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Case Based Questions Test: The Making of a Global World - Class 10 MCQ


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10 Questions MCQ Test Social Studies (SST) Class 10 - Case Based Questions Test: The Making of a Global World

Case Based Questions Test: The Making of a Global World for Class 10 2024 is part of Social Studies (SST) Class 10 preparation. The Case Based Questions Test: The Making of a Global World questions and answers have been prepared according to the Class 10 exam syllabus.The Case Based Questions Test: The Making of a Global World MCQs are made for Class 10 2024 Exam. Find important definitions, questions, notes, meanings, examples, exercises, MCQs and online tests for Case Based Questions Test: The Making of a Global World below.
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Case Based Questions Test: The Making of a Global World - Question 1

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Population growth from the late eighteenth century had increased the demand for food grains in Britain. As urban centres expanded and industry grew, the demand for agricultural products went up, pushing up food grain prices. Under pressure from landed groups, the government also restricted the import of corn. The laws allowing the government to do this were commonly known as the 'Corn Laws'. Unhappy with high food prices, industrialists and urban dwellers forced the abolition of the Corn Laws. After the Corn Laws were scrapped, food could be imported into Britain more cheaply than it could be produced within the country. British agriculture was unable to compete with imports. Vast areas of land were now left uncultivated, and thousands of men and women were thrown out of work. They flocked to the cities or migrated overseas.

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Q. The government restricted the import of:

Detailed Solution for Case Based Questions Test: The Making of a Global World - Question 1
The laws allowing the government to restrict the import of corn were commonly known as the Corn Laws. The Corn Laws were abolished because industrialists and urban dwellers were unhappy with high food prices. As a result, they forced the British Government to abolish the Corn Laws
Case Based Questions Test: The Making of a Global World - Question 2

Read the sources given below and answer the questions that follows:

Population growth from the late eighteenth century had increased the demand for food grains in Britain. As urban centres expanded and industry grew, the demand for agricultural products went up, pushing up food grain prices. Under pressure from landed groups, the government also restricted the import of corn. The laws allowing the government to do this were commonly known as the 'Corn Laws'. Unhappy with high food prices, industrialists and urban dwellers forced the abolition of the Corn Laws. After the Corn Laws were scrapped, food could be imported into Britain more cheaply than it could be produced within the country. British agriculture was unable to compete with imports. Vast areas of land were now left uncultivated, and thousands of men and women were thrown out of work. They flocked to the cities or migrated overseas.

Answer the following MCQs by choosing the most appropriate option:

Q. ................... were unhappy with high food prices.

Detailed Solution for Case Based Questions Test: The Making of a Global World - Question 2
Urban dwellers and Industrialists were unhappy with high food prices. One effect of higher food prices in a given country is higher consumer price index (CPI) inflation.
Case Based Questions Test: The Making of a Global World - Question 3

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The trade in meat offers a good example of this connected process. Till the 1870s, animals were shipped live from America to Europe and then slaughtered when they arrived there. But live animals took up a lot of ship space. Many also died in voyage, fell ill, lost weight, or became unfit to eat. Meat was hence an expensive luxury beyond the reach of the European poor. High prices in turn kept demand and production down until the development of a new technology, namely, refrigerated ships, which enabled the transport of perishable foods over long distances. Now animals were slaughtered for food at the starting point – in America, Australia or New Zealand – and then transported to Europe as frozen meat. This reduced shipping costs and lowered meat prices in Europe. The poor in Europe could now consume a more varied diet. To the earlier monotony of bread and potatoes many, though not all, could now add meat (and butter and eggs) to their diet. Better living condition promoted social peace within the country and support for imperialism abroad.

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Q. Example of Connected process is trade in meat, Connection here refers to:

Detailed Solution for Case Based Questions Test: The Making of a Global World - Question 3
Meat technology focuses on value adding to fresh meat and has a fully equipped small scale meat processing plant to manufacture fresh and cooked processed meat products, i.e. emulsions, smoked and cured products.
Case Based Questions Test: The Making of a Global World - Question 4

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The trade in meat offers a good example of this connected process. Till the 1870s, animals were shipped live from America to Europe and then slaughtered when they arrived there. But live animals took up a lot of ship space. Many also died in voyage, fell ill, lost weight, or became unfit to eat. Meat was hence an expensive luxury beyond the reach of the European poor. High prices in turn kept demand and production down until the development of a new technology, namely, refrigerated ships, which enabled the transport of perishable foods over long distances. Now animals were slaughtered for food at the starting point – in America, Australia or New Zealand – and then transported to Europe as frozen meat. This reduced shipping costs and lowered meat prices in Europe. The poor in Europe could now consume a more varied diet. To the earlier monotony of bread and potatoes many, though not all, could now add meat (and butter and eggs) to their diet. Better living condition promoted social peace within the country and support for imperialism abroad.

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Q. .................. enable the transport of perishable foods over long distances.

Detailed Solution for Case Based Questions Test: The Making of a Global World - Question 4
Refrigerated ships: The development of refrigerated ships enabled the transport of perishable foods over long distances.
Case Based Questions Test: The Making of a Global World - Question 5

Read the sources given below and answer the questions that follows:

The trade in meat offers a good example of this connected process. Till the 1870s, animals were shipped live from America to Europe and then slaughtered when they arrived there. But live animals took up a lot of ship space. Many also died in voyage, fell ill, lost weight, or became unfit to eat. Meat was hence an expensive luxury beyond the reach of the European poor. High prices in turn kept demand and production down until the development of a new technology, namely, refrigerated ships, which enabled the transport of perishable foods over long distances. Now animals were slaughtered for food at the starting point – in America, Australia or New Zealand – and then transported to Europe as frozen meat. This reduced shipping costs and lowered meat prices in Europe. The poor in Europe could now consume a more varied diet. To the earlier monotony of bread and potatoes many, though not all, could now add meat (and butter and eggs) to their diet. Better living condition promoted social peace within the country and support for imperialism abroad.

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Q. America, Australia and New Zealand were the ............... point for the export of meat to Europe.

Detailed Solution for Case Based Questions Test: The Making of a Global World - Question 5
The Australia, New Zealand, United States Security Treaty (ANZUS or ANZUS Treaty) is the 1951 collective security non-binding agreement between Australia and New Zealand and, separately, Australia and the United States, to co-operate on military matters in the Pacific Ocean region, although today the treaty is taken to relate to conflicts worldwide.
Case Based Questions Test: The Making of a Global World - Question 6

Read the sources given below and answer the questions that follows:

The trade in meat offers a good example of this connected process. Till the 1870s, animals were shipped live from America to Europe and then slaughtered when they arrived there. But live animals took up a lot of ship space. Many also died in voyage, fell ill, lost weight, or became unfit to eat. Meat was hence an expensive luxury beyond the reach of the European poor. High prices in turn kept demand and production down until the development of a new technology, namely, refrigerated ships, which enabled the transport of perishable foods over long distances. Now animals were slaughtered for food at the starting point – in America, Australia or New Zealand – and then transported to Europe as frozen meat. This reduced shipping costs and lowered meat prices in Europe. The poor in Europe could now consume a more varied diet. To the earlier monotony of bread and potatoes many, though not all, could now add meat (and butter and eggs) to their diet. Better living condition promoted social peace within the country and support for imperialism abroad.

Answer the following MCQs by choosing the most appropriate option:

Q. Animals were shipped live from:

Detailed Solution for Case Based Questions Test: The Making of a Global World - Question 6
Till the year 1870s, animals were shipped live from America to Europe and then slaughtered when they arrived there. But after this a new technology introduced namely, refrigerated ships, which enabled the transport of perishable foods over long distance.
Case Based Questions Test: The Making of a Global World - Question 7

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The Second World War broke out a mere two decades after the end of the First World War. It was fought between the Axis powers (mainly Nazi Germany, Japan and Italy) and the Allies (Britain, France, the Soviet Union and the US). It was a war waged for six years on many fronts, in many places, over land, on sea, in the air. Once again death and destruction was enormous. At least 60 million people, or about 3% of the world's 1939 population, are believed to have been killed, directly or indirectly, as a result of the war. Millions more were injured. Unlike in earlier wards, most of these deaths took place outside the battlefields. Many more civilians than soldiers died from war-related causes. Vast parts of Europe and Asia were devastated, and several cities were destroyed by aerial bombardment or relentless artillery attacks. The war caused an immense amount of economic devastation and social disruption. Reconstruction promised to be long and difficult.

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Q. The difference between First World War and Second World War was:

Detailed Solution for Case Based Questions Test: The Making of a Global World - Question 7
The difference between WWI and WWII is that the first world war was fought with the motive of acquiring territories and colonies hence imperialism was the cause whereas the second World War was based on the domination of ideologies like Fascism, Nazism, and communism.
Case Based Questions Test: The Making of a Global World - Question 8

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The Second World War broke out a mere two decades after the end of the First World War. It was fought between the Axis powers (mainly Nazi Germany, Japan and Italy) and the Allies (Britain, France, the Soviet Union and the US). It was a war waged for six years on many fronts, in many places, over land, on sea, in the air. Once again death and destruction was enormous. At least 60 million people, or about 3% of the world's 1939 population, are believed to have been killed, directly or indirectly, as a result of the war. Millions more were injured. Unlike in earlier wards, most of these deaths took place outside the battlefields. Many more civilians than soldiers died from war-related causes. Vast parts of Europe and Asia were devastated, and several cities were destroyed by aerial bombardment or relentless artillery attacks. The war caused an immense amount of economic devastation and social disruption. Reconstruction promised to be long and difficult.

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Q. In 1939 about ................ of world was at least ............... million people, who were killed in Second World War.

Detailed Solution for Case Based Questions Test: The Making of a Global World - Question 8
An estimated total of 70–85 million people perished, or about 3% of the 1940 world population (est. 2.3 billion). Deaths directly caused by the war (including military and civilian fatalities) are estimated at 50–56 million, with an additional estimated 19–28 million deaths from war-related disease and famine.
Case Based Questions Test: The Making of a Global World - Question 9

Read the sources given below and answer the questions that follows:

The Second World War broke out a mere two decades after the end of the First World War. It was fought between the Axis powers (mainly Nazi Germany, Japan and Italy) and the Allies (Britain, France, the Soviet Union and the US). It was a war waged for six years on many fronts, in many places, over land, on sea, in the air. Once again death and destruction was enormous. At least 60 million people, or about 3% of the world's 1939 population, are believed to have been killed, directly or indirectly, as a result of the war. Millions more were injured. Unlike in earlier wards, most of these deaths took place outside the battlefields. Many more civilians than soldiers died from war-related causes. Vast parts of Europe and Asia were devastated, and several cities were destroyed by aerial bombardment or relentless artillery attacks. The war caused an immense amount of economic devastation and social disruption. Reconstruction promised to be long and difficult.

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Q. Vast parts of .............. were devastated.

Detailed Solution for Case Based Questions Test: The Making of a Global World - Question 9
As well as spices and tea, they included silks, cottons, porcelains and other luxury goods. Since few European products could be successfully sold in bulk in Asian markets, these imports were paid for with silver. The resulting currency drain encouraged Europeans to imitate the goods they so admired.
Case Based Questions Test: The Making of a Global World - Question 10

Read the sources given below and answer the questions that follows:

The Second World War broke out a mere two decades after the end of the First World War. It was fought between the Axis powers (mainly Nazi Germany, Japan and Italy) and the Allies (Britain, France, the Soviet Union and the US). It was a war waged for six years on many fronts, in many places, over land, on sea, in the air. Once again death and destruction was enormous. At least 60 million people, or about 3% of the world's 1939 population, are believed to have been killed, directly or indirectly, as a result of the war. Millions more were injured. Unlike in earlier wards, most of these deaths took place outside the battlefields. Many more civilians than soldiers died from war-related causes. Vast parts of Europe and Asia were devastated, and several cities were destroyed by aerial bombardment or relentless artillery attacks. The war caused an immense amount of economic devastation and social disruption. Reconstruction promised to be long and difficult.

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Q. The Second world war was fought for ............ years on many fronts, in many places, over land, sea and air.

Detailed Solution for Case Based Questions Test: The Making of a Global World - Question 10
Hitler's invasion of Poland in September 1939 drove Great Britain and France to declare war on Germany, marking the beginning of World War II. Over the next six years, the conflict would take more lives and destroy more land and property around the globe than any previous war.
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