Test: Class 12 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper- Term I (2021-22)


60 Questions MCQ Test Sample Papers for Class 12 Commerce | Test: Class 12 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper- Term I (2021-22)


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Attempt Test: Class 12 English: CBSE Sample Question Paper- Term I (2021-22) | 60 questions in 90 minutes | Mock test for Class 12 preparation | Free important questions MCQ to study Sample Papers for Class 12 Commerce for Class 12 Exam | Download free PDF with solutions
QUESTION: 1

Direction: Read the passage given below:

  1. I got posted in Srinagar in the 1980s. Its rugged mountains, gushing rivers and vast meadows reminded me of the landscapes of my native place – the Jibhi Valley in Himachal Pradesh. Unlike Srinagar that saw numerous tourists, Jibhi Valley remained clouded in anonymity. That’s when the seed of starting tourism in Jibhi was planted. I decided to leave my service in the Indian Army and follow the urge to return home.
  2. We had two houses – a family house and a traditional house, which we often rented out. I pleaded with my father to ask the tenant to vacate the house so that I could convert it into a guesthouse. When my family finally relented, I renovated the house keeping its originality intact, just adding windows for sunlight.
  3. I still remember the summer of 1992 when I put a signboard outside my first guesthouse in Jibhi Valley! The village residents, however, were sceptical about my success. My business kept growing but it took years for tourism to take off in Jibhi Valley. Things changed significantly after 2008 when the government launched a homestay scheme. People built homestays and with rapid tourism growth, the region changed rapidly. Villages turned into towns with many concrete buildings. Local businesses and tourists continued putting a burden on nature.
  4. Then, with the 2020-21 pandemic and lockdown, tourism came to a complete standstill in Jibhi Valley. Local people, who were employed at over a hundred homestays and guesthouses, returned to their villages. Some went back to farming; some took up pottery and some got involved in government work schemes. Now, all ardently hope that normalcy and tourism will return to the valley soon. In a way, the pandemic has given us an opportunity to introspect, go back to our roots and look for sustainable solutions.
  5. For me, tourism has been my greatest teacher. It brought people from many countries and all states of India to my guesthouse. It gave me exposure to different cultures and countless opportunities to learn new things. Most people who stayed at my guesthouse became my regular clients and good friends. When I look back, I feel proud, yet humbled at the thought that I was not only able to fulfill my dream despite all the challenges, but also played a role in establishing tourism in the beautiful valley that I call home.

Q. The scenic beauty of Srinagar makes the writer feel:

Solution:
QUESTION: 2

Direction: Read the passage given below:

  1. I got posted in Srinagar in the 1980s. Its rugged mountains, gushing rivers and vast meadows reminded me of the landscapes of my native place – the Jibhi Valley in Himachal Pradesh. Unlike Srinagar that saw numerous tourists, Jibhi Valley remained clouded in anonymity. That’s when the seed of starting tourism in Jibhi was planted. I decided to leave my service in the Indian Army and follow the urge to return home.
  2. We had two houses – a family house and a traditional house, which we often rented out. I pleaded with my father to ask the tenant to vacate the house so that I could convert it into a guesthouse. When my family finally relented, I renovated the house keeping its originality intact, just adding windows for sunlight.
  3. I still remember the summer of 1992 when I put a signboard outside my first guesthouse in Jibhi Valley! The village residents, however, were sceptical about my success. My business kept growing but it took years for tourism to take off in Jibhi Valley. Things changed significantly after 2008 when the government launched a homestay scheme. People built homestays and with rapid tourism growth, the region changed rapidly. Villages turned into towns with many concrete buildings. Local businesses and tourists continued putting a burden on nature.
  4. Then, with the 2020-21 pandemic and lockdown, tourism came to a complete standstill in Jibhi Valley. Local people, who were employed at over a hundred homestays and guesthouses, returned to their villages. Some went back to farming; some took up pottery and some got involved in government work schemes. Now, all ardently hope that normalcy and tourism will return to the valley soon. In a way, the pandemic has given us an opportunity to introspect, go back to our roots and look for sustainable solutions.
  5. For me, tourism has been my greatest teacher. It brought people from many countries and all states of India to my guesthouse. It gave me exposure to different cultures and countless opportunities to learn new things. Most people who stayed at my guesthouse became my regular clients and good friends. When I look back, I feel proud, yet humbled at the thought that I was not only able to fulfill my dream despite all the challenges, but also played a role in establishing tourism in the beautiful valley that I call home.

Q. A collocation is a group of words that often occur together.
The writer says that Jibhi valley remained clouded in anonymity.
Select the word from the options that correctly collocates with clouded in.

Solution:
QUESTION: 3

Direction: Read the passage given below:

  1. I got posted in Srinagar in the 1980s. Its rugged mountains, gushing rivers and vast meadows reminded me of the landscapes of my native place – the Jibhi Valley in Himachal Pradesh. Unlike Srinagar that saw numerous tourists, Jibhi Valley remained clouded in anonymity. That’s when the seed of starting tourism in Jibhi was planted. I decided to leave my service in the Indian Army and follow the urge to return home.
  2. We had two houses – a family house and a traditional house, which we often rented out. I pleaded with my father to ask the tenant to vacate the house so that I could convert it into a guesthouse. When my family finally relented, I renovated the house keeping its originality intact, just adding windows for sunlight.
  3. I still remember the summer of 1992 when I put a signboard outside my first guesthouse in Jibhi Valley! The village residents, however, were sceptical about my success. My business kept growing but it took years for tourism to take off in Jibhi Valley. Things changed significantly after 2008 when the government launched a homestay scheme. People built homestays and with rapid tourism growth, the region changed rapidly. Villages turned into towns with many concrete buildings. Local businesses and tourists continued putting a burden on nature.
  4. Then, with the 2020-21 pandemic and lockdown, tourism came to a complete standstill in Jibhi Valley. Local people, who were employed at over a hundred homestays and guesthouses, returned to their villages. Some went back to farming; some took up pottery and some got involved in government work schemes. Now, all ardently hope that normalcy and tourism will return to the valley soon. In a way, the pandemic has given us an opportunity to introspect, go back to our roots and look for sustainable solutions.
  5. For me, tourism has been my greatest teacher. It brought people from many countries and all states of India to my guesthouse. It gave me exposure to different cultures and countless opportunities to learn new things. Most people who stayed at my guesthouse became my regular clients and good friends. When I look back, I feel proud, yet humbled at the thought that I was not only able to fulfill my dream despite all the challenges, but also played a role in establishing tourism in the beautiful valley that I call home.

Q. Select the option that suitably completes the given dialogue as per the context in paragraph II.
Father: Are you sure that your plan would work?
Writer: I can’t say (1) ______________.
Father: That’s a lot of uncertainty, isn’t it?
Writer: (2) _______________, father. Please let’s do this.

Solution:
QUESTION: 4

Direction: Read the passage given below:

  1. I got posted in Srinagar in the 1980s. Its rugged mountains, gushing rivers and vast meadows reminded me of the landscapes of my native place – the Jibhi Valley in Himachal Pradesh. Unlike Srinagar that saw numerous tourists, Jibhi Valley remained clouded in anonymity. That’s when the seed of starting tourism in Jibhi was planted. I decided to leave my service in the Indian Army and follow the urge to return home.
  2. We had two houses – a family house and a traditional house, which we often rented out. I pleaded with my father to ask the tenant to vacate the house so that I could convert it into a guesthouse. When my family finally relented, I renovated the house keeping its originality intact, just adding windows for sunlight.
  3. I still remember the summer of 1992 when I put a signboard outside my first guesthouse in Jibhi Valley! The village residents, however, were sceptical about my success. My business kept growing but it took years for tourism to take off in Jibhi Valley. Things changed significantly after 2008 when the government launched a homestay scheme. People built homestays and with rapid tourism growth, the region changed rapidly. Villages turned into towns with many concrete buildings. Local businesses and tourists continued putting a burden on nature.
  4. Then, with the 2020-21 pandemic and lockdown, tourism came to a complete standstill in Jibhi Valley. Local people, who were employed at over a hundred homestays and guesthouses, returned to their villages. Some went back to farming; some took up pottery and some got involved in government work schemes. Now, all ardently hope that normalcy and tourism will return to the valley soon. In a way, the pandemic has given us an opportunity to introspect, go back to our roots and look for sustainable solutions.
  5. For me, tourism has been my greatest teacher. It brought people from many countries and all states of India to my guesthouse. It gave me exposure to different cultures and countless opportunities to learn new things. Most people who stayed at my guesthouse became my regular clients and good friends. When I look back, I feel proud, yet humbled at the thought that I was not only able to fulfill my dream despite all the challenges, but also played a role in establishing tourism in the beautiful valley that I call home.

Q. Which signboard would the writer have chosen for his 1992 undertaking, in Jibhi Valley?

Solution:
QUESTION: 5

Direction: Read the passage given below:

  1. I got posted in Srinagar in the 1980s. Its rugged mountains, gushing rivers and vast meadows reminded me of the landscapes of my native place – the Jibhi Valley in Himachal Pradesh. Unlike Srinagar that saw numerous tourists, Jibhi Valley remained clouded in anonymity. That’s when the seed of starting tourism in Jibhi was planted. I decided to leave my service in the Indian Army and follow the urge to return home.
  2. We had two houses – a family house and a traditional house, which we often rented out. I pleaded with my father to ask the tenant to vacate the house so that I could convert it into a guesthouse. When my family finally relented, I renovated the house keeping its originality intact, just adding windows for sunlight.
  3. I still remember the summer of 1992 when I put a signboard outside my first guesthouse in Jibhi Valley! The village residents, however, were sceptical about my success. My business kept growing but it took years for tourism to take off in Jibhi Valley. Things changed significantly after 2008 when the government launched a homestay scheme. People built homestays and with rapid tourism growth, the region changed rapidly. Villages turned into towns with many concrete buildings. Local businesses and tourists continued putting a burden on nature.
  4. Then, with the 2020-21 pandemic and lockdown, tourism came to a complete standstill in Jibhi Valley. Local people, who were employed at over a hundred homestays and guesthouses, returned to their villages. Some went back to farming; some took up pottery and some got involved in government work schemes. Now, all ardently hope that normalcy and tourism will return to the valley soon. In a way, the pandemic has given us an opportunity to introspect, go back to our roots and look for sustainable solutions.
  5. For me, tourism has been my greatest teacher. It brought people from many countries and all states of India to my guesthouse. It gave me exposure to different cultures and countless opportunities to learn new things. Most people who stayed at my guesthouse became my regular clients and good friends. When I look back, I feel proud, yet humbled at the thought that I was not only able to fulfill my dream despite all the challenges, but also played a role in establishing tourism in the beautiful valley that I call home.

Q. Select the option that clearly indicates the situation before and after 2008, in Jibhi Valley.

Solution:
QUESTION: 6

Direction: Read the passage given below:

  1. I got posted in Srinagar in the 1980s. Its rugged mountains, gushing rivers and vast meadows reminded me of the landscapes of my native place – the Jibhi Valley in Himachal Pradesh. Unlike Srinagar that saw numerous tourists, Jibhi Valley remained clouded in anonymity. That’s when the seed of starting tourism in Jibhi was planted. I decided to leave my service in the Indian Army and follow the urge to return home.
  2. We had two houses – a family house and a traditional house, which we often rented out. I pleaded with my father to ask the tenant to vacate the house so that I could convert it into a guesthouse. When my family finally relented, I renovated the house keeping its originality intact, just adding windows for sunlight.
  3. I still remember the summer of 1992 when I put a signboard outside my first guesthouse in Jibhi Valley! The village residents, however, were sceptical about my success. My business kept growing but it took years for tourism to take off in Jibhi Valley. Things changed significantly after 2008 when the government launched a homestay scheme. People built homestays and with rapid tourism growth, the region changed rapidly. Villages turned into towns with many concrete buildings. Local businesses and tourists continued putting a burden on nature.
  4. Then, with the 2020-21 pandemic and lockdown, tourism came to a complete standstill in Jibhi Valley. Local people, who were employed at over a hundred homestays and guesthouses, returned to their villages. Some went back to farming; some took up pottery and some got involved in government work schemes. Now, all ardently hope that normalcy and tourism will return to the valley soon. In a way, the pandemic has given us an opportunity to introspect, go back to our roots and look for sustainable solutions.
  5. For me, tourism has been my greatest teacher. It brought people from many countries and all states of India to my guesthouse. It gave me exposure to different cultures and countless opportunities to learn new things. Most people who stayed at my guesthouse became my regular clients and good friends. When I look back, I feel proud, yet humbled at the thought that I was not only able to fulfill my dream despite all the challenges, but also played a role in establishing tourism in the beautiful valley that I call home.

Q. What is the relationship between (1) and (2)?
(1) __________ tourism came to a complete standstill in Jibhi Valley.
(2) __________ tourism has been my greatest teacher.

Solution:
QUESTION: 7

Direction: Read the passage given below:

  1. I got posted in Srinagar in the 1980s. Its rugged mountains, gushing rivers and vast meadows reminded me of the landscapes of my native place – the Jibhi Valley in Himachal Pradesh. Unlike Srinagar that saw numerous tourists, Jibhi Valley remained clouded in anonymity. That’s when the seed of starting tourism in Jibhi was planted. I decided to leave my service in the Indian Army and follow the urge to return home.
  2. We had two houses – a family house and a traditional house, which we often rented out. I pleaded with my father to ask the tenant to vacate the house so that I could convert it into a guesthouse. When my family finally relented, I renovated the house keeping its originality intact, just adding windows for sunlight.
  3. I still remember the summer of 1992 when I put a signboard outside my first guesthouse in Jibhi Valley! The village residents, however, were sceptical about my success. My business kept growing but it took years for tourism to take off in Jibhi Valley. Things changed significantly after 2008 when the government launched a homestay scheme. People built homestays and with rapid tourism growth, the region changed rapidly. Villages turned into towns with many concrete buildings. Local businesses and tourists continued putting a burden on nature.
  4. Then, with the 2020-21 pandemic and lockdown, tourism came to a complete standstill in Jibhi Valley. Local people, who were employed at over a hundred homestays and guesthouses, returned to their villages. Some went back to farming; some took up pottery and some got involved in government work schemes. Now, all ardently hope that normalcy and tourism will return to the valley soon. In a way, the pandemic has given us an opportunity to introspect, go back to our roots and look for sustainable solutions.
  5. For me, tourism has been my greatest teacher. It brought people from many countries and all states of India to my guesthouse. It gave me exposure to different cultures and countless opportunities to learn new things. Most people who stayed at my guesthouse became my regular clients and good friends. When I look back, I feel proud, yet humbled at the thought that I was not only able to fulfill my dream despite all the challenges, but also played a role in establishing tourism in the beautiful valley that I call home.

Q. The writer mentions looking for sustainable solutions. He refers to the need for sustainable solutions because he realises that:

Solution:
QUESTION: 8

Direction: Read the passage given below:

  1. I got posted in Srinagar in the 1980s. Its rugged mountains, gushing rivers and vast meadows reminded me of the landscapes of my native place – the Jibhi Valley in Himachal Pradesh. Unlike Srinagar that saw numerous tourists, Jibhi Valley remained clouded in anonymity. That’s when the seed of starting tourism in Jibhi was planted. I decided to leave my service in the Indian Army and follow the urge to return home.
  2. We had two houses – a family house and a traditional house, which we often rented out. I pleaded with my father to ask the tenant to vacate the house so that I could convert it into a guesthouse. When my family finally relented, I renovated the house keeping its originality intact, just adding windows for sunlight.
  3. I still remember the summer of 1992 when I put a signboard outside my first guesthouse in Jibhi Valley! The village residents, however, were sceptical about my success. My business kept growing but it took years for tourism to take off in Jibhi Valley. Things changed significantly after 2008 when the government launched a homestay scheme. People built homestays and with rapid tourism growth, the region changed rapidly. Villages turned into towns with many concrete buildings. Local businesses and tourists continued putting a burden on nature.
  4. Then, with the 2020-21 pandemic and lockdown, tourism came to a complete standstill in Jibhi Valley. Local people, who were employed at over a hundred homestays and guesthouses, returned to their villages. Some went back to farming; some took up pottery and some got involved in government work schemes. Now, all ardently hope that normalcy and tourism will return to the valley soon. In a way, the pandemic has given us an opportunity to introspect, go back to our roots and look for sustainable solutions.
  5. For me, tourism has been my greatest teacher. It brought people from many countries and all states of India to my guesthouse. It gave me exposure to different cultures and countless opportunities to learn new things. Most people who stayed at my guesthouse became my regular clients and good friends. When I look back, I feel proud, yet humbled at the thought that I was not only able to fulfill my dream despite all the challenges, but also played a role in establishing tourism in the beautiful valley that I call home.

Q. Select the option that lists the customer review for the writer ’s project.

Solution:
QUESTION: 9

Direction: Read the passage given below:

  1. I got posted in Srinagar in the 1980s. Its rugged mountains, gushing rivers and vast meadows reminded me of the landscapes of my native place – the Jibhi Valley in Himachal Pradesh. Unlike Srinagar that saw numerous tourists, Jibhi Valley remained clouded in anonymity. That’s when the seed of starting tourism in Jibhi was planted. I decided to leave my service in the Indian Army and follow the urge to return home.
  2. We had two houses – a family house and a traditional house, which we often rented out. I pleaded with my father to ask the tenant to vacate the house so that I could convert it into a guesthouse. When my family finally relented, I renovated the house keeping its originality intact, just adding windows for sunlight.
  3. I still remember the summer of 1992 when I put a signboard outside my first guesthouse in Jibhi Valley! The village residents, however, were sceptical about my success. My business kept growing but it took years for tourism to take off in Jibhi Valley. Things changed significantly after 2008 when the government launched a homestay scheme. People built homestays and with rapid tourism growth, the region changed rapidly. Villages turned into towns with many concrete buildings. Local businesses and tourists continued putting a burden on nature.
  4. Then, with the 2020-21 pandemic and lockdown, tourism came to a complete standstill in Jibhi Valley. Local people, who were employed at over a hundred homestays and guesthouses, returned to their villages. Some went back to farming; some took up pottery and some got involved in government work schemes. Now, all ardently hope that normalcy and tourism will return to the valley soon. In a way, the pandemic has given us an opportunity to introspect, go back to our roots and look for sustainable solutions.
  5. For me, tourism has been my greatest teacher. It brought people from many countries and all states of India to my guesthouse. It gave me exposure to different cultures and countless opportunities to learn new things. Most people who stayed at my guesthouse became my regular clients and good friends. When I look back, I feel proud, yet humbled at the thought that I was not only able to fulfill my dream despite all the challenges, but also played a role in establishing tourism in the beautiful valley that I call home.

Q. Which quote summarises the writer ’s feelings about the pace of growth of tourism in Jibhi Valley?

Solution:
QUESTION: 10

Direction: Read the passage given below:

  1. I got posted in Srinagar in the 1980s. Its rugged mountains, gushing rivers and vast meadows reminded me of the landscapes of my native place – the Jibhi Valley in Himachal Pradesh. Unlike Srinagar that saw numerous tourists, Jibhi Valley remained clouded in anonymity. That’s when the seed of starting tourism in Jibhi was planted. I decided to leave my service in the Indian Army and follow the urge to return home.
  2. We had two houses – a family house and a traditional house, which we often rented out. I pleaded with my father to ask the tenant to vacate the house so that I could convert it into a guesthouse. When my family finally relented, I renovated the house keeping its originality intact, just adding windows for sunlight.
  3. I still remember the summer of 1992 when I put a signboard outside my first guesthouse in Jibhi Valley! The village residents, however, were sceptical about my success. My business kept growing but it took years for tourism to take off in Jibhi Valley. Things changed significantly after 2008 when the government launched a homestay scheme. People built homestays and with rapid tourism growth, the region changed rapidly. Villages turned into towns with many concrete buildings. Local businesses and tourists continued putting a burden on nature.
  4. Then, with the 2020-21 pandemic and lockdown, tourism came to a complete standstill in Jibhi Valley. Local people, who were employed at over a hundred homestays and guesthouses, returned to their villages. Some went back to farming; some took up pottery and some got involved in government work schemes. Now, all ardently hope that normalcy and tourism will return to the valley soon. In a way, the pandemic has given us an opportunity to introspect, go back to our roots and look for sustainable solutions.
  5. For me, tourism has been my greatest teacher. It brought people from many countries and all states of India to my guesthouse. It gave me exposure to different cultures and countless opportunities to learn new things. Most people who stayed at my guesthouse became my regular clients and good friends. When I look back, I feel proud, yet humbled at the thought that I was not only able to fulfill my dream despite all the challenges, but also played a role in establishing tourism in the beautiful valley that I call home.

Q. Select the option that lists what we can conclude from the text.
(1) People of Jibhi Valley practiced sustainable tourism.
(2) The people of Jibhi valley gradually embraced tourism.
(3) Tourists never revisited Jibhi Valley.
(4) The writer was an enterprising person.

Solution:
QUESTION: 11

Direction: Read the passage given below: 

  1. Over the last five years, more companies have been actively looking for intern profiles, according to a 2018-19 survey by an online internship and training platform. This survey reveals that India had 80% more internship applications — with 2.2 million applications received in 2018 compared to 1.27 million in the year before. The trend was partly due to more industries looking to have fresh minds and ideas on existing projects for better productivity. What was originally seen as a western concept, getting an internship before plunging into the job market, is fast gaining momentum at Indian workplaces.
  2. According to the survey data, India’s National Capital Region has been the top provider of internships, with a total of 35% internship opportunities, followed by Mumbai and Bengaluru at 20% and 15%, respectively. This includes opportunities in startups, MNCs and even government entities. The survey also revealed popular fields to find internships in (Fig. 1). There has been growing awareness among the students about the intern profiles sought by hiring companies that often look for people with real-time experience in management than B- school masters.
  3. The stipend has been an important factor influencing the choice of internships. The survey data reveals that the average stipend offered to interns was recorded as ₹7000 while the maximum stipend went up to ₹85,000. According to statistics, a greater number of people considered virtual internships than in-office internships. Virtual internships got three times more applications than in-office, since a large chunk of students were the ones already enrolled in various courses, or preferred working from home.
  4. Internship portals have sprung up in the last three to four years and many of them already report healthy traffic per month. Reports suggest that on an average, an internship portal company has around 200, 000-plus students and some 8,000 companies registered on it. It gets around two lakh visits online every month. The Managing Director of a leading executive search firm says that though these web platforms are working as an effective bridge between the industry and students, most established companies are still reluctant to take too many interns on board for obvious reasons.

Q. Select the correct inference with reference to the following:
Over the last five years, more companies have been actively looking for intern profiles…

Solution:
QUESTION: 12

Direction: Read the passage given below: 

  1. Over the last five years, more companies have been actively looking for intern profiles, according to a 2018-19 survey by an online internship and training platform. This survey reveals that India had 80% more internship applications — with 2.2 million applications received in 2018 compared to 1.27 million in the year before. The trend was partly due to more industries looking to have fresh minds and ideas on existing projects for better productivity. What was originally seen as a western concept, getting an internship before plunging into the job market, is fast gaining momentum at Indian workplaces.
  2. According to the survey data, India’s National Capital Region has been the top provider of internships, with a total of 35% internship opportunities, followed by Mumbai and Bengaluru at 20% and 15%, respectively. This includes opportunities in startups, MNCs and even government entities. The survey also revealed popular fields to find internships in (Fig. 1). There has been growing awareness among the students about the intern profiles sought by hiring companies that often look for people with real-time experience in management than B- school masters.
  3. The stipend has been an important factor influencing the choice of internships. The survey data reveals that the average stipend offered to interns was recorded as ₹7000 while the maximum stipend went up to ₹85,000. According to statistics, a greater number of people considered virtual internships than in-office internships. Virtual internships got three times more applications than in-office, since a large chunk of students were the ones already enrolled in various courses, or preferred working from home.
  4. Internship portals have sprung up in the last three to four years and many of them already report healthy traffic per month. Reports suggest that on an average, an internship portal company has around 200, 000-plus students and some 8,000 companies registered on it. It gets around two lakh visits online every month. The Managing Director of a leading executive search firm says that though these web platforms are working as an effective bridge between the industry and students, most established companies are still reluctant to take too many interns on board for obvious reasons.

Q. Select the central idea of the paragraph likely to precede paragraph I.

Solution:
QUESTION: 13

Direction: Read the passage given below: 

  1. Over the last five years, more companies have been actively looking for intern profiles, according to a 2018-19 survey by an online internship and training platform. This survey reveals that India had 80% more internship applications — with 2.2 million applications received in 2018 compared to 1.27 million in the year before. The trend was partly due to more industries looking to have fresh minds and ideas on existing projects for better productivity. What was originally seen as a western concept, getting an internship before plunging into the job market, is fast gaining momentum at Indian workplaces.
  2. According to the survey data, India’s National Capital Region has been the top provider of internships, with a total of 35% internship opportunities, followed by Mumbai and Bengaluru at 20% and 15%, respectively. This includes opportunities in startups, MNCs and even government entities. The survey also revealed popular fields to find internships in (Fig. 1). There has been growing awareness among the students about the intern profiles sought by hiring companies that often look for people with real-time experience in management than B- school masters.
  3. The stipend has been an important factor influencing the choice of internships. The survey data reveals that the average stipend offered to interns was recorded as ₹7000 while the maximum stipend went up to ₹85,000. According to statistics, a greater number of people considered virtual internships than in-office internships. Virtual internships got three times more applications than in-office, since a large chunk of students were the ones already enrolled in various courses, or preferred working from home.
  4. Internship portals have sprung up in the last three to four years and many of them already report healthy traffic per month. Reports suggest that on an average, an internship portal company has around 200, 000-plus students and some 8,000 companies registered on it. It gets around two lakh visits online every month. The Managing Director of a leading executive search firm says that though these web platforms are working as an effective bridge between the industry and students, most established companies are still reluctant to take too many interns on board for obvious reasons.

Q. Select the option that displays the true statement with reference to Fig. 1.

Solution:
QUESTION: 14

Direction: Read the passage given below: 

  1. Over the last five years, more companies have been actively looking for intern profiles, according to a 2018-19 survey by an online internship and training platform. This survey reveals that India had 80% more internship applications — with 2.2 million applications received in 2018 compared to 1.27 million in the year before. The trend was partly due to more industries looking to have fresh minds and ideas on existing projects for better productivity. What was originally seen as a western concept, getting an internship before plunging into the job market, is fast gaining momentum at Indian workplaces.
  2. According to the survey data, India’s National Capital Region has been the top provider of internships, with a total of 35% internship opportunities, followed by Mumbai and Bengaluru at 20% and 15%, respectively. This includes opportunities in startups, MNCs and even government entities. The survey also revealed popular fields to find internships in (Fig. 1). There has been growing awareness among the students about the intern profiles sought by hiring companies that often look for people with real-time experience in management than B- school masters.
  3. The stipend has been an important factor influencing the choice of internships. The survey data reveals that the average stipend offered to interns was recorded as ₹7000 while the maximum stipend went up to ₹85,000. According to statistics, a greater number of people considered virtual internships than in-office internships. Virtual internships got three times more applications than in-office, since a large chunk of students were the ones already enrolled in various courses, or preferred working from home.
  4. Internship portals have sprung up in the last three to four years and many of them already report healthy traffic per month. Reports suggest that on an average, an internship portal company has around 200, 000-plus students and some 8,000 companies registered on it. It gets around two lakh visits online every month. The Managing Director of a leading executive search firm says that though these web platforms are working as an effective bridge between the industry and students, most established companies are still reluctant to take too many interns on board for obvious reasons.

Q. Based on your reading of paragraphs II-III, select the appropriate counter- argument to the given argument.
Argument: I don’t think you’ll be considered for an internship just because you’ve been the Student Editor and Head of Student Council.

Solution:
QUESTION: 15

Direction: Read the passage given below: 

  1. Over the last five years, more companies have been actively looking for intern profiles, according to a 2018-19 survey by an online internship and training platform. This survey reveals that India had 80% more internship applications — with 2.2 million applications received in 2018 compared to 1.27 million in the year before. The trend was partly due to more industries looking to have fresh minds and ideas on existing projects for better productivity. What was originally seen as a western concept, getting an internship before plunging into the job market, is fast gaining momentum at Indian workplaces.
  2. According to the survey data, India’s National Capital Region has been the top provider of internships, with a total of 35% internship opportunities, followed by Mumbai and Bengaluru at 20% and 15%, respectively. This includes opportunities in startups, MNCs and even government entities. The survey also revealed popular fields to find internships in (Fig. 1). There has been growing awareness among the students about the intern profiles sought by hiring companies that often look for people with real-time experience in management than B- school masters.
  3. The stipend has been an important factor influencing the choice of internships. The survey data reveals that the average stipend offered to interns was recorded as ₹7000 while the maximum stipend went up to ₹85,000. According to statistics, a greater number of people considered virtual internships than in-office internships. Virtual internships got three times more applications than in-office, since a large chunk of students were the ones already enrolled in various courses, or preferred working from home.
  4. Internship portals have sprung up in the last three to four years and many of them already report healthy traffic per month. Reports suggest that on an average, an internship portal company has around 200, 000-plus students and some 8,000 companies registered on it. It gets around two lakh visits online every month. The Managing Director of a leading executive search firm says that though these web platforms are working as an effective bridge between the industry and students, most established companies are still reluctant to take too many interns on board for obvious reasons.

Q. Select the option that displays the correct cause-effect relationship.

Solution:
QUESTION: 16

Direction: Read the passage given below: 

  1. Over the last five years, more companies have been actively looking for intern profiles, according to a 2018-19 survey by an online internship and training platform. This survey reveals that India had 80% more internship applications — with 2.2 million applications received in 2018 compared to 1.27 million in the year before. The trend was partly due to more industries looking to have fresh minds and ideas on existing projects for better productivity. What was originally seen as a western concept, getting an internship before plunging into the job market, is fast gaining momentum at Indian workplaces.
  2. According to the survey data, India’s National Capital Region has been the top provider of internships, with a total of 35% internship opportunities, followed by Mumbai and Bengaluru at 20% and 15%, respectively. This includes opportunities in startups, MNCs and even government entities. The survey also revealed popular fields to find internships in (Fig. 1). There has been growing awareness among the students about the intern profiles sought by hiring companies that often look for people with real-time experience in management than B- school masters.
  3. The stipend has been an important factor influencing the choice of internships. The survey data reveals that the average stipend offered to interns was recorded as ₹7000 while the maximum stipend went up to ₹85,000. According to statistics, a greater number of people considered virtual internships than in-office internships. Virtual internships got three times more applications than in-office, since a large chunk of students were the ones already enrolled in various courses, or preferred working from home.
  4. Internship portals have sprung up in the last three to four years and many of them already report healthy traffic per month. Reports suggest that on an average, an internship portal company has around 200, 000-plus students and some 8,000 companies registered on it. It gets around two lakh visits online every month. The Managing Director of a leading executive search firm says that though these web platforms are working as an effective bridge between the industry and students, most established companies are still reluctant to take too many interns on board for obvious reasons.

Q. The survey statistics mention the average stipend, indicating that

Solution:
QUESTION: 17

Direction: Read the passage given below: 

  1. Over the last five years, more companies have been actively looking for intern profiles, according to a 2018-19 survey by an online internship and training platform. This survey reveals that India had 80% more internship applications — with 2.2 million applications received in 2018 compared to 1.27 million in the year before. The trend was partly due to more industries looking to have fresh minds and ideas on existing projects for better productivity. What was originally seen as a western concept, getting an internship before plunging into the job market, is fast gaining momentum at Indian workplaces.
  2. According to the survey data, India’s National Capital Region has been the top provider of internships, with a total of 35% internship opportunities, followed by Mumbai and Bengaluru at 20% and 15%, respectively. This includes opportunities in startups, MNCs and even government entities. The survey also revealed popular fields to find internships in (Fig. 1). There has been growing awareness among the students about the intern profiles sought by hiring companies that often look for people with real-time experience in management than B- school masters.
  3. The stipend has been an important factor influencing the choice of internships. The survey data reveals that the average stipend offered to interns was recorded as ₹7000 while the maximum stipend went up to ₹85,000. According to statistics, a greater number of people considered virtual internships than in-office internships. Virtual internships got three times more applications than in-office, since a large chunk of students were the ones already enrolled in various courses, or preferred working from home.
  4. Internship portals have sprung up in the last three to four years and many of them already report healthy traffic per month. Reports suggest that on an average, an internship portal company has around 200, 000-plus students and some 8,000 companies registered on it. It gets around two lakh visits online every month. The Managing Director of a leading executive search firm says that though these web platforms are working as an effective bridge between the industry and students, most established companies are still reluctant to take too many interns on board for obvious reasons.

Q. The phrase ‘healthy traffic’ refers to the

Solution:
QUESTION: 18

Direction: Read the passage given below: 

  1. Over the last five years, more companies have been actively looking for intern profiles, according to a 2018-19 survey by an online internship and training platform. This survey reveals that India had 80% more internship applications — with 2.2 million applications received in 2018 compared to 1.27 million in the year before. The trend was partly due to more industries looking to have fresh minds and ideas on existing projects for better productivity. What was originally seen as a western concept, getting an internship before plunging into the job market, is fast gaining momentum at Indian workplaces.
  2. According to the survey data, India’s National Capital Region has been the top provider of internships, with a total of 35% internship opportunities, followed by Mumbai and Bengaluru at 20% and 15%, respectively. This includes opportunities in startups, MNCs and even government entities. The survey also revealed popular fields to find internships in (Fig. 1). There has been growing awareness among the students about the intern profiles sought by hiring companies that often look for people with real-time experience in management than B- school masters.
  3. The stipend has been an important factor influencing the choice of internships. The survey data reveals that the average stipend offered to interns was recorded as ₹7000 while the maximum stipend went up to ₹85,000. According to statistics, a greater number of people considered virtual internships than in-office internships. Virtual internships got three times more applications than in-office, since a large chunk of students were the ones already enrolled in various courses, or preferred working from home.
  4. Internship portals have sprung up in the last three to four years and many of them already report healthy traffic per month. Reports suggest that on an average, an internship portal company has around 200, 000-plus students and some 8,000 companies registered on it. It gets around two lakh visits online every month. The Managing Director of a leading executive search firm says that though these web platforms are working as an effective bridge between the industry and students, most established companies are still reluctant to take too many interns on board for obvious reasons.

Q. Read the two statements given below and select the option that suitably explains them.
(1) Established companies are reluctant to take too many interns on board.
(2) Probability of interns leaving the company for a variety of reasons, is high.

Solution:
QUESTION: 19

What is the word limit of the Notice?

Solution:
QUESTION: 20

Notice is always enclosed in a __________.

Solution:
QUESTION: 21

Which of the following Classified Advertisement is written by a person in need of a job?

Solution:
QUESTION: 22

What is the word limit of a Classified Advertisement?

Solution:
QUESTION: 23

What are the features of a Classified Advertisement?

Solution:
QUESTION: 24

While reading about new places and searching for them online has its merits, the advantages of actually travelling to various destinations far exceed them. Write an article in 120-150 words for the magazine Travel Times, evaluating both these options. You may use the cues given below along with your own ideas. You are Amrit/ Amrita.

  • Builds  confidence
  • Make friends  and memories
  • Experience new cultures 
  • Expands knowledge

(24) ________________
(25) ________________
Travelling is fun. Reading books on (26) _________ places is immersing. Travel allows you to escape from your stressful situation. (27) ____________. Seeing other parts of the world and immersing yourself in foreign cultures opens up completely new avenues of discovery. 
(28) ________________, and can open your eyes in ways you never thought possible. When you are out on the road meeting new people and opening up to new experiences, you may find that you are also slowly reinventing yourself. Travel can open up so many doors and provide for so many adventures, both planned and spontaneous.
Having said that, travelling as a (29) ________________ may sometimes take the form of running away from reality. Too much travel may develop a sense of homesickness at some point. Life at home will go on without you and you might miss some important moments you would have yearned to be present at. Travel can also be extremely expensive putting an unnecessary (30) _____________.

Q. Chose the appropriate the word for ____ (24)

Solution:
QUESTION: 25

While reading about new places and searching for them online has its merits, the advantages of actually travelling to various destinations far exceed them. Write an article in 120-150 words for the magazine Travel Times, evaluating both these options. You may use the cues given below along with your own ideas. You are Amrit/ Amrita.

  • Builds  confidence
  • Make friends  and memories
  • Experience new cultures 
  • Expands knowledge

(24) ________________
(25) ________________
Travelling is fun. Reading books on (26) _________ places is immersing. Travel allows you to escape from your stressful situation. (27) ____________. Seeing other parts of the world and immersing yourself in foreign cultures opens up completely new avenues of discovery. 
(28) ________________, and can open your eyes in ways you never thought possible. When you are out on the road meeting new people and opening up to new experiences, you may find that you are also slowly reinventing yourself. Travel can open up so many doors and provide for so many adventures, both planned and spontaneous.
Having said that, travelling as a (29) ________________ may sometimes take the form of running away from reality. Too much travel may develop a sense of homesickness at some point. Life at home will go on without you and you might miss some important moments you would have yearned to be present at. Travel can also be extremely expensive putting an unnecessary (30) _____________.

Q. Chose the appropriate the word for ____ (25)

Solution:
QUESTION: 26

While reading about new places and searching for them online has its merits, the advantages of actually travelling to various destinations far exceed them. Write an article in 120-150 words for the magazine Travel Times, evaluating both these options. You may use the cues given below along with your own ideas. You are Amrit/ Amrita.

  • Builds  confidence
  • Make friends  and memories
  • Experience new cultures 
  • Expands knowledge

(24) ________________
(25) ________________
Travelling is fun. Reading books on (26) _________ places is immersing. Travel allows you to escape from your stressful situation. (27) ____________. Seeing other parts of the world and immersing yourself in foreign cultures opens up completely new avenues of discovery. 
(28) ________________, and can open your eyes in ways you never thought possible. When you are out on the road meeting new people and opening up to new experiences, you may find that you are also slowly reinventing yourself. Travel can open up so many doors and provide for so many adventures, both planned and spontaneous.
Having said that, travelling as a (29) ________________ may sometimes take the form of running away from reality. Too much travel may develop a sense of homesickness at some point. Life at home will go on without you and you might miss some important moments you would have yearned to be present at. Travel can also be extremely expensive putting an unnecessary (30) _____________.

Q. Chose the appropriate the word for ____ (26)

Solution:
QUESTION: 27

While reading about new places and searching for them online has its merits, the advantages of actually travelling to various destinations far exceed them. Write an article in 120-150 words for the magazine Travel Times, evaluating both these options. You may use the cues given below along with your own ideas. You are Amrit/ Amrita.

  • Builds  confidence
  • Make friends  and memories
  • Experience new cultures 
  • Expands knowledge

(24) ________________
(25) ________________
Travelling is fun. Reading books on (26) _________ places is immersing. Travel allows you to escape from your stressful situation. (27) ____________. Seeing other parts of the world and immersing yourself in foreign cultures opens up completely new avenues of discovery. 
(28) ________________, and can open your eyes in ways you never thought possible. When you are out on the road meeting new people and opening up to new experiences, you may find that you are also slowly reinventing yourself. Travel can open up so many doors and provide for so many adventures, both planned and spontaneous.
Having said that, travelling as a (29) ________________ may sometimes take the form of running away from reality. Too much travel may develop a sense of homesickness at some point. Life at home will go on without you and you might miss some important moments you would have yearned to be present at. Travel can also be extremely expensive putting an unnecessary (30) _____________.

Q. Chose the appropriate the word for ____ (27)

Solution:
QUESTION: 28

While reading about new places and searching for them online has its merits, the advantages of actually travelling to various destinations far exceed them. Write an article in 120-150 words for the magazine Travel Times, evaluating both these options. You may use the cues given below along with your own ideas. You are Amrit/ Amrita.

  • Builds  confidence
  • Make friends  and memories
  • Experience new cultures 
  • Expands knowledge

(24) ________________
(25) ________________
Travelling is fun. Reading books on (26) _________ places is immersing. Travel allows you to escape from your stressful situation. (27) ____________. Seeing other parts of the world and immersing yourself in foreign cultures opens up completely new avenues of discovery. 
(28) ________________, and can open your eyes in ways you never thought possible. When you are out on the road meeting new people and opening up to new experiences, you may find that you are also slowly reinventing yourself. Travel can open up so many doors and provide for so many adventures, both planned and spontaneous.
Having said that, travelling as a (29) ________________ may sometimes take the form of running away from reality. Too much travel may develop a sense of homesickness at some point. Life at home will go on without you and you might miss some important moments you would have yearned to be present at. Travel can also be extremely expensive putting an unnecessary (30) _____________.

Q. Chose the appropriate the word for ____ (28)

Solution:
QUESTION: 29

While reading about new places and searching for them online has its merits, the advantages of actually travelling to various destinations far exceed them. Write an article in 120-150 words for the magazine Travel Times, evaluating both these options. You may use the cues given below along with your own ideas. You are Amrit/ Amrita.

  • Builds  confidence
  • Make friends  and memories
  • Experience new cultures 
  • Expands knowledge

(24) ________________
(25) ________________
Travelling is fun. Reading books on (26) _________ places is immersing. Travel allows you to escape from your stressful situation. (27) ____________. Seeing other parts of the world and immersing yourself in foreign cultures opens up completely new avenues of discovery. 
(28) ________________, and can open your eyes in ways you never thought possible. When you are out on the road meeting new people and opening up to new experiences, you may find that you are also slowly reinventing yourself. Travel can open up so many doors and provide for so many adventures, both planned and spontaneous.
Having said that, travelling as a (29) ________________ may sometimes take the form of running away from reality. Too much travel may develop a sense of homesickness at some point. Life at home will go on without you and you might miss some important moments you would have yearned to be present at. Travel can also be extremely expensive putting an unnecessary (30) _____________.

Q. Chose the appropriate the word for ____ (29)

Solution:
QUESTION: 30

While reading about new places and searching for them online has its merits, the advantages of actually travelling to various destinations far exceed them. Write an article in 120-150 words for the magazine Travel Times, evaluating both these options. You may use the cues given below along with your own ideas. You are Amrit/ Amrita.

  • Builds  confidence
  • Make friends  and memories
  • Experience new cultures 
  • Expands knowledge

(24) ________________
(25) ________________
Travelling is fun. Reading books on (26) _________ places is immersing. Travel allows you to escape from your stressful situation. (27) ____________. Seeing other parts of the world and immersing yourself in foreign cultures opens up completely new avenues of discovery. 
(28) ________________, and can open your eyes in ways you never thought possible. When you are out on the road meeting new people and opening up to new experiences, you may find that you are also slowly reinventing yourself. Travel can open up so many doors and provide for so many adventures, both planned and spontaneous.
Having said that, travelling as a (29) ________________ may sometimes take the form of running away from reality. Too much travel may develop a sense of homesickness at some point. Life at home will go on without you and you might miss some important moments you would have yearned to be present at. Travel can also be extremely expensive putting an unnecessary (30) _____________.

Q. Chose the appropriate the word for ____ (30)

Solution:
QUESTION: 31

My breath was gone. I was frightened. Father laughed, but there was terror in my heart at the overpowering force of the waves. My introduction to the Y.M.C.A. swimming pool revived unpleasant memories and stirred childish fears. But in a little while I gathered confidence. I paddled with my new water wings, watching the other boys and trying to learn by aping them. I did this two or three times on different days and was just beginning to feel at ease in the water when the misadventure happened.
Q. Choose the correct option with reference to the two statements given below.
Statement 1: The author’s father laughed to mock his son’s inability to swim.
Statement 2: The author wanted to swim just to prove to his father that he can swim.

Solution:

None of the statements is true

QUESTION: 32

My breath was gone. I was frightened. Father laughed, but there was terror in my heart at the overpowering force of the waves. My introduction to the Y.M.C.A. swimming pool revived unpleasant memories and stirred childish fears. But in a little while I gathered confidence. I paddled with my new water wings, watching the other boys and trying to learn by aping them. I did this two or three times on different days and was just beginning to feel at ease in the water when the misadventure happened.

Q. “My introduction to the Y.M.C.A. swimming pool revived unpleasant memories and stirred childish fears.” It can be inferred that this was a clear case of __________.

Solution:

Repression- the action or process of suppressing a thought or desire in oneself so that it remains unconscious.

QUESTION: 33

My breath was gone. I was frightened. Father laughed, but there was terror in my heart at the overpowering force of the waves. My introduction to the Y.M.C.A. swimming pool revived unpleasant memories and stirred childish fears. But in a little while I gathered confidence. I paddled with my new water wings, watching the other boys and trying to learn by aping them. I did this two or three times on different days and was just beginning to feel at ease in the water when the misadventure happened.

Q. The misadventure that took place right after the author felt comfortable was that:

Solution:

A bully tossed him into the pool for the sake of fun when Douglas went for swimming in the 'safe' YMCA swimming pool.

QUESTION: 34

My breath was gone. I was frightened. Father laughed, but there was terror in my heart at the overpowering force of the waves. My introduction to the Y.M.C.A. swimming pool revived unpleasant memories and stirred childish fears. But in a little while I gathered confidence. I paddled with my new water wings, watching the other boys and trying to learn by aping them. I did this two or three times on different days and was just beginning to feel at ease in the water when the misadventure happened.

Q. Choose the option that describes the equipment used by the author while learning to swim.

Solution:

Inflatable armbands/ water wings.

QUESTION: 35

My breath was gone. I was frightened. Father laughed, but there was terror in my heart at the overpowering force of the waves. My introduction to the Y.M.C.A. swimming pool revived unpleasant memories and stirred childish fears. But in a little while I gathered confidence. I paddled with my new water wings, watching the other boys and trying to learn by aping them. I did this two or three times on different days and was just beginning to feel at ease in the water when the misadventure happened.

Q. What does the word 'revived' means?

Solution:

All the options mean the same.

QUESTION: 36

But at this moment the door opened and she looked out, a dark–blue woollen haori over her kimono. She came to him affectionately and put her arm through his as he stood, smiled and said nothing.

Q. Who is ‘she‘ in the above lines?

Solution:

She- Hana

QUESTION: 37

But at this moment the door opened and she looked out, a dark–blue woollen haori over her kimono. She came to him affectionately and put her arm through his as he stood, smiled and said nothing.

Q. What is a ‘kimono’? 

Solution:

Japanese robe with wide sleeves.

QUESTION: 38

But at this moment the door opened and she looked out, a dark–blue woollen haori over her kimono. She came to him affectionately and put her arm through his as he stood, smiled and said nothing.

Q. Where were the two standing?

Solution:
QUESTION: 39

But at this moment the door opened and she looked out, a dark–blue woollen haori over her kimono. She came to him affectionately and put her arm through his as he stood, smiled and said nothing.

Q. Where had they first met?

Solution:

Sadao and Hana met at Professor Harley’s home.

QUESTION: 40

But at this moment the door opened and she looked out, a dark–blue woollen haori over her kimono. She came to him affectionately and put her arm through his as he stood, smiled and said nothing.

Q. What is the relationship between 'him' and 'her'?

Solution:

Sadao with his wife Hana.

QUESTION: 41

Unless, governor, inspector, visitor,
This map becomes their window and these windows
That shut upon their lives like catacombs,
Break O break open till they break the town
And show the children to green fields, and make their world
Run azure on gold sands, and let their tongues
Run naked into books the white and green leaves open
History theirs whose language is the sun.

Q. What is the tone of this stanza?

Solution:

The final stanza of the poem is a vehement appeal to change the conditions of the children.

QUESTION: 42

Unless, governor, inspector, visitor,
This map becomes their window and these windows
That shut upon their lives like catacombs,
Break O break open till they break the town
And show the children to green fields, and make their world
Run azure on gold sands, and let their tongues
Run naked into books the white and green leaves open
History theirs whose language is the sun.

Q. What is the demand of the poet through this stanza? 

Solution:

The poet’s fervent appeal is to bring about positive transformation in the lives of the slum dwellers.

QUESTION: 43

Unless, governor, inspector, visitor,
This map becomes their window and these windows
That shut upon their lives like catacombs,
Break O break open till they break the town
And show the children to green fields, and make their world
Run azure on gold sands, and let their tongues
Run naked into books the white and green leaves open
History theirs whose language is the sun.

Q. The need for change in their material conditions through economic upliftment is symbolized by ________________.  

Solution:

make their world ; Run azure on gold sands

QUESTION: 44

Unless, governor, inspector, visitor,
This map becomes their window and these windows
That shut upon their lives like catacombs,
Break O break open till they break the town
And show the children to green fields, and make their world
Run azure on gold sands, and let their tongues
Run naked into books the white and green leaves open
History theirs whose language is the sun.

Q. What picturesque view does the poet create through the line, “Run azure on gold sands”?

Solution:

The poem uses a brilliant imagery to describe the blue sky and the open space that the children should at least be provided with.

QUESTION: 45

Unless, governor, inspector, visitor,
This map becomes their window and these windows
That shut upon their lives like catacombs,
Break O break open till they break the town
And show the children to green fields, and make their world
Run azure on gold sands, and let their tongues
Run naked into books the white and green leaves open
History theirs whose language is the sun.

Q. "Run azure on gold sands, and let their tongues
Run naked into books the white and green leaves open"
Which of the following poetic devices can you spot in these lines?

Solution:

Anaphora: Run azure...; Run naked; Imagery: Image can be created while reading the lines

QUESTION: 46

The man moaned with pain in his stupor but he did not awaken.
“The best thing that we could do would be to put him back in the sea,” Sadao said, answering himself.
Now that the bleeding has stopped for the moment, he stood up and dusted the sand from his hands.
“Yes, undoubtedly that would be best,” Hana said steadily. But she continued to stare down at the motionless man.
“If we sheltered a white man in our house we should be arrested and if we turned him over as a prisoner, he would certainly die,” Sadao said.
“The kindest thing would be to put him back into the sea,” Hana said. But neither of them moved. They were staring with curious repulsion upon the inert figure.

Q. In which of the following options can the underlined words NOT be replaced with ‘stupor ’?

Solution:

Sluggishness means feeling lazy due to disinterest.

QUESTION: 47

The man moaned with pain in his stupor but he did not awaken.
“The best thing that we could do would be to put him back in the sea,” Sadao said, answering himself.
Now that the bleeding has stopped for the moment, he stood up and dusted the sand from his hands.
“Yes, undoubtedly that would be best,” Hana said steadily. But she continued to stare down at the motionless man.
“If we sheltered a white man in our house we should be arrested and if we turned him over as a prisoner, he would certainly die,” Sadao said.
“The kindest thing would be to put him back into the sea,” Hana said. But neither of them moved. They were staring with curious repulsion upon the inert figure.

Q. Pick the option that best describes Sadao and Hana in the passage.

Solution:

Sadao was being practical in approach but Hana was a bit apprehensive about sheltering an American.

QUESTION: 48

The man moaned with pain in his stupor but he did not awaken.
“The best thing that we could do would be to put him back in the sea,” Sadao said, answering himself.
Now that the bleeding has stopped for the moment, he stood up and dusted the sand from his hands.
“Yes, undoubtedly that would be best,” Hana said steadily. But she continued to stare down at the motionless man.
“If we sheltered a white man in our house we should be arrested and if we turned him over as a prisoner, he would certainly die,” Sadao said.
“The kindest thing would be to put him back into the sea,” Hana said. But neither of them moved. They were staring with curious repulsion upon the inert figure.

Q. Pick the idiom that best describes the situation in which Sadao and Hana were in.

Solution:

To be in hot water - to be in or get into a difficult situation in which you are in danger of being criticized or punished.

QUESTION: 49

The man moaned with pain in his stupor but he did not awaken.
“The best thing that we could do would be to put him back in the sea,” Sadao said, answering himself.
Now that the bleeding has stopped for the moment, he stood up and dusted the sand from his hands.
“Yes, undoubtedly that would be best,” Hana said steadily. But she continued to stare down at the motionless man.
“If we sheltered a white man in our house we should be arrested and if we turned him over as a prisoner, he would certainly die,” Sadao said.
“The kindest thing would be to put him back into the sea,” Hana said. But neither of them moved. They were staring with curious repulsion upon the inert figure.

Q. Choose the correct option with reference to the two statements given below.
Statement 1: Sadao and Hana cared about the soldier but were worried about the consequences of being considerate.
Statement 2: Sadao and Hana wanted to shirk their responsibilities of looking after an injured soldier, who could be an American

Solution:

But neither of them moved. They were staring with curious repulsion upon the inert figure.

QUESTION: 50

The man moaned with pain in his stupor but he did not awaken.
“The best thing that we could do would be to put him back in the sea,” Sadao said, answering himself.
Now that the bleeding has stopped for the moment, he stood up and dusted the sand from his hands.
“Yes, undoubtedly that would be best,” Hana said steadily. But she continued to stare down at the motionless man.
“If we sheltered a white man in our house we should be arrested and if we turned him over as a prisoner, he would certainly die,” Sadao said.
“The kindest thing would be to put him back into the sea,” Hana said. But neither of them moved. They were staring with curious repulsion upon the inert figure.

Q. ‘Why are we different from other Japanese?’
Who asked this?

Solution:

They were definitely different from the other Japanese because they had not given up their humanity, especially Dr. Sadao who had not forgotten a physician's duty, despite facing the chance of being condemned as a traitor. 

QUESTION: 51

Which of the following pictures clearly bring out the theme of the lesson, ‘The Lost Spring’?

Solution:

All the pictures show child exploitation due to poverty.

QUESTION: 52

‘There was usually great bustle and noise when school began.’ Which of the following describes the normal school activity most accurately?

Solution:

‘bustle and noise’ is similar to commotion and chaos.

QUESTION: 53

The essence of the poem ‘Keeping Quiet’ is based on ____________.

Solution:

The poet feels that some soul – searching is needed for us to be at peace with ourselves and others.

QUESTION: 54

Why are the children in ‘The Lost Spring’ compelled to live a life of abuse?

Solution:

Extremely poor and pathetic survival conditions and family lineage and traditions.

QUESTION: 55

Merry children in the poem are depicted to:

Solution:

Childhood stage is always full of energy and high spirits and happy playful children enhance this effect.

QUESTION: 56

The natural world can act as both, life threat as well as life survivor. How can you prove this with example from Douglas’ life?

Solution:

Douglas’ dislike of water first began when he was three years old and had gone to the California beach with his father. He was knocked down by the waves which swept over him and he was buried under the water. His breath was gone and he developed a fear of water. He wanted to try out his swimming skills at Lake Wentworth. He dived into the lake and only after swimming across the shore and back did he feel certain that his terror of water had fled.

QUESTION: 57

Which of the following statements justify the central idea of the story, ‘The Last Lesson’?

Solution:

Society and adults play a very important role in motivating the young learners to take education seriously. Adults being experienced can guide the children in the right track through their experience.

QUESTION: 58

Which figure of speech is indicated in “see you soon, Amma”?

Solution:

She says see you soon, Amma though she knows that she won’t be able to see her again.

QUESTION: 59

Why did the narrator ’s mind create ‘The Third Level’?

Solution:

Visiting the Third Level was like a ‘waking dream wish fulfilment’.

QUESTION: 60

What do you understand by the phrase, ‘Waking dream wish fulfilment’?

Solution:

This strategy makes one stress free and transports one to his dream world.

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