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Test: Regulation of Respiration (NCERT) - NEET MCQ


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10 Questions MCQ Test Biology Class 11 - Test: Regulation of Respiration (NCERT)

Test: Regulation of Respiration (NCERT) for NEET 2024 is part of Biology Class 11 preparation. The Test: Regulation of Respiration (NCERT) questions and answers have been prepared according to the NEET exam syllabus.The Test: Regulation of Respiration (NCERT) MCQs are made for NEET 2024 Exam. Find important definitions, questions, notes, meanings, examples, exercises, MCQs and online tests for Test: Regulation of Respiration (NCERT) below.
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Test: Regulation of Respiration (NCERT) - Question 1

During rest, the metabolic needs of the body are at their minimum. Which of the following is indicative of this situation?

Detailed Solution for Test: Regulation of Respiration (NCERT) - Question 1

Metabolic activities are the sum of physical and chemical processes taking place in the living organisms. Rate of breathing, O2 intake and CO2 output and pulse rate slow down indicating that the metabolic needs of the body are at their minimum during rest.

Test: Regulation of Respiration (NCERT) - Question 2

Chemosensitive area of respiratory centre in medulla is affected by

Detailed Solution for Test: Regulation of Respiration (NCERT) - Question 2

Respiratory rhythm centre is a specialised centre present in the medulla of the brain which is primarily responsible for the regulation of respiration. A chemosensitive area situated adjacent to the rhythm centre is highly sensitive to changes in CO2 and hydrogen ion concentrations in blood. Increase in CO2 and H+ ions stimulate this centre, which in turn stimulate the rhythm centre to make necessary adjustments in the respiratory process by which these substances can be eliminated.

Test: Regulation of Respiration (NCERT) - Question 3

Pneumotaxic centre which can moderate the functions of the respiratory rhythm centre is present at

Detailed Solution for Test: Regulation of Respiration (NCERT) - Question 3

The pneumotaxic centre, also known as the pontine respiratory group (PRG), is a network of neurons in the rostral dorsolateral pons. The PRG regulates the amount of air a person can take into the body in each breath. The absence of the PRG results in an increase in depth of respiration and a decrease in respiratory rate.

Test: Regulation of Respiration (NCERT) - Question 4

What is the primary site for the exchange of gases in the human body?

Detailed Solution for Test: Regulation of Respiration (NCERT) - Question 4

Answer: A. Alveoli

Solution: The alveoli are the primary sites for the exchange of gases. They are tiny, balloon-like structures in the lungs where oxygen is absorbed into the blood and carbon dioxide is released from the blood. This process is facilitated by the large surface area and thin walls of the alveoli, making them perfectly suited for gas exchange.

Test: Regulation of Respiration (NCERT) - Question 5

Match column I with column II and select the correct option from the given codes. 

Detailed Solution for Test: Regulation of Respiration (NCERT) - Question 5

Trachea consists of C-shaped cartilaginous rings that support the walls of the trachea and prevent its collapse during inspiration.
Respiratory centre is located in the medulla oblongata.
Yeast undergoes anaerobic respiration to produce ethanol and CO2
The type of respiration in insects and fish is tracheal respiration and branchial respiration respectively.
ATP is a biologically useful energy produced during respiration.
The partial pressure of O2 in alveolar air is approximately 104 mm Hg.
Vocal cords are present inside the larynx.

Test: Regulation of Respiration (NCERT) - Question 6

Partial pressure of oxygen in inspired and expired air is ....... and ....... mm of Hg.

Detailed Solution for Test: Regulation of Respiration (NCERT) - Question 6
Partial Pressure of Oxygen in Inspired and Expired Air

  • Inspired Air: The partial pressure of oxygen in inspired air is approximately 158 mm of Hg.

  • Expired Air: The partial pressure of oxygen in expired air is around 40 mm of Hg.


Explanation:

  • Inspired Air: When we breathe in, the air we inhale contains a higher concentration of oxygen compared to the air we breathe out. This is why the partial pressure of oxygen in inspired air is higher at around 158 mm of Hg.

  • Expired Air: As we exhale, our body utilizes oxygen for various metabolic processes, leading to a decrease in the partial pressure of oxygen in the exhaled air, which is around 40 mm of Hg.


Conclusion:

  • Therefore, the partial pressure of oxygen in inspired and expired air is approximately 158 mm of Hg and 40 mm of Hg, respectively.

Test: Regulation of Respiration (NCERT) - Question 7

Complete the following sentence by selecting the correct option.
The breathing rhythm is generated in the __(i)__ and is influenced by variation in levels of __(ii)___ in the blood.

Detailed Solution for Test: Regulation of Respiration (NCERT) - Question 7

The basic rhythm of respiration is generated mainly in the dorsal respiratory group in the medulla. Changes in blood carbon dioxide is believed to stimulate the neurons in chemosensitive area which affect the rhythm centre. CO2 acts by forming carbonic acid which dissociates into H+ and HCO3- H+ has direct effect on this. Oxygen does ot have a significant direct effect on rhythm centre.

Test: Regulation of Respiration (NCERT) - Question 8

Read the following four statements (i) - (iv) with certain mistakes in two of them.
(i) A water breather expends much more energy in ventilating its respiratory surface than an air-breathing one.
(ii) Lungs become empty after forceful expiration.
(iii) Exchange of gases in the lungs are interrupted during expiration.
Respiratory movement are controlled by CO2 concentration of arterial blood.
Which of the above two statements have mistakes?

Detailed Solution for Test: Regulation of Respiration (NCERT) - Question 8

Corrected statements:
(ii) Lungs do not become empty after a forceful expiration.
(iii) The exchange of gases in the lungs is not interrupted during expiration.

Test: Regulation of Respiration (NCERT) - Question 9

Fill up the blanks in the following paragraph by selecting the correct option.
Human beings have a significant ability to maintain and moderate the respiratory rhythm to suti the demands of the body tissues. This is done by the neural system. A specialised centre present in the medulla region of the brain called ___(i) is primarily responsible for this regulation. Another centre present in the pons region of the brain called ___(ii)can moderate the functions of the repiratory rhytm cenre. Neutral signal from this cenre cen reduce the duration of )___(iii) and thereby alter the respiratory rate. A ___(iv) is situated adjacent to the rhythm centre which is highly sensitive to CO2and hydrogen ions.

Detailed Solution for Test: Regulation of Respiration (NCERT) - Question 9

Human beings have a significant ability to maintain and moderate the respiratory rhythm, to suit the demands of the body tissues. This is done by the neural system. A specialised centre present in the medulla region of the brain called (i) Respiratory rhythm centre is primarily responsible for this regulation. Another centre present in the pons region of the brain called the (ii) Pneumotaxic centre can moderate the functions of the respiratory rhythm centre. A neural signal from this centre can reduce the duration of (iii) inspiration and thereby alter the respiratory rate. A chemosensitive (iv) area is situated adjacent to the rhythm centre which is highly sensitive to CO2 and hydrogen ions.
Correct answer is B.

Test: Regulation of Respiration (NCERT) - Question 10

Rate of breathing is controlled mainly by ________________.

Detailed Solution for Test: Regulation of Respiration (NCERT) - Question 10

Rate of breathing is mainly controlled by CO2 level in the blood.
Excess CO2 decrease the pH of the blood and it mainly stimulate the respiratory centre of the brain (i.e., Medulla oblongata) and increase the inspiratory and expiratory signals to the respiratory muscles.

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