NABARD English Language Practice: 5


30 Questions MCQ Test NABARD Assistant Manager Grade A Mock Test Series | NABARD English Language Practice: 5


Description
This mock test of NABARD English Language Practice: 5 for Banking Exams helps you for every Banking Exams entrance exam. This contains 30 Multiple Choice Questions for Banking Exams NABARD English Language Practice: 5 (mcq) to study with solutions a complete question bank. The solved questions answers in this NABARD English Language Practice: 5 quiz give you a good mix of easy questions and tough questions. Banking Exams students definitely take this NABARD English Language Practice: 5 exercise for a better result in the exam. You can find other NABARD English Language Practice: 5 extra questions, long questions & short questions for Banking Exams on EduRev as well by searching above.
QUESTION: 1

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been underline to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

The modern world requires us to repose trust in many anonymous institutions. We strap ourselves in a flying tin can with two hundred other people not because we know the pilot but because we believe that airline travel is safe. Our trust in these institutions depends on two factors : skills and ethics. We expect that the people who run these institutions know what they are doing, that they build and operate machines that work as they are supposed to and that they are looking out for our welfare even though we are strangers.
When one of these factors is weak or absent, trust breaks down and we either pay a high price in safety- as in the Bhopal tragedy -or a large ‘welfare premium’ such as the elaborate security measures at airports. Trust-deficient environments work in the favour of the rich and powerful, who can command premium treatment and afford welfare premiums. Poor people can command neither; which is why air travel is safer than train travel, which in turn is safer than walking by the road side.
Every modern society depends on the trust in the skills and ethics of a variety of institutions such as schools and colleges, hospital and markets. If we stopped believing in the expertise of our teachers, doctors and engineers, we will stop being a modern society.
As the Institution among institutions, it is the duty of the state to ensure that all other institutions meet their ethical obligations. The Indian state has failed in its regulatory role. Consequently, we cannot trust our schools to turn out good graduates, we cannot ensure that our colleges turn out well trained engineers and we cannot guarantee that our engineers will turn out to be good products.
Last year, I was invited to speak at an undergraduate research conference. Most of the participants in this conference were students at the best engineering colleges in the State. One student who was driving me back and forth recounted a story about the previous year’s final exam. One of his papers had a question from a leading textbook to which the textbook’s answer was wrong. The student was in a dilemma : should he write the (wrong) answer as given in the textbook or should he write the right answer using his own analytical skills. He decided to do the latter and received a zero on that question. Clearly, as the student had suspected, the examiners were looking at the textbook answer while correcting the examination papers instead of verifying its correctness.
The behaviour of these examiners is a breakdown of institutional morals, with consequences for the skills acquired by students. I say institutional morals, for the failure of these examiners is not a personal failure. At the same conference I met a whole range of college teachers, all of whom were drafted as examiners at some time or the other. Without exception, they were dedicated individuals who cared about the education and welfare of their students. However, when put in the institutional role of evaluating an anonymous individual, they fail in fulfilling their responsibilities. When some of our best colleges are run in this fashion, is it any wonder that we turn out unskilled engineers and scientists ? If, as we are led to expect, there is a vast increase in education at all levels and the regulatory regime is as weak as it is currently, isn’t it likely that the trust deficit is only going to increase ?
We are all aware of the consequences of ignoring corruption at all levels of society. While institutional failures in governance are obvious, I think the real problem lies deeper, in the failure of every day institutions that are quite apart from institutions that impinge on our lives only on rare occasions. It is true that our lives are made more miserable by government officials demanding bribes for all sorts of things, but what about the everyday lying andcheating and breaking of rules with people who are strangers ?
Let me give you an example that many of us have experienced. I prefer buying my fruits and vegetables from roadside vendors rather than chain stores. To the vendor, I am probably an ideal customer, since I do not bargain and I do not take hours choosing the best pieces, instead, letting the vendor do the selecting. The market near my house is quite busy; as a result, most vendors are selling their wares to strangers. It takes a while before a particular vendor realises that I am a repeat customer. In such a situation trust is crucial. I have a simple rule : if a vendor palms off a bad piece whose defects are obvious, I never go back to that person again. It is amazing how often that happens.
In my opinion, the failure of institutional ethics is as much about these little abuses of trust as anything else. Everyday thievery is like roadside trash; if you let it accumulate the whole neighbourhood stinks.

Q. What is the meaning of the phrase ‘ palms off ’as used in the passage ?

Solution:

Phrase palm something offmeans to tell somebody that something is better than it is, especially in order to sell it.

QUESTION: 2

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been underline to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

The modern world requires us to repose trust in many anonymous institutions. We strap ourselves in a flying tin can with two hundred other people not because we know the pilot but because we believe that airline travel is safe. Our trust in these institutions depends on two factors : skills and ethics. We expect that the people who run these institutions know what they are doing, that they build and operate machines that work as they are supposed to and that they are looking out for our welfare even though we are strangers.
When one of these factors is weak or absent, trust breaks down and we either pay a high price in safety- as in the Bhopal tragedy -or a large ‘welfare premium’ such as the elaborate security measures at airports. Trust-deficient environments work in the favour of the rich and powerful, who can command premium treatment and afford welfare premiums. Poor people can command neither; which is why air travel is safer than train travel, which in turn is safer than walking by the road side.
Every modern society depends on the trust in the skills and ethics of a variety of institutions such as schools and colleges, hospital and markets. If we stopped believing in the expertise of our teachers, doctors and engineers, we will stop being a modern society.
As the Institution among institutions, it is the duty of the state to ensure that all other institutions meet their ethical obligations. The Indian state has failed in its regulatory role. Consequently, we cannot trust our schools to turn out good graduates, we cannot ensure that our colleges turn out well trained engineers and we cannot guarantee that our engineers will turn out to be good products.
Last year, I was invited to speak at an undergraduate research conference. Most of the participants in this conference were students at the best engineering colleges in the State. One student who was driving me back and forth recounted a story about the previous year’s final exam. One of his papers had a question from a leading textbook to which the textbook’s answer was wrong. The student was in a dilemma : should he write the (wrong) answer as given in the textbook or should he write the right answer using his own analytical skills. He decided to do the latter and received a zero on that question. Clearly, as the student had suspected, the examiners were looking at the textbook answer while correcting the examination papers instead of verifying its correctness.
The behaviour of these examiners is a breakdown of institutional morals, with consequences for the skills acquired by students. I say institutional morals, for the failure of these examiners is not a personal failure. At the same conference I met a whole range of college teachers, all of whom were drafted as examiners at some time or the other. Without exception, they were dedicated individuals who cared about the education and welfare of their students. However, when put in the institutional role of evaluating an anonymous individual, they fail in fulfilling their responsibilities. When some of our best colleges are run in this fashion, is it any wonder that we turn out unskilled engineers and scientists ? If, as we are led to expect, there is a vast increase in education at all levels and the regulatory regime is as weak as it is currently, isn’t it likely that the trust deficit is only going to increase ?
We are all aware of the consequences of ignoring corruption at all levels of society. While institutional failures in governance are obvious, I think the real problem lies deeper, in the failure of every day institutions that are quite apart from institutions that impinge on our lives only on rare occasions. It is true that our lives are made more miserable by government officials demanding bribes for all sorts of things, but what about the everyday lying andcheating and breaking of rules with people who are strangers ?
Let me give you an example that many of us have experienced. I prefer buying my fruits and vegetables from roadside vendors rather than chain stores. To the vendor, I am probably an ideal customer, since I do not bargain and I do not take hours choosing the best pieces, instead, letting the vendor do the selecting. The market near my house is quite busy; as a result, most vendors are selling their wares to strangers. It takes a while before a particular vendor realises that I am a repeat customer. In such a situation trust is crucial. I have a simple rule : if a vendor palms off a bad piece whose defects are obvious, I never go back to that person again. It is amazing how often that happens.
In my opinion, the failure of institutional ethics is as much about these little abuses of trust as anything else. Everyday thievery is like roadside trash; if you let it accumulate the whole neighbourhood stinks.

Q. Why, according to the author, do people repose trust in Institutions they do not know ?​

Solution:

They believe that these institutions have the requisite knowledge and will act only in favour of the general public.

QUESTION: 3

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been  underline to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

The modern world requires us to repose trust in many anonymous institutions. We strap ourselves in a flying tin can with two hundred other people not because we know the pilot but because we believe that airline travel is safe. Our trust in these institutions depends on two factors : skills and ethics. We expect that the people who run these institutions know what they are doing, that they build and operate machines that work as they are supposed to and that they are looking out for our welfare even though we are strangers.
When one of these factors is weak or absent, trust breaks down and we either pay a high price in safety- as in the Bhopal tragedy -or a large ‘welfare premium’ such as the elaborate security measures at airports. Trust-deficient environments work in the favour of the rich and powerful, who can command premium treatment and afford welfare premiums. Poor people can command neither; which is why air travel is safer than train travel, which in turn is safer than walking by the road side.
Every modern society depends on the trust in the skills and ethics of a variety of institutions such as schools and colleges, hospital and markets. If we stopped believing in the expertise of our teachers, doctors and engineers, we will stop being a modern society.
As the Institution among institutions, it is the duty of the state to ensure that all other institutions meet their ethical obligations. The Indian state has failed in its regulatory role. Consequently, we cannot trust our schools to turn out good graduates, we cannot ensure that our colleges turn out well trained engineers and we cannot guarantee that our engineers will turn out to be good products.
Last year, I was invited to speak at an undergraduate research conference. Most of the participants in this conference were students at the best engineering colleges in the State. One student who was driving me back and forth recounted a story about the previous year’s final exam. One of his papers had a question from a leading textbook to which the textbook’s answer was wrong. The student was in a dilemma : should he write the (wrong) answer as given in the textbook or should he write the right answer using his own analytical skills. He decided to do the latter and received a zero on that question. Clearly, as the student had suspected, the examiners were looking at the textbook answer while correcting the examination papers instead of verifying its correctness.
The behaviour of these examiners is a breakdown of institutional morals, with consequences for the skills acquired by students. I say institutional morals, for the failure of these examiners is not a personal failure. At the same conference I met a whole range of college teachers, all of whom were drafted as examiners at some time or the other. Without exception, they were dedicated individuals who cared about the education and welfare of their students. However, when put in the institutional role of evaluating an anonymous individual, they fail in fulfilling their responsibilities. When some of our best colleges are run in this fashion, is it any wonder that we turn out unskilled engineers and scientists ? If, as we are led to expect, there is a vast increase in education at all levels and the regulatory regime is as weak as it is currently, isn’t it likely that the trust deficit is only going to increase ?
We are all aware of the consequences of ignoring corruption at all levels of society. While institutional failures in governance are obvious, I think the real problem lies deeper, in the failure of every day institutions that are quite apart from institutions that impinge on our lives only on rare occasions. It is true that our lives are made more miserable by government officials demanding bribes for all sorts of things, but what about the everyday lying andcheating and breaking of rules with people who are strangers ?
Let me give you an example that many of us have experienced. I prefer buying my fruits and vegetables from roadside vendors rather than chain stores. To the vendor, I am probably an ideal customer, since I do not bargain and I do not take hours choosing the best pieces, instead, letting the vendor do the selecting. The market near my house is quite busy; as a result, most vendors are selling their wares to strangers. It takes a while before a particular vendor realises that I am a repeat customer. In such a situation trust is crucial. I have a simple rule : if a vendor palms off a bad piece whose defects are obvious, I never go back to that person again. It is amazing how often that happens.
In my opinion, the failure of institutional ethics is as much about these little abuses of trust as anything else. Everyday thievery is like roadside trash; if you let it accumulate the whole neighbourhood stinks.

​Q. Why, according to the author, is the behaviour of examiners a breakdown of institutional morals ?

Solution:

As the institution is responsible for not encouraging examiners to venture outside the rote process.

QUESTION: 4

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been underline to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

The modern world requires us to repose trust in many anonymous institutions. We strap ourselves in a flying tin can with two hundred other people not because we know the pilot but because we believe that airline travel is safe. Our trust in these institutions depends on two factors : skills and ethics. We expect that the people who run these institutions know what they are doing, that they build and operate machines that work as they are supposed to and that they are looking out for our welfare even though we are strangers.
When one of these factors is weak or absent, trust breaks down and we either pay a high price in safety- as in the Bhopal tragedy -or a large ‘welfare premium’ such as the elaborate security measures at airports. Trust-deficient environments work in the favour of the rich and powerful, who can command premium treatment and afford welfare premiums. Poor people can command neither; which is why air travel is safer than train travel, which in turn is safer than walking by the road side.
Every modern society depends on the trust in the skills and ethics of a variety of institutions such as schools and colleges, hospital and markets. If we stopped believing in the expertise of our teachers, doctors and engineers, we will stop being a modern society.
As the Institution among institutions, it is the duty of the state to ensure that all other institutions meet their ethical obligations. The Indian state has failed in its regulatory role. Consequently, we cannot trust our schools to turn out good graduates, we cannot ensure that our colleges turn out well trained engineers and we cannot guarantee that our engineers will turn out to be good products.
Last year, I was invited to speak at an undergraduate research conference. Most of the participants in this conference were students at the best engineering colleges in the State. One student who was driving me back and forth recounted a story about the previous year’s final exam. One of his papers had a question from a leading textbook to which the textbook’s answer was wrong. The student was in a dilemma : should he write the (wrong) answer as given in the textbook or should he write the right answer using his own analytical skills. He decided to do the latter and received a zero on that question. Clearly, as the student had suspected, the examiners were looking at the textbook answer while correcting the examination papers instead of verifying its correctness.
The behaviour of these examiners is a breakdown of institutional morals, with consequences for the skills acquired by students. I say institutional morals, for the failure of these examiners is not a personal failure. At the same conference I met a whole range of college teachers, all of whom were drafted as examiners at some time or the other. Without exception, they were dedicated individuals who cared about the education and welfare of their students. However, when put in the institutional role of evaluating an anonymous individual, they fail in fulfilling their responsibilities. When some of our best colleges are run in this fashion, is it any wonder that we turn out unskilled engineers and scientists ? If, as we are led to expect, there is a vast increase in education at all levels and the regulatory regime is as weak as it is currently, isn’t it likely that the trust deficit is only going to increase ?
We are all aware of the consequences of ignoring corruption at all levels of society. While institutional failures in governance are obvious, I think the real problem lies deeper, in the failure of every day institutions that are quite apart from institutions that impinge on our lives only on rare occasions. It is true that our lives are made more miserable by government officials demanding bribes for all sorts of things, but what about the everyday lying andcheating and breaking of rules with people who are strangers ?
Let me give you an example that many of us have experienced. I prefer buying my fruits and vegetables from roadside vendors rather than chain stores. To the vendor, I am probably an ideal customer, since I do not bargain and I do not take hours choosing the best pieces, instead, letting the vendor do the selecting. The market near my house is quite busy; as a result, most vendors are selling their wares to strangers. It takes a while before a particular vendor realises that I am a repeat customer. In such a situation trust is crucial. I have a simple rule : if a vendor palms off a bad piece whose defects are obvious, I never go back to that person again. It is amazing how often that happens.
In my opinion, the failure of institutional ethics is as much about these little abuses of trust as anything else. Everyday thievery is like roadside trash; if you let it accumulate the whole neighbourhood stinks.

Q. Which of the following is possibly the most appropriate title for the passage ?

Solution:

Little Deceptions Add to Larger Trust-Deficit.

QUESTION: 5

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been underline to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

The modern world requires us to repose trust in many anonymous institutions. We strap ourselves in a flying tin can with two hundred other people not because we know the pilot but because we believe that airline travel is safe. Our trust in these institutions depends on two factors : skills and ethics. We expect that the people who run these institutions know what they are doing, that they build and operate machines that work as they are supposed to and that they are looking out for our welfare even though we are strangers.
When one of these factors is weak or absent, trust breaks down and we either pay a high price in safety- as in the Bhopal tragedy -or a large ‘welfare premium’ such as the elaborate security measures at airports. Trust-deficient environments work in the favour of the rich and powerful, who can command premium treatment and afford welfare premiums. Poor people can command neither; which is why air travel is safer than train travel, which in turn is safer than walking by the road side.
Every modern society depends on the trust in the skills and ethics of a variety of institutions such as schools and colleges, hospital and markets. If we stopped believing in the expertise of our teachers, doctors and engineers, we will stop being a modern society.
As the Institution among institutions, it is the duty of the state to ensure that all other institutions meet their ethical obligations. The Indian state has failed in its regulatory role. Consequently, we cannot trust our schools to turn out good graduates, we cannot ensure that our colleges turn out well trained engineers and we cannot guarantee that our engineers will turn out to be good products.
Last year, I was invited to speak at an undergraduate research conference. Most of the participants in this conference were students at the best engineering colleges in the State. One student who was driving me back and forth recounted a story about the previous year’s final exam. One of his papers had a question from a leading textbook to which the textbook’s answer was wrong. The student was in a dilemma : should he write the (wrong) answer as given in the textbook or should he write the right answer using his own analytical skills. He decided to do the latter and received a zero on that question. Clearly, as the student had suspected, the examiners were looking at the textbook answer while correcting the examination papers instead of verifying its correctness.
The behaviour of these examiners is a breakdown of institutional morals, with consequences for the skills acquired by students. I say institutional morals, for the failure of these examiners is not a personal failure. At the same conference I met a whole range of college teachers, all of whom were drafted as examiners at some time or the other. Without exception, they were dedicated individuals who cared about the education and welfare of their students. However, when put in the institutional role of evaluating an anonymous individual, they fail in fulfilling their responsibilities. When some of our best colleges are run in this fashion, is it any wonder that we turn out unskilled engineers and scientists ? If, as we are led to expect, there is a vast increase in education at all levels and the regulatory regime is as weak as it is currently, isn’t it likely that the trust deficit is only going to increase ?
We are all aware of the consequences of ignoring corruption at all levels of society. While institutional failures in governance are obvious, I think the real problem lies deeper, in the failure of every day institutions that are quite apart from institutions that impinge on our lives only on rare occasions. It is true that our lives are made more miserable by government officials demanding bribes for all sorts of things, but what about the everyday lying andcheating and breaking of rules with people who are strangers ?
Let me give you an example that many of us have experienced. I prefer buying my fruits and vegetables from roadside vendors rather than chain stores. To the vendor, I am probably an ideal customer, since I do not bargain and I do not take hours choosing the best pieces, instead, letting the vendor do the selecting. The market near my house is quite busy; as a result, most vendors are selling their wares to strangers. It takes a while before a particular vendor realises that I am a repeat customer. In such a situation trust is crucial. I have a simple rule : if a vendor palms off a bad piece whose defects are obvious, I never go back to that person again. It is amazing how often that happens.
In my opinion, the failure of institutional ethics is as much about these little abuses of trust as anything else. Everyday thievery is like roadside trash; if you let it accumulate the whole neighbourhood stinks.

Q. Which of the following is NOT TRUE in the context of the passage ?
(A) Despite being aware of the fact that clients will not return, fruit and vegetable vendors sell bad goods.
(B) Examiners are devoted to their jobs.
(C) Examiners deliberately mark correct answers as incorrect ones.

Solution:

Examiners are not devoted to their jobs.

QUESTION: 6

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been underline to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.
The modern world requires us to repose trust in many anonymous institutions. We strap ourselves in a flying tin can with two hundred other people not because we know the pilot but because we believe that airline travel is safe. Our trust in these institutions depends on two factors : skills and ethics. We expect that the people who run these institutions know what they are doing, that they build and operate machines that work as they are supposed to and that they are looking out for our welfare even though we are strangers.
When one of these factors is weak or absent, trust breaks down and we either pay a high price in safety- as in the Bhopal tragedy -or a large ‘welfare premium’ such as the elaborate security measures at airports. Trust-deficient environments work in the favour of the rich and powerful, who can command premium treatment and afford welfare premiums. Poor people can command neither; which is why air travel is safer than train travel, which in turn is safer than walking by the road side.
Every modern society depends on the trust in the skills and ethics of a variety of institutions such as schools and colleges, hospital and markets. If we stopped believing in the expertise of our teachers, doctors and engineers, we will stop being a modern society.
As the Institution among institutions, it is the duty of the state to ensure that all other institutions meet their ethical obligations. The Indian state has failed in its regulatory role. Consequently, we cannot trust our schools to turn out good graduates, we cannot ensure that our colleges turn out well trained engineers and we cannot guarantee that our engineers will turn out to be good products.
Last year, I was invited to speak at an undergraduate research conference. Most of the participants in this conference were students at the best engineering colleges in the State. One student who was driving me back and forth recounted a story about the previous year’s final exam. One of his papers had a question from a leading textbook to which the textbook’s answer was wrong. The student was in a dilemma : should he write the (wrong) answer as given in the textbook or should he write the right answer using his own analytical skills. He decided to do the latter and received a zero on that question. Clearly, as the student had suspected, the examiners were looking at the textbook answer while correcting the examination papers instead of verifying its correctness.
The behaviour of these examiners is a breakdown of institutional morals, with consequences for the skills acquired by students. I say institutional morals, for the failure of these examiners is not a personal failure. At the same conference I met a whole range of college teachers, all of whom were drafted as examiners at some time or the other. Without exception, they were dedicated individuals who cared about the education and welfare of their students. However, when put in the institutional role of evaluating an anonymous individual, they fail in fulfilling their responsibilities. When some of our best colleges are run in this fashion, is it any wonder that we turn out unskilled engineers and scientists ? If, as we are led to expect, there is a vast increase in education at all levels and the regulatory regime is as weak as it is currently, isn’t it likely that the trust deficit is only going to increase ?
We are all aware of the consequences of ignoring corruption at all levels of society. While institutional failures in governance are obvious, I think the real problem lies deeper, in the failure of every day institutions that are quite apart from institutions that impinge on our lives only on rare occasions. It is true that our lives are made more miserable by government officials demanding bribes for all sorts of things, but what about the everyday lying andcheating and breaking of rules with people who are strangers ?
Let me give you an example that many of us have experienced. I prefer buying my fruits and vegetables from roadside vendors rather than chain stores. To the vendor, I am probably an ideal customer, since I do not bargain and I do not take hours choosing the best pieces, instead, letting the vendor do the selecting. The market near my house is quite busy; as a result, most vendors are selling their wares to strangers. It takes a while before a particular vendor realises that I am a repeat customer. In such a situation trust is crucial. I have a simple rule : if a vendor palms off a bad piece whose defects are obvious, I never go back to that person again. It is amazing how often that happens.
In my opinion, the failure of institutional ethics is as much about these little abuses of trust as anything else. Everyday thievery is like roadside trash; if you let it accumulate the whole neighbourhood stinks.
Q. What, according to the author, happens when there is a breakdown of trust ?
(A) Less affluent people have to compromise on quality.
(B) Our wellbeing is compromised.
(C) We pay a higher price for services.

Solution:

Refer to second paragraph of the passage.

QUESTION: 7

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been underline to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

The modern world requires us to repose trust in many anonymous institutions. We strap ourselves in a flying tin can with two hundred other people not because we know the pilot but because we believe that airline travel is safe. Our trust in these institutions depends on two factors : skills and ethics. We expect that the people who run these institutions know what they are doing, that they build and operate machines that work as they are supposed to and that they are looking out for our welfare even though we are strangers.
When one of these factors is weak or absent, trust breaks down and we either pay a high price in safety- as in the Bhopal tragedy -or a large ‘welfare premium’ such as the elaborate security measures at airports. Trust-deficient environments work in the favour of the rich and powerful, who can command premium treatment and afford welfare premiums. Poor people can command neither; which is why air travel is safer than train travel, which in turn is safer than walking by the road side.
Every modern society depends on the trust in the skills and ethics of a variety of institutions such as schools and colleges, hospital and markets. If we stopped believing in the expertise of our teachers, doctors and engineers, we will stop being a modern society.
As the Institution among institutions, it is the duty of the state to ensure that all other institutions meet their ethical obligations. The Indian state has failed in its regulatory role. Consequently, we cannot trust our schools to turn out good graduates, we cannot ensure that our colleges turn out well trained engineers and we cannot guarantee that our engineers will turn out to be good products.
Last year, I was invited to speak at an undergraduate research conference. Most of the participants in this conference were students at the best engineering colleges in the State. One student who was driving me back and forth recounted a story about the previous year’s final exam. One of his papers had a question from a leading textbook to which the textbook’s answer was wrong. The student was in a dilemma : should he write the (wrong) answer as given in the textbook or should he write the right answer using his own analytical skills. He decided to do the latter and received a zero on that question. Clearly, as the student had suspected, the examiners were looking at the textbook answer while correcting the examination papers instead of verifying its correctness.
The behaviour of these examiners is a breakdown of institutional morals, with consequences for the skills acquired by students. I say institutional morals, for the failure of these examiners is not a personal failure. At the same conference I met a whole range of college teachers, all of whom were drafted as examiners at some time or the other. Without exception, they were dedicated individuals who cared about the education and welfare of their students. However, when put in the institutional role of evaluating an anonymous individual, they fail in fulfilling their responsibilities. When some of our best colleges are run in this fashion, is it any wonder that we turn out unskilled engineers and scientists ? If, as we are led to expect, there is a vast increase in education at all levels and the regulatory regime is as weak as it is currently, isn’t it likely that the trust deficit is only going to increase ?
We are all aware of the consequences of ignoring corruption at all levels of society. While institutional failures in governance are obvious, I think the real problem lies deeper, in the failure of every day institutions that are quite apart from institutions that impinge on our lives only on rare occasions. It is true that our lives are made more miserable by government officials demanding bribes for all sorts of things, but what about the everyday lying andcheating and breaking of rules with people who are strangers ?
Let me give you an example that many of us have experienced. I prefer buying my fruits and vegetables from roadside vendors rather than chain stores. To the vendor, I am probably an ideal customer, since I do not bargain and I do not take hours choosing the best pieces, instead, letting the vendor do the selecting. The market near my house is quite busy; as a result, most vendors are selling their wares to strangers. It takes a while before a particular vendor realises that I am a repeat customer. In such a situation trust is crucial. I have a simple rule : if a vendor palms off a bad piece whose defects are obvious, I never go back to that person again. It is amazing how often that happens.
In my opinion, the failure of institutional ethics is as much about these little abuses of trust as anything else. Everyday thievery is like roadside trash; if you let it accumulate the whole neighbourhood stinks.

Q. Choose the word/group of words which is most similar in meaning to the work/group of words underline as used in the passage.
PREMIUM

Solution:

Premium means very high; of high quality; extra. So, extra is the correct word which is similar in meaning to it.

QUESTION: 8

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been underline to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.
The modern world requires us to repose trust in many anonymous institutions. We strap ourselves in a flying tin can with two hundred other people not because we know the pilot but because we believe that airline travel is safe. Our trust in these institutions depends on two factors : skills and ethics. We expect that the people who run these institutions know what they are doing, that they build and operate machines that work as they are supposed to and that they are looking out for our welfare even though we are strangers.
When one of these factors is weak or absent, trust breaks down and we either pay a high price in safety- as in the Bhopal tragedy -or a large ‘welfare premium’ such as the elaborate security measures at airports. Trust-deficient environments work in the favour of the rich and powerful, who can command premium treatment and afford welfare premiums. Poor people can command neither; which is why air travel is safer than train travel, which in turn is safer than walking by the road side.
Every modern society depends on the trust in the skills and ethics of a variety of institutions such as schools and colleges, hospital and markets. If we stopped believing in the expertise of our teachers, doctors and engineers, we will stop being a modern society.
As the Institution among institutions, it is the duty of the state to ensure that all other institutions meet their ethical obligations. The Indian state has failed in its regulatory role. Consequently, we cannot trust our schools to turn out good graduates, we cannot ensure that our colleges turn out well trained engineers and we cannot guarantee that our engineers will turn out to be good products.
Last year, I was invited to speak at an undergraduate research conference. Most of the participants in this conference were students at the best engineering colleges in the State. One student who was driving me back and forth recounted a story about the previous year’s final exam. One of his papers had a question from a leading textbook to which the textbook’s answer was wrong. The student was in a dilemma : should he write the (wrong) answer as given in the textbook or should he write the right answer using his own analytical skills. He decided to do the latter and received a zero on that question. Clearly, as the student had suspected, the examiners were looking at the textbook answer while correcting the examination papers instead of verifying its correctness.
The behaviour of these examiners is a breakdown of institutional morals, with consequences for the skills acquired by students. I say institutional morals, for the failure of these examiners is not a personal failure. At the same conference I met a whole range of college teachers, all of whom were drafted as examiners at some time or the other. Without exception, they were dedicated individuals who cared about the education and welfare of their students. However, when put in the institutional role of evaluating an anonymous individual, they fail in fulfilling their responsibilities. When some of our best colleges are run in this fashion, is it any wonder that we turn out unskilled engineers and scientists ? If, as we are led to expect, there is a vast increase in education at all levels and the regulatory regime is as weak as it is currently, isn’t it likely that the trust deficit is only going to increase ?
We are all aware of the consequences of ignoring corruption at all levels of society. While institutional failures in governance are obvious, I think the real problem lies deeper, in the failure of every day institutions that are quite apart from institutions that impinge on our lives only on rare occasions. It is true that our lives are made more miserable by government officials demanding bribes for all sorts of things, but what about the everyday lying andcheating and breaking of rules with people who are strangers ?
Let me give you an example that many of us have experienced. I prefer buying my fruits and vegetables from roadside vendors rather than chain stores. To the vendor, I am probably an ideal customer, since I do not bargain and I do not take hours choosing the best pieces, instead, letting the vendor do the selecting. The market near my house is quite busy; as a result, most vendors are selling their wares to strangers. It takes a while before a particular vendor realises that I am a repeat customer. In such a situation trust is crucial. I have a simple rule : if a vendor palms off a bad piece whose defects are obvious, I never go back to that person again. It is amazing how often that happens.
In my opinion, the failure of institutional ethics is as much about these little abuses of trust as anything else. Everyday thievery is like roadside trash; if you let it accumulate the whole neighbourhood stinks

Q. Choose the word/group of words which is most similar in meaning to the work/group of words underline as used in the passage.
RECOUNTED

Solution:

Recount means to tell somebody about something; especially something that you have experienced. So, narrated is the correct word which is similar in meaning to it

QUESTION: 9

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been underline to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

The modern world requires us to repose trust in many anonymous institutions. We strap ourselves in a flying tin can with two hundred other people not because we know the pilot but because we believe that airline travel is safe. Our trust in these institutions depends on two factors : skills and ethics. We expect that the people who run these institutions know what they are doing, that they build and operate machines that work as they are supposed to and that they are looking out for our welfare even though we are strangers.
When one of these factors is weak or absent, trust breaks down and we either pay a high price in safety- as in the Bhopal tragedy -or a large ‘welfare premium’ such as the elaborate security measures at airports. Trust-deficient environments work in the favour of the rich and powerful, who can command premium treatment and afford welfare premiums. Poor people can command neither; which is why air travel is safer than train travel, which in turn is safer than walking by the road side.
Every modern society depends on the trust in the skills and ethics of a variety of institutions such as schools and colleges, hospital and markets. If we stopped believing in the expertise of our teachers, doctors and engineers, we will stop being a modern society.
As the Institution among institutions, it is the duty of the state to ensure that all other institutions meet their ethical obligations. The Indian state has failed in its regulatory role. Consequently, we cannot trust our schools to turn out good graduates, we cannot ensure that our colleges turn out well trained engineers and we cannot guarantee that our engineers will turn out to be good products.
Last year, I was invited to speak at an undergraduate research conference. Most of the participants in this conference were students at the best engineering colleges in the State. One student who was driving me back and forth recounted a story about the previous year’s final exam. One of his papers had a question from a leading textbook to which the textbook’s answer was wrong. The student was in a dilemma : should he write the (wrong) answer as given in the textbook or should he write the right answer using his own analytical skills. He decided to do the latter and received a zero on that question. Clearly, as the student had suspected, the examiners were looking at the textbook answer while correcting the examination papers instead of verifying its correctness.
The behaviour of these examiners is a breakdown of institutional morals, with consequences for the skills acquired by students. I say institutional morals, for the failure of these examiners is not a personal failure. At the same conference I met a whole range of college teachers, all of whom were drafted as examiners at some time or the other. Without exception, they were dedicated individuals who cared about the education and welfare of their students. However, when put in the institutional role of evaluating an anonymous individual, they fail in fulfilling their responsibilities. When some of our best colleges are run in this fashion, is it any wonder that we turn out unskilled engineers and scientists ? If, as we are led to expect, there is a vast increase in education at all levels and the regulatory regime is as weak as it is currently, isn’t it likely that the trust deficit is only going to increase ?
We are all aware of the consequences of ignoring corruption at all levels of society. While institutional failures in governance are obvious, I think the real problem lies deeper, in the failure of every day institutions that are quite apart from institutions that impinge on our lives only on rare occasions. It is true that our lives are made more miserable by government officials demanding bribes for all sorts of things, but what about the everyday lying andcheating and breaking of rules with people who are strangers ?
Let me give you an example that many of us have experienced. I prefer buying my fruits and vegetables from roadside vendors rather than chain stores. To the vendor, I am probably an ideal customer, since I do not bargain and I do not take hours choosing the best pieces, instead, letting the vendor do the selecting. The market near my house is quite busy; as a result, most vendors are selling their wares to strangers. It takes a while before a particular vendor realises that I am a repeat customer. In such a situation trust is crucial. I have a simple rule : if a vendor palms off a bad piece whose defects are obvious, I never go back to that person again. It is amazing how often that happens.
In my opinion, the failure of institutional ethics is as much about these little abuses of trust as anything else. Everyday thievery is like roadside trash; if you let it accumulate the whole neighbourhood stinks.

Q. Choose the word/group of words which is most opposite in meaning to the word/ group of words underline as used in the passage.
REPEAT

Solution:

Repeat means an event that is very similar to something that happened before; to happen again. So, new is the correct word which is opposite in meaning to it.

QUESTION: 10

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been underline to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

The modern world requires us to repose trust in many anonymous institutions. We strap ourselves in a flying tin can with two hundred other people not because we know the pilot but because we believe that airline travel is safe. Our trust in these institutions depends on two factors : skills and ethics. We expect that the people who run these institutions know what they are doing, that they build and operate machines that work as they are supposed to and that they are looking out for our welfare even though we are strangers.
When one of these factors is weak or absent, trust breaks down and we either pay a high price in safety- as in the Bhopal tragedy -or a large ‘welfare premium’ such as the elaborate security measures at airports. Trust-deficient environments work in the favour of the rich and powerful, who can command premium treatment and afford welfare premiums. Poor people can command neither; which is why air travel is safer than train travel, which in turn is safer than walking by the road side.
Every modern society depends on the trust in the skills and ethics of a variety of institutions such as schools and colleges, hospital and markets. If we stopped believing in the expertise of our teachers, doctors and engineers, we will stop being a modern society.
As the Institution among institutions, it is the duty of the state to ensure that all other institutions meet their ethical obligations. The Indian state has failed in its regulatory role. Consequently, we cannot trust our schools to turn out good graduates, we cannot ensure that our colleges turn out well trained engineers and we cannot guarantee that our engineers will turn out to be good products.
Last year, I was invited to speak at an undergraduate research conference. Most of the participants in this conference were students at the best engineering colleges in the State. One student who was driving me back and forth recounted a story about the previous year’s final exam. One of his papers had a question from a leading textbook to which the textbook’s answer was wrong. The student was in a dilemma : should he write the (wrong) answer as given in the textbook or should he write the right answer using his own analytical skills. He decided to do the latter and received a zero on that question. Clearly, as the student had suspected, the examiners were looking at the textbook answer while correcting the examination papers instead of verifying its correctness.
The behaviour of these examiners is a breakdown of institutional morals, with consequences for the skills acquired by students. I say institutional morals, for the failure of these examiners is not a personal failure. At the same conference I met a whole range of college teachers, all of whom were drafted as examiners at some time or the other. Without exception, they were dedicated individuals who cared about the education and welfare of their students. However, when put in the institutional role of evaluating an anonymous individual, they fail in fulfilling their responsibilities. When some of our best colleges are run in this fashion, is it any wonder that we turn out unskilled engineers and scientists ? If, as we are led to expect, there is a vast increase in education at all levels and the regulatory regime is as weak as it is currently, isn’t it likely that the trust deficit is only going to increase ?
We are all aware of the consequences of ignoring corruption at all levels of society. While institutional failures in governance are obvious, I think the real problem lies deeper, in the failure of every day institutions that are quite apart from institutions that impinge on our lives only on rare occasions. It is true that our lives are made more miserable by government officials demanding bribes for all sorts of things, but what about the everyday lying andcheating and breaking of rules with people who are strangers ?
Let me give you an example that many of us have experienced. I prefer buying my fruits and vegetables from roadside vendors rather than chain stores. To the vendor, I am probably an ideal customer, since I do not bargain and I do not take hours choosing the best pieces, instead, letting the vendor do the selecting. The market near my house is quite busy; as a result, most vendors are selling their wares to strangers. It takes a while before a particular vendor realises that I am a repeat customer. In such a situation trust is crucial. I have a simple rule : if a vendor palms off a bad piece whose defects are obvious, I never go back to that person again. It is amazing how often that happens.
In my opinion, the failure of institutional ethics is as much about these little abuses of trust as anything else. Everyday thievery is like roadside trash; if you let it accumulate the whole neighbourhood stinks.

Q. Choose the word/group of words which is most opposite in meaning to the word/ group of words underline as used in the passage.
UNSKILLED

Solution:

Unskilled means not having or needing special skills or training. So, trained is the correct word which is opposite in meaning to it.

QUESTION: 11

In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. These numbers are printed below the passage and against each, five words/ phrases are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find out the appropriate word/phrase in each case.

Information technology, and the hardware and software associated with the IT industry, are an integral part of nearly (11) major global industry. IT industry has become one of the most robust industries in the world. IT, more than any other industry or economic world, has an increased productivity, particularly in the developed world, and therefore is a key driver of global economic growth. Economies of scale and (12) demand from both consumers and enterprises (13) this rapidly growing sector. The Information Technology Association of America (ITAA) explains 'information technology' as encompassing all possible aspects of information systems based on computers. Both software development and the hardware involved in the IT industry include everything from computer systems, to the design, implementation, study and development of IT and management systems. (14) to its easy accessibility and the wide range of IT products available, the demand for IT services has increased substantially over the years. The IT sector has emerged as a major global (15)of both growth and employment.

Solution:
QUESTION: 12

In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. These numbers are printed below the passage and against each, five words/ phrases are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find out the appropriate word/phrase in each case.

Information technology, and the hardware and software associated with the IT industry, are an integral part of nearly (11) major global industry. IT industry has become one of the most robust industries in the world. IT, more than any other industry or economic world, has an increased productivity, particularly in the developed world, and therefore is a key driver of global economic growth. Economies of scale and (12) demand from both consumers and enterprises (13) this rapidly growing sector. The Information Technology Association of America (ITAA) explains 'information technology' as encompassing all possible aspects of information systems based on computers. Both software development and the hardware involved in the IT industry include everything from computer systems, to the design, implementation, study and development of IT and management systems. (14) to its easy accessibility and the wide range of IT products available, the demand for IT services has increased substantially over the years. The IT sector has emerged as a major global (15)of both growth and employment.

Solution:
QUESTION: 13

In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. These numbers are printed below the passage and against each, five words/ phrases are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find out the appropriate word/phrase in each case.

Information technology, and the hardware and software associated with the IT industry, are an integral part of nearly (11) major global industry. IT industry has become one of the most robust industries in the world. IT, more than any other industry or economic world, has an increased productivity, particularly in the developed world, and therefore is a key driver of global economic growth. Economies of scale and (12) demand from both consumers and enterprises (13) this rapidly growing sector. The Information Technology Association of America (ITAA) explains 'information technology' as encompassing all possible aspects of information systems based on computers. Both software development and the hardware involved in the IT industry include everything from computer systems, to the design, implementation, study and development of IT and management systems. (14) to its easy accessibility and the wide range of IT products available, the demand for IT services has increased substantially over the years. The IT sector has emerged as a major global (15)of both growth and employment.

Solution:
QUESTION: 14

In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. These numbers are printed below the passage and against each, five words/ phrases are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find out the appropriate word/phrase in each case.

Information technology, and the hardware and software associated with the IT industry, are an integral part of nearly (11) major global industry. IT industry has become one of the most robust industries in the world. IT, more than any other industry or economic world, has an increased productivity, particularly in the developed world, and therefore is a key driver of global economic growth. Economies of scale and (12) demand from both consumers and enterprises (13) this rapidly growing sector. The Information Technology Association of America (ITAA) explains 'information technology' as encompassing all possible aspects of information systems based on computers. Both software development and the hardware involved in the IT industry include everything from computer systems, to the design, implementation, study and development of IT and management systems. (14) to its easy accessibility and the wide range of IT products available, the demand for IT services has increased substantially over the years. The IT sector has emerged as a major global (15)of both growth and employment.

Solution:
QUESTION: 15

In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. These numbers are printed below the passage and against each, five words/ phrases are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find out the appropriate word/phrase in each case.

Information technology, and the hardware and software associated with the IT industry, are an integral part of nearly (11) major global industry. IT industry has become one of the most robust industries in the world. IT, more than any other industry or economic world, has an increased productivity, particularly in the developed world, and therefore is a key driver of global economic growth. Economies of scale and (12) demand from both consumers and enterprises (13) this rapidly growing sector. The Information Technology Association of America (ITAA) explains 'information technology' as encompassing all possible aspects of information systems based on computers. Both software development and the hardware involved in the IT industry include everything from computer systems, to the design, implementation, study and development of IT and management systems. (14) to its easy accessibility and the wide range of IT products available, the demand for IT services has increased substantially over the years. The IT sector has emerged as a major global (15)of both growth and employment.

Solution:
QUESTION: 16

Rearrange the following six sentences (A), (B), (C), (D), (E) and (F) in the proper sequence to form a meaningful paragraph: then answer the questions given below them.

(A) Building of these structures requires a lot of fuel to be burnt which emits a large amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.
(B) The major source of carbon dioxide is power plants.
(C) Another twenty percent of carbon dioxide emitted in the atmosphere comes from burning of gasoline in the engines of vehicles.
(D) Building, both commercial and residential represent a larger source of global warming pollution than the said cars and trucks.
(E) The major cause of global warming is the emission of green house gases like carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide etc. into the atmosphere.
(F)These power plants emit large amounts of carbon dioxide produced from burning of fossil fuels for the purpose of electricity generation.

Q. Which of the following should be the SECOND sentence after rearrangement ?

Solution:

The correct sequence to meaningful paragraph is EBFCDA.

QUESTION: 17

Rearrange the following six sentences (A), (B), (C), (D), (E) and (F) in the proper sequence to form a meaningful paragraph: then answer the questions given below them.

(A) Building of these structures requires a lot of fuel to be burnt which emits a large amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.
(B) The major source of carbon dioxide is power plants.
(C) Another twenty percent of carbon dioxide emitted in the atmosphere comes from burning of gasoline in the engines of vehicles.
(D) Building, both commercial and residential represent a larger source of global warming pollution than the said cars and trucks.
(E) The major cause of global warming is the emission of green house gases like carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide etc. into the atmosphere.
(F)These power plants emit large amounts of carbon dioxide produced from burning of fossil fuels for the purpose of electricity generation.

Q. Which of the following should be the THIRD sentence after rearrangement ?

Solution:

The correct sequence to meaningful paragraph is EBFCDA.

QUESTION: 18

Rearrange the following six sentences (A), (B), (C), (D), (E) and (F) in the proper sequence to form a meaningful paragraph: then answer the questions given below them.

(A) Building of these structures requires a lot of fuel to be burnt which emits a large amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.
(B) The major source of carbon dioxide is power plants.
(C) Another twenty percent of carbon dioxide emitted in the atmosphere comes from burning of gasoline in the engines of vehicles.
(D) Building, both commercial and residential represent a larger source of global warming pollution than the said cars and trucks.
(E) The major cause of global warming is the emission of green house gases like carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide etc. into the atmosphere.
(F)These power plants emit large amounts of carbon dioxide produced from burning of fossil fuels for the purpose of electricity generation.

​Q. Which of the following should be the FIRST sentence after rearrangement ?

Solution:

The correct sequence to meaningful paragraph is EBFCDA.

QUESTION: 19

Rearrange the following six sentences (A), (B), (C), (D), (E) and (F) in the proper sequence to form a meaningful paragraph: then answer the questions given below them.

(A) Building of these structures requires a lot of fuel to be burnt which emits a large amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.
(B) The major source of carbon dioxide is power plants.
(C) Another twenty percent of carbon dioxide emitted in the atmosphere comes from burning of gasoline in the engines of vehicles.
(D) Building, both commercial and residential represent a larger source of global warming pollution than the said cars and trucks.
(E) The major cause of global warming is the emission of green house gases like carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide etc. into the atmosphere.
(F)These power plants emit large amounts of carbon dioxide produced from burning of fossil fuels for the purpose of electricity generation.

​Q. Which of the following should be the SIXTH sentence after rearrangement ?

Solution:

The correct sequence to meaningful paragraph is EBFCDA.

QUESTION: 20

Rearrange the following six sentences (A), (B), (C), (D), (E) and (F) in the proper sequence to form a meaningful paragraph: then answer the questions given below them.

(A) Building of these structures requires a lot of fuel to be burnt which emits a large amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.
(B) The major source of carbon dioxide is power plants.
(C) Another twenty percent of carbon dioxide emitted in the atmosphere comes from burning of gasoline in the engines of vehicles.
(D) Building, both commercial and residential represent a larger source of global warming pollution than the said cars and trucks.
(E) The major cause of global warming is the emission of green house gases like carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide etc. into the atmosphere.
(F)These power plants emit large amounts of carbon dioxide produced from burning of fossil fuels for the purpose of electricity generation.

​Q. Which of the following should be the FOURTH sentence after rearrangement ?

Solution:

The correct sequence to meaningful paragraph is EBFCDA.

QUESTION: 21

Dress in black (1)/ several students from the University took part (2) / in a protest march in the city on Thursday as part (3)/ of a campaign against female infanticide. (4)/ No error (5).

Solution:

Change ‘dress’ to ‘dressed’.

QUESTION: 22

The poor experience in (1)/ neighbouring countries which have implemented (2)/ food stamp programmes should serve as (3)/ a deterrent on our country. (4)/ No error (5)

Solution:

Change ‘deterrent on’ to ‘deterrent to’.

QUESTION: 23

Closing the doors to a foreign citizen (1)/ seeking employment in India, the High Court on Thursday ruled (2)/ that it is not a foreign national's fundamental right, (3)/ to get an employment visa in the country. (4)/ No error (5).

Solution:

Change ‘that it is not a’ to ‘that it was not a’.

QUESTION: 24

For much of the developing world (1)/ historically, environmentalism was seen as a luxury (2)/ rather than a necessity because (3)/ always the development imperatives was seen to be urgent. (4)/ No error (5).

Solution:

Change ‘always the development imperatives was’ to ‘always the development imperatives were’.

QUESTION: 25

The consumer Forum directed/ the Power Corporation to (1)/ compensate a complainant for the inconvenience (2)/and mental agony who he had to suffer, (3)/ because of the power officials' irresponsible attitude. (4)/ No error (5).

Solution:

Change ‘and mental agony who he had to suffer’ to ‘and mental agony which he had to suffer’.

QUESTION: 26

The PradhanMantri Jan DhanYojana, a financial inclusion mission_____________by PM NarendraModi____________ off with a record 15 million new bank accounts opened on the first day itself.

Solution:

‘launched, kicked’ is the correct use.Launched means start or set in motion.Kicked means succeed in giving up.

QUESTION: 27

Q. Wayne Rooney has been named England captain, taking______________ the leadership role of an inexperienced team in a rebuilding phase____________________ its worst-ever World up.

Solution:

‘over, following’ is the correct use.

QUESTION: 28

The suffering in Gaza has been so________________ that people are bound to be overjoyed at the news that a permanent ceasefire has been________________ between Hamas and Israel.

Solution:

‘deep, established’ is the correct use.Established means having existed or done something for a long time and therefore recognized and generally accepted.

QUESTION: 29

The CBI has registered a case against Bengal India Global Infrastructure for allegedly cheating Central Bank of India by ________________loans using_______________ documents.

Solution:

‘availing, forged’ is the correct use.Availing means use or take advantage of (an opportunity or available resource).Forged means copied fraudulently.

QUESTION: 30

One notable feature of Nigerian politics is the __________at which political actors switch __________________from one political group to another.

Solution:

‘frequency, allegiance’ is the correct use.Frequency means the rate at which something occurs over a particular period of time or in a given sample.Allegiance means loyalty or commitment to a superior or to a group or cause.

Related tests