NABARD English Language Practice: 4


30 Questions MCQ Test NABARD Assistant Manager Grade A Mock Test Series | NABARD English Language Practice: 4


Description
This mock test of NABARD English Language Practice: 4 for Banking Exams helps you for every Banking Exams entrance exam. This contains 30 Multiple Choice Questions for Banking Exams NABARD English Language Practice: 4 (mcq) to study with solutions a complete question bank. The solved questions answers in this NABARD English Language Practice: 4 quiz give you a good mix of easy questions and tough questions. Banking Exams students definitely take this NABARD English Language Practice: 4 exercise for a better result in the exam. You can find other NABARD English Language Practice: 4 extra questions, long questions & short questions for Banking Exams on EduRev as well by searching above.
QUESTION: 1

Read following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words have been printed in underline to help you locate them while answering same of the questions.

"We have always known that heedless self-interest was bad morals. We now know that it is bad economics," said American President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1937 in the midst of the Great Depression. And the world has learnt that enlightened self-interest is good economics all over again after the Great Recession of 2009. Americans are entering a period of social change as they are recalibrating their sense of what it means to be a citizen, not just through voting or volunteering but also through commerce. There is a new dimension to civic duty that is growing among Americans - the idea that they can serve not only by spending time in communities and classrooms but by spending more responsibly. In short, Americans are beginning to put their money where their ideals are.
In a recent poll most said they had consciously supported local or small neighbourhood businesses and 40 percent said that they had purchased a product because they liked the social or political values of the company that produced it. People were alarmed about 'blood diamonds' mined in war zones and used to finance conflict in Africa. They were also willing to pay $2000 more for a car that gets 35 miles per gallon than for one that gives less, though the former is more expensive but environment friendly. Of course consumers have done their own doing-well-by doing-good calculation -a more expensive car that gives; better mileage will save them money in the long run and makes them feel good about protecting the environment. Moreover since 1995, the number of socially responsible investment (SRI) mutual funds, which generally avoid buying shares of companies that profit from tobacco, oil or child labour has grown from 55 to 260. SRI funds now manage approximately 11 percent of all the money invested in the US financial markets an estimated $ 2.7 trillion. This is evidence of a changing mindset in a nation whose most iconic economist Milton Friedman wrote in 1970 that a corporation's only moral responsibility was to increase shareholder profits. At first the corporate stance was defensive: companies were punished by consumers for unethical behaviour such as discriminatory labour practices. The nexus of activist groups, consumers and government regulation could not merely tarnish a company but put it out of business. But corporate America quickly discerned that social responsibility attracts investment capital as well as customer loyalty, creating a virtuous circle. Some companies quickly embraced the new ethos that consumers boycotted products they considered unethical and others purchase products in part because their manufacturers were responsible. With global warming on the minds of many consumers lots of companies are racing to 'outgreen' each other. The most progressive companies are talking about a triple bottom line-profit, planet and people - that focuses on how to run a business while trying to improve environmental and worker conditions.
This is a time when the only thing that has sunk lower than the American public's opinion of Congress is its opinion of business. One burning question is how many of these Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) initiatives are just shrewd marketing to give companies a halo effect? After all only 8 per cent of the large American corporations go through the trouble of verifying their CSR reports, which many consumers don't bother to read. And while social responsibility is one way for companies to get back their reputations consumers too need to make ethical choices.

Q. Which of the following represents the change/s that has/ have occurred in the American outlook?
(A) The perception that the government needs to invest resources in business rather than in education.
(B) Loss of faith in American corporations as they do not disburse their profits equitably among shareholders.
(C) Americans have cut down on their expenditure drastically to invest only in socially responsible mutual funds.

Solution:
QUESTION: 2

Read following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words have been printed in underline to help you locate them while answering same of the questions.

"We have always known that heedless self-interest was bad morals. We now know that it is bad economics," said American President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1937 in the midst of the Great Depression. And the world has learnt that enlightened self-interest is good economics all over again after the Great Recession of 2009. Americans are entering a period of social change as they are recalibrating their sense of what it means to be a citizen, not just through voting or volunteering but also through commerce. There is a new dimension to civic duty that is growing among Americans - the idea that they can serve not only by spending time in communities and classrooms but by spending more responsibly. In short, Americans are beginning to put their money where their ideals are.
In a recent poll most said they had consciously supported local or small neighbourhood businesses and 40 percent said that they had purchased a product because they liked the social or political values of the company that produced it. People were alarmed about 'blood diamonds' mined in war zones and used to finance conflict in Africa. They were also willing to pay $2000 more for a car that gets 35 miles per gallon than for one that gives less, though the former is more expensive but environment friendly. Of course consumers have done their own doing-well-by doing-good calculation -a more expensive car that gives; better mileage will save them money in the long run and makes them feel good about protecting the environment. Moreover since 1995, the number of socially responsible investment (SRI) mutual funds, which generally avoid buying shares of companies that profit from tobacco, oil or child labour has grown from 55 to 260. SRI funds now manage approximately 11 percent of all the money invested in the US financial markets an estimated $ 2.7 trillion. This is evidence of a changing mindset in a nation whose most iconic economist Milton Friedman wrote in 1970 that a corporation's only moral responsibility was to increase shareholder profits. At first the corporate stance was defensive: companies were punished by consumers for unethical behaviour such as discriminatory labour practices. The nexus of activist groups, consumers and government regulation could not merely tarnish a company but put it out of business. But corporate America quickly discerned that social responsibility attracts investment capital as well as customer loyalty, creating a virtuous circle. Some companies quickly embraced the new ethos that consumers boycotted products they considered unethical and others purchase products in part because their manufacturers were responsible. With global warming on the minds of many consumers lots of companies are racing to 'outgreen' each other. The most progressive companies are talking about a triple bottom line-profit, planet and people - that focuses on how to run a business while trying to improve environmental and worker conditions.
This is a time when the only thing that has sunk lower than the American public's opinion of Congress is its opinion of business. One burning question is how many of these Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) initiatives are just shrewd marketing to give companies a halo effect? After all only 8 per cent of the large American corporations go through the trouble of verifying their CSR reports, which many consumers don't bother to read. And while social responsibility is one way for companies to get back their reputations consumers too need to make ethical choices.

Q. Which of the following is/are TRUE in the context of the passage ?
(A) The voter turnout during the 2009 American elections was high.
(B) African diamonds are highly valued by the American public.
(C) American forms have to spend vast amounts on advertising because activists cast aspersions on their images.

Solution:

All the given statements are true according to the passage.

QUESTION: 3

Read following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words have been printed in underline to help you locate them while answering same of the questions.

"We have always known that heedless self-interest was bad morals. We now know that it is bad economics," said American President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1937 in the midst of the Great Depression. And the world has learnt that enlightened self-interest is good economics all over again after the Great Recession of 2009. Americans are entering a period of social change as they are recalibrating their sense of what it means to be a citizen, not just through voting or volunteering but also through commerce. There is a new dimension to civic duty that is growing among Americans - the idea that they can serve not only by spending time in communities and classrooms but by spending more responsibly. In short, Americans are beginning to put their money where their ideals are.
In a recent poll most said they had consciously supported local or small neighbourhood businesses and 40 percent said that they had purchased a product because they liked the social or political values of the company that produced it. People were alarmed about 'blood diamonds' mined in war zones and used to finance conflict in Africa. They were also willing to pay $2000 more for a car that gets 35 miles per gallon than for one that gives less, though the former is more expensive but environment friendly. Of course consumers have done their own doing-well-by doing-good calculation -a more expensive car that gives; better mileage will save them money in the long run and makes them feel good about protecting the environment. Moreover since 1995, the number of socially responsible investment (SRI) mutual funds, which generally avoid buying shares of companies that profit from tobacco, oil or child labour has grown from 55 to 260. SRI funds now manage approximately 11 percent of all the money invested in the US financial markets an estimated $ 2.7 trillion. This is evidence of a changing mindset in a nation whose most iconic economist Milton Friedman wrote in 1970 that a corporation's only moral responsibility was to increase shareholder profits. At first the corporate stance was defensive: companies were punished by consumers for unethical behaviour such as discriminatory labour practices. The nexus of activist groups, consumers and government regulation could not merely tarnish a company but put it out of business. But corporate America quickly discerned that social responsibility attracts investment capital as well as customer loyalty, creating a virtuous circle. Some companies quickly embraced the new ethos that consumers boycotted products they considered unethical and others purchase products in part because their manufacturers were responsible. With global warming on the minds of many consumers lots of companies are racing to 'outgreen' each other. The most progressive companies are talking about a triple bottom line-profit, planet and people - that focuses on how to run a business while trying to improve environmental and worker conditions.
This is a time when the only thing that has sunk lower than the American public's opinion of Congress is its opinion of business. One burning question is how many of these Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) initiatives are just shrewd marketing to give companies a halo effect? After all only 8 per cent of the large American corporations go through the trouble of verifying their CSR reports, which many consumers don't bother to read. And while social responsibility is one way for companies to get back their reputations consumers too need to make ethical choices.

Q. To what does the author attribute the consumers' willingness to purchase environment friendly vehicles?

Solution:

“And the world has learnt that enlightened self-interest is good economics all over again after the Great Recession of 2009.”

QUESTION: 4

Read following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words have been printed in underline to help you locate them while answering same of the questions.

"We have always known that heedless self-interest was bad morals. We now know that it is bad economics," said American President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1937 in the midst of the Great Depression. And the world has learnt that enlightened self-interest is good economics all over again after the Great Recession of 2009. Americans are entering a period of social change as they are recalibrating their sense of what it means to be a citizen, not just through voting or volunteering but also through commerce. There is a new dimension to civic duty that is growing among Americans - the idea that they can serve not only by spending time in communities and classrooms but by spending more responsibly. In short, Americans are beginning to put their money where their ideals are.
In a recent poll most said they had consciously supported local or small neighbourhood businesses and 40 percent said that they had purchased a product because they liked the social or political values of the company that produced it. People were alarmed about 'blood diamonds' mined in war zones and used to finance conflict in Africa. They were also willing to pay $2000 more for a car that gets 35 miles per gallon than for one that gives less, though the former is more expensive but environment friendly. Of course consumers have done their own doing-well-by doing-good calculation -a more expensive car that gives; better mileage will save them money in the long run and makes them feel good about protecting the environment. Moreover since 1995, the number of socially responsible investment (SRI) mutual funds, which generally avoid buying shares of companies that profit from tobacco, oil or child labour has grown from 55 to 260. SRI funds now manage approximately 11 percent of all the money invested in the US financial markets an estimated $ 2.7 trillion. This is evidence of a changing mindset in a nation whose most iconic economist Milton Friedman wrote in 1970 that a corporation's only moral responsibility was to increase shareholder profits. At first the corporate stance was defensive: companies were punished by consumers for unethical behaviour such as discriminatory labour practices. The nexus of activist groups, consumers and government regulation could not merely tarnish a company but put it out of business. But corporate America quickly discerned that social responsibility attracts investment capital as well as customer loyalty, creating a virtuous circle. Some companies quickly embraced the new ethos that consumers boycotted products they considered unethical and others purchase products in part because their manufacturers were responsible. With global warming on the minds of many consumers lots of companies are racing to 'outgreen' each other. The most progressive companies are talking about a triple bottom line-profit, planet and people - that focuses on how to run a business while trying to improve environmental and worker conditions.
This is a time when the only thing that has sunk lower than the American public's opinion of Congress is its opinion of business. One burning question is how many of these Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) initiatives are just shrewd marketing to give companies a halo effect? After all only 8 per cent of the large American corporations go through the trouble of verifying their CSR reports, which many consumers don't bother to read. And while social responsibility is one way for companies to get back their reputations consumers too need to make ethical choices.

Q. Which of the following is the central idea of the passage ?

Solution:

“And while social responsibility is one way for companies to get back their reputations consumers too need to make ethical choices.”

QUESTION: 5

Read following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words have been printed in underline to help you locate them while answering same of the questions.

"We have always known that heedless self-interest was bad morals. We now know that it is bad economics," said American President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1937 in the midst of the Great Depression. And the world has learnt that enlightened self-interest is good economics all over again after the Great Recession of 2009. Americans are entering a period of social change as they are recalibrating their sense of what it means to be a citizen, not just through voting or volunteering but also through commerce. There is a new dimension to civic duty that is growing among Americans - the idea that they can serve not only by spending time in communities and classrooms but by spending more responsibly. In short, Americans are beginning to put their money where their ideals are.
In a recent poll most said they had consciously supported local or small neighbourhood businesses and 40 percent said that they had purchased a product because they liked the social or political values of the company that produced it. People were alarmed about 'blood diamonds' mined in war zones and used to finance conflict in Africa. They were also willing to pay $2000 more for a car that gets 35 miles per gallon than for one that gives less, though the former is more expensive but environment friendly. Of course consumers have done their own doing-well-by doing-good calculation -a more expensive car that gives; better mileage will save them money in the long run and makes them feel good about protecting the environment. Moreover since 1995, the number of socially responsible investment (SRI) mutual funds, which generally avoid buying shares of companies that profit from tobacco, oil or child labour has grown from 55 to 260. SRI funds now manage approximately 11 percent of all the money invested in the US financial markets an estimated $ 2.7 trillion. This is evidence of a changing mindset in a nation whose most iconic economist Milton Friedman wrote in 1970 that a corporation's only moral responsibility was to increase shareholder profits. At first the corporate stance was defensive: companies were punished by consumers for unethical behaviour such as discriminatory labour practices. The nexus of activist groups, consumers and government regulation could not merely tarnish a company but put it out of business. But corporate America quickly discerned that social responsibility attracts investment capital as well as customer loyalty, creating a virtuous circle. Some companies quickly embraced the new ethos that consumers boycotted products they considered unethical and others purchase products in part because their manufacturers were responsible. With global warming on the minds of many consumers lots of companies are racing to 'outgreen' each other. The most progressive companies are talking about a triple bottom line-profit, planet and people - that focuses on how to run a business while trying to improve environmental and worker conditions.
This is a time when the only thing that has sunk lower than the American public's opinion of Congress is its opinion of business. One burning question is how many of these Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) initiatives are just shrewd marketing to give companies a halo effect? After all only 8 per cent of the large American corporations go through the trouble of verifying their CSR reports, which many consumers don't bother to read. And while social responsibility is one way for companies to get back their reputations consumers too need to make ethical choices.

Q. Which of the following best describes the widespread view among Americans about big corporations?

Solution:

“The most progressive companies are talking about a triple bottom line-profit, planet and people - that focusses on how to run a business while trying to improve environmental and worker conditions.”

QUESTION: 6

Read following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words have been printed in underline to help you locate them while answering same of the questions.

"We have always known that heedless self-interest was bad morals. We now know that it is bad economics," said American President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1937 in the midst of the Great Depression. And the world has learnt that enlightened self-interest is good economics all over again after the Great Recession of 2009. Americans are entering a period of social change as they are recalibrating their sense of what it means to be a citizen, not just through voting or volunteering but also through commerce. There is a new dimension to civic duty that is growing among Americans - the idea that they can serve not only by spending time in communities and classrooms but by spending more responsibly. In short, Americans are beginning to put their money where their ideals are.
In a recent poll most said they had consciously supported local or small neighbourhood businesses and 40 percent said that they had purchased a product because they liked the social or political values of the company that produced it. People were alarmed about 'blood diamonds' mined in war zones and used to finance conflict in Africa. They were also willing to pay $2000 more for a car that gets 35 miles per gallon than for one that gives less, though the former is more expensive but environment friendly. Of course consumers have done their own doing-well-by doing-good calculation -a more expensive car that gives; better mileage will save them money in the long run and makes them feel good about protecting the environment. Moreover since 1995, the number of socially responsible investment (SRI) mutual funds, which generally avoid buying shares of companies that profit from tobacco, oil or child labour has grown from 55 to 260. SRI funds now manage approximately 11 percent of all the money invested in the US financial markets an estimated $ 2.7 trillion. This is evidence of a changing mindset in a nation whose most iconic economist Milton Friedman wrote in 1970 that a corporation's only moral responsibility was to increase shareholder profits. At first the corporate stance was defensive: companies were punished by consumers for unethical behaviour such as discriminatory labour practices. The nexus of activist groups, consumers and government regulation could not merely tarnish a company but put it out of business. But corporate America quickly discerned that social responsibility attracts investment capital as well as customer loyalty, creating a virtuous circle. Some companies quickly embraced the new ethos that consumers boycotted products they considered unethical and others purchase products in part because their manufacturers were responsible. With global warming on the minds of many consumers lots of companies are racing to 'outgreen' each other. The most progressive companies are talking about a triple bottom line-profit, planet and people - that focuses on how to run a business while trying to improve environmental and worker conditions.
This is a time when the only thing that has sunk lower than the American public's opinion of Congress is its opinion of business. One burning question is how many of these Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) initiatives are just shrewd marketing to give companies a halo effect? After all only 8 per cent of the large American corporations go through the trouble of verifying their CSR reports, which many consumers don't bother to read. And while social responsibility is one way for companies to get back their reputations consumers too need to make ethical choices.

Q. Choose the word which is most similar in meaning to the word printed in underline as used in the passage.
IDEALS

Solution:

Ideals means a person or thing regarded as perfect. So, values is the word which is the word which is similar in meaning to it.

QUESTION: 7

Read following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words have been printed in underline to help you locate them while answering same of the questions.

"We have always known that heedless self-interest was bad morals. We now know that it is bad economics," said American President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1937 in the midst of the Great Depression. And the world has learnt that enlightened self-interest is good economics all over again after the Great Recession of 2009. Americans are entering a period of social change as they are recalibrating their sense of what it means to be a citizen, not just through voting or volunteering but also through commerce. There is a new dimension to civic duty that is growing among Americans - the idea that they can serve not only by spending time in communities and classrooms but by spending more responsibly. In short, Americans are beginning to put their money where their ideals are.
In a recent poll most said they had consciously supported local or small neighbourhood businesses and 40 percent said that they had purchased a product because they liked the social or political values of the company that produced it. People were alarmed about 'blood diamonds' mined in war zones and used to finance conflict in Africa. They were also willing to pay $2000 more for a car that gets 35 miles per gallon than for one that gives less, though the former is more expensive but environment friendly. Of course consumers have done their own doing-well-by doing-good calculation -a more expensive car that gives; better mileage will save them money in the long run and makes them feel good about protecting the environment. Moreover since 1995, the number of socially responsible investment (SRI) mutual funds, which generally avoid buying shares of companies that profit from tobacco, oil or child labour has grown from 55 to 260. SRI funds now manage approximately 11 percent of all the money invested in the US financial markets an estimated $ 2.7 trillion. This is evidence of a changing mindset in a nation whose most iconic economist Milton Friedman wrote in 1970 that a corporation's only moral responsibility was to increase shareholder profits. At first the corporate stance was defensive: companies were punished by consumers for unethical behaviour such as discriminatory labour practices. The nexus of activist groups, consumers and government regulation could not merely tarnish a company but put it out of business. But corporate America quickly discerned that social responsibility attracts investment capital as well as customer loyalty, creating a virtuous circle. Some companies quickly embraced the new ethos that consumers boycotted products they considered unethical and others purchase products in part because their manufacturers were responsible. With global warming on the minds of many consumers lots of companies are racing to 'outgreen' each other. The most progressive companies are talking about a triple bottom line-profit, planet and people - that focuses on how to run a business while trying to improve environmental and worker conditions.
This is a time when the only thing that has sunk lower than the American public's opinion of Congress is its opinion of business. One burning question is how many of these Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) initiatives are just shrewd marketing to give companies a halo effect? After all only 8 per cent of the large American corporations go through the trouble of verifying their CSR reports, which many consumers don't bother to read. And while social responsibility is one way for companies to get back their reputations consumers too need to make ethical choices.

Q. Choose the word which is most similar in meaning to the word printed in underline as used in the passage.
EMBRACED

Solution:

Embraced means to accept (a belief, theory, or change) willingly and enthusiastically. So, adopted is the word which is similar in meaning to it.

QUESTION: 8

Read following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words have been printed in underline to help you locate them while answering same of the questions.
"We have always known that heedless self-interest was bad morals. We now know that it is bad economics," said American President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1937 in the midst of the Great Depression. And the world has learnt that enlightened self-interest is good economics all over again after the Great Recession of 2009. Americans are entering a period of social change as they are recalibrating their sense of what it means to be a citizen, not just through voting or volunteering but also through commerce. There is a new dimension to civic duty that is growing among Americans - the idea that they can serve not only by spending time in communities and classrooms but by spending more responsibly. In short, Americans are beginning to put their money where their ideals are.
In a recent poll most said they had consciously supported local or small neighbourhood businesses and 40 percent said that they had purchased a product because they liked the social or political values of the company that produced it. People were alarmed about 'blood diamonds' mined in war zones and used to finance conflict in Africa. They were also willing to pay $2000 more for a car that gets 35 miles per gallon than for one that gives less, though the former is more expensive but environment friendly. Of course consumers have done their own doing-well-by doing-good calculation -a more expensive car that gives; better mileage will save them money in the long run and makes them feel good about protecting the environment. Moreover since 1995, the number of socially responsible investment (SRI) mutual funds, which generally avoid buying shares of companies that profit from tobacco, oil or child labour has grown from 55 to 260. SRI funds now manage approximately 11 percent of all the money invested in the US financial markets an estimated $ 2.7 trillion. This is evidence of a changing mindset in a nation whose most iconic economist Milton Friedman wrote in 1970 that a corporation's only moral responsibility was to increase shareholder profits. At first the corporate stance was defensive: companies were punished by consumers for unethical behaviour such as discriminatory labour practices. The nexus of activist groups, consumers and government regulation could not merely tarnish a company but put it out of business. But corporate America quickly discerned that social responsibility attracts investment capital as well as customer loyalty, creating a virtuous circle. Some companies quickly embraced the new ethos that consumers boycotted products they considered unethical and others purchase products in part because their manufacturers were responsible. With global warming on the minds of many consumers lots of companies are racing to 'outgreen' each other. The most progressive companies are talking about a triple bottom line-profit, planet and people - that focuses on how to run a business while trying to improve environmental and worker conditions.
This is a time when the only thing that has sunk lower than the American public's opinion of Congress is its opinion of business. One burning question is how many of these Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) initiatives are just shrewd marketing to give companies a halo effect? After all only 8 per cent of the large American corporations go through the trouble of verifying their CSR reports, which many consumers don't bother to read. And while social responsibility is one way for companies to get back their reputations consumers too need to make ethical choices.
Q. Choose the word which is most similar in meaning to the word printed in underline as used in the passage.
ATTRACTS

Solution:

Attracts means to have a liking for or interest in something. So, fascinates is the word which is similar in meaning to it.

QUESTION: 9

Read following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words have been printed in underline to help you locate them while answering same of the questions.

"We have always known that heedless self-interest was bad morals. We now know that it is bad economics," said American President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1937 in the midst of the Great Depression. And the world has learnt that enlightened self-interest is good economics all over again after the Great Recession of 2009. Americans are entering a period of social change as they are recalibrating their sense of what it means to be a citizen, not just through voting or volunteering but also through commerce. There is a new dimension to civic duty that is growing among Americans - the idea that they can serve not only by spending time in communities and classrooms but by spending more responsibly. In short, Americans are beginning to put their money where their ideals are.
In a recent poll most said they had consciously supported local or small neighbourhood businesses and 40 percent said that they had purchased a product because they liked the social or political values of the company that produced it. People were alarmed about 'blood diamonds' mined in war zones and used to finance conflict in Africa. They were also willing to pay $2000 more for a car that gets 35 miles per gallon than for one that gives less, though the former is more expensive but environment friendly. Of course consumers have done their own doing-well-by doing-good calculation -a more expensive car that gives; better mileage will save them money in the long run and makes them feel good about protecting the environment. Moreover since 1995, the number of socially responsible investment (SRI) mutual funds, which generally avoid buying shares of companies that profit from tobacco, oil or child labour has grown from 55 to 260. SRI funds now manage approximately 11 percent of all the money invested in the US financial markets an estimated $ 2.7 trillion. This is evidence of a changing mindset in a nation whose most iconic economist Milton Friedman wrote in 1970 that a corporation's only moral responsibility was to increase shareholder profits. At first the corporate stance was defensive: companies were punished by consumers for unethical behaviour such as discriminatory labour practices. The nexus of activist groups, consumers and government regulation could not merely tarnish a company but put it out of business. But corporate America quickly discerned that social responsibility attracts investment capital as well as customer loyalty, creating a virtuous circle. Some companies quickly embraced the new ethos that consumers boycotted products they considered unethical and others purchase products in part because their manufacturers were responsible. With global warming on the minds of many consumers lots of companies are racing to 'outgreen' each other. The most progressive companies are talking about a triple bottom line-profit, planet and people - that focuses on how to run a business while trying to improve environmental and worker conditions.
This is a time when the only thing that has sunk lower than the American public's opinion of Congress is its opinion of business. One burning question is how many of these Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) initiatives are just shrewd marketing to give companies a halo effect? After all only 8 per cent of the large American corporations go through the trouble of verifying their CSR reports, which many consumers don't bother to read. And while social responsibility is one way for companies to get back their reputations consumers too need to make ethical choices.

Q. Choose word/phrase which is most opposite in meaning to the word printed in underline as used in the passage.
ENLIGHTENED

Solution:

Enlightened means having or showing a rational, modern, and well-informed outlook. So, ignorant is the word which is opposite in meaning to it.

QUESTION: 10

Read following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words have been printed in underline to help you locate them while answering same of the questions.

"We have always known that heedless self-interest was bad morals. We now know that it is bad economics," said American President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1937 in the midst of the Great Depression. And the world has learnt that enlightened self-interest is good economics all over again after the Great Recession of 2009. Americans are entering a period of social change as they are recalibrating their sense of what it means to be a citizen, not just through voting or volunteering but also through commerce. There is a new dimension to civic duty that is growing among Americans - the idea that they can serve not only by spending time in communities and classrooms but by spending more responsibly. In short, Americans are beginning to put their money where their ideals are.
In a recent poll most said they had consciously supported local or small neighbourhood businesses and 40 percent said that they had purchased a product because they liked the social or political values of the company that produced it. People were alarmed about 'blood diamonds' mined in war zones and used to finance conflict in Africa. They were also willing to pay $2000 more for a car that gets 35 miles per gallon than for one that gives less, though the former is more expensive but environment friendly. Of course consumers have done their own doing-well-by doing-good calculation -a more expensive car that gives; better mileage will save them money in the long run and makes them feel good about protecting the environment. Moreover since 1995, the number of socially responsible investment (SRI) mutual funds, which generally avoid buying shares of companies that profit from tobacco, oil or child labour has grown from 55 to 260. SRI funds now manage approximately 11 percent of all the money invested in the US financial markets an estimated $ 2.7 trillion. This is evidence of a changing mindset in a nation whose most iconic economist Milton Friedman wrote in 1970 that a corporation's only moral responsibility was to increase shareholder profits. At first the corporate stance was defensive: companies were punished by consumers for unethical behaviour such as discriminatory labour practices. The nexus of activist groups, consumers and government regulation could not merely tarnish a company but put it out of business. But corporate America quickly discerned that social responsibility attracts investment capital as well as customer loyalty, creating a virtuous circle. Some companies quickly embraced the new ethos that consumers boycotted products they considered unethical and others purchase products in part because their manufacturers were responsible. With global warming on the minds of many consumers lots of companies are racing to 'outgreen' each other. The most progressive companies are talking about a triple bottom line-profit, planet and people - that focuses on how to run a business while trying to improve environmental and worker conditions.
This is a time when the only thing that has sunk lower than the American public's opinion of Congress is its opinion of business. One burning question is how many of these Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) initiatives are just shrewd marketing to give companies a halo effect? After all only 8 per cent of the large American corporations go through the trouble of verifying their CSR reports, which many consumers don't bother to read. And while social responsibility is one way for companies to get back their reputations consumers too need to make ethical choices.

Q. Choose word/phrase which is most opposite in meaning to the word printed in under as used in the passage.
HEEDLESS

Solution:

Heedless means showing a reckless lack of care or attention. So, prudent is the word which is opposite in meaning to it.

QUESTION: 11

Read each sentence to find out whether is any grammatical error or idiomatic error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number of part is the answer. If there is no error, the answer is (e). (Ignore errors of punctuation, if any)

​Q. They have invited (A)/ Sushma and I (B)/ for the meeting to be (C)/ held in the next month. (D)/ No error (E)

Solution:

Change ‘I’ (subject) to ‘me’ (object).

QUESTION: 12

Read each sentence to find out whether is any grammatical error or idiomatic error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number of part is the answer. If there is no error, the answer is (e). (Ignore errors of punctuation, if any)

Q. The city people stayed (A)/ fearlessly despite of (B)/ rumour of terrorist attack (C)/ in the area. (D)/ No error (E)

Solution:

Change ‘despite of’ to ‘despite’ as despite is not followed by ‘of’.

QUESTION: 13

Read each sentence to find out whether is any grammatical error or idiomatic error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number of part is the answer. If there is no error, the answer is (e). (Ignore errors of punctuation, if any)

​Q. The Director asked me (A)/ how I have not (B)/ taken his permission (C)/ before applying for the new job. (D)/ No error (E)

Solution:

Change ‘how I have not’ to ‘why I had not’ as sentence is in past.

QUESTION: 14

Read each sentence to find out whether is any grammatical error or idiomatic error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number of part is the answer. If there is no error, the answer is (e). (Ignore errors of punctuation, if any)

Q. Buy presents for ladies (A)/ in their absence (B)/ is a very (C)/ difficult task. (D)/ No error (E)

Solution:

Change ‘Buy’ to ‘Buying’ as Buying (gerund) is the subject of the sentence.

QUESTION: 15

Read each sentence to find out whether is any grammatical error or idiomatic error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number of part is the answer. If there is no error, the answer is (e). (Ignore errors of punctuation, if any)

Q. A disaster management cell is opened (A)/ by the state government (B)/ before the rainy season (C)/ as a precautionary measure. (D)/ No error (E)

Solution:

No error

QUESTION: 16

Which of the phrases (A), (B), (C) and (D) given below each sentence should replace the phrase printed in underline type to make the sentence grammatically correct? If the sentence is correct as it is, mark (e) i.e. ‘No correction required’ as the answer.

​Q. Lift the handset only after paid a one rupee coin.

Solution:

Replace ‘paid a one rupee coin’ with ‘paying a one-rupee coin’.

QUESTION: 17

Which of the phrases (A), (B), (C) and (D) given below each sentence should replace the phrase printed in underline type to make the sentence grammatically correct? If the sentence is correct as it is, mark (e) i.e. ‘No correction required’ as the answer.

Q. Good life, according to many people, is to making more and more money.

Solution:

Replace ‘is to making’ with ‘is making’

QUESTION: 18

Which of the phrases (A), (B), (C) and (D) given below each sentence should replace the phrase printed in underline type to make the sentence grammatically correct? If the sentence is correct as it is, mark (e) i.e. ‘No correction required’ as the answer.

Q. His behaviour with all his employees is so pleasing that everyone come forward for helping him.

Solution:

Replace ‘forward for helping him’ with ‘comes forward to help him’

QUESTION: 19

Which of the phrases (A), (B), (C) and (D) given below each sentence should replace the phrase printed in underline type to make the sentence grammatically correct? If the sentence is correct as it is, mark (e) i.e. ‘No correction required’ as the answer.

Q. A master should never impose his servants too much work.

Solution:

Replace ‘his servants too much work’ with ‘too much work on his servants’

QUESTION: 20

 Which of the phrases (A), (B), (C) and (D) given below each sentence should replace the phrase printed in underline type to make the sentence grammatically correct? If the sentence is correct as it is, mark (e) i.e. ‘No correction required’ as the answer.

Q. What matter does most is the quality and not the quantity.

Solution:

Replace ‘What matter does’ with ‘What matters’

QUESTION: 21

In each of the following sentences there are two blank spaces. Below each sentence there are five pair of words denoted by numbers (A), (B), (C), (D) and (E). Find out which pair of words can be filled up in the blanks in the sentence in the same sequence to make the sentence meaningfully complete.

Q. Many teachers…………the lack of professional freedom as the…………for leaving the job.

Solution:

‘cited, reason’ is the correct use.Cited means evidence for or justification of an argument or statement, especially in a scholarly work.

QUESTION: 22

In each of the following sentences there are two blank spaces. Below each sentence there are five pair of words denoted by numbers (A), (B), (C), (D) and (E). Find out which pair of words can be filled up in the blanks in the sentence in the same sequence to make the sentence meaningfully complete.

Q. The make-up of the syllabus________ students to have a wide ________of knowledge.

Solution:

‘expects, variety’ is the correct use.Variety means the quality or state of being different or diverse.

QUESTION: 23

In each of the following sentences there are two blank spaces. Below each sentence there are five pair of words denoted by numbers (A), (B), (C), (D) and (E). Find out which pair of words can be filled up in the blanks in the sentence in the same sequence to make the sentence meaningfully complete.

Q. Unpredictable…………of the child could not lead the consultants to any…………..

Solution:

‘behavior, conclusion’ is the correct use.Behavior means the way in which one acts or conducts oneself, especially towards others.Conclusion means the end or finish of an event, process, or text.

QUESTION: 24

In each of the following sentences there are two blank spaces. Below each sentence there are five pair of words denoted by numbers (A), (B), (C), (D) and (E). Find out which pair of words can be filled up in the blanks in the sentence in the same sequence to make the sentence meaningfully complete.

​Q. A public servant who is guilty will not…………punishment and no…………person will be punished.

Solution:

escape, innocent’ is the correct use.Escape- to break free, to get out of a situation you don’t want to be in.Innocent- not guilty of a crime or offence.

QUESTION: 25

In each of the following sentences there are two blank spaces. Below each sentence there are five pair of words denoted by numbers (A), (B), (C), (D) and (E). Find out which pair of words can be filled up in the blanks in the sentence in the same sequence to make the sentence meaningfully complete.

​Q. Few professions can…………the sheer variety and constant…………of being a doctor.

Solution:

‘match, challenge’ is the correct use.Challenge means a call to prove or justify something.

QUESTION: 26

In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. These number are again printed below the passage and against each, five words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find out the appropriate word in each case.

Bank customers may no (26) have to maintain a minimum balance in their saving account as the Reserve Bank of India has directed banks to do away with the practice of levying penalty on account holders who don’t do so. While this spells good news for account holders, some bankers said this would increase their (27) and they might start charging for some of the services they were offering free. “I think what they are saying is, if you don’t charge on (28) minimum balance then you are authorised to charge on the transaction,” said HDFC banks’ managing director AdityaPuri. For instance, if a customer has a balance of less than Rs. 10000 in the savings account, the bank may not charge for non-maintenance of minimum balance, but could (29) charge for more than two ATM transactions a month.
RBI has urged banks to limit the liability of customers in cases like non-maintenance of balance or electronic transactions (30) banks are not able to prove customer negligence.

Solution:
QUESTION: 27

In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. These number are again printed below the passage and against each, five words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find out the appropriate word in each case.

Bank customers may no (26) have to maintain a minimum balance in their saving account as the Reserve Bank of India has directed banks to do away with the practice of levying penalty on account holders who don’t do so. While this spells good news for account holders, some bankers said this would increase their (27) and they might start charging for some of the services they were offering free. “I think what they are saying is, if you don’t charge on (28) minimum balance then you are authorised to charge on the transaction,” said HDFC banks’ managing director AdityaPuri. For instance, if a customer has a balance of less than Rs. 10000 in the savings account, the bank may not charge for non-maintenance of minimum balance, but could (29) charge for more than two ATM transactions a month.
RBI has urged banks to limit the liability of customers in cases like non-maintenance of balance or electronic transactions (30) banks are not able to prove customer negligence.

Solution:
QUESTION: 28

In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. These number are again printed below the passage and against each, five words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find out the appropriate word in each case.

Bank customers may no (26) have to maintain a minimum balance in their saving account as the Reserve Bank of India has directed banks to do away with the practice of levying penalty on account holders who don’t do so. While this spells good news for account holders, some bankers said this would increase their (27) and they might start charging for some of the services they were offering free. “I think what they are saying is, if you don’t charge on (28) minimum balance then you are authorised to charge on the transaction,” said HDFC banks’ managing director AdityaPuri. For instance, if a customer has a balance of less than Rs. 10000 in the savings account, the bank may not charge for non-maintenance of minimum balance, but could (29) charge for more than two ATM transactions a month.
RBI has urged banks to limit the liability of customers in cases like non-maintenance of balance or electronic transactions (30) banks are not able to prove customer negligence.

Solution:
QUESTION: 29

In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. These number are again printed below the passage and against each, five words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find out the appropriate word in each case.

Bank customers may no (26) have to maintain a minimum balance in their saving account as the Reserve Bank of India has directed banks to do away with the practice of levying penalty on account holders who don’t do so. While this spells good news for account holders, some bankers said this would increase their (27) and they might start charging for some of the services they were offering free. “I think what they are saying is, if you don’t charge on (28) minimum balance then you are authorised to charge on the transaction,” said HDFC banks’ managing director AdityaPuri. For instance, if a customer has a balance of less than Rs. 10000 in the savings account, the bank may not charge for non-maintenance of minimum balance, but could (29) charge for more than two ATM transactions a month.
RBI has urged banks to limit the liability of customers in cases like non-maintenance of balance or electronic transactions (30) banks are not able to prove customer negligence.

Solution:
QUESTION: 30

In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. These number are again printed below the passage and against each, five words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find out the appropriate word in each case.

Bank customers may no (26) have to maintain a minimum balance in their saving account as the Reserve Bank of India has directed banks to do away with the practice of levying penalty on account holders who don’t do so. While this spells good news for account holders, some bankers said this would increase their (27) and they might start charging for some of the services they were offering free. “I think what they are saying is, if you don’t charge on (28) minimum balance then you are authorised to charge on the transaction,” said HDFC banks’ managing director AdityaPuri. For instance, if a customer has a balance of less than Rs. 10000 in the savings account, the bank may not charge for non-maintenance of minimum balance, but could (29) charge for more than two ATM transactions a month.
RBI has urged banks to limit the liability of customers in cases like non-maintenance of balance or electronic transactions (30) banks are not able to prove customer negligence.

Solution:

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