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Test: Idioms- 2 - Class 9 MCQ


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15 Questions MCQ Test English Olympiad for Class 9 - Test: Idioms- 2

Test: Idioms- 2 for Class 9 2024 is part of English Olympiad for Class 9 preparation. The Test: Idioms- 2 questions and answers have been prepared according to the Class 9 exam syllabus.The Test: Idioms- 2 MCQs are made for Class 9 2024 Exam. Find important definitions, questions, notes, meanings, examples, exercises, MCQs and online tests for Test: Idioms- 2 below.
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Test: Idioms- 2 - Question 1

Direction: Choose the correct option for each of the given idioms.

Q. Back of beyond

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms- 2 - Question 1

The correct option for the idiom "Back of beyond" is D: A lonely forsaken place.
Here is a detailed explanation of the given idiom and its correct option:
Idiom: Back of beyond
- This idiom is used to describe a remote or isolated place that is far away from civilization or populated areas.
- It implies a location that is difficult to reach or rarely visited.
Explanation of the options:
A: An ideal place for holidays
- This option is incorrect because "Back of beyond" does not refer to an ideal holiday destination. It implies a place that is isolated and far from amenities and facilities.
B: A place with certain memories
- This option is incorrect because "Back of beyond" does not specifically refer to a place with memories. It focuses more on the remoteness and isolation of a place.
C: A religious place
- This option is incorrect because "Back of beyond" does not specifically refer to a religious place. It is a general idiom used to describe a remote location.
Correct Option:
D: A lonely forsaken place
- This option is correct because "Back of beyond" accurately conveys the meaning of a place that is lonely and forsaken, far away from civilization.
In conclusion, the correct option for the idiom "Back of beyond" is D: A lonely forsaken place. This idiom refers to a remote and isolated location that is far from populated areas and difficult to reach.
Test: Idioms- 2 - Question 2

Direction: Choose the correct option for each of the given idioms.

Q. Bandy words

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms- 2 - Question 2

Idiom: Bandy words
To understand the correct option for the idiom "Bandy words," let's analyze the meaning and usage of the phrase.
Meaning:
When someone "bandies words," it means they are engaging in a heated argument or verbal dispute. It implies a back-and-forth exchange of harsh or angry words between two or more people.
Usage:
This idiom is commonly used to describe situations where individuals are involved in a heated debate, disagreement, or verbal altercation.
Options:
The correct option for the idiom "Bandy words" is:
A: to argue
Explanation:
- To argue means to express differing opinions or points of view, often in a confrontational or heated manner.
- Bandy words specifically refers to engaging in an argument or verbal dispute, making option A the correct choice.
Summary:
- The idiom "Bandy words" means to engage in a heated argument or verbal dispute.
- The correct option for this idiom is A: to argue.
Test: Idioms- 2 - Question 3

Direction: Choose the correct option for each of the given idioms.

Q. Bad blood

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms- 2 - Question 3

Explanation:



  • Idiom: Bad blood

  • Meaning: Bitter relations or hostility between people

  • Options:


    • Option A: Wounded in scuffle - This option does not match the meaning of the idiom.

    • Option B: Bitter relations - This option matches the meaning of the idiom and is the correct answer.

    • Option C: Dishonest - This option does not match the meaning of the idiom.

    • Option D: Arrogant - This option does not match the meaning of the idiom.


  • Correct Answer: B: Bitter relations


Therefore, the correct option for the idiom "Bad blood" is B: Bitter relations.

Test: Idioms- 2 - Question 4

Direction: Choose the correct option for each of the given idioms.

Q. Brow beat

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms- 2 - Question 4

The correct option for the idiom "Brow beat" is A: to bully.
Explanation:
Definition: "Brow beat" is an idiom that means to intimidate or bully someone with harsh words or actions.
Explanation of options:
A:

to bully

- This is the correct option. It accurately represents the meaning of the idiom.
B:

to respect

- This option does not match the meaning of the idiom. "Brow beat" does not refer to showing respect.
C:

to praise

- This option does not match the meaning of the idiom. "Brow beat" does not refer to praising someone.
D:

to rebuke

- This option is similar to the correct option, but it does not fully capture the intensity and harshness associated with bullying.
Conclusion: Therefore, the correct option for the idiom "Brow beat" is A: to bully.
Test: Idioms- 2 - Question 5

Direction: Choose the correct option for each of the given idioms.

Q. Blow one's trumpet

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms- 2 - Question 5

Idiom: Blow one's trumpet
The correct option for the given idiom is C: To praise oneself.
Explanation:
To "blow one's trumpet" is an idiom that means to boast or speak highly of oneself. It is a figurative expression that originated from the act of trumpeters drawing attention to themselves by playing their trumpets loudly. In a similar way, when someone "blows their own trumpet," they are drawing attention to their own achievements or abilities.
Here is a detailed explanation of the options:
A: To praise others - This option is incorrect as the idiom specifically refers to praising oneself, not others.
B: To praise the leader - This option is incorrect as the idiom does not specifically refer to praising a leader. It is about self-promotion.
C: To praise oneself - This option is correct. "Blow one's trumpet" means to boast or speak highly of oneself.
D: To praise the community - This option is incorrect as the idiom focuses on self-praise rather than praising a community.
In conclusion, the correct option for the idiom "Blow one's trumpet" is C: To praise oneself.
Test: Idioms- 2 - Question 6

Direction: Choose the correct option for each of the given idioms.

Q. Bring to book

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms- 2 - Question 6

To solve this question, we need to understand the meaning of the idiom "bring to book" and then select the correct option that best matches its meaning.
Meaning of "bring to book":
The idiom "bring to book" means to hold someone accountable or responsible for their actions, especially when they have done something wrong or illegal. It can also refer to taking legal action against someone.
Options:
A: To punish
B: To serve
C: To praise
D: To write a story
Correct Answer: A: To punish
Explanation:
- To bring someone to book means to make them face the consequences of their actions, which often involves punishing them.
- Option A, "To punish", is the correct answer because it aligns with the meaning of the idiom "bring to book".
- Option B, "To serve", does not accurately represent the meaning of the idiom. Serving refers to fulfilling a duty or providing a service, which is unrelated to the idiom's meaning.
- Option C, "To praise", is the opposite of the idiom's meaning. Bringing someone to book implies holding them accountable for their actions, whereas praising someone involves expressing admiration or approval.
- Option D, "To write a story", is unrelated to the idiom's meaning. Bringing someone to book does not involve writing a story; it pertains to taking action against someone.
In conclusion, the correct option for the idiom "bring to book" is A: To punish.
Test: Idioms- 2 - Question 7

Direction: Choose the correct option for each of the given idioms.

Q. Broken reed

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms- 2 - Question 7

Idiom: Broken reed
The correct option for the idiom "Broken reed" is B: Support that failed.
Explanation:
- The idiom "Broken reed" refers to a support or assistance that has failed or proved unreliable.
- When we say someone is a "broken reed," it means that they cannot be relied upon or trusted for support.
- The phrase is derived from the image of a reed, which is a thin plant stem that can easily break and lose its strength.
- By choosing option B, it implies that the support provided by the person or thing in question has failed or let us down in some way.
To summarize, the correct option B for the idiom "Broken reed" signifies support that has failed or proved unreliable.
Test: Idioms- 2 - Question 8

Direction: Choose the correct option for each of the given idioms.

Q. Charley horse

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms- 2 - Question 8
Explanation:
The correct option for the idiom "Charley horse" is C: Stiffness. Here's why:
- "Charley horse" is an idiomatic expression used to describe a sudden pain or stiffness in the leg or thigh muscles, typically caused by muscle cramps or a muscle strain.
- The term originated in the sport of baseball, where it was used to describe the condition when a player's leg muscles tightened up and caused pain or discomfort.
- The idiom is often used colloquially to refer to any kind of muscle cramp or stiffness, not just limited to the leg muscles.
- Option A: "Very rapid" is not related to the meaning of "Charley horse" and can be eliminated.
- Option B: "Very weak" is also unrelated to the idiom and can be eliminated.
- Option D: "Boldness" is not a characteristic associated with muscle stiffness or cramps and is therefore incorrect.
- Therefore, the correct option is C: "Stiffness" as it accurately reflects the meaning of the idiom "Charley horse."
Overall, the idiom "Charley horse" refers to muscle stiffness or cramps, typically in the leg or thigh muscles. It is important to understand the meanings of idioms in order to effectively communicate in English.
Test: Idioms- 2 - Question 9

Direction: Choose the correct option for each of the given idioms.

Q.  Chalk and cheese

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms- 2 - Question 9

The correct option for the idiom "Chalk and cheese" is A: Different from each other.
Explanation:
- The idiom "Chalk and cheese" is used to describe two things or people that are completely different or have contrasting characteristics.
- Here, "chalk" represents something pale or white, while "cheese" represents something yellow or orange. These two substances are visually different and have different properties.
- Therefore, option A: Different from each other is the correct choice for the given idiom.
- The other options, B: Having same properties, C: Having fun together, and D: Making plans, do not accurately represent the meaning of the idiom "Chalk and cheese."
In summary, the idiom "Chalk and cheese" means two things or people that are completely different from each other, and option A is the correct choice.
Test: Idioms- 2 - Question 10

Direction: Choose the correct option for each of the given idioms.

Q. Carry the day

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms- 2 - Question 10

Idiom: Carry the day
The correct option for the idiom "Carry the day" is C. "To win a victory."
Here is a detailed explanation of the idiom:
Meaning:
- To be successful
- To win a victory or achieve a goal
Usage:
- The phrase "carry the day" is often used in situations where someone or something is able to overcome obstacles or challenges and achieve a desired outcome.
Example Sentences:
1. Despite facing many challenges, the team's hard work and determination helped them carry the day and win the championship.
2. The candidate's strong performance in the debate carried the day and secured him the majority vote.
3. The company's innovative approach to marketing has helped them carry the day and become a leader in their industry.
In summary, the idiom "carry the day" means to win a victory or achieve success in a particular situation. It is often used to describe overcoming obstacles and achieving desired outcomes.
Test: Idioms- 2 - Question 11

Direction: Choose the correct option for each of the given idioms.

Q. Cry over spilt milk

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms- 2 - Question 11

Explanation of the idiom:
The idiom "Cry over spilt milk" means to be upset or regretful about something that has already happened and cannot be changed. It implies that it is pointless to dwell on past mistakes or unfortunate events.
Correct answer:
D: Repent
Explanation of the options:
A: Approve - This option is incorrect because "cry over spilt milk" does not imply approval.
B: Be happy - This option is incorrect because "cry over spilt milk" suggests regret or sadness, not happiness.
C: Praise - This option is incorrect because "cry over spilt milk" does not involve praising anything.
D: Repent - This option is correct because "cry over spilt milk" means to feel regret or remorse for something that has already happened.
Conclusion:
The correct option for the idiom "Cry over spilt milk" is D: Repent. This idiom suggests feeling regret or remorse for something that has already occurred and cannot be changed.
Test: Idioms- 2 - Question 12

Direction: Choose the correct option for each of the given idioms.

Q. Call a spade a spade

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms- 2 - Question 12

The correct option for the given idiom "Call a spade a spade" is C. "to speak plainly."
Explanation:
- The idiom "Call a spade a spade" means to speak honestly and directly, without using euphemisms or beating around the bush.
- The idiom originates from the Greek philosopher Plutarch, who used the phrase to emphasize the importance of using clear and straightforward language.
- When someone calls a spade a spade, they are being honest and straightforward in their communication, not sugarcoating or avoiding the truth.
- This idiom is often used to encourage people to be direct and honest in their speech, even if it may be uncomfortable or unpopular.
- Option A, "to disrespect," is incorrect because calling a spade a spade is not about disrespecting someone but rather about being honest.
- Option B, "to say in anger," is incorrect because the idiom does not imply anger but rather plain and straightforward speech.
- Option D, "to manipulate," is incorrect because the idiom is about honesty and straightforwardness, not manipulation.
In conclusion, the correct option for the idiom "Call a spade a spade" is C, "to speak plainly."
Test: Idioms- 2 - Question 13

Direction: Choose the correct option for each of the given idioms.

Q. Cock sure

Test: Idioms- 2 - Question 14

Direction: Choose the correct option for each of the given idioms.

Q. Crocodile tears

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms- 2 - Question 14
Explanation:
The correct option for the idiom "Crocodile tears" is B: Insincere tears.
Reasoning:
- Crocodile tears is an idiom that refers to a display of false or insincere emotion or sympathy.
- The phrase originated from the belief that crocodiles shed tears while eating their prey, but in reality, the tears are a result of the reptile's natural glandular activity and not genuine emotion.
- Therefore, the correct option is B: Insincere tears, as it accurately reflects the meaning of the idiom.
Example:
- He pretended to be sad and shed crocodile tears when he heard the news of her success, but deep down, he was envious.
Test: Idioms- 2 - Question 15

Direction: Choose the correct option for each of the given idioms.

Q. All and sundry

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms- 2 - Question 15

The correct option for the idiom "All and sundry" is A: Everybody without distinction.
Here is a detailed explanation of the idiom:
Meaning:
- The idiom "All and sundry" means everyone or everybody without exception or distinction. It refers to a wide and diverse group of people.
Explanation:
- The phrase "All and sundry" is an idiomatic expression that combines the words "all" and "sundry" to convey the idea of inclusiveness. Here is a breakdown of the options and their meanings:
A: Everybody without distinction
- This option correctly defines the idiom. It means that the phrase includes every single person, without any exceptions or distinctions based on social status, wealth, or other factors.
B: Only rich person
- This option is incorrect. The idiom does not refer specifically to rich people but rather to everyone in general.
C: Together
- This option is incorrect. While the idiom does imply a sense of togetherness, it is not the primary meaning. It focuses more on the idea of inclusiveness.
D: Selected people
- This option is incorrect. The idiom refers to everyone without any selection or exclusion.
Conclusion:
- The correct option for the idiom "All and sundry" is A: Everybody without distinction. This option accurately captures the meaning of the idiom, which refers to including every single person without exceptions or distinctions.
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