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Important Questions (2 marks): The French Revolution - Class 9 MCQ


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Important Questions (2 marks): The French Revolution - Question 1

Who wrote the book Two Treatises of Government?

Detailed Solution for Important Questions (2 marks): The French Revolution - Question 1

Two Treatises of Government, a major statement of the political philosophy of the English philosopher John Locke, published in 1689 but substantially composed some years before then.

Important Questions (2 marks): The French Revolution - Question 2

Which of the following was a factor in the rise of Napoleon?

Detailed Solution for Important Questions (2 marks): The French Revolution - Question 2

Soon after the French Revolution, France was politically unstable. There were a series of events which made Napoleon become the Emperor of France.

Important Questions (2 marks): The French Revolution - Question 3

Tax Levied by the church comprising —the of agriculture produce was known as

Detailed Solution for Important Questions (2 marks): The French Revolution - Question 3
Tax Levied by the Church on Agricultural Produce: Tithe
The tax levied by the church on agricultural produce was known as the tithe. Here is a detailed explanation of this tax:
1. Definition of Tithe:
- The tithe was a mandatory tax or offering that required individuals to give a percentage of their agricultural produce to the church.
- It was typically 10% of the agricultural yield, although the exact percentage could vary in different regions.
2. Purpose of the Tithe:
- The main purpose of the tithe was to support the church and its clergy.
- It was used to finance the church's activities, maintain church buildings, support religious ceremonies, and provide for the needs of the clergy.
3. Historical Context:
- The practice of tithing has ancient roots and can be traced back to biblical times.
- In medieval Europe, the tithe became an important source of income for the church and played a significant role in shaping the social and economic fabric of society.
4. Collection of the Tithe:
- The tithe was collected by church officials or appointed agents.
- Farmers were required to bring a portion of their agricultural produce, such as grains, fruits, or livestock, to designated church locations.
5. Impact on Agricultural Communities:
- The tithe could be a burden on agricultural communities, as it required them to give a significant portion of their harvest to the church.
- It could affect their livelihoods and economic well-being, especially during times of poor harvest or agricultural crisis.
6. Reforms and Abolition:
- Over time, there were attempts to reform or abolish the tithe due to its perceived injustices and burdensome nature.
- In some countries, such as England, the tithe was eventually abolished or replaced with alternative forms of taxation.
In conclusion, the tax levied by the church on agricultural produce was known as the tithe. It played a significant role in supporting the church and its activities but could also be a burden on agricultural communities. Over time, reforms and changes in taxation systems led to the abolition or replacement of the tithe in some regions.
Important Questions (2 marks): The French Revolution - Question 4

What did Bastille symbolize as?

Detailed Solution for Important Questions (2 marks): The French Revolution - Question 4

Bastille was a symbol of social injustice, inequality and absolute monarchy.

Important Questions (2 marks): The French Revolution - Question 5

What was the reason for the increased demand for food grains in France from 1715 to 1789?

Detailed Solution for Important Questions (2 marks): The French Revolution - Question 5

The population of France rose from about 23 million in 1715 to 28 million in 1789. This led to a rapid increase in the demand for food grains. Production of grains could not keep pace with the demand. So the price of bread, which was the staple diet of the majority rose rapidly.

Important Questions (2 marks): The French Revolution - Question 6

which of these provisions form a part of the ‘Declaration of Rights of Man and Citizen’?

Detailed Solution for Important Questions (2 marks): The French Revolution - Question 6

The basic principle of the Declaration was that all “men are born and remain free and equal in rights” (Article 1), which were specified as the rights of liberty, private property, the inviolability of the person, and resistance to oppression (Article 2).

Important Questions (2 marks): The French Revolution - Question 7

Who proposed the division of powers between the legislature, executive and judiciary?

Detailed Solution for Important Questions (2 marks): The French Revolution - Question 7

Montesquieu described the various forms of distribution of political power in his work The Spirit of the Laws'. He discussed how the power needs to be distributed between the legislature, executive, and judiciary instead of being concentrated in a single monarch or an aristocrat's hands.

Important Questions (2 marks): The French Revolution - Question 8

On which date did the third estate members assemble in the Versailles indoor tennis court?

Detailed Solution for Important Questions (2 marks): The French Revolution - Question 8

On 20 June 1789, the members of the Third Estate, who call themselves the National Assembly, assembled in Versailles hall's indoor tennis court and took the Tennis Court Oath, vowing "not to separate, and to reassemble wherever circumstances require until the constitution of the kingdom is established". It was a significant event in the French Revolution.

Important Questions (2 marks): The French Revolution - Question 9

The revolutionary journalist Jean-Paul Marat published the newspaper L'Ami du Peuple, which means

Detailed Solution for Important Questions (2 marks): The French Revolution - Question 9
Answer:
The correct answer is A: The friend of the people. Jean-Paul Marat, a revolutionary journalist during the French Revolution, published the newspaper L'Ami du Peuple, which translates to "The friend of the people." Here is a detailed explanation:
- Jean-Paul Marat: He was a prominent figure during the French Revolution and a strong advocate for radical political and social change.
- Newspaper L'Ami du Peuple: Marat published this newspaper from 1789 to 1793, using it as a platform to express his revolutionary ideas and criticize the monarchy, aristocracy, and counter-revolutionaries.
- Meaning of L'Ami du Peuple: The title of the newspaper translates to "The friend of the people" in English.
- Symbolism: Marat saw himself as a defender and supporter of the common people, fighting against corruption and oppression. The title of his newspaper reflects his belief in being a friend and ally of the masses.
- Content of the Newspaper: L'Ami du Peuple contained Marat's radical and inflammatory writings, which called for the overthrow of the monarchy and the establishment of a more egalitarian society.
- Influence and Impact: The newspaper gained a significant readership and played a crucial role in shaping public opinion during the French Revolution. Marat's writings helped fuel the revolutionary fervor and contributed to the radicalization of the revolution.
Overall, Jean-Paul Marat's newspaper L'Ami du Peuple was named as such to reflect his self-proclaimed role as "The friend of the people" and to emphasize his dedication to the cause of the common people during the French Revolution.
Important Questions (2 marks): The French Revolution - Question 10

When did the Jacobins storm the Palace of the Tuileries?

Detailed Solution for Important Questions (2 marks): The French Revolution - Question 10

The Legislative Assembly and the official residence of King Louis XVI were known as Tuileries' Palace. Similar to the attack of Bastilles, the Jacobins stormed the palace on August 10, 1792.

Important Questions (2 marks): The French Revolution - Question 11

The two Indians who responded to the ideas of liberty and equality as endorsed by the French Revolution were

Detailed Solution for Important Questions (2 marks): The French Revolution - Question 11

Tipu Sultan and Rammohan Roy responded to the ideas of liberty and equality as endorsed by the French Revolution. These two Indian leaders were inspired by the ideals of nationalism and social equality of the french revolution. They were also inspired by democratic rights and the right to liberty of the french revolution.

Important Questions (2 marks): The French Revolution - Question 12

In the context of Fra nee, what was 'tithes'?

Detailed Solution for Important Questions (2 marks): The French Revolution - Question 12
Tithes in the context of Fra nee:
- Tithes were a form of taxation in the medieval period, particularly in the context of Fra nee.
- They referred to a portion of one's income or produce that was required to be given to the Church or religious institution.
- Tithes were usually a fixed percentage, often 10%, of a person's agricultural, livestock, or monetary income.
- The purpose of tithing was to support the clergy, maintain the Church, and fund charitable activities.
- Tithes were considered mandatory and failure to pay them could result in penalties or excommunication.
- Tithes were collected by the Church and were often enforceable by law.
- The Church used tithes to fund its activities, pay clergy salaries, build and maintain churches, and support the poor and needy.
- Tithes were an important source of income for the Church and played a significant role in the medieval economy.
- Tithing practices varied across different regions and periods, but the concept of tithes was prevalent in Fra nee during the medieval period.
- It is important to note that tithes were not a direct tax levied by the state, but rather a tax levied by the Church.
Important Questions (2 marks): The French Revolution - Question 13

Select the correct option.

Detailed Solution for Important Questions (2 marks): The French Revolution - Question 13

Blue-white-red is the national colours of France: Winged woman stands for personification of the law; Sceptre, for the symbol of royal power; and Broken chain means a symbol that constitutes the act of becoming free.

Important Questions (2 marks): The French Revolution - Question 14

Identify the statement which is wrong regarding Robespierre.

Detailed Solution for Important Questions (2 marks): The French Revolution - Question 14

Robespierre followed a policy of severe control and punishment. All those he saw as being 'enemies' of the republic - ex-nobles and clergy, members of other political parties, even members of his own party who disagreed with his methods - were arrested, imprisoned and then tried by a revolutionary tribunal.

Important Questions (2 marks): The French Revolution - Question 15

Political_______ became an important rallying point in France for people who wished to

discuss government policies and plan their own form and action.

Detailed Solution for Important Questions (2 marks): The French Revolution - Question 15

Political Clubs were the place people discussed politics and about the government. The two famous clubs in France were Jacobins and Girondins.

Important Questions (2 marks): The French Revolution - Question 16

When did the French Revolution take place?

Detailed Solution for Important Questions (2 marks): The French Revolution - Question 16

The first clear expression of nationalism came with the French Revolution in 1789. France was a full-fledged territorial state in 1789 under the rule of an absolute monarch. The political and constitutional changes that came in the wake of the French Revolution led to the transfer of sovereignty from the monarchy to French citizens' body.

Important Questions (2 marks): The French Revolution - Question 17

Who led the representatives of the Third Estate in Versailles on 20th June?

Detailed Solution for Important Questions (2 marks): The French Revolution - Question 17

Mirabeau and Abbe Sieyes were the two prominent figures in the history of the French Revolution. They led the people of the Third Estate, who gathered in the hall of a tennis court, to the grounds of Versailles on 20th June 1789.

Important Questions (2 marks): The French Revolution - Question 18

King Louis XVI entered into secret negotiations with the king of?

Detailed Solution for Important Questions (2 marks): The French Revolution - Question 18
King Louis XVI's Secret Negotiations with the King of Prussia
King Louis XVI of France entered into secret negotiations with the king of Prussia. Here is a detailed explanation of the events:
Background:
- Louis XVI was the last king of France before the French Revolution.
- His reign was marked by financial crisis and political instability.
- In an attempt to stabilize the situation, Louis XVI sought alliances with other European powers.
King of Prussia:
- Frederick William II was the king of Prussia during Louis XVI's reign.
- Prussia was a powerful kingdom in Europe at the time.
Reasons for Negotiations:
- Louis XVI sought Prussia's support against the revolutionary movements in France.
- He hoped to secure military assistance and financial aid from Prussia.
- The negotiations were conducted secretly to avoid drawing attention from other European powers.
Key Points:
- The negotiations between Louis XVI and the king of Prussia were conducted through intermediaries and diplomats.
- The discussions focused on forming an alliance against the French Revolutionaries and providing military aid to the French monarchy.
- Louis XVI's aim was to suppress the revolution and maintain his authority as king.
- The negotiations, however, ultimately failed to achieve their goals as the French Revolution gained momentum and the monarchy was overthrown.
Conclusion:
- King Louis XVI entered into secret negotiations with the king of Prussia in an attempt to secure support against the French Revolutionaries.
- The negotiations aimed to form an alliance and obtain military aid.
- Despite their efforts, the negotiations were unsuccessful, and the French Revolution ultimately led to the downfall of the monarchy.
Important Questions (2 marks): The French Revolution - Question 19

Who wrote the book Two Treatises of Government?

Detailed Solution for Important Questions (2 marks): The French Revolution - Question 19
The Book "Two Treatises of Government" was written by John Locke.
Here is a detailed explanation:

  • Introduction:


    • The book "Two Treatises of Government" is a work of political philosophy.

    • It was first published anonymously in 1689.

    • The book is divided into two parts, with each part addressing different aspects of government and political theory.


  • The Author:


    • John Locke: He was an English philosopher and physician.

    • Locke is considered one of the most influential Enlightenment thinkers.

    • He is known for his ideas on natural rights, social contract theory, and government by consent of the governed.

    • Locke's writings greatly influenced the development of liberal democracy and the formation of the United States.


  • The Content:


    • First Treatise: This treatise argues against the idea of the divine right of kings and the absolute power of monarchs.

    • Locke challenges the notion that political power is derived from God and instead asserts that it comes from the consent of the governed.

    • He emphasizes the importance of individual rights and the need for government to protect those rights.



    • Second Treatise: This treatise lays out Locke's theory of government and the principles of a just and legitimate political system.

    • Locke argues that government exists to protect the natural rights of individuals, including life, liberty, and property.

    • He advocates for a limited government with separation of powers and checks and balances.

    • Locke also discusses the right to revolution, stating that people have the right to overthrow a government that violates their rights.


  • Legacy and Influence:


    • The ideas presented in "Two Treatises of Government" had a profound impact on political thought and the development of democratic systems.

    • Locke's theories on natural rights and the social contract influenced the drafting of the United States Declaration of Independence and the Constitution.

    • His ideas also shaped the principles of liberalism and individual freedom that continue to be influential today.



In conclusion, "Two Treatises of Government" was written by John Locke, an influential Enlightenment philosopher who advocated for individual rights, limited government, and the consent of the governed.
Important Questions (2 marks): The French Revolution - Question 20

The______ Estate was least prosperous in France.

Detailed Solution for Important Questions (2 marks): The French Revolution - Question 20

Before the French Revolution, French society was divided into three estates. The First estate comprised the clergy, the Second estate comprised the nobility. These two states were exempted from paying taxes. And the third estate consisted of peasants, wage-labourers and they had to pay all the taxes. Therefore, the third estate was the least prosperous.

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