities including the main metros. With this, the stage is set for corporate entities to enter the medical education market.
Until now, medical education in India has been projected as a not for profit activity to be organised for the public good. While private bodies can run medical colleges, these can only be societies or trusts, legally non-profit organizations. In opening the door to corporate colleges, thus, a major policy change has been effected without changing the law or even a discussion in Parliament, but by simply getting a compliant MCI to change the regulation on establishment of medical colleges. This and other changes have been justified in the name of addressing the shortage of doctors. At the same time, over 50, existing medical colleges, including 15 run by the government, have been prohibited from admitting students in 2010 for having failed to meet the basic standards prescribed. Ninety per cent of these colleges have come up in the last 5 years. Particularly shocking is the phenomenon of government colleges falling short of standards approved by the Government. Why are state government institutions not able to meet the requirements that have been approved by the central government? A severe problem faced by government-run institutions is attracting and retaining teaching faculty, and this is likely to be among the major reasons for these colleges failing to satisfy the MCI norms. The crisis building up on the faculty front has been flagged by various commissions looking Into problems of medical education over the years.
An indicator of the crisis is the attempt to conjure up faculty when MCI carries out inspections of new colleges, one of its regulatory functions. Judging by news reports, the practice of presenting fake faculty-students or private medical practitioners hired for the day -during MCI inspections in private colleges is common. What is interesting is that even government colleges are adopting unscrupulous methods. An-other indicator is the extraordinary scheme, verging on the ridiculous that is being put in place by the MCI to make inspections ‘foolproof. Faculty in all medical colleges are to be issued an RFID based smart card by the MCI with a unique Faculty Number. The card, it is argued, will eliminate the possibility of a teacher being shown on the faculty of more than one college and establish if the qualifications of a teacher are genuine. In the future it is projected that biometric RFID readers will be in-stalled in the colleges that will enable a Faculty Identification, Tracking and Monitoring System to monitor faculty from within the college and even remotely from MCI headquarters.
The picture above does not even start to reveal the true and pathetic situation of medical care especially in rural India. Only a fraction of the doctors and nursing professionals serve rural areas where 70 per cent of our population lives. The Health Ministry, with the help of the MCI, has been active in proposing yet another ‘innovative’ solution to the problem of lack of doctors in the rural areas. The proposal is for a three-and-a-half year course to obtain the degree of Bachelor of Rural Medicine and Surgery (BRMS). Only rural candidates would be able to join this course. The study and training would happen at two different levels -Community Health Centers for 18 months, and sub-divisional hospitals for a further period of 2 years -and be conducted by retired professors. After completion of training, they would only be able to serve in their own state in district hospitals, community health centres, and primary health centres.
The BRMS proposal has invited sharp criticism from some doctors’ organisations on the grounds that it is discriminatory to have two different standards of health care one for urban and the other for rural areas, and that the health care provided by such graduates will be compromised. At the other end is the opinion expressed by some that “something is better than nothing”, that since doctors do not want to serve in rural areas, the government may as well create a new cadre of medics who will be obliged to serve there. The debate will surely pick up after the government formally lays out its plans. What is apparent is that neither this proposal nor the various stopgap measures adopted so far address the root of the problem of health care. The far larger issue is government policy, the low priority attached by the government to the social sector as a whole and the health sector in particular, evidenced in the paltry allocations for maintaining and upgrading medical infrastructure and medical education and for looking after precious human resources.

Q. Choose the word/group of words which is most opposite in meaning to the word/group of words printed in underline as used in the passage.
UNSCRUPULOUS

Solution:

UNSCRUPULOUS means without moral principles, not honest or fair; unprincipled. So, honest is the word which is opposite in meaning to it.

QUESTION: 10

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been printed in underline to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

In February 2010 the Medical Council of India announced a major change in the regulation governing the establishment of medical colleges. With this change, corporate entities were permitted to open medical colleges. The new regulation also carried the following warning: “permission shall be with-drawn if the colleges resort to commercialization”. Since the regulation does not elaborate on what constitutes “resorting to commercialisation”, this will presumably be a matter left to the discretion of the Government.
A basic requirement for a new medical college is a pre-existing hospital that will serve as a teaching hospital. Corporate entities have hospitals in the major metros and that is where they will have to locate medical colleges. The earlier mandated land requirement for a medical college cam-pus, minimum of 25 acres of contiguous land, cannot be fulfilled in the metros. Not surprisingly, yet another tweak has been made in the regulation, prescribing 10 acres as the new mini-mum campus size for 9 cities including the main metros. With this, the stage is set for corporate entities to enter the medical education market.
Until now, medical education in India has been projected as a not for profit activity to be organised for the public good. While private bodies can run medical colleges, these can only be societies or trusts, legally non-profit organizations. In opening the door to corporate colleges, thus, a major policy change has been effected without changing the law or even a discussion in Parliament, but by simply getting a compliant MCI to change the regulation on establishment of medical colleges. This and other changes have been justified in the name of addressing the shortage of doctors. At the same time, over 50, existing medical colleges, including 15 run by the government, have been prohibited from admitting students in 2010 for having failed to meet the basic standards prescribed. Ninety per cent of these colleges have come up in the last 5 years. Particularly shocking is the phenomenon of government colleges falling short of standards approved by the Government. Why are state government institutions not able to meet the requirements that have been approved by the central government? A severe problem faced by government-run institutions is attracting and retaining teaching faculty, and this is likely to be among the major reasons for these colleges failing to satisfy the MCI norms. The crisis building up on the faculty front has been flagged by various commissions looking Into problems of medical education over the years.
An indicator of the crisis is the attempt to conjure up faculty when MCI carries out inspections of new colleges, one of its regulatory functions. Judging by news reports, the practice of presenting fake faculty-students or private medical practitioners hired for the day -during MCI inspections in private colleges is common. What is interesting is that even government colleges are adopting unscrupulous methods. An-other indicator is the extraordinary scheme, verging on the ridiculous that is being put in place by the MCI to make inspections ‘foolproof. Faculty in all medical colleges are to be issued an RFID based smart card by the MCI with a unique Faculty Number. The card, it is argued, will eliminate the possibility of a teacher being shown on the faculty of more than one college and establish if the qualifications of a teacher are genuine. In the future it is projected that biometric RFID readers will be in-stalled in the colleges that will enable a Faculty Identification, Tracking and Monitoring System to monitor faculty from within the college and even remotely from MCI headquarters.
The picture above does not even start to reveal the true and pathetic situation of medical care especially in rural India. Only a fraction of the doctors and nursing professionals serve rural areas where 70 per cent of our population lives. The Health Ministry, with the help of the MCI, has been active in proposing yet another ‘innovative’ solution to the problem of lack of doctors in the rural areas. The proposal is for a three-and-a-half year course to obtain the degree of Bachelor of Rural Medicine and Surgery (BRMS). Only rural candidates would be able to join this course. The study and training would happen at two different levels -Community Health Centers for 18 months, and sub-divisional hospitals for a further period of 2 years -and be conducted by retired professors. After completion of training, they would only be able to serve in their own state in district hospitals, community health centres, and primary health centres.
The BRMS proposal has invited sharp criticism from some doctors’ organisations on the grounds that it is discriminatory to have two different standards of health care one for urban and the other for rural areas, and that the health care provided by such graduates will be compromised. At the other end is the opinion expressed by some that “something is better than nothing”, that since doctors do not want to serve in rural areas, the government may as well create a new cadre of medics who will be obliged to serve there. The debate will surely pick up after the government formally lays out its plans. What is apparent is that neither this proposal nor the various stopgap measures adopted so far address the root of the problem of health care. The far larger issue is government policy, the low priority attached by the government to the social sector as a whole and the health sector in particular, evidenced in the paltry allocations for maintaining and upgrading medical infrastructure and medical education and for looking after precious human resources.

Q. Choose the word/group of words which is most opposite in meaning to the word/group of words printed in underline as used in the passage.
COMPLIANT

Solution:

COMPLIANT means to willing to agree with people or to obey rules; in agreement with a set of rules. So, unyielding is the word which is opposite in meaning to it.

QUESTION: 11

In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. These numbers are printed below the passage and against each, five words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find out the appropriate word in each case.

When sound (11) the world of cinema, mime made a gracious exit. (12) then, it stood proudly as a performing art in itself, independent and (13) in style, approach, treatment and performance not matched however, by (14) acceptance. During the silent era actors in silent films had to (15) totally on mime as the only way of (16) their emotions, expressions, incidents. events and interactions between and among characters. German Expressionist cinema, the acting of classic performers like Charlie Chaplin, Harold Lloyd and Buster Keaton used mime they had (17) as part of their theatrical (18) in their films with great effect. A French mime artist once said, "Mime is the poetry of silence." But once talking (19) entered the scenario, mime was (20) ever used in films, even through a character introduced as a mime artist.

Solution:
QUESTION: 12

In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. These numbers are printed below the passage and against each, five words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find out the appropriate word in each case.

When sound (11) the world of cinema, mime made a gracious exit. (12) then, it stood proudly as a performing art in itself, independent and (13) in style, approach, treatment and performance not matched however, by (14) acceptance. During the silent era actors in silent films had to (15) totally on mime as the only way of (16) their emotions, expressions, incidents. events and interactions between and among characters. German Expressionist cinema, the acting of classic performers like Charlie Chaplin, Harold Lloyd and Buster Keaton used mime they had (17) as part of their theatrical (18) in their films with great effect. A French mime artist once said, "Mime is the poetry of silence." But once talking (19) entered the scenario, mime was (20) ever used in films, even through a character introduced as a mime artist.

Solution:
QUESTION: 13

In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. These numbers are printed below the passage and against each, five words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find out the appropriate word in each case.

When sound (11) the world of cinema, mime made a gracious exit. (12) then, it stood proudly as a performing art in itself, independent and (13) in style, approach, treatment and performance not matched however, by (14) acceptance. During the silent era actors in silent films had to (15) totally on mime as the only way of (16) their emotions, expressions, incidents. events and interactions between and among characters. German Expressionist cinema, the acting of classic performers like Charlie Chaplin, Harold Lloyd and Buster Keaton used mime they had (17) as part of their theatrical (18) in their films with great effect. A French mime artist once said, "Mime is the poetry of silence." But once talking (19) entered the scenario, mime was (20) ever used in films, even through a character introduced as a mime artist.

Solution:
QUESTION: 14

In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. These numbers are printed below the passage and against each, five words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find out the appropriate word in each case.

When sound (11) the world of cinema, mime made a gracious exit. (12) then, it stood proudly as a performing art in itself, independent and (13) in style, approach, treatment and performance not matched however, by (14) acceptance. During the silent era actors in silent films had to (15) totally on mime as the only way of (16) their emotions, expressions, incidents. events and interactions between and among characters. German Expressionist cinema, the acting of classic performers like Charlie Chaplin, Harold Lloyd and Buster Keaton used mime they had (17) as part of their theatrical (18) in their films with great effect. A French mime artist once said, "Mime is the poetry of silence." But once talking (19) entered the scenario, mime was (20) ever used in films, even through a character introduced as a mime artist.

Solution:
QUESTION: 15

In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. These numbers are printed below the passage and against each, five words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find out the appropriate word in each case.

When sound (11) the world of cinema, mime made a gracious exit. (12) then, it stood proudly as a performing art in itself, independent and (13) in style, approach, treatment and performance not matched however, by (14) acceptance. During the silent era actors in silent films had to (15) totally on mime as the only way of (16) their emotions, expressions, incidents. events and interactions between and among characters. German Expressionist cinema, the acting of classic performers like Charlie Chaplin, Harold Lloyd and Buster Keaton used mime they had (17) as part of their theatrical (18) in their films with great effect. A French mime artist once said, "Mime is the poetry of silence." But once talking (19) entered the scenario, mime was (20) ever used in films, even through a character introduced as a mime artist.

Solution:
QUESTION: 16

In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. These numbers are printed below the passage and against each, five words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find out the appropriate word in each case.

When sound (11) the world of cinema, mime made a gracious exit. (12) then, it stood proudly as a performing art in itself, independent and (13) in style, approach, treatment and performance not matched however, by (14) acceptance. During the silent era actors in silent films had to (15) totally on mime as the only way of (16) their emotions, expressions, incidents. events and interactions between and among characters. German Expressionist cinema, the acting of classic performers like Charlie Chaplin, Harold Lloyd and Buster Keaton used mime they had (17) as part of their theatrical (18) in their films with great effect. A French mime artist once said, "Mime is the poetry of silence." But once talking (19) entered the scenario, mime was (20) ever used in films, even through a character introduced as a mime artist.

Solution:
QUESTION: 17

In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. These numbers are printed below the passage and against each, five words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find out the appropriate word in each case.

When sound (11) the world of cinema, mime made a gracious exit. (12) then, it stood proudly as a performing art in itself, independent and (13) in style, approach, treatment and performance not matched however, by (14) acceptance. During the silent era actors in silent films had to (15) totally on mime as the only way of (16) their emotions, expressions, incidents. events and interactions between and among characters. German Expressionist cinema, the acting of classic performers like Charlie Chaplin, Harold Lloyd and Buster Keaton used mime they had (17) as part of their theatrical (18) in their films with great effect. A French mime artist once said, "Mime is the poetry of silence." But once talking (19) entered the scenario, mime was (20) ever used in films, even through a character introduced as a mime artist.

Solution:
QUESTION: 18

In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. These numbers are printed below the passage and against each, five words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find out the appropriate word in each case.

When sound (11) the world of cinema, mime made a gracious exit. (12) then, it stood proudly as a performing art in itself, independent and (13) in style, approach, treatment and performance not matched however, by (14) acceptance. During the silent era actors in silent films had to (15) totally on mime as the only way of (16) their emotions, expressions, incidents. events and interactions between and among characters. German Expressionist cinema, the acting of classic performers like Charlie Chaplin, Harold Lloyd and Buster Keaton used mime they had (17) as part of their theatrical (18) in their films with great effect. A French mime artist once said, "Mime is the poetry of silence." But once talking (19) entered the scenario, mime was (20) ever used in films, even through a character introduced as a mime artist.

Solution:
QUESTION: 19

In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. These numbers are printed below the passage and against each, five words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find out the appropriate word in each case.

When sound (11) the world of cinema, mime made a gracious exit. (12) then, it stood proudly as a performing art in itself, independent and (13) in style, approach, treatment and performance not matched however, by (14) acceptance. During the silent era actors in silent films had to (15) totally on mime as the only way of (16) their emotions, expressions, incidents. events and interactions between and among characters. German Expressionist cinema, the acting of classic performers like Charlie Chaplin, Harold Lloyd and Buster Keaton used mime they had (17) as part of their theatrical (18) in their films with great effect. A French mime artist once said, "Mime is the poetry of silence." But once talking (19) entered the scenario, mime was (20) ever used in films, even through a character introduced as a mime artist.

Solution:
QUESTION: 20

In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. These numbers are printed below the passage and against each, five words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find out the appropriate word in each case.

When sound (11) the world of cinema, mime made a gracious exit. (12) then, it stood proudly as a performing art in itself, independent and (13) in style, approach, treatment and performance not matched however, by (14) acceptance. During the silent era actors in silent films had to (15) totally on mime as the only way of (16) their emotions, expressions, incidents. events and interactions between and among characters. German Expressionist cinema, the acting of classic performers like Charlie Chaplin, Harold Lloyd and Buster Keaton used mime they had (17) as part of their theatrical (18) in their films with great effect. A French mime artist once said, "Mime is the poetry of silence." But once talking (19) entered the scenario, mime was (20) ever used in films, even through a character introduced as a mime artist.

Solution:
QUESTION: 21

Rearrange the following five sentences (A), (B), (C), (D) and (E) in the proper sequence to form a paragraph; then answer the questions given below them.

(A) A small wooden nest box is all it has taken to rekindle all the romance of bringing sparrows and other birds back into our cities and halt them from fading into the past like a forgotten folktale.
(B) There is something wrong with a city that remains unperturbed even as its birds desert it.
(C) Thankfully, the situation is not as hopeless as it seems.
(D) Much as we try to defend the seemingly irreversible modern life of these cities, we can't stop our hearts from crying when we realize that our rapidly degenerating urban eco-system isn't generous enough to let these delicate winged creatures build tiny little nests in its nooks and crannies, sit in solitude, and rear offspring.
(E) And this desertion seems to be true with most metros in India where house sparrows have almost become a thing of the past.

​Q. Which of the following should be the FIRST sentence after rearrangement ?

Solution:

The correct sequence to form meaningful paragraph is BEDCA. 

QUESTION: 22

Rearrange the following five sentences (A), (B), (C), (D) and (E) in the proper sequence to form a paragraph; then answer the questions given below them.

(A) A small wooden nest box is all it has taken to rekindle all the romance of bringing sparrows and other birds back into our cities and halt them from fading into the past like a forgotten folktale.
(B) There is something wrong with a city that remains unperturbed even as its birds desert it.
(C) Thankfully, the situation is not as hopeless as it seems.
(D) Much as we try to defend the seemingly irreversible modern life of these cities, we can't stop our hearts from crying when we realize that our rapidly degenerating urban eco-system isn't generous enough to let these delicate winged creatures build tiny little nests in its nooks and crannies, sit in solitude, and rear offspring.
(E) And this desertion seems to be true with most metros in India where house sparrows have almost become a thing of the past.

​Q. Which of the following should be the SECOND sentence after rearrangement ?

Solution:

The correct sequence to form meaningful paragraph is BEDCA.

QUESTION: 23

Rearrange the following five sentences (A), (B), (C), (D) and (E) in the proper sequence to form a paragraph; then answer the questions given below them. 

(A) A small wooden nest box is all it has taken to rekindle all the romance of bringing sparrows and other birds back into our cities and halt them from fading into the past like a forgotten folktale.
(B) There is something wrong with a city that remains unperturbed even as its birds desert it.
(C) Thankfully, the situation is not as hopeless as it seems.
(D) Much as we try to defend the seemingly irreversible modern life of these cities, we can't stop our hearts from crying when we realize that our rapidly degenerating urban eco-system isn't generous enough to let these delicate winged creatures build tiny little nests in its nooks and crannies, sit in solitude, and rear offspring.
(E) And this desertion seems to be true with most metros in India where house sparrows have almost become a thing of the past.

​Q. Which of the following should be the THIRD sentence after rearrangement ?

Solution:

The correct sequence to form meaningful paragraph is BEDCA.

QUESTION: 24

Rearrange the following five sentences (A), (B), (C), (D) and (E) in the proper sequence to form a paragraph; then answer the questions given below them.

(A) A small wooden nest box is all it has taken to rekindle all the romance of bringing sparrows and other birds back into our cities and halt them from fading into the past like a forgotten folktale.
(B) There is something wrong with a city that remains unperturbed even as its birds desert it.
(C) Thankfully, the situation is not as hopeless as it seems.
(D) Much as we try to defend the seemingly irreversible modern life of these cities, we can't stop our hearts from crying when we realize that our rapidly degenerating urban eco-system isn't generous enough to let these delicate winged creatures build tiny little nests in its nooks and crannies, sit in solitude, and rear offspring.
(E) And this desertion seems to be true with most metros in India where house sparrows have almost become a thing of the past.

Q. Which of the following should be the FOURTH sentence after rearrangement ?

Solution:

The correct sequence to form meaningful paragraph is BEDCA.

QUESTION: 25

Rearrange the following five sentences (A), (B), (C), (D) and (E) in the proper sequence to form a paragraph; then answer the questions given below them.

(A) A small wooden nest box is all it has taken to rekindle all the romance of bringing sparrows and other birds back into our cities and halt them from fading into the past like a forgotten folktale.
(B) There is something wrong with a city that remains unperturbed even as its birds desert it.
(C) Thankfully, the situation is not as hopeless as it seems.
(D) Much as we try to defend the seemingly irreversible modern life of these cities, we can't stop our hearts from crying when we realize that our rapidly degenerating urban eco-system isn't generous enough to let these delicate winged creatures build tiny little nests in its nooks and crannies, sit in solitude, and rear offspring.
(E) And this desertion seems to be true with most metros in India where house sparrows have almost become a thing of the past.

Q. Which of the following should be the FIFTH sentence after rearrangement ?

Solution:

The correct sequence to form meaningful paragraph is BEDCA.

QUESTION: 26

Which of the phrases (A), (B), (C) and (D) given below each sentence should replace the phrase printed in underline in the sentence to make it grammatically correct? If the sentence is correct as it is given and no correction is required, mark (E) as the answer.

Q. After keeping a ten-year-old in detention for around six days, the police finally registered a case of fraud against the child and sent him to jail.

Solution:
QUESTION: 27

Which of the phrases (A), (B), (C) and (D) given below each sentence should replace the phrase printed in underline in the sentence to make it grammatically correct? If the sentence is correct as it is given and no correction is required, mark (E) as the answer.

Q. Whichever reasons, there is no denying the changing attitudes to traditions as well as livelihoods, by implication to the environment as well.

Solution:

Replace ‘Whichever reasons’ with ‘Whatever the reasons’.

QUESTION: 28

Which of the phrases (A), (B), (C) and (D) given below each sentence should replace the phrase printed in underline in the sentence to make it grammatically correct? If the sentence is correct as it is given and no correction is required, mark (E) as the answer.
Q. Visiting the village is like be transported into some other century.

Solution:

Replace ‘like be transported’ with ‘like being transported’.

QUESTION: 29

Which of the phrases (A), (B), (C) and (D) given below each sentence should replace the phrase printed in underline in the sentence to make it grammatically correct? If the sentence is correct as it is given and no correction is required, mark (E) as the answer.
Q. Environmentalists has pay little heed to the 'softer' aspects of the movement, of which the need to change our culture is one of the most important.

Solution:

Replace ‘has pay little heed’ with ‘have paid little heed’.

QUESTION: 30

Which of the phrases (A), (B), (C) and (D) given below each sentence should replace the phrase printed in underline in the sentence to make it grammatically correct? If the sentence is correct as it is given and no correction is required, mark (E) as the answer.
​Q. Even in a changing world, we cannot wishes away the Indian nation and replace it with a world government overnight.

Solution:

Replace ‘cannot wishes away’ with ‘cannot wish away’.

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