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Case Based Questions Test: Manufacturing Industries - Class 10 MCQ


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15 Questions MCQ Test Geography for Class 10 - Case Based Questions Test: Manufacturing Industries

Case Based Questions Test: Manufacturing Industries for Class 10 2024 is part of Geography for Class 10 preparation. The Case Based Questions Test: Manufacturing Industries questions and answers have been prepared according to the Class 10 exam syllabus.The Case Based Questions Test: Manufacturing Industries MCQs are made for Class 10 2024 Exam. Find important definitions, questions, notes, meanings, examples, exercises, MCQs and online tests for Case Based Questions Test: Manufacturing Industries below.
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Case Based Questions Test: Manufacturing Industries - Question 1

Read the text given below and answer the questions that follows:

Manufacturing industries not only help in modernising agriculture, which forms the backbone of our economy, they also reduce the heavy dependence of people on agricultural income by providing them jobs in secondary and tertiary sectors. Industrial development is a precondition for eradication of unemployment and poverty from our country. This was the main philosophy behind public sector industries and joint sector ventures in India. It was also aimed at bringing down regional disparities by establishing industries in tribal and backward areas. Export of manufactured goods expands trade and commerce, and brings in much needed foreign exchange. Countries that transform their raw materials into a wide variety of finished goods of higher value are prosperous. India’s prosperity lies in increasing and diversifying its manufacturing industries as quickly as possible. Agriculture and industry are not exclusive to each other. They move hand in hand. For instance, the agro-industries in India have given a major boost to agriculture by raising its productivity.

Answer the following MCQs by choosing the most appropriate option.

Q. Manufacturing industries fall in _________ and agriculture in ___________ .

Detailed Solution for Case Based Questions Test: Manufacturing Industries - Question 1
Manufacturing industries fall in Secondary Sector ​and agriculture in Primary Sector. The secondary sector, more commonly called the manufacturing sector - parts of the economy producing goods through some manufacturing process (as opposed to raw resources extracted from nature).
Case Based Questions Test: Manufacturing Industries - Question 2

Read the text given below and answer the questions that follows:

Manufacturing industries not only help in modernising agriculture, which forms the backbone of our economy, they also reduce the heavy dependence of people on agricultural income by providing them jobs in secondary and tertiary sectors. Industrial development is a precondition for eradication of unemployment and poverty from our country. This was the main philosophy behind public sector industries and joint sector ventures in India. It was also aimed at bringing down regional disparities by establishing industries in tribal and backward areas. Export of manufactured goods expands trade and commerce, and brings in much needed foreign exchange. Countries that transform their raw materials into a wide variety of finished goods of higher value are prosperous. India’s prosperity lies in increasing and diversifying its manufacturing industries as quickly as possible. Agriculture and industry are not exclusive to each other. They move hand in hand. For instance, the agro-industries in India have given a major boost to agriculture by raising its productivity.

Answer the following MCQs by choosing the most appropriate option.

Q. Which of the following options does not help in modernising agriculture?

Detailed Solution for Case Based Questions Test: Manufacturing Industries - Question 2
The manufacturing industries help in modernizing agriculture. Apart from this, manufacturing industries also reduce the heavy dependence of people on agricultural income. This becomes possible because of the creation of new jobs in secondary and tertiary sectors.
Case Based Questions Test: Manufacturing Industries - Question 3

Read the text given below and answer the questions that follows:

Manufacturing industries not only help in modernising agriculture, which forms the backbone of our economy, they also reduce the heavy dependence of people on agricultural income by providing them jobs in secondary and tertiary sectors. Industrial development is a precondition for eradication of unemployment and poverty from our country. This was the main philosophy behind public sector industries and joint sector ventures in India. It was also aimed at bringing down regional disparities by establishing industries in tribal and backward areas. Export of manufactured goods expands trade and commerce, and brings in much needed foreign exchange. Countries that transform their raw materials into a wide variety of finished goods of higher value are prosperous. India’s prosperity lies in increasing and diversifying its manufacturing industries as quickly as possible. Agriculture and industry are not exclusive to each other. They move hand in hand. For instance, the agro-industries in India have given a major boost to agriculture by raising its productivity.

Answer the following MCQs by choosing the most appropriate option.

Q. In order to attract foreign manufacturing firms, a country needs to develop:

Detailed Solution for Case Based Questions Test: Manufacturing Industries - Question 3
Infrastructure is the set of fundamental facilities and systems that support the sustainable functionality of households and firms. Serving a country, city, or other area, including the services and facilities necessary for its economy to function.
Case Based Questions Test: Manufacturing Industries - Question 4

Read the text given below and answer the questions that follows:

Manufacturing industries not only help in modernising agriculture, which forms the backbone of our economy, they also reduce the heavy dependence of people on agricultural income by providing them jobs in secondary and tertiary sectors. Industrial development is a precondition for eradication of unemployment and poverty from our country. This was the main philosophy behind public sector industries and joint sector ventures in India. It was also aimed at bringing down regional disparities by establishing industries in tribal and backward areas. Export of manufactured goods expands trade and commerce, and brings in much needed foreign exchange. Countries that transform their raw materials into a wide variety of finished goods of higher value are prosperous. India’s prosperity lies in increasing and diversifying its manufacturing industries as quickly as possible. Agriculture and industry are not exclusive to each other. They move hand in hand. For instance, the agro-industries in India have given a major boost to agriculture by raising its productivity.

Answer the following MCQs by choosing the most appropriate option.

Q. Manufacturing provides job opportunities to reduce dependence on agriculture. Identify which sector the following jobs belong to:

Choose the correct option:

Detailed Solution for Case Based Questions Test: Manufacturing Industries - Question 4

(a) Garment production belongs to Secondary Sector.

(b) Research and Development belongs to Quaternary Sector.

(c) Banking belongs to Tertiary Sector.

(d) Mining belongs to Primary Sector.

Case Based Questions Test: Manufacturing Industries - Question 5

Read the text given below and answer the questions that follows:

The iron and steel industry is the basic industry since all the other industries — heavy, medium and light, depend on it for their machinery. Steel is needed to manufacture a variety of engineering goods, construction material, defence, medical, telephonic, scientific equipment and a variety of consumer goods. Production and consumption of steel is often regarded as the index of a country’s development. Iron and steel is a heavy industry because all the raw materials as well as finished goods are heavy and bulky, entailing heavy transportation costs. Iron ore, coking coal and limestone are required in the ratio of approximately 4 : 2 : 1. Some quantities of manganese are also required to harden the steel. Where should the steel plants be ideally located? Remember that the finished products also need an efficient transport network for their distribution to the markets and consumers. In 2016 with 95.6 million tonnes of crude steel production, India ranked 3rd among the world crude steel producers. It is the largest producer of sponge iron. In 2016 per capita consumption of steel in the country was only around 63 kg per annum against the world average of 208 kg.

Answer the following MCQs by choosing the most appropriate option.

Q. Which industry is called the basic industry of India?

Detailed Solution for Case Based Questions Test: Manufacturing Industries - Question 5
Iron and steel industry is called the basic industry due to following reasons:
  • All industries whether heavy, medium or light depend on it for the machinery. Thus, it provides base to the other industries.

  • Steel is required for manufacturing variety of engineering, construction and defence goods. Various ship building industries, aircrafts, transport equipments etc require steel which is a finished product of the iron and steel industry.

  • Day to day consumer goods like containers, safety pins etc. are made up of steel.

Case Based Questions Test: Manufacturing Industries - Question 6

Read the text given below and answer the questions that follows:

The iron and steel industry is the basic industry since all the other industries — heavy, medium and light, depend on it for their machinery. Steel is needed to manufacture a variety of engineering goods, construction material, defence, medical, telephonic, scientific equipment and a variety of consumer goods. Production and consumption of steel is often regarded as the index of a country’s development. Iron and steel is a heavy industry because all the raw materials as well as finished goods are heavy and bulky, entailing heavy transportation costs. Iron ore, coking coal and limestone are required in the ratio of approximately 4 : 2 : 1. Some quantities of manganese are also required to harden the steel. Where should the steel plants be ideally located? Remember that the finished products also need an efficient transport network for their distribution to the markets and consumers. In 2016 with 95.6 million tonnes of crude steel production, India ranked 3rd among the world crude steel producers. It is the largest producer of sponge iron. In 2016 per capita consumption of steel in the country was only around 63 kg per annum against the world average of 208 kg.

Answer the following MCQs by choosing the most appropriate option.

Explain the process of manufacturing of steel. Choose the correct option:

(i) Pig iron

(ii) Blast furnace

(iii) Shaping metal

(iv) Steel making

Detailed Solution for Case Based Questions Test: Manufacturing Industries - Question 6
Steel is made primarily in a two-step process. In the primary steelmaking step, liquid iron is converted into steel by the basic oxygen furnace (BOF) process, or by melting scrap steel or direct reduced iron (DRI) in an electric arc furnace.
Case Based Questions Test: Manufacturing Industries - Question 7

Read the text given below and answer the questions that follows:

The iron and steel industry is the basic industry since all the other industries — heavy, medium and light, depend on it for their machinery. Steel is needed to manufacture a variety of engineering goods, construction material, defence, medical, telephonic, scientific equipment and a variety of consumer goods. Production and consumption of steel is often regarded as the index of a country’s development. Iron and steel is a heavy industry because all the raw materials as well as finished goods are heavy and bulky, entailing heavy transportation costs. Iron ore, coking coal and limestone are required in the ratio of approximately 4 : 2 : 1. Some quantities of manganese are also required to harden the steel. Where should the steel plants be ideally located? Remember that the finished products also need an efficient transport network for their distribution to the markets and consumers. In 2016 with 95.6 million tonnes of crude steel production, India ranked 3rd among the world crude steel producers. It is the largest producer of sponge iron. In 2016 per capita consumption of steel in the country was only around 63 kg per annum against the world average of 208 kg.

Answer the following MCQs by choosing the most appropriate option.

Q. Manufacturing steel is not every person's business. Suppose you are working in a steel industry, what will be the proportion of Iron Ore, coking coal and limestone you would use to produce steel?

Detailed Solution for Case Based Questions Test: Manufacturing Industries - Question 7
Iron ore, coking coal and limestone are required in the ratio of approximately 4 : 2 : 1. Some quantities of manganese, are also required to harden the steel Justify this statement.
Case Based Questions Test: Manufacturing Industries - Question 8

Read the text given below and answer the questions that follows:

The iron and steel industry is the basic industry since all the other industries — heavy, medium and light, depend on it for their machinery. Steel is needed to manufacture a variety of engineering goods, construction material, defence, medical, telephonic, scientific equipment and a variety of consumer goods. Production and consumption of steel is often regarded as the index of a country’s development. Iron and steel is a heavy industry because all the raw materials as well as finished goods are heavy and bulky, entailing heavy transportation costs. Iron ore, coking coal and limestone are required in the ratio of approximately 4 : 2 : 1. Some quantities of manganese are also required to harden the steel. Where should the steel plants be ideally located? Remember that the finished products also need an efficient transport network for their distribution to the markets and consumers. In 2016 with 95.6 million tonnes of crude steel production, India ranked 3rd among the world crude steel producers. It is the largest producer of sponge iron. In 2016 per capita consumption of steel in the country was only around 63 kg per annum against the world average of 208 kg.

Answer the following MCQs by choosing the most appropriate option.

Q. Index of a country is regarded on what basis? Select the appropriate option:

Detailed Solution for Case Based Questions Test: Manufacturing Industries - Question 8
“Production and consumption of steel is often regarded as the index of a country's development”. “Production and consumption of steel is often regarded as the index of a country's development”.
Case Based Questions Test: Manufacturing Industries - Question 9

Read the text given below and answer the questions that follows:

Every litre of waste water discharged by our industry pollutes eight times the quantity of fresh water. How can the industrial pollution of fresh water be reduced ? Some suggestions are-

(i) minimising the use of water for processing by reusing and recycling it in two or more successive stages.

(ii) harvesting of rainwater to meet water requirements.

(iii) treating hot water and effluents before releasing them in rivers and ponds. Treatment of industrial effluents can be done in three phases.

(a) Primary treatment by mechanical means it involves screening, grinding, flocculation and sedimentation.

(b) Secondary treatment by biological process.

(c) Tertiary treatment by biological, chemical and physical processes. This involves recycling of waste water.

Overdrawing of ground water reserves by industry where there is a threat to ground water resources also needs to be regulated legally. Particulate matter in the air can be reduced by fitting smoke stacks to factories with electrostatic precipitators, fabric filters, scrubbers and inertial separators. Smoke can be reduced by using oil or gas instead of coal in factories. Machinery and equipment can be used and generators should be fitted with silencers. Almost all machinery can be redesigned to increase energy efficiency and reduce noise. Noise absorbing material may be used apart from personal use of earplugs and earphones. The challenge of sustainable development requires integration of economic development with environmental concerns.

Answer the following MCQs by choosing the most appropriate option.

Q. How many treatments are there for industrial effluents?

Detailed Solution for Case Based Questions Test: Manufacturing Industries - Question 9
There are three main stages of the wastewater treatment process, aptly known as primary, secondary and tertiary water treatment.
Case Based Questions Test: Manufacturing Industries - Question 10

Read the text given below and answer the questions that follows:

Every litre of waste water discharged by our industry pollutes eight times the quantity of fresh water. How can the industrial pollution of fresh water be reduced ? Some suggestions are-

(i) minimising the use of water for processing by reusing and recycling it in two or more successive stages.

(ii) harvesting of rainwater to meet water requirements.

(iii) treating hot water and effluents before releasing them in rivers and ponds. Treatment of industrial effluents can be done in three phases.

(a) Primary treatment by mechanical means it involves screening, grinding, flocculation and sedimentation.

(b) Secondary treatment by biological process.

(c) Tertiary treatment by biological, chemical and physical processes. This involves recycling of waste water.

Overdrawing of ground water reserves by industry where there is a threat to ground water resources also needs to be regulated legally. Particulate matter in the air can be reduced by fitting smoke stacks to factories with electrostatic precipitators, fabric filters, scrubbers and inertial separators. Smoke can be reduced by using oil or gas instead of coal in factories. Machinery and equipment can be used and generators should be fitted with silencers. Almost all machinery can be redesigned to increase energy efficiency and reduce noise. Noise absorbing material may be used apart from personal use of earplugs and earphones. The challenge of sustainable development requires integration of economic development with environmental concerns.

Answer the following MCQs by choosing the most appropriate option.

Q. The challenge of sustainable development requires integration of economic development with _______concerns.

Detailed Solution for Case Based Questions Test: Manufacturing Industries - Question 10
  • The challenge of sustainable development requires integration of economic development with environmental concern

  • The Challenge of sustainable development: Sustainable development aims at development without damaging the environment and at the same time, conserving for future.

Case Based Questions Test: Manufacturing Industries - Question 11

Read the text given below and answer the questions that follows:

Every litre of waste water discharged by our industry pollutes eight times the quantity of fresh water. How can the industrial pollution of fresh water be reduced ? Some suggestions are-

(i) minimising the use of water for processing by reusing and recycling it in two or more successive stages.

(ii) harvesting of rainwater to meet water requirements.

(iii) treating hot water and effluents before releasing them in rivers and ponds. Treatment of industrial effluents can be done in three phases.

(a) Primary treatment by mechanical means it involves screening, grinding, flocculation and sedimentation.

(b) Secondary treatment by biological process.

(c) Tertiary treatment by biological, chemical and physical processes. This involves recycling of waste water.

Overdrawing of ground water reserves by industry where there is a threat to ground water resources also needs to be regulated legally. Particulate matter in the air can be reduced by fitting smoke stacks to factories with electrostatic precipitators, fabric filters, scrubbers and inertial separators. Smoke can be reduced by using oil or gas instead of coal in factories. Machinery and equipment can be used and generators should be fitted with silencers. Almost all machinery can be redesigned to increase energy efficiency and reduce noise. Noise absorbing material may be used apart from personal use of earplugs and earphones. The challenge of sustainable development requires integration of economic development with environmental concerns.

Answer the following MCQs by choosing the most appropriate option.

Q. _______ treatment involves biological, chemical and physical processes.

Detailed Solution for Case Based Questions Test: Manufacturing Industries - Question 11
Tertiary treatment technologies can be the extensions of conventional secondary biological treatment to further stabilize oxygen-demanding substances in the wastewater or to remove nitrogen and phosphorus.
Case Based Questions Test: Manufacturing Industries - Question 12

Read the text given below and answer the questions that follows:

Every litre of waste water discharged by our industry pollutes eight times the quantity of fresh water. How can the industrial pollution of fresh water be reduced ? Some suggestions are-

(i) minimising the use of water for processing by reusing and recycling it in two or more successive stages.

(ii) harvesting of rainwater to meet water requirements.

(iii) treating hot water and effluents before releasing them in rivers and ponds. Treatment of industrial effluents can be done in three phases.

(a) Primary treatment by mechanical means it involves screening, grinding, flocculation and sedimentation.

(b) Secondary treatment by biological process.

(c) Tertiary treatment by biological, chemical and physical processes. This involves recycling of waste water.

Overdrawing of ground water reserves by industry where there is a threat to ground water resources also needs to be regulated legally. Particulate matter in the air can be reduced by fitting smoke stacks to factories with electrostatic precipitators, fabric filters, scrubbers and inertial separators. Smoke can be reduced by using oil or gas instead of coal in factories. Machinery and equipment can be used and generators should be fitted with silencers. Almost all machinery can be redesigned to increase energy efficiency and reduce noise. Noise absorbing material may be used apart from personal use of earplugs and earphones. The challenge of sustainable development requires integration of economic development with environmental concerns.

Answer the following MCQs by choosing the most appropriate option.

Q. What could be done to reduce pollution of machinery and equipment?

Detailed Solution for Case Based Questions Test: Manufacturing Industries - Question 12
Use an automotive muffler to muffle the sound of your portable generator. While this is not the most straightforward method when done correctly, it can achieve a 10-15 decibel reduction. All you will need is an automotive muffler, some creativity, and a few tools.
Case Based Questions Test: Manufacturing Industries - Question 13

Read the text given below and answer the questions that follows:

In ancient India, cotton textiles were produced with hand spinning and handloom weaving techniques. After the 18th century, power-looms came into use. Our traditional industries suffered a setback during the colonial period because they could not compete with the mill-made cloth from England. In the early years, the cotton textile industry was concentrated in the cotton growing belt of Maharashtra and Gujarat. Availability of raw cotton, market, transport including accessible port facilities, labour, moist climate, etc. contributed towards its localisation. This industry has close links with agriculture and provides a living to farmers, cotton boll pluckers and workers engaged in ginning, spinning, weaving, dyeing, designing, packaging, tailoring and sewing. The industry by creating demands supports many other industries, such as, chemicals and dyes, packaging materials and engineering works. While spinning continues to be centralised in Maharashtra, Gujarat and Tamil Nadu, weaving is highly decentralised to provide scope for incorporating traditional skills and designs of weaving in cotton, silk, zari, embroidery, etc. India has world class production in spinning, but weaving supplies low quality of fabric as it cannot use much of the high-quality yarn produced in the country. Weaving is done by handloom, power loom and in mills. The handspun khadi provides large scale employment to weavers in their homes as a cottage industry.

Answer the following MCQs by choosing the most appropriate option.

Q. Why did our traditional industries suffer a setback during the colonial period?

Detailed Solution for Case Based Questions Test: Manufacturing Industries - Question 13
After the 18th century, power-looms came into use. Our traditional industries suffered a setback during the colonial period because they could not compete with the mill-made cloth from England.
Case Based Questions Test: Manufacturing Industries - Question 14

Read the text given below and answer the questions that follows:

In ancient India, cotton textiles were produced with hand spinning and handloom weaving techniques. After the 18th century, power-looms came into use. Our traditional industries suffered a setback during the colonial period because they could not compete with the mill-made cloth from England. In the early years, the cotton textile industry was concentrated in the cotton growing belt of Maharashtra and Gujarat. Availability of raw cotton, market, transport including accessible port facilities, labour, moist climate, etc. contributed towards its localisation. This industry has close links with agriculture and provides a living to farmers, cotton boll pluckers and workers engaged in ginning, spinning, weaving, dyeing, designing, packaging, tailoring and sewing. The industry by creating demands supports many other industries, such as, chemicals and dyes, packaging materials and engineering works. While spinning continues to be centralised in Maharashtra, Gujarat and Tamil Nadu, weaving is highly decentralised to provide scope for incorporating traditional skills and designs of weaving in cotton, silk, zari, embroidery, etc. India has world class production in spinning, but weaving supplies low quality of fabric as it cannot use much of the high-quality yarn produced in the country. Weaving is done by handloom, power loom and in mills. The handspun khadi provides large scale employment to weavers in their homes as a cottage industry.

Answer the following MCQs by choosing the most appropriate option.

Q. Availability of raw cotton, market, transport including accessible port facilities, labour, moist climate, etc., contributed towards its localisation.

Detailed Solution for Case Based Questions Test: Manufacturing Industries - Question 14
  • In the early years, the cotton textile industry was concentrated in the cotton growing belt of Maharashtra and Gujarat. Availability of raw cotton, market, transport including accessible port facilities, labour, moist climate, etc contributed towards its localisation.

  • This industry has close links with agriculture and provides a living to farmers, cotton boll pluckers and workers engaged in ginning, spinning, weaving,dyeing, designing, packaging, tailoring and sewing.

  • The industry by creating demands supports many other industries, such as, chemicals and dyes, mill stores, packaging materials and engineering works. These all factors determine location of cotton mill in early years.

Case Based Questions Test: Manufacturing Industries - Question 15

Read the text given below and answer the questions that follows:

In ancient India, cotton textiles were produced with hand spinning and handloom weaving techniques. After the 18th century, power-looms came into use. Our traditional industries suffered a setback during the colonial period because they could not compete with the mill-made cloth from England. In the early years, the cotton textile industry was concentrated in the cotton growing belt of Maharashtra and Gujarat. Availability of raw cotton, market, transport including accessible port facilities, labour, moist climate, etc. contributed towards its localisation. This industry has close links with agriculture and provides a living to farmers, cotton boll pluckers and workers engaged in ginning, spinning, weaving, dyeing, designing, packaging, tailoring and sewing. The industry by creating demands supports many other industries, such as, chemicals and dyes, packaging materials and engineering works. While spinning continues to be centralised in Maharashtra, Gujarat and Tamil Nadu, weaving is highly decentralised to provide scope for incorporating traditional skills and designs of weaving in cotton, silk, zari, embroidery, etc. India has world class production in spinning, but weaving supplies low quality of fabric as it cannot use much of the high-quality yarn produced in the country. Weaving is done by handloom, power loom and in mills. The handspun khadi provides large scale employment to weavers in their homes as a cottage industry.

Answer the following MCQs by choosing the most appropriate option.

Q. Weaving is done by:

Detailed Solution for Case Based Questions Test: Manufacturing Industries - Question 15
Weaving is done on a loom, which holds the warp threads under tension allowing them to be intersected by the weft.
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