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SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023)


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100 Questions MCQ Test Mock Tests for Banking Exam and Past Year Papers | SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023)

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SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 1

Directions: In the following passage, some of the words have been left out, each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraph meaningful.

In these days of economic liberalization, globalization, etc. materialistic values have assumed (1) importance. Money, physical comforts and luxuries are the most sought after aspects. There has been (2) competition. Such competition (3) undue stress. The stress leads to (4) of health of the people. Indian culture has (5) its striking uniqueness, as against the Western culture, in the fact that there is a (6) place for spiritualism in the value system in all walks of life. The spirituality is a very (7) force which helps us in maintaining our physical and mental health. It gives us (8) to cope with the stress. Westerners have now (9) the importance of spirituality and, therefore, they have started (10) us in the matter of spirituality. 

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 2

Directions: In the following passage, some of the words have been left out, each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraph meaningful.

In these days of economic liberalization, globalization, etc. materialistic values have assumed (1) importance. Money, physical comforts and luxuries are the most sought after aspects. There has been (2) competition. Such competition (3) undue stress. The stress leads to (4) of health of the people. Indian culture has (5) its striking uniqueness, as against the Western culture, in the fact that there is a (6) place for spiritualism in the value system in all walks of life. The spirituality is a very (7) force which helps us in maintaining our physical and mental health. It gives us (8) to cope with the stress. Westerners have now (9) the importance of spirituality and, therefore, they have started (10) us in the matter of spirituality. 

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 3

Directions: In the following passage, some of the words have been left out, each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraph meaningful.

In these days of economic liberalization, globalization, etc. materialistic values have assumed (1) importance. Money, physical comforts and luxuries are the most sought after aspects. There has been (2) competition. Such competition (3) undue stress. The stress leads to (4) of health of the people. Indian culture has (5) its striking uniqueness, as against the Western culture, in the fact that there is a (6) place for spiritualism in the value system in all walks of life. The spirituality is a very (7) force which helps us in maintaining our physical and mental health. It gives us (8) to cope with the stress. Westerners have now (9) the importance of spirituality and, therefore, they have started (10) us in the matter of spirituality. 

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 4

Directions: In the following passage, some of the words have been left out, each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraph meaningful.

In these days of economic liberalization, globalization, etc. materialistic values have assumed (1) importance. Money, physical comforts and luxuries are the most sought after aspects. There has been (2) competition. Such competition (3) undue stress. The stress leads to (4) of health of the people. Indian culture has (5) its striking uniqueness, as against the Western culture, in the fact that there is a (6) place for spiritualism in the value system in all walks of life. The spirituality is a very (7) force which helps us in maintaining our physical and mental health. It gives us (8) to cope with the stress. Westerners have now (9) the importance of spirituality and, therefore, they have started (10) us in the matter of spirituality. 

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 5

Directions: In the following passage, some of the words have been left out, each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraph meaningful.

In these days of economic liberalization, globalization, etc. materialistic values have assumed (1) importance. Money, physical comforts and luxuries are the most sought after aspects. There has been (2) competition. Such competition (3) undue stress. The stress leads to (4) of health of the people. Indian culture has (5) its striking uniqueness, as against the Western culture, in the fact that there is a (6) place for spiritualism in the value system in all walks of life. The spirituality is a very (7) force which helps us in maintaining our physical and mental health. It gives us (8) to cope with the stress. Westerners have now (9) the importance of spirituality and, therefore, they have started (10) us in the matter of spirituality. 

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 6

Directions: In the following passage, some of the words have been left out, each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraph meaningful.

In these days of economic liberalization, globalization, etc. materialistic values have assumed (1) importance. Money, physical comforts and luxuries are the most sought after aspects. There has been (2) competition. Such competition (3) undue stress. The stress leads to (4) of health of the people. Indian culture has (5) its striking uniqueness, as against the Western culture, in the fact that there is a (6) place for spiritualism in the value system in all walks of life. The spirituality is a very (7) force which helps us in maintaining our physical and mental health. It gives us (8) to cope with the stress. Westerners have now (9) the importance of spirituality and, therefore, they have started (10) us in the matter of spirituality. 

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 7

Directions: In the following passage, some of the words have been left out, each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraph meaningful.

In these days of economic liberalization, globalization, etc. materialistic values have assumed (1) importance. Money, physical comforts and luxuries are the most sought after aspects. There has been (2) competition. Such competition (3) undue stress. The stress leads to (4) of health of the people. Indian culture has (5) its striking uniqueness, as against the Western culture, in the fact that there is a (6) place for spiritualism in the value system in all walks of life. The spirituality is a very (7) force which helps us in maintaining our physical and mental health. It gives us (8) to cope with the stress. Westerners have now (9) the importance of spirituality and, therefore, they have started (10) us in the matter of spirituality. 

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 8

Directions: In the following passage, some of the words have been left out, each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraph meaningful.

In these days of economic liberalization, globalization, etc. materialistic values have assumed (1) importance. Money, physical comforts and luxuries are the most sought after aspects. There has been (2) competition. Such competition (3) undue stress. The stress leads to (4) of health of the people. Indian culture has (5) its striking uniqueness, as against the Western culture, in the fact that there is a (6) place for spiritualism in the value system in all walks of life. The spirituality is a very (7) force which helps us in maintaining our physical and mental health. It gives us (8) to cope with the stress. Westerners have now (9) the importance of spirituality and, therefore, they have started (10) us in the matter of spirituality. 

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 9

Directions: In the following passage, some of the words have been left out, each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraph meaningful.

In these days of economic liberalization, globalization, etc. materialistic values have assumed (1) importance. Money, physical comforts and luxuries are the most sought after aspects. There has been (2) competition. Such competition (3) undue stress. The stress leads to (4) of health of the people. Indian culture has (5) its striking uniqueness, as against the Western culture, in the fact that there is a (6) place for spiritualism in the value system in all walks of life. The spirituality is a very (7) force which helps us in maintaining our physical and mental health. It gives us (8) to cope with the stress. Westerners have now (9) the importance of spirituality and, therefore, they have started (10) us in the matter of spirituality. 

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 10

Directions: In the following passage, some of the words have been left out, each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraph meaningful.

In these days of economic liberalization, globalization, etc. materialistic values have assumed (1) importance. Money, physical comforts and luxuries are the most sought after aspects. There has been (2) competition. Such competition (3) undue stress. The stress leads to (4) of health of the people. Indian culture has (5) its striking uniqueness, as against the Western culture, in the fact that there is a (6) place for spiritualism in the value system in all walks of life. The spirituality is a very (7) force which helps us in maintaining our physical and mental health. It gives us (8) to cope with the stress. Westerners have now (9) the importance of spirituality and, therefore, they have started (10) us in the matter of spirituality. 

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 11

Directions : Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

Our universities are changing. Never has the pace of change been this fast, nor the protests this loud. On the rare occasion that the media take notice, the discussion usually focusses on whether or not due procedure has been followed. Given our authoritarian power structures, it is as important to ask whether adequate thought has gone into the initiation of the changes. Teachers of the University of Delhi are especially familiar with changes; the recent spate began with the introduction of the semester system in undergraduate teaching in 2011. Although there are certain serious logistical issues involved, there is nothing inherently wrong with teaching in a semester mode. What is problematic is when the introduction of the system is done in a manner in which little attention is paid to the content of semester courses. Unfortunately, these courses were created by snipping the existing annual courses in half, sometimes badly. Why? There was no time to reflect on curricular or pedagogic issues.

More recently, we saw even more radical changes with the introduction of the four-year undergraduate programme (FYUP) in the University of Delhi. There is nothing inherently good or bad about a four-year BA programme. A great deal hinges on the quality of the courses that form the programme. Of course, questions can be asked about whether a single university in the country can move to a four-year system and the implications of an additional year’s education in a country where many students find it difficult to pay even the highly subsidised fees. Anyhow, the programme was introduced in 2013, again without adequate time to think seriously about curricular or pedagogic issues. And then, in the summer of 2014, it was just as suddenly withdrawn. The University of Delhi is still reeling under the impact of all these changes, but what is now on the cards is something even more worrying; something that will affect not one but all Indian universities. A communiqué? from the University Grants Commission (UGC) dated November 14, 2014, gives certain directives that were apparently discussed at a retreat of the vice chancellors of Central universities on September 12 and 13, 2014; these were subsequently approved by the Ministry of Human Resource Development. The directives require that all universities follow a Choice Based Credit System (CBCS) from 2015 onwards. We are told that the aim is to provide choice to students within an institution as well as “seamless mobility across institutions” in India and abroad by adopting a “cafeteria approach”. These guidelines are apparently supposed to apply to all undergraduate and postgraduate level degree, diploma and certificate programmes being run by Central, State and deemed universities in India. Once again: such sweeping change, so little thought.

There would have been no problem if the new system only involved giving students grades instead of marks. However, it gives an all-India scale of conversion of marks into grades which does not take into account the fact that there are radical differences between the “standard” in different colleges and universities. But even this is only a small part of a larger package that has very serious implications for the autonomy of universities and the quality of university education across the country.

All universities are to have a uniform structure of syllabi. There will be “core” courses, “compulsory foundation” courses, and “elective foundation courses” that “are value-based and are aimed at man-making education”. This seems to be the FYUP in a new three-year, all-India garb. In the new system, in at least half of the core courses, the assessment will be based on examinations in which external examiners will set and mark the papers. The new system will also have an impact on PhD programmes. Theses must be evaluated by external as well as internal examiners. In the University of Delhi, while undergraduate examination papers are currently marked by teachers from across the university, postgraduate assessment is done within the departments. In the History Department, we currently have three external examiners for PhD theses. The new diktat is set to change all this. No say in courses It gets worse. It is now clear that the new system also aims at introducing uniform syllabi across universities in the country. The website of the UGC displays model undergraduate syllabi for various subjects, from which only minimal deviation will be permitted. It does not specify where these syllabi have come from. The History syllabus on the UGC website happens to be the syllabus of the University of Delhi, with a mishmash of elements drawn from the old FYUP syllabus. This is the “chosen one” which will presumably be imposed on universities all over the country.

This is not in the least bit flattering. In normal times, the process of syllabus revision in our University has involved wide-ranging consultation and discussion among all the teachers involved. It takes time — sometimes too much — but it is worth it. For example, the MA History syllabus was revised a few years ago, and the History Department has recently initiated a revision of its BA syllabi, because teachers are convinced that these syllabi need to be changed and improved. Now it seems that we need not bother. Our old courses, with which we are dissatisfied, will continue and will be imposed not only on us, but on other universities in the country. In the best universities in the world, postgraduate courses represent cutting-edge approaches and research, and are tailored to the research expertise of its teachers. The uniqueness of the profiles of departments and universities rests, to a great extent, on this. But this will no longer be possible, will not be allowed, in our universities. We teachers will no longer have a role in designing the courses that we teach.

The changes that are envisaged in the new system are much more far-reaching in scope and scale than the recently jettisoned FYUP. But in both cases, we see an attempt to bring about radical change in a hasty manner without adequate thought about the rationale and logistics, and even less time devoted to what matters the most — the actual content of courses. Many universities have already fallen in line and have embraced the Choice Based Credit System, and others will no doubt follow suit. Instead of uniform excellence, the result will be uniform mediocrity and a lowering of the academic standards of our best institutions. Given the enormous logistical problems involved in introducing too much change too fast, it could also involve a breakdown of our university system.

Q.  Which of the following is not the antonym of the word “spate”?

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 12

Directions : Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

Our universities are changing. Never has the pace of change been this fast, nor the protests this loud. On the rare occasion that the media take notice, the discussion usually focusses on whether or not due procedure has been followed. Given our authoritarian power structures, it is as important to ask whether adequate thought has gone into the initiation of the changes. Teachers of the University of Delhi are especially familiar with changes; the recent spate began with the introduction of the semester system in undergraduate teaching in 2011. Although there are certain serious logistical issues involved, there is nothing inherently wrong with teaching in a semester mode. What is problematic is when the introduction of the system is done in a manner in which little attention is paid to the content of semester courses. Unfortunately, these courses were created by snipping the existing annual courses in half, sometimes badly. Why? There was no time to reflect on curricular or pedagogic issues.

More recently, we saw even more radical changes with the introduction of the four-year undergraduate programme (FYUP) in the University of Delhi. There is nothing inherently good or bad about a four-year BA programme. A great deal hinges on the quality of the courses that form the programme. Of course, questions can be asked about whether a single university in the country can move to a four-year system and the implications of an additional year’s education in a country where many students find it difficult to pay even the highly subsidised fees. Anyhow, the programme was introduced in 2013, again without adequate time to think seriously about curricular or pedagogic issues. And then, in the summer of 2014, it was just as suddenly withdrawn. The University of Delhi is still reeling under the impact of all these changes, but what is now on the cards is something even more worrying; something that will affect not one but all Indian universities. A communiqué? from the University Grants Commission (UGC) dated November 14, 2014, gives certain directives that were apparently discussed at a retreat of the vice chancellors of Central universities on September 12 and 13, 2014; these were subsequently approved by the Ministry of Human Resource Development. The directives require that all universities follow a Choice Based Credit System (CBCS) from 2015 onwards. We are told that the aim is to provide choice to students within an institution as well as “seamless mobility across institutions” in India and abroad by adopting a “cafeteria approach”. These guidelines are apparently supposed to apply to all undergraduate and postgraduate level degree, diploma and certificate programmes being run by Central, State and deemed universities in India. Once again: such sweeping change, so little thought.

There would have been no problem if the new system only involved giving students grades instead of marks. However, it gives an all-India scale of conversion of marks into grades which does not take into account the fact that there are radical differences between the “standard” in different colleges and universities. But even this is only a small part of a larger package that has very serious implications for the autonomy of universities and the quality of university education across the country.

All universities are to have a uniform structure of syllabi. There will be “core” courses, “compulsory foundation” courses, and “elective foundation courses” that “are value-based and are aimed at man-making education”. This seems to be the FYUP in a new three-year, all-India garb. In the new system, in at least half of the core courses, the assessment will be based on examinations in which external examiners will set and mark the papers. The new system will also have an impact on PhD programmes. Theses must be evaluated by external as well as internal examiners. In the University of Delhi, while undergraduate examination papers are currently marked by teachers from across the university, postgraduate assessment is done within the departments. In the History Department, we currently have three external examiners for PhD theses. The new diktat is set to change all this. No say in courses It gets worse. It is now clear that the new system also aims at introducing uniform syllabi across universities in the country. The website of the UGC displays model undergraduate syllabi for various subjects, from which only minimal deviation will be permitted. It does not specify where these syllabi have come from. The History syllabus on the UGC website happens to be the syllabus of the University of Delhi, with a mishmash of elements drawn from the old FYUP syllabus. This is the “chosen one” which will presumably be imposed on universities all over the country.

This is not in the least bit flattering. In normal times, the process of syllabus revision in our University has involved wide-ranging consultation and discussion among all the teachers involved. It takes time — sometimes too much — but it is worth it. For example, the MA History syllabus was revised a few years ago, and the History Department has recently initiated a revision of its BA syllabi, because teachers are convinced that these syllabi need to be changed and improved. Now it seems that we need not bother. Our old courses, with which we are dissatisfied, will continue and will be imposed not only on us, but on other universities in the country. In the best universities in the world, postgraduate courses represent cutting-edge approaches and research, and are tailored to the research expertise of its teachers. The uniqueness of the profiles of departments and universities rests, to a great extent, on this. But this will no longer be possible, will not be allowed, in our universities. We teachers will no longer have a role in designing the courses that we teach.

The changes that are envisaged in the new system are much more far-reaching in scope and scale than the recently jettisoned FYUP. But in both cases, we see an attempt to bring about radical change in a hasty manner without adequate thought about the rationale and logistics, and even less time devoted to what matters the most — the actual content of courses. Many universities have already fallen in line and have embraced the Choice Based Credit System, and others will no doubt follow suit. Instead of uniform excellence, the result will be uniform mediocrity and a lowering of the academic standards of our best institutions. Given the enormous logistical problems involved in introducing too much change too fast, it could also involve a breakdown of our university system.

Q. What does the word “Pedagogic” mean?

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 13

Directions : Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

Our universities are changing. Never has the pace of change been this fast, nor the protests this loud. On the rare occasion that the media take notice, the discussion usually focusses on whether or not due procedure has been followed. Given our authoritarian power structures, it is as important to ask whether adequate thought has gone into the initiation of the changes. Teachers of the University of Delhi are especially familiar with changes; the recent spate began with the introduction of the semester system in undergraduate teaching in 2011. Although there are certain serious logistical issues involved, there is nothing inherently wrong with teaching in a semester mode. What is problematic is when the introduction of the system is done in a manner in which little attention is paid to the content of semester courses. Unfortunately, these courses were created by snipping the existing annual courses in half, sometimes badly. Why? There was no time to reflect on curricular or pedagogic issues.

More recently, we saw even more radical changes with the introduction of the four-year undergraduate programme (FYUP) in the University of Delhi. There is nothing inherently good or bad about a four-year BA programme. A great deal hinges on the quality of the courses that form the programme. Of course, questions can be asked about whether a single university in the country can move to a four-year system and the implications of an additional year’s education in a country where many students find it difficult to pay even the highly subsidised fees. Anyhow, the programme was introduced in 2013, again without adequate time to think seriously about curricular or pedagogic issues. And then, in the summer of 2014, it was just as suddenly withdrawn. The University of Delhi is still reeling under the impact of all these changes, but what is now on the cards is something even more worrying; something that will affect not one but all Indian universities. A communiqué? from the University Grants Commission (UGC) dated November 14, 2014, gives certain directives that were apparently discussed at a retreat of the vice chancellors of Central universities on September 12 and 13, 2014; these were subsequently approved by the Ministry of Human Resource Development. The directives require that all universities follow a Choice Based Credit System (CBCS) from 2015 onwards. We are told that the aim is to provide choice to students within an institution as well as “seamless mobility across institutions” in India and abroad by adopting a “cafeteria approach”. These guidelines are apparently supposed to apply to all undergraduate and postgraduate level degree, diploma and certificate programmes being run by Central, State and deemed universities in India. Once again: such sweeping change, so little thought.

There would have been no problem if the new system only involved giving students grades instead of marks. However, it gives an all-India scale of conversion of marks into grades which does not take into account the fact that there are radical differences between the “standard” in different colleges and universities. But even this is only a small part of a larger package that has very serious implications for the autonomy of universities and the quality of university education across the country.

All universities are to have a uniform structure of syllabi. There will be “core” courses, “compulsory foundation” courses, and “elective foundation courses” that “are value-based and are aimed at man-making education”. This seems to be the FYUP in a new three-year, all-India garb. In the new system, in at least half of the core courses, the assessment will be based on examinations in which external examiners will set and mark the papers. The new system will also have an impact on PhD programmes. Theses must be evaluated by external as well as internal examiners. In the University of Delhi, while undergraduate examination papers are currently marked by teachers from across the university, postgraduate assessment is done within the departments. In the History Department, we currently have three external examiners for PhD theses. The new diktat is set to change all this. No say in courses It gets worse. It is now clear that the new system also aims at introducing uniform syllabi across universities in the country. The website of the UGC displays model undergraduate syllabi for various subjects, from which only minimal deviation will be permitted. It does not specify where these syllabi have come from. The History syllabus on the UGC website happens to be the syllabus of the University of Delhi, with a mishmash of elements drawn from the old FYUP syllabus. This is the “chosen one” which will presumably be imposed on universities all over the country.

This is not in the least bit flattering. In normal times, the process of syllabus revision in our University has involved wide-ranging consultation and discussion among all the teachers involved. It takes time — sometimes too much — but it is worth it. For example, the MA History syllabus was revised a few years ago, and the History Department has recently initiated a revision of its BA syllabi, because teachers are convinced that these syllabi need to be changed and improved. Now it seems that we need not bother. Our old courses, with which we are dissatisfied, will continue and will be imposed not only on us, but on other universities in the country. In the best universities in the world, postgraduate courses represent cutting-edge approaches and research, and are tailored to the research expertise of its teachers. The uniqueness of the profiles of departments and universities rests, to a great extent, on this. But this will no longer be possible, will not be allowed, in our universities. We teachers will no longer have a role in designing the courses that we teach.

The changes that are envisaged in the new system are much more far-reaching in scope and scale than the recently jettisoned FYUP. But in both cases, we see an attempt to bring about radical change in a hasty manner without adequate thought about the rationale and logistics, and even less time devoted to what matters the most — the actual content of courses. Many universities have already fallen in line and have embraced the Choice Based Credit System, and others will no doubt follow suit. Instead of uniform excellence, the result will be uniform mediocrity and a lowering of the academic standards of our best institutions. Given the enormous logistical problems involved in introducing too much change too fast, it could also involve a breakdown of our university system.

Q. Choose an appropriate title for the passage.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 14

Directions : Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

Our universities are changing. Never has the pace of change been this fast, nor the protests this loud. On the rare occasion that the media take notice, the discussion usually focusses on whether or not due procedure has been followed. Given our authoritarian power structures, it is as important to ask whether adequate thought has gone into the initiation of the changes. Teachers of the University of Delhi are especially familiar with changes; the recent spate began with the introduction of the semester system in undergraduate teaching in 2011. Although there are certain serious logistical issues involved, there is nothing inherently wrong with teaching in a semester mode. What is problematic is when the introduction of the system is done in a manner in which little attention is paid to the content of semester courses. Unfortunately, these courses were created by snipping the existing annual courses in half, sometimes badly. Why? There was no time to reflect on curricular or pedagogic issues.

More recently, we saw even more radical changes with the introduction of the four-year undergraduate programme (FYUP) in the University of Delhi. There is nothing inherently good or bad about a four-year BA programme. A great deal hinges on the quality of the courses that form the programme. Of course, questions can be asked about whether a single university in the country can move to a four-year system and the implications of an additional year’s education in a country where many students find it difficult to pay even the highly subsidised fees. Anyhow, the programme was introduced in 2013, again without adequate time to think seriously about curricular or pedagogic issues. And then, in the summer of 2014, it was just as suddenly withdrawn. The University of Delhi is still reeling under the impact of all these changes, but what is now on the cards is something even more worrying; something that will affect not one but all Indian universities. A communiqué? from the University Grants Commission (UGC) dated November 14, 2014, gives certain directives that were apparently discussed at a retreat of the vice chancellors of Central universities on September 12 and 13, 2014; these were subsequently approved by the Ministry of Human Resource Development. The directives require that all universities follow a Choice Based Credit System (CBCS) from 2015 onwards. We are told that the aim is to provide choice to students within an institution as well as “seamless mobility across institutions” in India and abroad by adopting a “cafeteria approach”. These guidelines are apparently supposed to apply to all undergraduate and postgraduate level degree, diploma and certificate programmes being run by Central, State and deemed universities in India. Once again: such sweeping change, so little thought.

There would have been no problem if the new system only involved giving students grades instead of marks. However, it gives an all-India scale of conversion of marks into grades which does not take into account the fact that there are radical differences between the “standard” in different colleges and universities. But even this is only a small part of a larger package that has very serious implications for the autonomy of universities and the quality of university education across the country.

All universities are to have a uniform structure of syllabi. There will be “core” courses, “compulsory foundation” courses, and “elective foundation courses” that “are value-based and are aimed at man-making education”. This seems to be the FYUP in a new three-year, all-India garb. In the new system, in at least half of the core courses, the assessment will be based on examinations in which external examiners will set and mark the papers. The new system will also have an impact on PhD programmes. Theses must be evaluated by external as well as internal examiners. In the University of Delhi, while undergraduate examination papers are currently marked by teachers from across the university, postgraduate assessment is done within the departments. In the History Department, we currently have three external examiners for PhD theses. The new diktat is set to change all this. No say in courses It gets worse. It is now clear that the new system also aims at introducing uniform syllabi across universities in the country. The website of the UGC displays model undergraduate syllabi for various subjects, from which only minimal deviation will be permitted. It does not specify where these syllabi have come from. The History syllabus on the UGC website happens to be the syllabus of the University of Delhi, with a mishmash of elements drawn from the old FYUP syllabus. This is the “chosen one” which will presumably be imposed on universities all over the country.

This is not in the least bit flattering. In normal times, the process of syllabus revision in our University has involved wide-ranging consultation and discussion among all the teachers involved. It takes time — sometimes too much — but it is worth it. For example, the MA History syllabus was revised a few years ago, and the History Department has recently initiated a revision of its BA syllabi, because teachers are convinced that these syllabi need to be changed and improved. Now it seems that we need not bother. Our old courses, with which we are dissatisfied, will continue and will be imposed not only on us, but on other universities in the country. In the best universities in the world, postgraduate courses represent cutting-edge approaches and research, and are tailored to the research expertise of its teachers. The uniqueness of the profiles of departments and universities rests, to a great extent, on this. But this will no longer be possible, will not be allowed, in our universities. We teachers will no longer have a role in designing the courses that we teach.

The changes that are envisaged in the new system are much more far-reaching in scope and scale than the recently jettisoned FYUP. But in both cases, we see an attempt to bring about radical change in a hasty manner without adequate thought about the rationale and logistics, and even less time devoted to what matters the most — the actual content of courses. Many universities have already fallen in line and have embraced the Choice Based Credit System, and others will no doubt follow suit. Instead of uniform excellence, the result will be uniform mediocrity and a lowering of the academic standards of our best institutions. Given the enormous logistical problems involved in introducing too much change too fast, it could also involve a breakdown of our university system.

Q. Which of the following acronyms are not used in the above passage?

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 15

Directions : Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

Our universities are changing. Never has the pace of change been this fast, nor the protests this loud. On the rare occasion that the media take notice, the discussion usually focusses on whether or not due procedure has been followed. Given our authoritarian power structures, it is as important to ask whether adequate thought has gone into the initiation of the changes. Teachers of the University of Delhi are especially familiar with changes; the recent spate began with the introduction of the semester system in undergraduate teaching in 2011. Although there are certain serious logistical issues involved, there is nothing inherently wrong with teaching in a semester mode. What is problematic is when the introduction of the system is done in a manner in which little attention is paid to the content of semester courses. Unfortunately, these courses were created by snipping the existing annual courses in half, sometimes badly. Why? There was no time to reflect on curricular or pedagogic issues.

More recently, we saw even more radical changes with the introduction of the four-year undergraduate programme (FYUP) in the University of Delhi. There is nothing inherently good or bad about a four-year BA programme. A great deal hinges on the quality of the courses that form the programme. Of course, questions can be asked about whether a single university in the country can move to a four-year system and the implications of an additional year’s education in a country where many students find it difficult to pay even the highly subsidised fees. Anyhow, the programme was introduced in 2013, again without adequate time to think seriously about curricular or pedagogic issues. And then, in the summer of 2014, it was just as suddenly withdrawn. The University of Delhi is still reeling under the impact of all these changes, but what is now on the cards is something even more worrying; something that will affect not one but all Indian universities. A communiqué? from the University Grants Commission (UGC) dated November 14, 2014, gives certain directives that were apparently discussed at a retreat of the vice chancellors of Central universities on September 12 and 13, 2014; these were subsequently approved by the Ministry of Human Resource Development. The directives require that all universities follow a Choice Based Credit System (CBCS) from 2015 onwards. We are told that the aim is to provide choice to students within an institution as well as “seamless mobility across institutions” in India and abroad by adopting a “cafeteria approach”. These guidelines are apparently supposed to apply to all undergraduate and postgraduate level degree, diploma and certificate programmes being run by Central, State and deemed universities in India. Once again: such sweeping change, so little thought.

There would have been no problem if the new system only involved giving students grades instead of marks. However, it gives an all-India scale of conversion of marks into grades which does not take into account the fact that there are radical differences between the “standard” in different colleges and universities. But even this is only a small part of a larger package that has very serious implications for the autonomy of universities and the quality of university education across the country.

All universities are to have a uniform structure of syllabi. There will be “core” courses, “compulsory foundation” courses, and “elective foundation courses” that “are value-based and are aimed at man-making education”. This seems to be the FYUP in a new three-year, all-India garb. In the new system, in at least half of the core courses, the assessment will be based on examinations in which external examiners will set and mark the papers. The new system will also have an impact on PhD programmes. Theses must be evaluated by external as well as internal examiners. In the University of Delhi, while undergraduate examination papers are currently marked by teachers from across the university, postgraduate assessment is done within the departments. In the History Department, we currently have three external examiners for PhD theses. The new diktat is set to change all this. No say in courses It gets worse. It is now clear that the new system also aims at introducing uniform syllabi across universities in the country. The website of the UGC displays model undergraduate syllabi for various subjects, from which only minimal deviation will be permitted. It does not specify where these syllabi have come from. The History syllabus on the UGC website happens to be the syllabus of the University of Delhi, with a mishmash of elements drawn from the old FYUP syllabus. This is the “chosen one” which will presumably be imposed on universities all over the country.

This is not in the least bit flattering. In normal times, the process of syllabus revision in our University has involved wide-ranging consultation and discussion among all the teachers involved. It takes time — sometimes too much — but it is worth it. For example, the MA History syllabus was revised a few years ago, and the History Department has recently initiated a revision of its BA syllabi, because teachers are convinced that these syllabi need to be changed and improved. Now it seems that we need not bother. Our old courses, with which we are dissatisfied, will continue and will be imposed not only on us, but on other universities in the country. In the best universities in the world, postgraduate courses represent cutting-edge approaches and research, and are tailored to the research expertise of its teachers. The uniqueness of the profiles of departments and universities rests, to a great extent, on this. But this will no longer be possible, will not be allowed, in our universities. We teachers will no longer have a role in designing the courses that we teach.

The changes that are envisaged in the new system are much more far-reaching in scope and scale than the recently jettisoned FYUP. But in both cases, we see an attempt to bring about radical change in a hasty manner without adequate thought about the rationale and logistics, and even less time devoted to what matters the most — the actual content of courses. Many universities have already fallen in line and have embraced the Choice Based Credit System, and others will no doubt follow suit. Instead of uniform excellence, the result will be uniform mediocrity and a lowering of the academic standards of our best institutions. Given the enormous logistical problems involved in introducing too much change too fast, it could also involve a breakdown of our university system.

Q. Which of the following is not true regarding the passage?

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 16

Directions : Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

Our universities are changing. Never has the pace of change been this fast, nor the protests this loud. On the rare occasion that the media take notice, the discussion usually focusses on whether or not due procedure has been followed. Given our authoritarian power structures, it is as important to ask whether adequate thought has gone into the initiation of the changes. Teachers of the University of Delhi are especially familiar with changes; the recent spate began with the introduction of the semester system in undergraduate teaching in 2011. Although there are certain serious logistical issues involved, there is nothing inherently wrong with teaching in a semester mode. What is problematic is when the introduction of the system is done in a manner in which little attention is paid to the content of semester courses. Unfortunately, these courses were created by snipping the existing annual courses in half, sometimes badly. Why? There was no time to reflect on curricular or pedagogic issues.

More recently, we saw even more radical changes with the introduction of the four-year undergraduate programme (FYUP) in the University of Delhi. There is nothing inherently good or bad about a four-year BA programme. A great deal hinges on the quality of the courses that form the programme. Of course, questions can be asked about whether a single university in the country can move to a four-year system and the implications of an additional year’s education in a country where many students find it difficult to pay even the highly subsidised fees. Anyhow, the programme was introduced in 2013, again without adequate time to think seriously about curricular or pedagogic issues. And then, in the summer of 2014, it was just as suddenly withdrawn. The University of Delhi is still reeling under the impact of all these changes, but what is now on the cards is something even more worrying; something that will affect not one but all Indian universities. A communiqué? from the University Grants Commission (UGC) dated November 14, 2014, gives certain directives that were apparently discussed at a retreat of the vice chancellors of Central universities on September 12 and 13, 2014; these were subsequently approved by the Ministry of Human Resource Development. The directives require that all universities follow a Choice Based Credit System (CBCS) from 2015 onwards. We are told that the aim is to provide choice to students within an institution as well as “seamless mobility across institutions” in India and abroad by adopting a “cafeteria approach”. These guidelines are apparently supposed to apply to all undergraduate and postgraduate level degree, diploma and certificate programmes being run by Central, State and deemed universities in India. Once again: such sweeping change, so little thought.

There would have been no problem if the new system only involved giving students grades instead of marks. However, it gives an all-India scale of conversion of marks into grades which does not take into account the fact that there are radical differences between the “standard” in different colleges and universities. But even this is only a small part of a larger package that has very serious implications for the autonomy of universities and the quality of university education across the country.

All universities are to have a uniform structure of syllabi. There will be “core” courses, “compulsory foundation” courses, and “elective foundation courses” that “are value-based and are aimed at man-making education”. This seems to be the FYUP in a new three-year, all-India garb. In the new system, in at least half of the core courses, the assessment will be based on examinations in which external examiners will set and mark the papers. The new system will also have an impact on PhD programmes. Theses must be evaluated by external as well as internal examiners. In the University of Delhi, while undergraduate examination papers are currently marked by teachers from across the university, postgraduate assessment is done within the departments. In the History Department, we currently have three external examiners for PhD theses. The new diktat is set to change all this. No say in courses It gets worse. It is now clear that the new system also aims at introducing uniform syllabi across universities in the country. The website of the UGC displays model undergraduate syllabi for various subjects, from which only minimal deviation will be permitted. It does not specify where these syllabi have come from. The History syllabus on the UGC website happens to be the syllabus of the University of Delhi, with a mishmash of elements drawn from the old FYUP syllabus. This is the “chosen one” which will presumably be imposed on universities all over the country.

This is not in the least bit flattering. In normal times, the process of syllabus revision in our University has involved wide-ranging consultation and discussion among all the teachers involved. It takes time — sometimes too much — but it is worth it. For example, the MA History syllabus was revised a few years ago, and the History Department has recently initiated a revision of its BA syllabi, because teachers are convinced that these syllabi need to be changed and improved. Now it seems that we need not bother. Our old courses, with which we are dissatisfied, will continue and will be imposed not only on us, but on other universities in the country. In the best universities in the world, postgraduate courses represent cutting-edge approaches and research, and are tailored to the research expertise of its teachers. The uniqueness of the profiles of departments and universities rests, to a great extent, on this. But this will no longer be possible, will not be allowed, in our universities. We teachers will no longer have a role in designing the courses that we teach.

The changes that are envisaged in the new system are much more far-reaching in scope and scale than the recently jettisoned FYUP. But in both cases, we see an attempt to bring about radical change in a hasty manner without adequate thought about the rationale and logistics, and even less time devoted to what matters the most — the actual content of courses. Many universities have already fallen in line and have embraced the Choice Based Credit System, and others will no doubt follow suit. Instead of uniform excellence, the result will be uniform mediocrity and a lowering of the academic standards of our best institutions. Given the enormous logistical problems involved in introducing too much change too fast, it could also involve a breakdown of our university system.

Q. Which of the following is the meaning of the word ‘communique’?

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 17

Directions : Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

Our universities are changing. Never has the pace of change been this fast, nor the protests this loud. On the rare occasion that the media take notice, the discussion usually focusses on whether or not due procedure has been followed. Given our authoritarian power structures, it is as important to ask whether adequate thought has gone into the initiation of the changes. Teachers of the University of Delhi are especially familiar with changes; the recent spate began with the introduction of the semester system in undergraduate teaching in 2011. Although there are certain serious logistical issues involved, there is nothing inherently wrong with teaching in a semester mode. What is problematic is when the introduction of the system is done in a manner in which little attention is paid to the content of semester courses. Unfortunately, these courses were created by snipping the existing annual courses in half, sometimes badly. Why? There was no time to reflect on curricular or pedagogic issues.

More recently, we saw even more radical changes with the introduction of the four-year undergraduate programme (FYUP) in the University of Delhi. There is nothing inherently good or bad about a four-year BA programme. A great deal hinges on the quality of the courses that form the programme. Of course, questions can be asked about whether a single university in the country can move to a four-year system and the implications of an additional year’s education in a country where many students find it difficult to pay even the highly subsidised fees. Anyhow, the programme was introduced in 2013, again without adequate time to think seriously about curricular or pedagogic issues. And then, in the summer of 2014, it was just as suddenly withdrawn. The University of Delhi is still reeling under the impact of all these changes, but what is now on the cards is something even more worrying; something that will affect not one but all Indian universities. A communiqué? from the University Grants Commission (UGC) dated November 14, 2014, gives certain directives that were apparently discussed at a retreat of the vice chancellors of Central universities on September 12 and 13, 2014; these were subsequently approved by the Ministry of Human Resource Development. The directives require that all universities follow a Choice Based Credit System (CBCS) from 2015 onwards. We are told that the aim is to provide choice to students within an institution as well as “seamless mobility across institutions” in India and abroad by adopting a “cafeteria approach”. These guidelines are apparently supposed to apply to all undergraduate and postgraduate level degree, diploma and certificate programmes being run by Central, State and deemed universities in India. Once again: such sweeping change, so little thought.

There would have been no problem if the new system only involved giving students grades instead of marks. However, it gives an all-India scale of conversion of marks into grades which does not take into account the fact that there are radical differences between the “standard” in different colleges and universities. But even this is only a small part of a larger package that has very serious implications for the autonomy of universities and the quality of university education across the country.

All universities are to have a uniform structure of syllabi. There will be “core” courses, “compulsory foundation” courses, and “elective foundation courses” that “are value-based and are aimed at man-making education”. This seems to be the FYUP in a new three-year, all-India garb. In the new system, in at least half of the core courses, the assessment will be based on examinations in which external examiners will set and mark the papers. The new system will also have an impact on PhD programmes. Theses must be evaluated by external as well as internal examiners. In the University of Delhi, while undergraduate examination papers are currently marked by teachers from across the university, postgraduate assessment is done within the departments. In the History Department, we currently have three external examiners for PhD theses. The new diktat is set to change all this. No say in courses It gets worse. It is now clear that the new system also aims at introducing uniform syllabi across universities in the country. The website of the UGC displays model undergraduate syllabi for various subjects, from which only minimal deviation will be permitted. It does not specify where these syllabi have come from. The History syllabus on the UGC website happens to be the syllabus of the University of Delhi, with a mishmash of elements drawn from the old FYUP syllabus. This is the “chosen one” which will presumably be imposed on universities all over the country.

This is not in the least bit flattering. In normal times, the process of syllabus revision in our University has involved wide-ranging consultation and discussion among all the teachers involved. It takes time — sometimes too much — but it is worth it. For example, the MA History syllabus was revised a few years ago, and the History Department has recently initiated a revision of its BA syllabi, because teachers are convinced that these syllabi need to be changed and improved. Now it seems that we need not bother. Our old courses, with which we are dissatisfied, will continue and will be imposed not only on us, but on other universities in the country. In the best universities in the world, postgraduate courses represent cutting-edge approaches and research, and are tailored to the research expertise of its teachers. The uniqueness of the profiles of departments and universities rests, to a great extent, on this. But this will no longer be possible, will not be allowed, in our universities. We teachers will no longer have a role in designing the courses that we teach.

The changes that are envisaged in the new system are much more far-reaching in scope and scale than the recently jettisoned FYUP. But in both cases, we see an attempt to bring about radical change in a hasty manner without adequate thought about the rationale and logistics, and even less time devoted to what matters the most — the actual content of courses. Many universities have already fallen in line and have embraced the Choice Based Credit System, and others will no doubt follow suit. Instead of uniform excellence, the result will be uniform mediocrity and a lowering of the academic standards of our best institutions. Given the enormous logistical problems involved in introducing too much change too fast, it could also involve a breakdown of our university system.

Q. What does the author mean by the phrase ‘elective foundation courses’?

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 18

Directions : Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

Our universities are changing. Never has the pace of change been this fast, nor the protests this loud. On the rare occasion that the media take notice, the discussion usually focusses on whether or not due procedure has been followed. Given our authoritarian power structures, it is as important to ask whether adequate thought has gone into the initiation of the changes. Teachers of the University of Delhi are especially familiar with changes; the recent spate began with the introduction of the semester system in undergraduate teaching in 2011. Although there are certain serious logistical issues involved, there is nothing inherently wrong with teaching in a semester mode. What is problematic is when the introduction of the system is done in a manner in which little attention is paid to the content of semester courses. Unfortunately, these courses were created by snipping the existing annual courses in half, sometimes badly. Why? There was no time to reflect on curricular or pedagogic issues.

More recently, we saw even more radical changes with the introduction of the four-year undergraduate programme (FYUP) in the University of Delhi. There is nothing inherently good or bad about a four-year BA programme. A great deal hinges on the quality of the courses that form the programme. Of course, questions can be asked about whether a single university in the country can move to a four-year system and the implications of an additional year’s education in a country where many students find it difficult to pay even the highly subsidised fees. Anyhow, the programme was introduced in 2013, again without adequate time to think seriously about curricular or pedagogic issues. And then, in the summer of 2014, it was just as suddenly withdrawn. The University of Delhi is still reeling under the impact of all these changes, but what is now on the cards is something even more worrying; something that will affect not one but all Indian universities. A communiqué? from the University Grants Commission (UGC) dated November 14, 2014, gives certain directives that were apparently discussed at a retreat of the vice chancellors of Central universities on September 12 and 13, 2014; these were subsequently approved by the Ministry of Human Resource Development. The directives require that all universities follow a Choice Based Credit System (CBCS) from 2015 onwards. We are told that the aim is to provide choice to students within an institution as well as “seamless mobility across institutions” in India and abroad by adopting a “cafeteria approach”. These guidelines are apparently supposed to apply to all undergraduate and postgraduate level degree, diploma and certificate programmes being run by Central, State and deemed universities in India. Once again: such sweeping change, so little thought.

There would have been no problem if the new system only involved giving students grades instead of marks. However, it gives an all-India scale of conversion of marks into grades which does not take into account the fact that there are radical differences between the “standard” in different colleges and universities. But even this is only a small part of a larger package that has very serious implications for the autonomy of universities and the quality of university education across the country.

All universities are to have a uniform structure of syllabi. There will be “core” courses, “compulsory foundation” courses, and “elective foundation courses” that “are value-based and are aimed at man-making education”. This seems to be the FYUP in a new three-year, all-India garb. In the new system, in at least half of the core courses, the assessment will be based on examinations in which external examiners will set and mark the papers. The new system will also have an impact on PhD programmes. Theses must be evaluated by external as well as internal examiners. In the University of Delhi, while undergraduate examination papers are currently marked by teachers from across the university, postgraduate assessment is done within the departments. In the History Department, we currently have three external examiners for PhD theses. The new diktat is set to change all this. No say in courses It gets worse. It is now clear that the new system also aims at introducing uniform syllabi across universities in the country. The website of the UGC displays model undergraduate syllabi for various subjects, from which only minimal deviation will be permitted. It does not specify where these syllabi have come from. The History syllabus on the UGC website happens to be the syllabus of the University of Delhi, with a mishmash of elements drawn from the old FYUP syllabus. This is the “chosen one” which will presumably be imposed on universities all over the country.

This is not in the least bit flattering. In normal times, the process of syllabus revision in our University has involved wide-ranging consultation and discussion among all the teachers involved. It takes time — sometimes too much — but it is worth it. For example, the MA History syllabus was revised a few years ago, and the History Department has recently initiated a revision of its BA syllabi, because teachers are convinced that these syllabi need to be changed and improved. Now it seems that we need not bother. Our old courses, with which we are dissatisfied, will continue and will be imposed not only on us, but on other universities in the country. In the best universities in the world, postgraduate courses represent cutting-edge approaches and research, and are tailored to the research expertise of its teachers. The uniqueness of the profiles of departments and universities rests, to a great extent, on this. But this will no longer be possible, will not be allowed, in our universities. We teachers will no longer have a role in designing the courses that we teach.

The changes that are envisaged in the new system are much more far-reaching in scope and scale than the recently jettisoned FYUP. But in both cases, we see an attempt to bring about radical change in a hasty manner without adequate thought about the rationale and logistics, and even less time devoted to what matters the most — the actual content of courses. Many universities have already fallen in line and have embraced the Choice Based Credit System, and others will no doubt follow suit. Instead of uniform excellence, the result will be uniform mediocrity and a lowering of the academic standards of our best institutions. Given the enormous logistical problems involved in introducing too much change too fast, it could also involve a breakdown of our university system.

Q. What is the intention of the author behind this article?

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 19

Directions : Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

Our universities are changing. Never has the pace of change been this fast, nor the protests this loud. On the rare occasion that the media take notice, the discussion usually focusses on whether or not due procedure has been followed. Given our authoritarian power structures, it is as important to ask whether adequate thought has gone into the initiation of the changes. Teachers of the University of Delhi are especially familiar with changes; the recent spate began with the introduction of the semester system in undergraduate teaching in 2011. Although there are certain serious logistical issues involved, there is nothing inherently wrong with teaching in a semester mode. What is problematic is when the introduction of the system is done in a manner in which little attention is paid to the content of semester courses. Unfortunately, these courses were created by snipping the existing annual courses in half, sometimes badly. Why? There was no time to reflect on curricular or pedagogic issues.

More recently, we saw even more radical changes with the introduction of the four-year undergraduate programme (FYUP) in the University of Delhi. There is nothing inherently good or bad about a four-year BA programme. A great deal hinges on the quality of the courses that form the programme. Of course, questions can be asked about whether a single university in the country can move to a four-year system and the implications of an additional year’s education in a country where many students find it difficult to pay even the highly subsidised fees. Anyhow, the programme was introduced in 2013, again without adequate time to think seriously about curricular or pedagogic issues. And then, in the summer of 2014, it was just as suddenly withdrawn. The University of Delhi is still reeling under the impact of all these changes, but what is now on the cards is something even more worrying; something that will affect not one but all Indian universities. A communiqué? from the University Grants Commission (UGC) dated November 14, 2014, gives certain directives that were apparently discussed at a retreat of the vice chancellors of Central universities on September 12 and 13, 2014; these were subsequently approved by the Ministry of Human Resource Development. The directives require that all universities follow a Choice Based Credit System (CBCS) from 2015 onwards. We are told that the aim is to provide choice to students within an institution as well as “seamless mobility across institutions” in India and abroad by adopting a “cafeteria approach”. These guidelines are apparently supposed to apply to all undergraduate and postgraduate level degree, diploma and certificate programmes being run by Central, State and deemed universities in India. Once again: such sweeping change, so little thought.

There would have been no problem if the new system only involved giving students grades instead of marks. However, it gives an all-India scale of conversion of marks into grades which does not take into account the fact that there are radical differences between the “standard” in different colleges and universities. But even this is only a small part of a larger package that has very serious implications for the autonomy of universities and the quality of university education across the country.

All universities are to have a uniform structure of syllabi. There will be “core” courses, “compulsory foundation” courses, and “elective foundation courses” that “are value-based and are aimed at man-making education”. This seems to be the FYUP in a new three-year, all-India garb. In the new system, in at least half of the core courses, the assessment will be based on examinations in which external examiners will set and mark the papers. The new system will also have an impact on PhD programmes. Theses must be evaluated by external as well as internal examiners. In the University of Delhi, while undergraduate examination papers are currently marked by teachers from across the university, postgraduate assessment is done within the departments. In the History Department, we currently have three external examiners for PhD theses. The new diktat is set to change all this. No say in courses It gets worse. It is now clear that the new system also aims at introducing uniform syllabi across universities in the country. The website of the UGC displays model undergraduate syllabi for various subjects, from which only minimal deviation will be permitted. It does not specify where these syllabi have come from. The History syllabus on the UGC website happens to be the syllabus of the University of Delhi, with a mishmash of elements drawn from the old FYUP syllabus. This is the “chosen one” which will presumably be imposed on universities all over the country.

This is not in the least bit flattering. In normal times, the process of syllabus revision in our University has involved wide-ranging consultation and discussion among all the teachers involved. It takes time — sometimes too much — but it is worth it. For example, the MA History syllabus was revised a few years ago, and the History Department has recently initiated a revision of its BA syllabi, because teachers are convinced that these syllabi need to be changed and improved. Now it seems that we need not bother. Our old courses, with which we are dissatisfied, will continue and will be imposed not only on us, but on other universities in the country. In the best universities in the world, postgraduate courses represent cutting-edge approaches and research, and are tailored to the research expertise of its teachers. The uniqueness of the profiles of departments and universities rests, to a great extent, on this. But this will no longer be possible, will not be allowed, in our universities. We teachers will no longer have a role in designing the courses that we teach.

The changes that are envisaged in the new system are much more far-reaching in scope and scale than the recently jettisoned FYUP. But in both cases, we see an attempt to bring about radical change in a hasty manner without adequate thought about the rationale and logistics, and even less time devoted to what matters the most — the actual content of courses. Many universities have already fallen in line and have embraced the Choice Based Credit System, and others will no doubt follow suit. Instead of uniform excellence, the result will be uniform mediocrity and a lowering of the academic standards of our best institutions. Given the enormous logistical problems involved in introducing too much change too fast, it could also involve a breakdown of our university system.

Q. What is the meaning of the word ‘Autonomy’?

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 20

Directions : Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

Our universities are changing. Never has the pace of change been this fast, nor the protests this loud. On the rare occasion that the media take notice, the discussion usually focusses on whether or not due procedure has been followed. Given our authoritarian power structures, it is as important to ask whether adequate thought has gone into the initiation of the changes. Teachers of the University of Delhi are especially familiar with changes; the recent spate began with the introduction of the semester system in undergraduate teaching in 2011. Although there are certain serious logistical issues involved, there is nothing inherently wrong with teaching in a semester mode. What is problematic is when the introduction of the system is done in a manner in which little attention is paid to the content of semester courses. Unfortunately, these courses were created by snipping the existing annual courses in half, sometimes badly. Why? There was no time to reflect on curricular or pedagogic issues.

More recently, we saw even more radical changes with the introduction of the four-year undergraduate programme (FYUP) in the University of Delhi. There is nothing inherently good or bad about a four-year BA programme. A great deal hinges on the quality of the courses that form the programme. Of course, questions can be asked about whether a single university in the country can move to a four-year system and the implications of an additional year’s education in a country where many students find it difficult to pay even the highly subsidised fees. Anyhow, the programme was introduced in 2013, again without adequate time to think seriously about curricular or pedagogic issues. And then, in the summer of 2014, it was just as suddenly withdrawn. The University of Delhi is still reeling under the impact of all these changes, but what is now on the cards is something even more worrying; something that will affect not one but all Indian universities. A communiqué? from the University Grants Commission (UGC) dated November 14, 2014, gives certain directives that were apparently discussed at a retreat of the vice chancellors of Central universities on September 12 and 13, 2014; these were subsequently approved by the Ministry of Human Resource Development. The directives require that all universities follow a Choice Based Credit System (CBCS) from 2015 onwards. We are told that the aim is to provide choice to students within an institution as well as “seamless mobility across institutions” in India and abroad by adopting a “cafeteria approach”. These guidelines are apparently supposed to apply to all undergraduate and postgraduate level degree, diploma and certificate programmes being run by Central, State and deemed universities in India. Once again: such sweeping change, so little thought.

There would have been no problem if the new system only involved giving students grades instead of marks. However, it gives an all-India scale of conversion of marks into grades which does not take into account the fact that there are radical differences between the “standard” in different colleges and universities. But even this is only a small part of a larger package that has very serious implications for the autonomy of universities and the quality of university education across the country.

All universities are to have a uniform structure of syllabi. There will be “core” courses, “compulsory foundation” courses, and “elective foundation courses” that “are value-based and are aimed at man-making education”. This seems to be the FYUP in a new three-year, all-India garb. In the new system, in at least half of the core courses, the assessment will be based on examinations in which external examiners will set and mark the papers. The new system will also have an impact on PhD programmes. Theses must be evaluated by external as well as internal examiners. In the University of Delhi, while undergraduate examination papers are currently marked by teachers from across the university, postgraduate assessment is done within the departments. In the History Department, we currently have three external examiners for PhD theses. The new diktat is set to change all this. No say in courses It gets worse. It is now clear that the new system also aims at introducing uniform syllabi across universities in the country. The website of the UGC displays model undergraduate syllabi for various subjects, from which only minimal deviation will be permitted. It does not specify where these syllabi have come from. The History syllabus on the UGC website happens to be the syllabus of the University of Delhi, with a mishmash of elements drawn from the old FYUP syllabus. This is the “chosen one” which will presumably be imposed on universities all over the country.

This is not in the least bit flattering. In normal times, the process of syllabus revision in our University has involved wide-ranging consultation and discussion among all the teachers involved. It takes time — sometimes too much — but it is worth it. For example, the MA History syllabus was revised a few years ago, and the History Department has recently initiated a revision of its BA syllabi, because teachers are convinced that these syllabi need to be changed and improved. Now it seems that we need not bother. Our old courses, with which we are dissatisfied, will continue and will be imposed not only on us, but on other universities in the country. In the best universities in the world, postgraduate courses represent cutting-edge approaches and research, and are tailored to the research expertise of its teachers. The uniqueness of the profiles of departments and universities rests, to a great extent, on this. But this will no longer be possible, will not be allowed, in our universities. We teachers will no longer have a role in designing the courses that we teach.

The changes that are envisaged in the new system are much more far-reaching in scope and scale than the recently jettisoned FYUP. But in both cases, we see an attempt to bring about radical change in a hasty manner without adequate thought about the rationale and logistics, and even less time devoted to what matters the most — the actual content of courses. Many universities have already fallen in line and have embraced the Choice Based Credit System, and others will no doubt follow suit. Instead of uniform excellence, the result will be uniform mediocrity and a lowering of the academic standards of our best institutions. Given the enormous logistical problems involved in introducing too much change too fast, it could also involve a breakdown of our university system.

Q. What is the antonym of the word ‘radical’?

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 21

Directions: Read each sentence to find out whether there is any error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number of that part is the answer. If there is no error the answer is (5). (Ignore errors of punctuation, if any.)

We were happy that 1)/ the audience responded well 2)/ and gave all the speakers 3)/ a patiently listening. 4)/ No error 5).

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 21

Replace 'patient' in the place of 'patiently.'

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 22

Directions: Read each sentence to find out whether there is any error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number of that part is the answer. If there is no error the answer is (5). (Ignore errors of punctuation, if any.)

He received timely support 1)/ from his elder brother 2)/ who is working abroad 3)/ for the last six years. 4)/ No error 5).

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 22

Who had been working abroad.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 23

Directions: Read each sentence to find out whether there is any error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number of that part is the answer. If there is no error the answer is (5). (Ignore errors of punctuation, if any.)

The notorious gang opened 1)/ the door quietly and 2)/ escaped in the dark with 3)/ whatever they would collect. 4)/ No error 5).

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 23

Whatever they had collected.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 24

Directions: Read each sentence to find out whether there is any error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number of that part is the answer. If there is no error the answer is (5). (Ignore errors of punctuation, if any.)

One of the security men 1)/ rushed forward and asked 2)/ me whether I 3)/ had anything objectionable. 4)/ No error 5).

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 25

Directions: Read each sentence to find out whether there is any error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number of that part is the answer. If there is no error the answer is (5). (Ignore errors of punctuation, if any.)

We could not 1)/ believe that one 2)/ of us was 3)/ responsible with the act. 4)/ No error 5).

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 25

Replace 'for' in place of 'with.'

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 26

DIRECTIONS: Which of the phrases (a), (b), (c) and (d) given below each sentence should replace the phrase printed in bold in the sentence to make it grammatically correct? If the sentence is correct as it is given and no correction is required, mark (e) as the answer.

Q. He is unique as he behaves with the same courtesy of the poor as of the rich. 

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 27

DIRECTIONS: Which of the phrases (a), (b), (c) and (d) given below each sentence should replace the phrase printed in bold in the sentence to make it grammatically correct? If the sentence is correct as it is given and no correction is required, mark (e) as the answer.

Q. The judge asked the accused why was he looking so depressed.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 28

DIRECTIONS: Which of the phrases (a), (b), (c) and (d) given below each sentence should replace the phrase printed in bold in the sentence to make it grammatically correct? If the sentence is correct as it is given and no correction is required, mark (e) as the answer.

Q. They could not admire his bright performance because of they dislike him.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 29

DIRECTIONS: Which of the phrases (a), (b), (c) and (d) given below each sentence should replace the phrase printed in bold in the sentence to make it grammatically correct? If the sentence is correct as it is given and no correction is required, mark (e) as the answer.

As the time were hard for all, the country was generally making progress.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 30

DIRECTIONS: Which of the phrases (a), (b), (c) and (d) given below each sentence should replace the phrase printed in bold in the sentence to make it grammatically correct? If the sentence is correct as it is given and no correction is required, mark (e) as the answer.

Q. Our hope was that he would not enter college till he had had some grounding in science.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 31

Directions : The following pie-chart shows the sources of funds to be collected by the National Highways Authority of India (NHAI) for its Phase II projects. Study the pie-chart and answers the question that follow.

Sources of funds to be arranged by NHAI for Phase II projects (in Rs. crores)

Q. Nearly about 20% of the funds are to be arranged through:

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 31

20% of the total funds to be arranged = Rs. (20% of 57600) crores

= Rs. 11520 crores » Rs. 11486 crores.

Rs. 11486 crores is the amount of funds to be arranged through External Assistance

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 32

Directions : The following pie-chart shows the sources of funds to be collected by the National Highways Authority of India (NHAI) for its Phase II projects. Study the pie-chart and answers the question that follow.

Sources of funds to be arranged by NHAI for Phase II projects (in Rs. crores)

 

Q. If NHAI could receive a total of Rs. 9695 crores as External Assistance, by what percent (approximately) should it increase the Market Borrowing to arrange for the shortage of funds?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 32

Shortage of funds arranged through External Assistance  }= Rs. (11486 - 9695) crores

= Rs. 1791 crores.

Increase required in Market Borrowing = Rs. 1791 crores.

Percentage increase required = {[(1791 / 29952) ] x 100}% = = 5.98% ≈ 6%.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 33

Directions : The following pie-chart shows the sources of funds to be collected by the National Highways Authority of India (NHAI) for its Phase II projects. Study the pie-chart and answers the question that follow.

Sources of funds to be arranged by NHAI for Phase II projects (in Rs. crores)

Q. If the toll is to be collected through an outsourced agency by allowing a maximum 10% commission, how much approximate amount should be permitted to be collected by the outsourced agency, so that the project is supported with Rs. 4910 crores?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 33

Let Amount Permitted be x. 
    According to the question 

 x * 90% = 4910
then x = 5455.55 ≈ 5455 crores 

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 34

Directions : The following pie-chart shows the sources of funds to be collected by the National Highways Authority of India (NHAI) for its Phase II projects. Study the pie-chart and answers the question that follow.

Sources of funds to be arranged by NHAI for Phase II projects (in Rs. crores)

Q. The central angle corresponding to Market Borrowing is

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 34

Central angle corresponding to Market Borrowing =[(29952/57600)]x 360º = 187.2º

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 35

Directions : The following pie-chart shows the sources of funds to be collected by the National Highways Authority of India (NHAI) for its Phase II projects. Study the pie-chart and answers the question that follow.

Sources of funds to be arranged by NHAI for Phase II projects (in Rs. crores)

Q. The approximate ratio of the funds to be arranged through Toll and that through Market Borrowing is

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 35

Required ratio = 4910/29952= 1/6.1 ≈ 1/6

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 36

Directions:The following line graph gives the ratio of the amounts of imports by a company to the amount of exports from that company over the period from 1995 to 2001. 

Ratio of Value of Imports to Exports by a Company over the Years

Q. If the imports in 1998 were Rs. 250 crores and the total exports in the years 1998 and 1999 together was Rs. 500 crores, then the imports in 1999 was?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 36

The ratio of imports to exports for the years 1998 and 1999 are 1.25 and 1.40 respectively.

Let the exports in the year 1998 = Rs. x crores.

Then, the exports in the year 1999 = Rs. (500 - x) crores.

1.25 = 250/x ⇒ x = 250 /1.25 = 200 ( Using ratio for 1998

Thus, the exports in the year 1999 = Rs. (500 - 200) crores = Rs. 300 crores.

Let the imports in the year 1999 = Rs. y crores.

Then, 1.40 = y / 300 ⇒ y = ( 300 * 1.40 ) = 420

Imports in the year 1999 = Rs. 420 crores.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 37

Directions:The following line graph gives the ratio of the amounts of imports by a company to the amount of exports from that company over the period from 1995 to 2001. 

Ratio of Value of Imports to Exports by a Company over the Years

Q. The imports were minimum proportionate to the exports of the company in the year ?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 37

The imports are minimum proportionate to the exports implies that the ratio of the value of imports to exports has the minimum value.

Now, this ratio has a minimum value 0.35 in 1997, i.e., the imports are minimum proportionate to the exports in 1997.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 38

Directions:The following line graph gives the ratio of the amounts of imports by a company to the amount of exports from that company over the period from 1995 to 2001. 

Ratio of Value of Imports to Exports by a Company over the Years

 

Q. What was the percentage increase in imports from 1997 to 1998?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 38

The graph gives only the ratio of imports to exports for different years. To find the percentage increase in imports from 1997 to 1998, we require more details such as the value of imports or exports during these years.

Hence, the data is inadequate to answer this question.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 39

Directions:The following line graph gives the ratio of the amounts of imports by a company to the amount of exports from that company over the period from 1995 to 2001. 

Ratio of Value of Imports to Exports by a Company over the Years

Q. If the imports of the company in 1996 was Rs. 272 crores, the exports from the company in 1996 was?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 39

Ratio of imports to exports in the year 1996 = 0.85.

Let the exports in 1996 = Rs. x crores.

Then, 272/x = 0.85 ⇒ x = 272 / 0.85= 320

Exports in 1996 = Rs. 320 crores.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 40

Directions:The following line graph gives the ratio of the amounts of imports by a company to the amount of exports from that company over the period from 1995 to 2001. 

Ratio of Value of Imports to Exports by a Company over the Years

 

Q. In how many of the given years were the exports more than the imports?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 40

The exports are more than the imports imply that the ratio of value of imports to exports is less than 1.

Now, this ratio is less than 1 in years 1995, 1996, 1997 and 2000.

Thus, there are four such years.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 41

A gold chain is sold for Rs. 14630 at a loss of 23%, what is the cost price of gold chain?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 41

C.P.= 14630 × 77/100 = Rs. 19000

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 42

The ratio of length and breadth of a rectangle is 3 : 2 respectively. The respective ratio of its perimeter and area is 5 : 9. What is the length of the rectangle (in meters)?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 42

Let the length and breadth be 3x and 2x respectively.

2(3x + 2x)/(3x * 2x) = 5/9

10x/6x^2 = 5/9

x = 3

Length = 3 * 3 = 9m

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 43

The average salary of 15 worker is Rs. 8600. If the salary of a supervisor is added, the average increases to Rs. 9000. What is the salary of supervisor?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 43

Salary of supervisor = 9000 × 16 – 8600 × 15

= 1,44,000 – 1,29,000 = Rs. 15000

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 44

One eleventh of three–fourth of a number is 27. What is the number?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 44

Required number = 27 * 11 * 4/3 =396

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 45

Six years ago, mother's age was 20 years more than the son's age. If the sum of their present ages is 34, what was the age of the mothers 6 years ago?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 45

Let the present age of mother be x years

Son’s age = 34 – x

Then, (x – 6) = 20 + 34 – x – 6

2x = 54

x = 27

Required answer = 21 years

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 46

Prateek bought a laptop for Rs. 14800 and sold it for Rs. 20720. What is the profit percentage?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 46

Profit percentage = 5920/14800 * 100 = 40%

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 47

A 330 m-long train passes a pole in 6 sec. How long will it take to cross a railway platform 165 meters long?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 47

Speed of train = 330/6 = 55 m/sec

Required time = (330 + 165)/55 = 9 sec

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 48

Anil spends 75% of his income. His income is increased by 20% and he increases his expenditure by 16%. His saving is increased by what per cent?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 48

Let income be Rs. x

Expenditure = Rs. 75/100x

Saving = Rs. 25/100x

Now, income = Rs. 120/100x

Expenditure = Rs. 75/100 * 116/100

Savingsn = 120x/100 - (75 * 116)x/10000

= (120/100 - 87/100)x

= 33/100x

Saving increased = (33x - 25x)/25x * 100 = 32%

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 49

Directions: Each question below is followed by two statements A and B. You have to decide whether the data given in the statements are sufficient for answering the questions. Read both the statements and give answer:

Q. What is the product of x and y ?

A) x = y + 24

B) 36 – 8 = x

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 49

From statement B, x = 28

From statement A, y = x – 24 = 28 – 24 = 4

xy = 28 × 4

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 50

Directions: Each question below is followed by two statements A and B. You have to decide whether the data given in the statements are sufficient for answering the questions. Read both the statements and give answer:

What is the perimeter of the square ?

A) The measure of one of its sides is given.

B) The measure of its diagonal is given.

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 50

Perimeter of a square can be known, if either a side or a diagonal is known.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 51

Directions : Each question below is followed by two statements A and B. You have to decide whether the data given in the statements are sufficient for answering the questions. Read both the statements and give answer:

How long did the secretary's speech last ?

A) He spoke at an average of 50 words per minute.

B) He would have spoken for 10 min extra had his speech rate been 4 words less per minute.

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 51

Let, the secretary spoke for x min. Then from statement A.

Number of words = 50 x

From statement B,

Number of words spoken = (x + 10) ( 50 –4)

50 x = 46 (x + 10)

x = 460/4 = 115 min

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 52

Directions: Each question below is followed by two statements A and B. You have to decide whether the data given in the statements are sufficient for answering the questions. Read both the statements and give answer:

What will Niranjan's age be 5 years from now ?

A) Niranjan's present age is twice Sohan's present age.

B) Sohan, who is half Niranjan's present age, was 21 years old, 5 years ago.

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 52

From statement B :

Sohan’s age 5 years ago = 21 years

Sohan’s present age = 21 + 5 = 26 years

Niranjan’s present age = 26 × 2 = 52 years

Niranjan’s age after 5 years = 52 + 5 = 57 years

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 53

Directions : Each question below is followed by two statements A and B. You have to decide whether the data given in the statements are sufficient for answering the questions. Read both the statements and give answer:

What is the two–digit number ?

A) The product of the two digits of number is 0.

B) The difference between the two–digits of the number is 7.

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 53

Let greater and smaller digits of the number be x and y

respectively. Then,

From statement A, xy = 0

From statement B, x – y = 7

x –y = 7

x = 7, y = 0

Two digit number is 70.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 54

There is a point inside a circle. What is the probability that this point is closer to the circumference than to the centre?  

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 54

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 55

A yacht went down the river for a distance of 20 km. It then turned back and returned to its starting point, having travelled a total of 7 hours. On its return trip, at a distance of 12 km from the starting point, it encountered a wooden broken boat, which had passed the starting point at the moment at which the yacht had started downstream. Find the downstream speed of the yacht. 

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 55

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 56

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 56

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 57

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 57

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 58

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 58

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 59

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 59

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 60

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 60

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 61

In how many ways, can the letters of the word ‘ASSASSINATION’ be arranged, so that all the A are together? 

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 61

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 62

In how many ways, a cricket team of 11 players can be made from 15 players, if a particular player is always chosen?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 62

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 63

The ratio of length of each equal side and the third side of an isosceles triangle is 3 : 4. If the area of the triangle is 18√5 sq units, the third side is?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 63

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 64

The area of rectangle lies between 40 cm2  and 45 cm2. If one of the sides is 5 cm, then its diagonal lies between?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 64

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 65

What is the area of the larger segment circle formed by a chord of length 5 cm subtending an angle of 90° at the centre? 

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 65

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 66

Directions: These questions are based on the following information. Read the information carefully and answer the questions given below.

Seven friends, viz Sonu, Monu, Deepu, Siddhu, Anuj, Namit and Tinku are pursuing their M.Phil in different subjects—Maths, History, Political Science, Chemistry, Economic, Accounts and Geography but not necessarily in the same order. They study in three different universities, viz P, Q and S. At least two friends study in the same university. Siddhu is studying Political Science in university P. The one who is studying History is not from university S. Tinku is studying Geography in university Q with only Monu. Sonu is not studying Economics and is not from university P. Namit is studying Accounts and is not from university P. Anuj is studying Chemistry but not from university P. No one studies Maths or Economics in University P.
Siddhu is studying Political Science in university P. The one who is studying History is not from university S. Tinku is studying Geography in university Q with only Monu. Sonu is not studying Economics and is not from university P. Namit is studying Accounts and is not from university P. Anuj is studying Chemistry but not from university P. No one studies Maths or Economics in university P.

Q. Which of the following represents the group that studies in university S?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 66

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 67

Directions: These questions are based on the following information. Read the information carefully and answer the questions given below.

Seven friends, viz Sonu, Monu, Deepu, Siddhu, Anuj, Namit and Tinku are pursuing their M.Phil in different subjects—Maths, History, Political Science, Chemistry, Economic, Accounts and Geography but not necessarily in the same order. They study in three different universities, viz P, Q and S. At least two friends study in the same university. Siddhu is studying Political Science in university P. The one who is studying History is not from university S. Tinku is studying Geography in university Q with only Monu. Sonu is not studying Economics and is not from university P. Namit is studying Accounts and is not from university P. Anuj is studying Chemistry but not from university P. No one studies Maths or Economics in University P.
Siddhu is studying Political Science in university P. The one who is studying History is not from university S. Tinku is studying Geography in university Q with only Monu. Sonu is not studying Economics and is not from university P. Namit is studying Accounts and is not from university P. Anuj is studying Chemistry but not from university P. No one studies Maths or Economics in university P.

Q. Deepu is studying in which of the following universities?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 67

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 68

Directions: These questions are based on the following information. Read the information carefully and answer the questions given below.

Seven friends, viz Sonu, Monu, Deepu, Siddhu, Anuj, Namit and Tinku are pursuing their M.Phil in different subjects—Maths, History, Political Science, Chemistry, Economic, Accounts and Geography but not necessarily in the same order. They study in three different universities, viz P, Q and S. At least two friends study in the same university. Siddhu is studying Political Science in university P. The one who is studying History is not from university S. Tinku is studying Geography in university Q with only Monu. Sonu is not studying Economics and is not from university P. Namit is studying Accounts and is not from university P. Anuj is studying Chemistry but not from university P. No one studies Maths or Economics in University P.
Siddhu is studying Political Science in university P. The one who is studying History is not from university S. Tinku is studying Geography in university Q with only Monu. Sonu is not studying Economics and is not from university P. Namit is studying Accounts and is not from university P. Anuj is studying Chemistry but not from university P. No one studies Maths or Economics in university P.

Q. Which of the following combinations is true?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 68

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 69

Directions: These questions are based on the following information. Read the information carefully and answer the questions given below.

Seven friends, viz Sonu, Monu, Deepu, Siddhu, Anuj, Namit and Tinku are pursuing their M.Phil in different subjects—Maths, History, Political Science, Chemistry, Economic, Accounts and Geography but not necessarily in the same order. They study in three different universities, viz P, Q and S. At least two friends study in the same university. Siddhu is studying Political Science in university P. The one who is studying History is not from university S. Tinku is studying Geography in university Q with only Monu. Sonu is not studying Economics and is not from university P. Namit is studying Accounts and is not from university P. Anuj is studying Chemistry but not from university P. No one studies Maths or Economics in University P.
Siddhu is studying Political Science in university P. The one who is studying History is not from university S. Tinku is studying Geography in university Q with only Monu. Sonu is not studying Economics and is not from university P. Namit is studying Accounts and is not from university P. Anuj is studying Chemistry but not from university P. No one studies Maths or Economics in university P.

Q. Monu studies which subject in M.Phil?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 69

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 70

Directions: These questions are based on the following information. Read the information carefully and answer the questions given below.

Seven friends, viz Sonu, Monu, Deepu, Siddhu, Anuj, Namit and Tinku are pursuing their M.Phil in different subjects—Maths, History, Political Science, Chemistry, Economic, Accounts and Geography but not necessarily in the same order. They study in three different universities, viz P, Q and S. At least two friends study in the same university. Siddhu is studying Political Science in university P. The one who is studying History is not from university S. Tinku is studying Geography in university Q with only Monu. Sonu is not studying Economics and is not from university P. Namit is studying Accounts and is not from university P. Anuj is studying Chemistry but not from university P. No one studies Maths or Economics in University P.
Siddhu is studying Political Science in university P. The one who is studying History is not from university S. Tinku is studying Geography in university Q with only Monu. Sonu is not studying Economics and is not from university P. Namit is studying Accounts and is not from university P. Anuj is studying Chemistry but not from university P. No one studies Maths or Economics in university P.

Q. Who among the following is studying History in M.Phil?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 70

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 71

Directions: In the following questions, the symbols @, ©, %, δ and # are used with the following meaning as illustrated below.

‘P % Q’ means ‘P is not greater than Q’.

‘P δ Q’ means ‘P is neither greater than nor smaller than Q’.

‘P # Q’ means ‘P is neither greater than nor equal to Q’.

‘P © Q’ means ‘P is not smaller than Q’.

‘P @ Q’ means ‘P is neither smaller than nor equal to Q’.

Now, in each of the following questions assuming the given statements to be true, find which of the two Conclusions I and II given below them is/are definitely true?

Q. Statements: R © T, T @ M, M δ D

Conclusions:

I. D # T

II. M # T

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 71

Statement- R ≥ T > M =D
Conclusion I- D < T (True)
Conclusion II- M < T (True)

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 72

Directions: In the following questions, the symbols @, ©, %, δ and # are used with the following meaning as illustrated below.

‘P % Q’ means ‘P is not greater than Q’.

‘P δ Q’ means ‘P is neither greater than nor smaller than Q’.

‘P # Q’ means ‘P is neither greater than nor equal to Q’.

‘P © Q’ means ‘P is not smaller than Q’.

‘P @ Q’ means ‘P is neither smaller than nor equal to Q’.

Now, in each of the following questions assuming the given statements to be true, find which of the two Conclusions I and II given below them is/are definitely true?

Q. Statements: B @ N, N % R, R © F

Conclusions:

I. B @ F

II. N # F

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 72

Statement- B >N ≤ R ≥ F
Conclusion I- B > F (false)
Conclusion II- N <F (false)

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 73

Directions: In the following questions, the symbols @, ©, %, δ and # are used with the following meaning as illustrated below.

‘P % Q’ means ‘P is not greater than Q’.

‘P δ Q’ means ‘P is neither greater than nor smaller than Q’.

‘P # Q’ means ‘P is neither greater than nor equal to Q’.

‘P © Q’ means ‘P is not smaller than Q’.

‘P @ Q’ means ‘P is neither smaller than nor equal to Q’.

Now, in each of the following questions assuming the given statements to be true, find which of the two Conclusions I and II given below them is/are definitely true?

Q. Statements: D # T, T @ R, R © M

Conclusions:

I. M # D

II. M # T

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 73

Statement- D <T >R ≥ M
Conclusion I- M <D (false)
Conclusion II- M<T (True)

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 74

Directions: In the following questions, the symbols @, ©, %, δ and # are used with the following meaning as illustrated below.

‘P % Q’ means ‘P is not greater than Q’.

‘P δ Q’ means ‘P is neither greater than nor smaller than Q’.

‘P # Q’ means ‘P is neither greater than nor equal to Q’.

‘P © Q’ means ‘P is not smaller than Q’.

‘P @ Q’ means ‘P is neither smaller than nor equal to Q’.

Now, in each of the following questions assuming the given statements to be true, find which of the two Conclusions I and II given below them is/are definitely true?

Q. Statements: K δ H, H % F, F # J

Conclusions:

I. F © K

II. J © H

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 74

Statement- K = H ≤ F < J
Conclusion I- F ≥ K (True)
Conclusion II- J ≥ H (false)

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 75

Directions: In the following questions, the symbols @, ©, %, δ and # are used with the following meaning as illustrated below.

‘P % Q’ means ‘P is not greater than Q’.

‘P δ Q’ means ‘P is neither greater than nor smaller than Q’.

‘P # Q’ means ‘P is neither greater than nor equal to Q’.

‘P © Q’ means ‘P is not smaller than Q’.

‘P @ Q’ means ‘P is neither smaller than nor equal to Q’.

Now, in each of the following questions assuming the given statements to be true, find which of the two Conclusions I and II given below them is/are definitely true?

Q. Statements: W @ G, N © G, N % V

Conclusions:

I. W @ N

II. V © G

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 75

Statement- W > G ≤ N ≤ V
Conclusion I- W > N (false)
Conclusion II- V ≥ G (True)

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 76

If it is possible to make only one meaningful word from the third, the sixth, the ninth and the tenth letters of the word PARENTHESIS using each letter only once, last letter of the word is your answer. If no such word can be formed your answer is X and if more than one such word can be formed your answer is Y.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 77

Directions : Study the following information given below and answer the given questions.

Eight colleagues of Adda247 , viz A, B, C, D, E, F, G and H are sitting in a straight line but not necessarily in the same order and all of them are facing north direction. Each of them has belong to different blocks of Adda247, viz Bhima, Nakul, Arjuna, Krishna, Karna, Dharma, Bhishma and Abhimanyu but not necessarily in the same order.
G sits third to the right of the person who belongs to Karna block. The person who belongs to Abhimanyu block sit second to the right of G. A and E are immediate neighbours of each other. Neither A nor E belong to Karna or Abhimanyu block. Neither A nor E is an immediate neighbour of G. H sits third to the right of the person who belongs to Bhima block. Neither A nor E belongs to Bhima. H does not belong to Abhimanyu block. Only two people sit between E and the person who belongs to Bhishma block. The person who belongs to Nakul block sits on the immediate left of D. Only one person sits between E and B. C sits second to left of one who belongs to Bhishma block. E does not belong to Arjuna block. The one who belongs to Dharma block sits at extreme end of the line.

Q. Who among following belongs to Krishna block?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 77

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 78

Directions : Study the following information given below and answer the given questions.

Eight colleagues of Adda247 , viz A, B, C, D, E, F, G and H are sitting in a straight line but not necessarily in the same order and all of them are facing north direction. Each of them has belong to different blocks of Adda247, viz Bhima, Nakul, Arjuna, Krishna, Karna, Dharma, Bhishma and Abhimanyu but not necessarily in the same order.
G sits third to the right of the person who belongs to Karna block. The person who belongs to Abhimanyu block sit second to the right of G. A and E are immediate neighbours of each other. Neither A nor E belong to Karna or Abhimanyu block. Neither A nor E is an immediate neighbour of G. H sits third to the right of the person who belongs to Bhima block. Neither A nor E belongs to Bhima. H does not belong to Abhimanyu block. Only two people sit between E and the person who belongs to Bhishma block. The person who belongs to Nakul block sits on the immediate left of D. Only one person sits between E and B. C sits second to left of one who belongs to Bhishma block. E does not belong to Arjuna block. The one who belongs to Dharma block sits at extreme end of the line.

Q. Who among following sits on the extreme end?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 78

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 79

Directions : Study the following information given below and answer the given questions.

Eight colleagues of Adda247 , viz A, B, C, D, E, F, G and H are sitting in a straight line but not necessarily in the same order and all of them are facing north direction. Each of them has belong to different blocks of Adda247, viz Bhima, Nakul, Arjuna, Krishna, Karna, Dharma, Bhishma and Abhimanyu but not necessarily in the same order.
G sits third to the right of the person who belongs to Karna block. The person who belongs to Abhimanyu block sit second to the right of G. A and E are immediate neighbours of each other. Neither A nor E belong to Karna or Abhimanyu block. Neither A nor E is an immediate neighbour of G. H sits third to the right of the person who belongs to Bhima block. Neither A nor E belongs to Bhima. H does not belong to Abhimanyu block. Only two people sit between E and the person who belongs to Bhishma block. The person who belongs to Nakul block sits on the immediate left of D. Only one person sits between E and B. C sits second to left of one who belongs to Bhishma block. E does not belong to Arjuna block. The one who belongs to Dharma block sits at extreme end of the line.

Q.Who among following sits third to right of F?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 79

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 80

Directions : Study the following information given below and answer the given questions.

Eight colleagues of Adda247 , viz A, B, C, D, E, F, G and H are sitting in a straight line but not necessarily in the same order and all of them are facing north direction. Each of them has belong to different blocks of Adda247, viz Bhima, Nakul, Arjuna, Krishna, Karna, Dharma, Bhishma and Abhimanyu but not necessarily in the same order.
G sits third to the right of the person who belongs to Karna block. The person who belongs to Abhimanyu block sit second to the right of G. A and E are immediate neighbours of each other. Neither A nor E belong to Karna or Abhimanyu block. Neither A nor E is an immediate neighbour of G. H sits third to the right of the person who belongs to Bhima block. Neither A nor E belongs to Bhima. H does not belong to Abhimanyu block. Only two people sit between E and the person who belongs to Bhishma block. The person who belongs to Nakul block sits on the immediate left of D. Only one person sits between E and B. C sits second to left of one who belongs to Bhishma block. E does not belong to Arjuna block. The one who belongs to Dharma block sits at extreme end of the line.

Q. Who among following sits immediate left of one who belongs to Dharma block?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 80

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 81

Directions : Study the following information given below and answer the given questions.

Eight colleagues of Adda247 , viz A, B, C, D, E, F, G and H are sitting in a straight line but not necessarily in the same order and all of them are facing north direction. Each of them has belong to different blocks of Adda247, viz Bhima, Nakul, Arjuna, Krishna, Karna, Dharma, Bhishma and Abhimanyu but not necessarily in the same order.
G sits third to the right of the person who belongs to Karna block. The person who belongs to Abhimanyu block sit second to the right of G. A and E are immediate neighbours of each other. Neither A nor E belong to Karna or Abhimanyu block. Neither A nor E is an immediate neighbour of G. H sits third to the right of the person who belongs to Bhima block. Neither A nor E belongs to Bhima. H does not belong to Abhimanyu block. Only two people sit between E and the person who belongs to Bhishma block. The person who belongs to Nakul block sits on the immediate left of D. Only one person sits between E and B. C sits second to left of one who belongs to Bhishma block. E does not belong to Arjuna block. The one who belongs to Dharma block sits at extreme end of the line.

Q. How many persons sit between C and the one who belongs to Nakul block?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 81

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 82

Directions : Study the information and answer the following questions:

In a certain code language 

" just for tackle and" is coded as " 21G4 15I3 1V6 14W3 " 

" then fight with enemy" is coded as " 8M4 9G5 9S4 14B5 " 

" this policy has final" is coded as " 8H4 15B6 1H3 9O5 " 

Q.What is the code for ‘approach’ in the given code language?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 82

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 83

Directions : Study the information and answer the following questions:

In a certain code language 

" just for tackle and" is coded as " 21G4 15I3 1V6 14W3 " 

" then fight with enemy" is coded as " 8M4 9G5 9S4 14B5 " 

" this policy has final" is coded as " 8H4 15B6 1H3 9O5 " 

Q.What is the code for ‘fighting’ in the given code language?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 83

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 84

Directions : Study the information and answer the following questions:

In a certain code language 

" just for tackle and" is coded as " 21G4 15I3 1V6 14W3 " 

" then fight with enemy" is coded as " 8M4 9G5 9S4 14B5 " 

" this policy has final" is coded as " 8H4 15B6 1H3 9O5 " 

Q.What is the code for ‘different’ in the given code language?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 84

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 85

Directions : Study the information and answer the following questions:

In a certain code language 

" just for tackle and" is coded as " 21G4 15I3 1V6 14W3 " 

" then fight with enemy" is coded as " 8M4 9G5 9S4 14B5 " 

" this policy has final" is coded as " 8H4 15B6 1H3 9O5 " 

Q.What is the code for ‘political’ in the given code language?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 85

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 86

Directions : Study the information and answer the following questions:

In a certain code language 

" just for tackle and" is coded as " 21G4 15I3 1V6 14W3 " 

" then fight with enemy" is coded as " 8M4 9G5 9S4 14B5 " 

" this policy has final" is coded as " 8H4 15B6 1H3 9O5 " 

Q.What is the code for ‘solution’ in the given code language?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 86

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 87

How many such pairs of letters are there in the word INTEREST each of which has as many letters between them in the word as in the English alphabetical series?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 87

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 88

How many meaningful English words can be formed with the letters ABTI using all the letters, and each letter only once in each word?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 88

ABTI=BAIT

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 89

Directions: Study the following information carefully and answer the given question:

There are six letter O,R,U,D,N and A which are arranged in a particular manner such that A is placed fourth to the left of N. O is not placed immediately next to either A or N. Both letters R and U are placed immediately next to O. D is not at the left end of the row.

Q. Which of the following pairs sits at the extreme ends of the row?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 89

A R O U N D or A U O R N D

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 90

Directions: Study the following information carefully and answer the given question:

There are six letter O,R,U,D,N and A which are arranged in a particular manner such that A is placed fourth to the left of N. O is not placed immediately next to either A or N. Both letters R and U are placed immediately next to O. D is not at the left end of the row.

Q. Which of the following meaningful words will be formed after arrangement?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 90

Meaningful word is AROUND

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 91

In a row of 25 persons, Ronaldo is twelfth from the right. If there are five persons between Ronaldo and Rivaldo, who is on the right side of Ronaldo, what is the position of Rivaldo from the left?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 91

 here Ronaldo is 12th from the right , i.e. 14th from the left. therefore, the position of Rivaldo is 14+5+1=20th from the left.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 92

Directions:Answer the following questions referring to the symbol-letter-number sequence given below:

X N 5 C Z 2 $ P*A B 1 Q 3 Y N O 9 L 6 M 4 ~ F 7 I

Q. Which of the following is exactly midway between the tenth element from the right and fifth element from the left end?

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 93

Directions:Answer the following questions referring to the symbol-letter-number sequence given below:

X N 5 C Z 2 $ P*A B 1 Q 3 Y N O 9 L 6 M 4 ~ F 7 I

Q. How many letters are there in the above sequence which are immediately preceded by a number and immediately followed by a consonant?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 93

5CZ ,3YN

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 94

Directions:Answer the following questions referring to the symbol-letter-number sequence given below:

X N 5 C Z 2 $ P*A B 1 Q 3 Y N O 9 L 6 M 4 ~ F 7 I

Q. What should come in place of the question mark (?) in the following sequence?

?, 2AC, *Q$, 1NA

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 95

Directions:Answer the following questions referring to the symbol-letter-number sequence given below:

X N 5 C Z 2 $ P*A B 1 Q 3 Y N O 9 L 6 M 4 ~ F 7 I

Q. Which of the following is the eleventh element to the right of the second element from the left end in the above sequence?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 95

R=11th
L=2nd
L=13th =Q

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 96

Directions:Answer the following questions referring to the symbol-letter-number sequence given below:

X N 5 C Z 2 $ P*A B 1 Q 3 Y N O 9 L 6 M 4 ~ F 7 I

Q. If both the halves of the above sequence are written in reverse order, which will be the sixth element to the right of the sixteenth element from the right end?

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 97

Directions: In each question below, there are two or three statements followed by four conclusions numbered I, II, III and IV. You have to take the given statements to be true even if they seem to be variance with commonly known facts and then decide which of the given conclusions logically follow(s) from the given statements.

Statements: 

All hunters are punters.

Some punters are tigers.

Conclusions 

I. Some hunters are tigers.

II. All tigers are punters.

III. Some punters are hunters.

IV. No punters are hunters.

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 97

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 98

Directions: In each question below, there are two or three statements followed by four conclusions numbered I, II, III and IV. You have to take the given statements to be true even if they seem to be variance with commonly known facts and then decide which of the given conclusions logically follow(s) from the given statements.

Statements: 

Some boxes are dogs. 

All dogs are pens. 

Conclusions 

I. Some boxes are pens. 

II. Some pens are boxes. 

III. Some pens are dogs. 

IV. All pens are dogs.

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 98

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 99

Directions: In each question below, there are two or three statements followed by four conclusions numbered I, II, III and IV. You have to take the given statements to be true even if they seem to be variance with commonly known facts and then decide which of the given conclusions logically follow(s) from the given statements.

Statements: 

Some diggers are jokers.

All jokers are cute. 

Conclusions 

I. Some diggers are cute. 

II. No diggers are cute. 

III. All cute are joker. 

IV. All diggers are

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 99

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 100

Directions: In each question below, there are two or three statements followed by four conclusions numbered I, II, III and IV. You have to take the given statements to be true even if they seem to be variance with commonly known facts and then decide which of the given conclusions logically follow(s) from the given statements.

Statements: 

Some barbers are painters.

No painters are watches. 

Conclusions

I. Some barbers are not watches. 

II. Some barbers are watches.

III. Some watches are not barbers. 

IV. Some watches are barbers. 

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 10 (16-01-2023) - Question 100

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