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Test: Socialism In Europe And The Russian Revolution (Easy) - Question 1

Who Was the last Tsar of Russia?

Detailed Solution for Test: Socialism In Europe And The Russian Revolution (Easy) - Question 1
The last Tsar of Russia was Tsar Nicholas II. He was the last Emperor of Russia, Grand Duke of Finland, and titular King of Poland. Nicholas II ruled from 1 November 1894 until his enforced abdication on 2 March 1917.

Test: Socialism In Europe And The Russian Revolution (Easy) - Question 2

The nuclear tests were banned between________ to

Detailed Solution for Test: Socialism In Europe And The Russian Revolution (Easy) - Question 2
The early 1960s also saw the introduction of the only testing limitation effort that had concrete effects on how testing was conducted during the Cold War. The 1963 Partial Test Ban Treaty banned nuclear testing for military and peaceful purposes, in the atmosphere, underwater and in space.

Test: Socialism In Europe And The Russian Revolution (Easy) - Question 3

The Russian Parliament is known as

Detailed Solution for Test: Socialism In Europe And The Russian Revolution (Easy) - Question 3
In the modern history of Russia, the State Duma, along with the Federation Council, is one of the two chambers of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation.

Test: Socialism In Europe And The Russian Revolution (Easy) - Question 4

Who believed that the traditional institutions like the Monarchy and the Church should be preserved?

Detailed Solution for Test: Socialism In Europe And The Russian Revolution (Easy) - Question 4
European governments were driven by the spirit of Conservatism after the defeat of Napoleon in 1815. Conservatives believed that established, traditional institutions of state and society-the Church, social hierarchies, property and family should be preserved. They also realized that modernization could strengthen traditional institutions like the monarchy and a return to the society of the pre-revolutionary days was not required.

Test: Socialism In Europe And The Russian Revolution (Easy) - Question 5

The slogan "from each according to his capacity and to each according to his work" was first coined by

Detailed Solution for Test: Socialism In Europe And The Russian Revolution (Easy) - Question 5
The slogan "from each according to his capacity and to each according to his work" was first coined by Karl Marx. Here is a detailed explanation:
Background:
- Karl Marx was a German philosopher, economist, and political theorist who is best known for his work in Marxism.
- He developed the theory of communism, which advocates for a classless society where the means of production are owned collectively by the workers.
Explanation:
- The slogan "from each according to his capacity and to each according to his work" encapsulates the idea of distribution in a communist society.
- It implies that individuals should contribute based on their abilities (capacity) and receive rewards (distribution) based on the amount and quality of their work.
- This slogan emphasizes the principle of equality and fairness, as it suggests that everyone should be given what they deserve based on their contributions.
Significance:
- The slogan reflects the core principles of Marxism, which seeks to eliminate social classes and create a more equitable society.
- It highlights the belief that in a communist system, individuals should not be rewarded based on their social status or privileges, but rather on their actual contributions to society.
- This slogan has been widely associated with Marx's theory of communism and has influenced political and social movements around the world.
In conclusion, the slogan "from each according to his capacity and to each according to his work" was first coined by Karl Marx. It captures the essence of the communist ideology and emphasizes the principles of equality and fairness in the distribution of resources.
Test: Socialism In Europe And The Russian Revolution (Easy) - Question 6

In which year was Russia affected by a severe famine?

Detailed Solution for Test: Socialism In Europe And The Russian Revolution (Easy) - Question 6
Background:
- A severe famine occurred in Russia during the early years of the Soviet Union.
- This famine was a result of various factors, including the effects of World War I, the Russian Revolution, and the subsequent civil war.
- The famine led to a significant loss of life and had long-lasting economic and social impacts on the country.
Identification of the correct year:
- To determine the correct year in which Russia was affected by a severe famine, we need to analyze the given options and their corresponding time frames.
Options:
A: 1924-25
B: 1921-22
C: 1928-29
D: 1930-31
Evaluating the options:
- To identify the correct year, we need to consider the historical context and events surrounding each time frame.
1924-25:
- This time frame is unlikely to be the correct answer as it falls after the Russian famine.
1928-29:
- This time frame is also unlikely to be the correct answer as it falls after the Russian famine.
1930-31:
- This time frame is unlikely to be the correct answer as it falls after the Russian famine.
The correct answer:
- Based on the evaluation of the options, the correct answer is option B: 1921-22.
- The severe famine in Russia occurred during this time frame.
Conclusion:
- Russia was affected by a severe famine in 1921-22.
- This famine had significant consequences for the country and its population.
Test: Socialism In Europe And The Russian Revolution (Easy) - Question 7

Who executed the Tsar and his entire family?

Detailed Solution for Test: Socialism In Europe And The Russian Revolution (Easy) - Question 7
The Execution of the Tsar and his Family:
The Tsar and his entire family were executed by the Bolsheviks, who were a faction of the Russian Social Democratic Labor Party led by Vladimir Lenin. Here are the details of the execution:
Background:
- The Tsar, Nicholas II, was the last Emperor of Russia, ruling from 1894 until his abdication in 1917 during the Russian Revolution.
- The revolution led to the overthrow of the Tsarist autocracy and the establishment of a socialist government led by the Bolsheviks.
Events Leading to Execution:
- After the Bolsheviks seized power in October 1917, the Tsar and his family were placed under house arrest in the Alexander Palace in Tsarskoye Selo.
- In April 1918, following the Tsar's abdication, the family was moved to Tobolsk in Siberia.
- In August 1918, the family was transferred to Yekaterinburg, where they were held captive in the Ipatiev House, also known as the "House of Special Purpose."
The Execution:
- On the night of July 16-17, 1918, the Tsar, his wife Alexandra, their five children (Olga, Tatiana, Maria, Anastasia, and Alexei), and four loyal servants were awakened and told they would be moved to a safer location due to approaching counter-revolutionary forces.
- Instead, they were taken to the basement of the Ipatiev House, where they were executed by a firing squad.
- The execution was carried out on the orders of local Bolshevik authorities, including Yakov Yurovsky.
Aftermath:
- The bodies of the Tsar and his family were initially buried in a mass grave in a nearby forest.
- In 1991, after the fall of the Soviet Union, their remains were discovered and identified through DNA testing.
- The bodies were eventually reinterred in 1998 in the Peter and Paul Fortress in St. Petersburg, Russia.
In conclusion, the Tsar and his entire family were executed by the Bolsheviks, who were the ruling faction during the Russian Revolution. The execution took place in the basement of the Ipatiev House in Yekaterinburg on July 16-17, 1918.
Test: Socialism In Europe And The Russian Revolution (Easy) - Question 8

Who argued that capitalism is a system in which those with money pay those without money to make things happen?

Detailed Solution for Test: Socialism In Europe And The Russian Revolution (Easy) - Question 8
Karl Marx argued that capitalism is a system in which those with money pay those without money to make things happen. Here is a detailed explanation:
Background: Karl Marx was a German philosopher, economist, and political theorist who is best known for his works on communism and socialism. He critiqued capitalism and sought to analyze its structure and dynamics.
Capitalism: Marx described capitalism as an economic system in which the means of production, such as factories and machinery, are privately owned and operated for profit. He believed that capitalism is inherently exploitative and characterized by class struggle.
Exploitation: According to Marx, capitalism relies on the exploitation of the working class by the bourgeoisie, the capitalist class that owns the means of production. The bourgeoisie accumulates wealth by extracting surplus value from the labor of the working class.
Wage Labor: Marx argued that in a capitalist society, workers are forced to sell their labor power as a commodity to survive. They receive wages that are often insufficient to meet their needs, while capitalists profit from the surplus value generated by the workers' labor.
Role of Money: Marx emphasized the role of money in capitalism. He believed that money mediates the relationship between the capitalist class and the working class. The capitalists, who possess money, hire workers and pay them wages in exchange for their labor.
Conclusion: In summary, Karl Marx argued that capitalism is a system in which those with money (the bourgeoisie) pay those without money (the working class) to make things happen. He saw capitalism as a system of exploitation and class conflict, and believed that it would eventually be replaced by communism.
Test: Socialism In Europe And The Russian Revolution (Easy) - Question 9

Who annoyed the need for the disbanding of USSR in 1991?

Detailed Solution for Test: Socialism In Europe And The Russian Revolution (Easy) - Question 9
Who annoyed the need for the disbanding of USSR in 1991?
Answer: D. Boris Yeltsin
Explanation:
- Boris Yeltsin, the first President of the Russian Federation, played a crucial role in the disbanding of the USSR in 1991.
- Here are the reasons why Boris Yeltsin annoyed the need for the disbanding of the USSR:
- Political Reforms: Yeltsin was a prominent figure in the political reforms that aimed to transform the Soviet Union into a more democratic and market-oriented system.
- Resistance to Soviet Hardliners: Yeltsin's defiance of the Soviet hardliners and his strong opposition to the August 1991 coup attempt by Communist Party members demonstrated his commitment to democratic principles.
- Push for Independence: Yeltsin supported the aspirations of the Soviet republics, including Russia, to gain independence from the USSR and pursue their own political and economic paths.
- Popular Support: Yeltsin enjoyed significant popular support and was able to rally the Russian people behind his vision of a new Russia separate from the Soviet Union.
- Ultimately, Boris Yeltsin's actions and leadership were instrumental in the disbanding of the USSR in 1991.
Test: Socialism In Europe And The Russian Revolution (Easy) - Question 10

Which among the following is/are the main demands of workers during the revolt in St Petersburg?

Detailed Solution for Test: Socialism In Europe And The Russian Revolution (Easy) - Question 10
On January 22, 1905, a group of workers led by the radical priest Georgy Apollonovich Gapon marched to the czar's Winter Palace in St. Petersburg to make their demands. Their demands were

Test: Socialism In Europe And The Russian Revolution (Easy) - Question 11

Which country declared war on Russia at the inception of World War One?

Detailed Solution for Test: Socialism In Europe And The Russian Revolution (Easy) - Question 11
Which country declared war on Russia at the inception of World War One?
Answer: C. Germany
Explanation:

  • The country that declared war on Russia at the beginning of World War One is Germany.

  • This event occurred on August 1, 1914, following the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria-Hungary.

  • The war between Germany and Russia was part of a larger conflict known as the Great War or World War One.

  • The declaration of war by Germany was a result of the complex alliances and tensions between the major powers in Europe at the time.

  • Germany's decision to declare war on Russia was influenced by their alliance with Austria-Hungary, who sought to punish Serbia for the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand.

  • Russia, on the other hand, had an alliance with Serbia and was determined to defend its interests in the Balkans.

  • The declaration of war by Germany led to a series of military actions and counteractions that eventually escalated into a global conflict involving many countries.

  • World War One lasted from 1914 to 1918 and had a profound impact on the political and social landscape of the world.


In summary, Germany declared war on Russia at the inception of World War One due to its alliance with Austria-Hungary and the complex web of alliances and tensions between the major powers in Europe at the time. This declaration of war set in motion a series of events that eventually led to a global conflict involving many countries.
Test: Socialism In Europe And The Russian Revolution (Easy) - Question 12

In which year was Russia affected by a severe famine?

Detailed Solution for Test: Socialism In Europe And The Russian Revolution (Easy) - Question 12
Year of Severe Famine in Russia: 1921-22
The severe famine in Russia occurred in the year 1921-22. Here is a detailed explanation of the famine and its impact:
Causes of the Famine:
- The Russian famine of 1921-22 was primarily caused by a combination of factors such as drought, poor harvests, and the disruption caused by World War I and the Russian Revolution.
- The civil war in Russia, which lasted from 1918 to 1922, also contributed to the famine as it disrupted agricultural production and distribution.
Impact of the Famine:
- The famine resulted in widespread hunger and starvation across various regions of Russia, particularly affecting rural areas.
- It is estimated that millions of people died during this period due to malnutrition and related diseases.
- The famine also led to social unrest, as people struggled to find food and resources for survival.
Response to the Famine:
- The Russian government, under the leadership of Vladimir Lenin, sought international aid to address the famine.
- Relief efforts were organized, and foreign aid was provided to alleviate the suffering of the affected population.
- However, due to various challenges, including the ongoing civil war, the response to the famine was limited and insufficient to fully address the crisis.
Long-Term Effects:
- The severe famine of 1921-22 had long-lasting effects on the Russian population and economy.
- It further weakened the already struggling agricultural sector, leading to food shortages and economic instability in the years that followed.
- The famine also had political implications, as it highlighted the challenges faced by the new Soviet government in effectively managing the country's resources and meeting the needs of its citizens.
Overall, the severe famine that struck Russia in 1921-22 had a devastating impact on the population, economy, and political stability of the country.
Test: Socialism In Europe And The Russian Revolution (Easy) - Question 13

Which statement is not correct about the Imperial Russian Army?

Detailed Solution for Test: Socialism In Europe And The Russian Revolution (Easy) - Question 13
The Imperial Russian Army (also known as 'Russian steamroller') was the armed force of the Russian Empire, active from around 1721 to the Russian Revolution of 1917 when Tsar Nicholas II was ruling the country. It consisted of more than 900,000 regular soldiers and was the largest armed force during the First World War. The army also played an important role in the downfall of the Tsarist power.

Test: Socialism In Europe And The Russian Revolution (Easy) - Question 14

What is the term used when factories are taken away from private owners and run by the state?

Detailed Solution for Test: Socialism In Europe And The Russian Revolution (Easy) - Question 14
The term used when factories are taken away from private owners and run by the state is "nationalized".
Explanation:
When factories are nationalized, it means that the government takes control and ownership of these factories, removing them from private ownership. This can occur for various reasons, such as to promote public interest, ensure fair distribution of resources, or exercise greater control over the economy.
Here is a detailed explanation of the term "nationalized":
- Nationalization: It refers to the process of transferring the ownership and control of private industries or assets to the state or government.
- Reasons for nationalization: Nationalization can be driven by various factors, such as:
- Public interest: The government may believe that nationalizing certain industries will better serve the public interest by providing essential services, ensuring fair pricing, or safeguarding national security.
- Economic control: Nationalization can be a tool for the government to exercise greater control over the economy, directing resources and production towards specific goals or sectors.
- Redistribution of wealth: Nationalization can be used to address income inequality by redistributing wealth and resources more equitably.
- Process of nationalization: The process of nationalizing a private industry typically involves the following steps:
- Legislation: The government enacts laws or legislation to authorize the nationalization of specific industries or assets.
- Compensation: Private owners are typically compensated for their lost assets, although the terms and amount of compensation can vary.
- Transfer of ownership: The ownership and control of the factories or industries are transferred to the state or government.
- Examples of nationalization: Nationalization has been implemented in various countries and industries throughout history. Some notable examples include:
- Oil industry: Many countries have nationalized their oil industries to gain control over valuable resources and ensure a fair distribution of profits.
- Telecommunications: Governments often nationalize telecommunications industries to ensure universal access to communication services and infrastructure.
- Banking sector: During economic crises, governments may nationalize troubled banks to stabilize the financial system and protect depositors.
- Impact and controversies: Nationalization can have both positive and negative impacts, and it often sparks debates and controversies. Some argue that nationalization leads to greater efficiency, fairness, and public control, while others believe it stifles innovation, increases bureaucracy, and limits private enterprise.
In conclusion, the term "nationalized" is used when factories are taken away from private owners and run by the state. This process involves the transfer of ownership and control from the private sector to the government, often in pursuit of public interest, economic control, or redistribution of wealth. Nationalization has been implemented in various industries and countries throughout history, and it continues to be a topic of debate and controversy.
Test: Socialism In Europe And The Russian Revolution (Easy) - Question 15

The main tenets of April Theses during the Bolshevik Revolution were:

Detailed Solution for Test: Socialism In Europe And The Russian Revolution (Easy) - Question 15
In April 1917, the Bolshevik leader Vladimir Lenin returned to Russia from his exile. He and the Bolsheviks had opposed the war since 1914. Now he felt it was time for the Soviets to take overpower. He declared that the war is brought to a close, land be transferred to the peasants, and banks are nationalized. These three demands were Lenin's 'April Theses'.

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