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SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023)


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100 Questions MCQ Test Mock Tests for Banking Exam and Past Year Papers | SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023)

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SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 1

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

It is in this backdrop that we need to understand the heightened sensitivities and palpable anger over forcible land acquisition. Given that 90 per cent of our coal, more than 50 per cent of most minerals, and prospective dam sites are mainly in Adivasi regions, there has been, and is likely to be, continuing tension over issues of land acquisition.

Through these tensions, not only has a question mark been placed over our development strategy, the delicate fabric of Indian democracy has become terribly frayed at the edges. In the remote Adivasi heartlands of India, people feel such a deep and abiding sense of hurt, alienation and cynicism that they have allowed themselves to be helplessly drawn into a terrible vortex of violence and counter-violence, even when they know in their heart of hearts that it will lead to their own destruction. The 2013 land law tried to reach out to these people, by undoing a draconian colonial Act more suited to a 19th century empire than to a 21st century vibrant democracy. At the heart of the 2013 law was the provision of seeking the consent of those whose lands were to be acquired and of caring for those whose livelihoods would be destroyed in the process. Undoing these provisions is a virtual resurrection of undiluted powers of “eminent domain”, which the 1894 law conferred on the state.

I do not dispute the fact that there can be many situations where land is needed for a development project that could actually benefit those whose lands are being acquired. What could be the possible harm in seeking the prior, informed consent of these people, after making the effort of explaining to them how they would stand to benefit? There are those who argue that farmers would be better off giving up farming. Indeed, they say farmers do not want to farm any more. Why would these farmers conceivably say no if we were to propose more attractive and tangible alternative options to them in return for their land? Is it not for farmers to assess whether the project will actually be of benefit to them and whether the recompense offered to them is a fair bargain? And allow them to be parties in working out what could be regarded as a fair deal for all? But all this will happen only if we are willing to talk to farmers and listen to them, who, I dare say, based on my experience of listening to them for 25 years, have a great deal to teach us.

This is the essence of Social Impact Assessment (SIA), which was again at the heart of the 2013 law. SIA is an instrument meant to assess the positive and negative impacts of the project and also to assess whether the objectives of the proposed project could not be achieved in some other manner, especially by acquiring significantly less fertile, multi-cropped land, a crucial requirement of national food security. When we look back at the history of land acquisition in India, we find it riddled with instances of far too much land being acquired and not being put to use. Just one look at the huge amounts of unused land in possession of many of our universities today would make you see the point. And as a recent study by the Comptroller and Auditor General (CAG) reveals, of the over 60,000 hectares of land acquired for Special Economic Zones (SEZs), from 2006 to 2013, around 53 per cent has not been put to any use. Just because it was possible to bully uninformed village people, we continued to do so. SIA is an attempt to check these kinds of malpractices. It is also a way of making sure that land acquisition is not an easy way for the real estate mafia to make a quick buck in the name of development. The CAG study found many instances of land acquired at rates much below the market value being diverted to private builders in urban areas for commercial exploitation after denotification. The 2013 Act provided for the return of unused land to the original owner in cases where the land has not been used for the purposes for which it was acquired within five years. This is a key provision that should be retained.

SIA is an attempt to restore the declining faith in the democratic process, by reaching out to those who believe all decisions affecting their lives are made in distant, uncaring corridors of power, leaving them without any say. Incidentally, SIA is also best practice in development projects across the world. The 2013 law was a belated attempt to catch up with what other nations have been doing for long. Doing away with SIA would destroy a very powerful means of what is globally termed “conflict prevention”, a variety of activities aimed at anticipating and averting the outbreak of conflict.

Q. What is the synonym of the word “riddled” according to the passage?

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 2

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

It is in this backdrop that we need to understand the heightened sensitivities and palpable anger over forcible land acquisition. Given that 90 per cent of our coal, more than 50 per cent of most minerals, and prospective dam sites are mainly in Adivasi regions, there has been, and is likely to be, continuing tension over issues of land acquisition.

Through these tensions, not only has a question mark been placed over our development strategy, the delicate fabric of Indian democracy has become terribly frayed at the edges. In the remote Adivasi heartlands of India, people feel such a deep and abiding sense of hurt, alienation and cynicism that they have allowed themselves to be helplessly drawn into a terrible vortex of violence and counter-violence, even when they know in their heart of hearts that it will lead to their own destruction. The 2013 land law tried to reach out to these people, by undoing a draconian colonial Act more suited to a 19th century empire than to a 21st century vibrant democracy. At the heart of the 2013 law was the provision of seeking the consent of those whose lands were to be acquired and of caring for those whose livelihoods would be destroyed in the process. Undoing these provisions is a virtual resurrection of undiluted powers of “eminent domain”, which the 1894 law conferred on the state.

I do not dispute the fact that there can be many situations where land is needed for a development project that could actually benefit those whose lands are being acquired. What could be the possible harm in seeking the prior, informed consent of these people, after making the effort of explaining to them how they would stand to benefit? There are those who argue that farmers would be better off giving up farming. Indeed, they say farmers do not want to farm any more. Why would these farmers conceivably say no if we were to propose more attractive and tangible alternative options to them in return for their land? Is it not for farmers to assess whether the project will actually be of benefit to them and whether the recompense offered to them is a fair bargain? And allow them to be parties in working out what could be regarded as a fair deal for all? But all this will happen only if we are willing to talk to farmers and listen to them, who, I dare say, based on my experience of listening to them for 25 years, have a great deal to teach us.

This is the essence of Social Impact Assessment (SIA), which was again at the heart of the 2013 law. SIA is an instrument meant to assess the positive and negative impacts of the project and also to assess whether the objectives of the proposed project could not be achieved in some other manner, especially by acquiring significantly less fertile, multi-cropped land, a crucial requirement of national food security. When we look back at the history of land acquisition in India, we find it riddled with instances of far too much land being acquired and not being put to use. Just one look at the huge amounts of unused land in possession of many of our universities today would make you see the point. And as a recent study by the Comptroller and Auditor General (CAG) reveals, of the over 60,000 hectares of land acquired for Special Economic Zones (SEZs), from 2006 to 2013, around 53 per cent has not been put to any use. Just because it was possible to bully uninformed village people, we continued to do so. SIA is an attempt to check these kinds of malpractices. It is also a way of making sure that land acquisition is not an easy way for the real estate mafia to make a quick buck in the name of development. The CAG study found many instances of land acquired at rates much below the market value being diverted to private builders in urban areas for commercial exploitation after denotification. The 2013 Act provided for the return of unused land to the original owner in cases where the land has not been used for the purposes for which it was acquired within five years. This is a key provision that should be retained.

SIA is an attempt to restore the declining faith in the democratic process, by reaching out to those who believe all decisions affecting their lives are made in distant, uncaring corridors of power, leaving them without any say. Incidentally, SIA is also best practice in development projects across the world. The 2013 law was a belated attempt to catch up with what other nations have been doing for long. Doing away with SIA would destroy a very powerful means of what is globally termed “conflict prevention”, a variety of activities aimed at anticipating and averting the outbreak of conflict

Q. Choose an appropriate title for the above passage?

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 3

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

It is in this backdrop that we need to understand the heightened sensitivities and palpable anger over forcible land acquisition. Given that 90 per cent of our coal, more than 50 per cent of most minerals, and prospective dam sites are mainly in Adivasi regions, there has been, and is likely to be, continuing tension over issues of land acquisition.

Through these tensions, not only has a question mark been placed over our development strategy, the delicate fabric of Indian democracy has become terribly frayed at the edges. In the remote Adivasi heartlands of India, people feel such a deep and abiding sense of hurt, alienation and cynicism that they have allowed themselves to be helplessly drawn into a terrible vortex of violence and counter-violence, even when they know in their heart of hearts that it will lead to their own destruction. The 2013 land law tried to reach out to these people, by undoing a draconian colonial Act more suited to a 19th century empire than to a 21st century vibrant democracy. At the heart of the 2013 law was the provision of seeking the consent of those whose lands were to be acquired and of caring for those whose livelihoods would be destroyed in the process. Undoing these provisions is a virtual resurrection of undiluted powers of “eminent domain”, which the 1894 law conferred on the state.

I do not dispute the fact that there can be many situations where land is needed for a development project that could actually benefit those whose lands are being acquired. What could be the possible harm in seeking the prior, informed consent of these people, after making the effort of explaining to them how they would stand to benefit? There are those who argue that farmers would be better off giving up farming. Indeed, they say farmers do not want to farm any more. Why would these farmers conceivably say no if we were to propose more attractive and tangible alternative options to them in return for their land? Is it not for farmers to assess whether the project will actually be of benefit to them and whether the recompense offered to them is a fair bargain? And allow them to be parties in working out what could be regarded as a fair deal for all? But all this will happen only if we are willing to talk to farmers and listen to them, who, I dare say, based on my experience of listening to them for 25 years, have a great deal to teach us.

This is the essence of Social Impact Assessment (SIA), which was again at the heart of the 2013 law. SIA is an instrument meant to assess the positive and negative impacts of the project and also to assess whether the objectives of the proposed project could not be achieved in some other manner, especially by acquiring significantly less fertile, multi-cropped land, a crucial requirement of national food security. When we look back at the history of land acquisition in India, we find it riddled with instances of far too much land being acquired and not being put to use. Just one look at the huge amounts of unused land in possession of many of our universities today would make you see the point. And as a recent study by the Comptroller and Auditor General (CAG) reveals, of the over 60,000 hectares of land acquired for Special Economic Zones (SEZs), from 2006 to 2013, around 53 per cent has not been put to any use. Just because it was possible to bully uninformed village people, we continued to do so. SIA is an attempt to check these kinds of malpractices. It is also a way of making sure that land acquisition is not an easy way for the real estate mafia to make a quick buck in the name of development. The CAG study found many instances of land acquired at rates much below the market value being diverted to private builders in urban areas for commercial exploitation after denotification. The 2013 Act provided for the return of unused land to the original owner in cases where the land has not been used for the purposes for which it was acquired within five years. This is a key provision that should be retained.

SIA is an attempt to restore the declining faith in the democratic process, by reaching out to those who believe all decisions affecting their lives are made in distant, uncaring corridors of power, leaving them without any say. Incidentally, SIA is also best practice in development projects across the world. The 2013 law was a belated attempt to catch up with what other nations have been doing for long. Doing away with SIA would destroy a very powerful means of what is globally termed “conflict prevention”, a variety of activities aimed at anticipating and averting the outbreak of conflict

Q.What is the synonym of the word “palpable” according to the passage?

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 4

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

It is in this backdrop that we need to understand the heightened sensitivities and palpable anger over forcible land acquisition. Given that 90 per cent of our coal, more than 50 per cent of most minerals, and prospective dam sites are mainly in Adivasi regions, there has been, and is likely to be, continuing tension over issues of land acquisition.

Through these tensions, not only has a question mark been placed over our development strategy, the delicate fabric of Indian democracy has become terribly frayed at the edges. In the remote Adivasi heartlands of India, people feel such a deep and abiding sense of hurt, alienation and cynicism that they have allowed themselves to be helplessly drawn into a terrible vortex of violence and counter-violence, even when they know in their heart of hearts that it will lead to their own destruction. The 2013 land law tried to reach out to these people, by undoing a draconian colonial Act more suited to a 19th century empire than to a 21st century vibrant democracy. At the heart of the 2013 law was the provision of seeking the consent of those whose lands were to be acquired and of caring for those whose livelihoods would be destroyed in the process. Undoing these provisions is a virtual resurrection of undiluted powers of “eminent domain”, which the 1894 law conferred on the state.

I do not dispute the fact that there can be many situations where land is needed for a development project that could actually benefit those whose lands are being acquired. What could be the possible harm in seeking the prior, informed consent of these people, after making the effort of explaining to them how they would stand to benefit? There are those who argue that farmers would be better off giving up farming. Indeed, they say farmers do not want to farm any more. Why would these farmers conceivably say no if we were to propose more attractive and tangible alternative options to them in return for their land? Is it not for farmers to assess whether the project will actually be of benefit to them and whether the recompense offered to them is a fair bargain? And allow them to be parties in working out what could be regarded as a fair deal for all? But all this will happen only if we are willing to talk to farmers and listen to them, who, I dare say, based on my experience of listening to them for 25 years, have a great deal to teach us.

This is the essence of Social Impact Assessment (SIA), which was again at the heart of the 2013 law. SIA is an instrument meant to assess the positive and negative impacts of the project and also to assess whether the objectives of the proposed project could not be achieved in some other manner, especially by acquiring significantly less fertile, multi-cropped land, a crucial requirement of national food security. When we look back at the history of land acquisition in India, we find it riddled with instances of far too much land being acquired and not being put to use. Just one look at the huge amounts of unused land in possession of many of our universities today would make you see the point. And as a recent study by the Comptroller and Auditor General (CAG) reveals, of the over 60,000 hectares of land acquired for Special Economic Zones (SEZs), from 2006 to 2013, around 53 per cent has not been put to any use. Just because it was possible to bully uninformed village people, we continued to do so. SIA is an attempt to check these kinds of malpractices. It is also a way of making sure that land acquisition is not an easy way for the real estate mafia to make a quick buck in the name of development. The CAG study found many instances of land acquired at rates much below the market value being diverted to private builders in urban areas for commercial exploitation after denotification. The 2013 Act provided for the return of unused land to the original owner in cases where the land has not been used for the purposes for which it was acquired within five years. This is a key provision that should be retained.

SIA is an attempt to restore the declining faith in the democratic process, by reaching out to those who believe all decisions affecting their lives are made in distant, uncaring corridors of power, leaving them without any say. Incidentally, SIA is also best practice in development projects across the world. The 2013 law was a belated attempt to catch up with what other nations have been doing for long. Doing away with SIA would destroy a very powerful means of what is globally termed “conflict prevention”, a variety of activities aimed at anticipating and averting the outbreak of conflict

Q. What is the meaning of the phrase “undiluted powers of eminent domain”?

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 5

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

It is in this backdrop that we need to understand the heightened sensitivities and palpable anger over forcible land acquisition. Given that 90 per cent of our coal, more than 50 per cent of most minerals, and prospective dam sites are mainly in Adivasi regions, there has been, and is likely to be, continuing tension over issues of land acquisition.

Through these tensions, not only has a question mark been placed over our development strategy, the delicate fabric of Indian democracy has become terribly frayed at the edges. In the remote Adivasi heartlands of India, people feel such a deep and abiding sense of hurt, alienation and cynicism that they have allowed themselves to be helplessly drawn into a terrible vortex of violence and counter-violence, even when they know in their heart of hearts that it will lead to their own destruction. The 2013 land law tried to reach out to these people, by undoing a draconian colonial Act more suited to a 19th century empire than to a 21st century vibrant democracy. At the heart of the 2013 law was the provision of seeking the consent of those whose lands were to be acquired and of caring for those whose livelihoods would be destroyed in the process. Undoing these provisions is a virtual resurrection of undiluted powers of “eminent domain”, which the 1894 law conferred on the state.

I do not dispute the fact that there can be many situations where land is needed for a development project that could actually benefit those whose lands are being acquired. What could be the possible harm in seeking the prior, informed consent of these people, after making the effort of explaining to them how they would stand to benefit? There are those who argue that farmers would be better off giving up farming. Indeed, they say farmers do not want to farm any more. Why would these farmers conceivably say no if we were to propose more attractive and tangible alternative options to them in return for their land? Is it not for farmers to assess whether the project will actually be of benefit to them and whether the recompense offered to them is a fair bargain? And allow them to be parties in working out what could be regarded as a fair deal for all? But all this will happen only if we are willing to talk to farmers and listen to them, who, I dare say, based on my experience of listening to them for 25 years, have a great deal to teach us.

This is the essence of Social Impact Assessment (SIA), which was again at the heart of the 2013 law. SIA is an instrument meant to assess the positive and negative impacts of the project and also to assess whether the objectives of the proposed project could not be achieved in some other manner, especially by acquiring significantly less fertile, multi-cropped land, a crucial requirement of national food security. When we look back at the history of land acquisition in India, we find it riddled with instances of far too much land being acquired and not being put to use. Just one look at the huge amounts of unused land in possession of many of our universities today would make you see the point. And as a recent study by the Comptroller and Auditor General (CAG) reveals, of the over 60,000 hectares of land acquired for Special Economic Zones (SEZs), from 2006 to 2013, around 53 per cent has not been put to any use. Just because it was possible to bully uninformed village people, we continued to do so. SIA is an attempt to check these kinds of malpractices. It is also a way of making sure that land acquisition is not an easy way for the real estate mafia to make a quick buck in the name of development. The CAG study found many instances of land acquired at rates much below the market value being diverted to private builders in urban areas for commercial exploitation after denotification. The 2013 Act provided for the return of unused land to the original owner in cases where the land has not been used for the purposes for which it was acquired within five years. This is a key provision that should be retained.

SIA is an attempt to restore the declining faith in the democratic process, by reaching out to those who believe all decisions affecting their lives are made in distant, uncaring corridors of power, leaving them without any say. Incidentally, SIA is also best practice in development projects across the world. The 2013 law was a belated attempt to catch up with what other nations have been doing for long. Doing away with SIA would destroy a very powerful means of what is globally termed “conflict prevention”, a variety of activities aimed at anticipating and averting the outbreak of conflict

Q. Which of the following is true according to the passage?

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 6

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

It is in this backdrop that we need to understand the heightened sensitivities and palpable anger over forcible land acquisition. Given that 90 per cent of our coal, more than 50 per cent of most minerals, and prospective dam sites are mainly in Adivasi regions, there has been, and is likely to be, continuing tension over issues of land acquisition.

Through these tensions, not only has a question mark been placed over our development strategy, the delicate fabric of Indian democracy has become terribly frayed at the edges. In the remote Adivasi heartlands of India, people feel such a deep and abiding sense of hurt, alienation and cynicism that they have allowed themselves to be helplessly drawn into a terrible vortex of violence and counter-violence, even when they know in their heart of hearts that it will lead to their own destruction. The 2013 land law tried to reach out to these people, by undoing a draconian colonial Act more suited to a 19th century empire than to a 21st century vibrant democracy. At the heart of the 2013 law was the provision of seeking the consent of those whose lands were to be acquired and of caring for those whose livelihoods would be destroyed in the process. Undoing these provisions is a virtual resurrection of undiluted powers of “eminent domain”, which the 1894 law conferred on the state.

I do not dispute the fact that there can be many situations where land is needed for a development project that could actually benefit those whose lands are being acquired. What could be the possible harm in seeking the prior, informed consent of these people, after making the effort of explaining to them how they would stand to benefit? There are those who argue that farmers would be better off giving up farming. Indeed, they say farmers do not want to farm any more. Why would these farmers conceivably say no if we were to propose more attractive and tangible alternative options to them in return for their land? Is it not for farmers to assess whether the project will actually be of benefit to them and whether the recompense offered to them is a fair bargain? And allow them to be parties in working out what could be regarded as a fair deal for all? But all this will happen only if we are willing to talk to farmers and listen to them, who, I dare say, based on my experience of listening to them for 25 years, have a great deal to teach us.

This is the essence of Social Impact Assessment (SIA), which was again at the heart of the 2013 law. SIA is an instrument meant to assess the positive and negative impacts of the project and also to assess whether the objectives of the proposed project could not be achieved in some other manner, especially by acquiring significantly less fertile, multi-cropped land, a crucial requirement of national food security. When we look back at the history of land acquisition in India, we find it riddled with instances of far too much land being acquired and not being put to use. Just one look at the huge amounts of unused land in possession of many of our universities today would make you see the point. And as a recent study by the Comptroller and Auditor General (CAG) reveals, of the over 60,000 hectares of land acquired for Special Economic Zones (SEZs), from 2006 to 2013, around 53 per cent has not been put to any use. Just because it was possible to bully uninformed village people, we continued to do so. SIA is an attempt to check these kinds of malpractices. It is also a way of making sure that land acquisition is not an easy way for the real estate mafia to make a quick buck in the name of development. The CAG study found many instances of land acquired at rates much below the market value being diverted to private builders in urban areas for commercial exploitation after denotification. The 2013 Act provided for the return of unused land to the original owner in cases where the land has not been used for the purposes for which it was acquired within five years. This is a key provision that should be retained.

SIA is an attempt to restore the declining faith in the democratic process, by reaching out to those who believe all decisions affecting their lives are made in distant, uncaring corridors of power, leaving them without any say. Incidentally, SIA is also best practice in development projects across the world. The 2013 law was a belated attempt to catch up with what other nations have been doing for long. Doing away with SIA would destroy a very powerful means of what is globally termed “conflict prevention”, a variety of activities aimed at anticipating and averting the outbreak of conflict

Q. Which of the following is acronym is not used in the above passage?

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 7

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

It is in this backdrop that we need to understand the heightened sensitivities and palpable anger over forcible land acquisition. Given that 90 per cent of our coal, more than 50 per cent of most minerals, and prospective dam sites are mainly in Adivasi regions, there has been, and is likely to be, continuing tension over issues of land acquisition.

Through these tensions, not only has a question mark been placed over our development strategy, the delicate fabric of Indian democracy has become terribly frayed at the edges. In the remote Adivasi heartlands of India, people feel such a deep and abiding sense of hurt, alienation and cynicism that they have allowed themselves to be helplessly drawn into a terrible vortex of violence and counter-violence, even when they know in their heart of hearts that it will lead to their own destruction. The 2013 land law tried to reach out to these people, by undoing a draconian colonial Act more suited to a 19th century empire than to a 21st century vibrant democracy. At the heart of the 2013 law was the provision of seeking the consent of those whose lands were to be acquired and of caring for those whose livelihoods would be destroyed in the process. Undoing these provisions is a virtual resurrection of undiluted powers of “eminent domain”, which the 1894 law conferred on the state.

I do not dispute the fact that there can be many situations where land is needed for a development project that could actually benefit those whose lands are being acquired. What could be the possible harm in seeking the prior, informed consent of these people, after making the effort of explaining to them how they would stand to benefit? There are those who argue that farmers would be better off giving up farming. Indeed, they say farmers do not want to farm any more. Why would these farmers conceivably say no if we were to propose more attractive and tangible alternative options to them in return for their land? Is it not for farmers to assess whether the project will actually be of benefit to them and whether the recompense offered to them is a fair bargain? And allow them to be parties in working out what could be regarded as a fair deal for all? But all this will happen only if we are willing to talk to farmers and listen to them, who, I dare say, based on my experience of listening to them for 25 years, have a great deal to teach us.

This is the essence of Social Impact Assessment (SIA), which was again at the heart of the 2013 law. SIA is an instrument meant to assess the positive and negative impacts of the project and also to assess whether the objectives of the proposed project could not be achieved in some other manner, especially by acquiring significantly less fertile, multi-cropped land, a crucial requirement of national food security. When we look back at the history of land acquisition in India, we find it riddled with instances of far too much land being acquired and not being put to use. Just one look at the huge amounts of unused land in possession of many of our universities today would make you see the point. And as a recent study by the Comptroller and Auditor General (CAG) reveals, of the over 60,000 hectares of land acquired for Special Economic Zones (SEZs), from 2006 to 2013, around 53 per cent has not been put to any use. Just because it was possible to bully uninformed village people, we continued to do so. SIA is an attempt to check these kinds of malpractices. It is also a way of making sure that land acquisition is not an easy way for the real estate mafia to make a quick buck in the name of development. The CAG study found many instances of land acquired at rates much below the market value being diverted to private builders in urban areas for commercial exploitation after denotification. The 2013 Act provided for the return of unused land to the original owner in cases where the land has not been used for the purposes for which it was acquired within five years. This is a key provision that should be retained.

SIA is an attempt to restore the declining faith in the democratic process, by reaching out to those who believe all decisions affecting their lives are made in distant, uncaring corridors of power, leaving them without any say. Incidentally, SIA is also best practice in development projects across the world. The 2013 law was a belated attempt to catch up with what other nations have been doing for long. Doing away with SIA would destroy a very powerful means of what is globally termed “conflict prevention”, a variety of activities aimed at anticipating and averting the outbreak of conflict

Q. What is the intention of the author behind this passage?

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 8

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

It is in this backdrop that we need to understand the heightened sensitivities and palpable anger over forcible land acquisition. Given that 90 per cent of our coal, more than 50 per cent of most minerals, and prospective dam sites are mainly in Adivasi regions, there has been, and is likely to be, continuing tension over issues of land acquisition.

Through these tensions, not only has a question mark been placed over our development strategy, the delicate fabric of Indian democracy has become terribly frayed at the edges. In the remote Adivasi heartlands of India, people feel such a deep and abiding sense of hurt, alienation and cynicism that they have allowed themselves to be helplessly drawn into a terrible vortex of violence and counter-violence, even when they know in their heart of hearts that it will lead to their own destruction. The 2013 land law tried to reach out to these people, by undoing a draconian colonial Act more suited to a 19th century empire than to a 21st century vibrant democracy. At the heart of the 2013 law was the provision of seeking the consent of those whose lands were to be acquired and of caring for those whose livelihoods would be destroyed in the process. Undoing these provisions is a virtual resurrection of undiluted powers of “eminent domain”, which the 1894 law conferred on the state.

I do not dispute the fact that there can be many situations where land is needed for a development project that could actually benefit those whose lands are being acquired. What could be the possible harm in seeking the prior, informed consent of these people, after making the effort of explaining to them how they would stand to benefit? There are those who argue that farmers would be better off giving up farming. Indeed, they say farmers do not want to farm any more. Why would these farmers conceivably say no if we were to propose more attractive and tangible alternative options to them in return for their land? Is it not for farmers to assess whether the project will actually be of benefit to them and whether the recompense offered to them is a fair bargain? And allow them to be parties in working out what could be regarded as a fair deal for all? But all this will happen only if we are willing to talk to farmers and listen to them, who, I dare say, based on my experience of listening to them for 25 years, have a great deal to teach us.

This is the essence of Social Impact Assessment (SIA), which was again at the heart of the 2013 law. SIA is an instrument meant to assess the positive and negative impacts of the project and also to assess whether the objectives of the proposed project could not be achieved in some other manner, especially by acquiring significantly less fertile, multi-cropped land, a crucial requirement of national food security. When we look back at the history of land acquisition in India, we find it riddled with instances of far too much land being acquired and not being put to use. Just one look at the huge amounts of unused land in possession of many of our universities today would make you see the point. And as a recent study by the Comptroller and Auditor General (CAG) reveals, of the over 60,000 hectares of land acquired for Special Economic Zones (SEZs), from 2006 to 2013, around 53 per cent has not been put to any use. Just because it was possible to bully uninformed village people, we continued to do so. SIA is an attempt to check these kinds of malpractices. It is also a way of making sure that land acquisition is not an easy way for the real estate mafia to make a quick buck in the name of development. The CAG study found many instances of land acquired at rates much below the market value being diverted to private builders in urban areas for commercial exploitation after denotification. The 2013 Act provided for the return of unused land to the original owner in cases where the land has not been used for the purposes for which it was acquired within five years. This is a key provision that should be retained.

SIA is an attempt to restore the declining faith in the democratic process, by reaching out to those who believe all decisions affecting their lives are made in distant, uncaring corridors of power, leaving them without any say. Incidentally, SIA is also best practice in development projects across the world. The 2013 law was a belated attempt to catch up with what other nations have been doing for long. Doing away with SIA would destroy a very powerful means of what is globally termed “conflict prevention”, a variety of activities aimed at anticipating and averting the outbreak of conflict

Q. What does the author mean by the word “Frayed”?

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 9

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

It is in this backdrop that we need to understand the heightened sensitivities and palpable anger over forcible land acquisition. Given that 90 per cent of our coal, more than 50 per cent of most minerals, and prospective dam sites are mainly in Adivasi regions, there has been, and is likely to be, continuing tension over issues of land acquisition.

Through these tensions, not only has a question mark been placed over our development strategy, the delicate fabric of Indian democracy has become terribly frayed at the edges. In the remote Adivasi heartlands of India, people feel such a deep and abiding sense of hurt, alienation and cynicism that they have allowed themselves to be helplessly drawn into a terrible vortex of violence and counter-violence, even when they know in their heart of hearts that it will lead to their own destruction. The 2013 land law tried to reach out to these people, by undoing a draconian colonial Act more suited to a 19th century empire than to a 21st century vibrant democracy. At the heart of the 2013 law was the provision of seeking the consent of those whose lands were to be acquired and of caring for those whose livelihoods would be destroyed in the process. Undoing these provisions is a virtual resurrection of undiluted powers of “eminent domain”, which the 1894 law conferred on the state.

I do not dispute the fact that there can be many situations where land is needed for a development project that could actually benefit those whose lands are being acquired. What could be the possible harm in seeking the prior, informed consent of these people, after making the effort of explaining to them how they would stand to benefit? There are those who argue that farmers would be better off giving up farming. Indeed, they say farmers do not want to farm any more. Why would these farmers conceivably say no if we were to propose more attractive and tangible alternative options to them in return for their land? Is it not for farmers to assess whether the project will actually be of benefit to them and whether the recompense offered to them is a fair bargain? And allow them to be parties in working out what could be regarded as a fair deal for all? But all this will happen only if we are willing to talk to farmers and listen to them, who, I dare say, based on my experience of listening to them for 25 years, have a great deal to teach us.

This is the essence of Social Impact Assessment (SIA), which was again at the heart of the 2013 law. SIA is an instrument meant to assess the positive and negative impacts of the project and also to assess whether the objectives of the proposed project could not be achieved in some other manner, especially by acquiring significantly less fertile, multi-cropped land, a crucial requirement of national food security. When we look back at the history of land acquisition in India, we find it riddled with instances of far too much land being acquired and not being put to use. Just one look at the huge amounts of unused land in possession of many of our universities today would make you see the point. And as a recent study by the Comptroller and Auditor General (CAG) reveals, of the over 60,000 hectares of land acquired for Special Economic Zones (SEZs), from 2006 to 2013, around 53 per cent has not been put to any use. Just because it was possible to bully uninformed village people, we continued to do so. SIA is an attempt to check these kinds of malpractices. It is also a way of making sure that land acquisition is not an easy way for the real estate mafia to make a quick buck in the name of development. The CAG study found many instances of land acquired at rates much below the market value being diverted to private builders in urban areas for commercial exploitation after denotification. The 2013 Act provided for the return of unused land to the original owner in cases where the land has not been used for the purposes for which it was acquired within five years. This is a key provision that should be retained.

SIA is an attempt to restore the declining faith in the democratic process, by reaching out to those who believe all decisions affecting their lives are made in distant, uncaring corridors of power, leaving them without any say. Incidentally, SIA is also best practice in development projects across the world. The 2013 law was a belated attempt to catch up with what other nations have been doing for long. Doing away with SIA would destroy a very powerful means of what is globally termed “conflict prevention”, a variety of activities aimed at anticipating and averting the outbreak of conflict

Q. What is the antonym of the word “Anticipate”?

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 10

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

It is in this backdrop that we need to understand the heightened sensitivities and palpable anger over forcible land acquisition. Given that 90 per cent of our coal, more than 50 per cent of most minerals, and prospective dam sites are mainly in Adivasi regions, there has been, and is likely to be, continuing tension over issues of land acquisition.

Through these tensions, not only has a question mark been placed over our development strategy, the delicate fabric of Indian democracy has become terribly frayed at the edges. In the remote Adivasi heartlands of India, people feel such a deep and abiding sense of hurt, alienation and cynicism that they have allowed themselves to be helplessly drawn into a terrible vortex of violence and counter-violence, even when they know in their heart of hearts that it will lead to their own destruction. The 2013 land law tried to reach out to these people, by undoing a draconian colonial Act more suited to a 19th century empire than to a 21st century vibrant democracy. At the heart of the 2013 law was the provision of seeking the consent of those whose lands were to be acquired and of caring for those whose livelihoods would be destroyed in the process. Undoing these provisions is a virtual resurrection of undiluted powers of “eminent domain”, which the 1894 law conferred on the state.

I do not dispute the fact that there can be many situations where land is needed for a development project that could actually benefit those whose lands are being acquired. What could be the possible harm in seeking the prior, informed consent of these people, after making the effort of explaining to them how they would stand to benefit? There are those who argue that farmers would be better off giving up farming. Indeed, they say farmers do not want to farm any more. Why would these farmers conceivably say no if we were to propose more attractive and tangible alternative options to them in return for their land? Is it not for farmers to assess whether the project will actually be of benefit to them and whether the recompense offered to them is a fair bargain? And allow them to be parties in working out what could be regarded as a fair deal for all? But all this will happen only if we are willing to talk to farmers and listen to them, who, I dare say, based on my experience of listening to them for 25 years, have a great deal to teach us.

This is the essence of Social Impact Assessment (SIA), which was again at the heart of the 2013 law. SIA is an instrument meant to assess the positive and negative impacts of the project and also to assess whether the objectives of the proposed project could not be achieved in some other manner, especially by acquiring significantly less fertile, multi-cropped land, a crucial requirement of national food security. When we look back at the history of land acquisition in India, we find it riddled with instances of far too much land being acquired and not being put to use. Just one look at the huge amounts of unused land in possession of many of our universities today would make you see the point. And as a recent study by the Comptroller and Auditor General (CAG) reveals, of the over 60,000 hectares of land acquired for Special Economic Zones (SEZs), from 2006 to 2013, around 53 per cent has not been put to any use. Just because it was possible to bully uninformed village people, we continued to do so. SIA is an attempt to check these kinds of malpractices. It is also a way of making sure that land acquisition is not an easy way for the real estate mafia to make a quick buck in the name of development. The CAG study found many instances of land acquired at rates much below the market value being diverted to private builders in urban areas for commercial exploitation after denotification. The 2013 Act provided for the return of unused land to the original owner in cases where the land has not been used for the purposes for which it was acquired within five years. This is a key provision that should be retained.

SIA is an attempt to restore the declining faith in the democratic process, by reaching out to those who believe all decisions affecting their lives are made in distant, uncaring corridors of power, leaving them without any say. Incidentally, SIA is also best practice in development projects across the world. The 2013 law was a belated attempt to catch up with what other nations have been doing for long. Doing away with SIA would destroy a very powerful means of what is globally termed “conflict prevention”, a variety of activities aimed at anticipating and averting the outbreak of conflict

Q. What does the author mean by the word “Malpractice”?

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 11

Directions: Rearrange the following six sentences (A), (B), (C), (D), (E) and (F) in the proper sequence to form a meaningful paragraph and then answer the questions given below.

(A) Being rejected from almost every management and banking competition I applied for, taught me that strategy comes from planning and real world application of ideas not seat of the pants thinking.

(B) My failure taught me to be clearer about my practice, vision, and objectives when persuading others to get behind me.

(C) Getting dinged from 4 out of the 9 top banks taught me that accuracy matters just as much as speed when evaluating what organization or post you should align yourself with.

(D) Getting out from second round examinations taught me that I should funnel my desire for accuracy off stage.

(E) Failing my exam taught me that you have to be prepared, always, in order to be successful.

F) I've chosen a field that requires me to think logically about time management problems and apply my interest in the quantitative aptitude and accuracy.

Q. Which of the following would be the FOURTH sentence after rearrangement?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 11

B D F E A C

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 12

Directions: Rearrange the following six sentences (A), (B), (C), (D), (E) and (F) in the proper sequence to form a meaningful paragraph and then answer the questions given below.

(A) Being rejected from almost every management and banking competition I applied for, taught me that strategy comes from planning and real world application of ideas not seat of the pants thinking.

(B) My failure taught me to be clearer about my practice, vision, and objectives when persuading others to get behind me.

(C) Getting dinged from 4 out of the 9 top banks taught me that accuracy matters just as much as speed when evaluating what organization or post you should align yourself with.

(D) Getting out from second round examinations taught me that I should funnel my desire for accuracy off stage.

(E) Failing my exam taught me that you have to be prepared, always, in order to be successful.

F) I've chosen a field that requires me to think logically about time management problems and apply my interest in the quantitative aptitude and accuracy.

Q. Which of the following would be the LAST sentence after rearrangement?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 12

B D F E A C

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 13

Directions: Rearrange the following six sentences (A), (B), (C), (D), (E) and (F) in the proper sequence to form a meaningful paragraph and then answer the questions given below.

(A) Being rejected from almost every management and banking competition I applied for, taught me that strategy comes from planning and real world application of ideas not seat of the pants thinking.

(B) My failure taught me to be clearer about my practice, vision, and objectives when persuading others to get behind me.

(C) Getting dinged from 4 out of the 9 top banks taught me that accuracy matters just as much as speed when evaluating what organization or post you should align yourself with.

(D) Getting out from second round examinations taught me that I should funnel my desire for accuracy off stage.

(E) Failing my exam taught me that you have to be prepared, always, in order to be successful.

F) I've chosen a field that requires me to think logically about time management problems and apply my interest in the quantitative aptitude and accuracy.

Q. Which of the following would be the FIFTH sentence after rearrangement?

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 14

Directions: Rearrange the following six sentences (A), (B), (C), (D), (E) and (F) in the proper sequence to form a meaningful paragraph and then answer the questions given below.

(A) Being rejected from almost every management and banking competition I applied for, taught me that strategy comes from planning and real world application of ideas not seat of the pants thinking.

(B) My failure taught me to be clearer about my practice, vision, and objectives when persuading others to get behind me.

(C) Getting dinged from 4 out of the 9 top banks taught me that accuracy matters just as much as speed when evaluating what organization or post you should align yourself with.

(D) Getting out from second round examinations taught me that I should funnel my desire for accuracy off stage.

(E) Failing my exam taught me that you have to be prepared, always, in order to be successful.

F) I've chosen a field that requires me to think logically about time management problems and apply my interest in the quantitative aptitude and accuracy.

Q. Which of the following would be the FIRST sentence after rearrangement?

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 15

Directions: Rearrange the following six sentences (A), (B), (C), (D), (E) and (F) in the proper sequence to form a meaningful paragraph and then answer the questions given below.

(A) Being rejected from almost every management and banking competition I applied for, taught me that strategy comes from planning and real world application of ideas not seat of the pants thinking.

(B) My failure taught me to be clearer about my practice, vision, and objectives when persuading others to get behind me.

(C) Getting dinged from 4 out of the 9 top banks taught me that accuracy matters just as much as speed when evaluating what organization or post you should align yourself with.

(D) Getting out from second round examinations taught me that I should funnel my desire for accuracy off stage.

(E) Failing my exam taught me that you have to be prepared, always, in order to be successful.

F) I've chosen a field that requires me to think logically about time management problems and apply my interest in the quantitative aptitude and accuracy.

Q. Which of the following would be the THIRD sentence after rearrangement?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 15

B D F E A C

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 16

Directions: Read each sentence to find out whether there is any error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number of that part is the answer. If there is no error the answer is (5). (Ignore errors of punctuation, if any.)

The management is 1)/ not willing to 2)/ make no concession 3)/ to the employee’s demands. 4)/ No error 5) 

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 16

substitute 'any' for 'no'

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 17

Directions: Read each sentence to find out whether there is any error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number of that part is the answer. If there is no error the answer is (5). (Ignore errors of punctuation, if any.)

After her retiring 1)/ she established many 2)/ institutions to train 3)/ underprivileged but talented children. 4)/ No error 5)

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 17

replace 'retirement' with 'retiring'

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 18

Directions: Read each sentence to find out whether there is any error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number of that part is the answer. If there is no error the answer is (5). (Ignore errors of punctuation, if any.)

The company has launched 1)/ a creative marketing campaign 2)/ to reach for 3)/ its rural customers. 4)/ No error 5)

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 18

delete 'for'

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 19

Directions: Read each sentence to find out whether there is any error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number of that part is the answer. If there is no error the answer is (5). (Ignore errors of punctuation, if any.)

Against his family’s wishes 1)/ Rajesh plans to 2)/ take up a job 3)/ as a journalist. 4)/ No error 5)

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 19

use singular 'wish'

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 20

Directions: Read each sentence to find out whether there is any error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number of that part is the answer. If there is no error the answer is (5). (Ignore errors of punctuation, if any.)

The candidate has appealed 1)/ donations from younger voters. 2)/ who will be used 3)/ to defray campaign expenses. 4)/ No error 5)

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 20

substitute 'which' for 'who'

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 21

Directions: In the following passage, some of the words have been left out, each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraph meaningful.

Studies (21) the impact of computer models to support policy—making processes in organizations have (22) that client involvement in the model-building process is often a (23) for effective model-building. One important reason is that the process of model-building is frequently more important than the resulting model. Model-building itself is largely a (24) process about the problem. Most (25) about the characteristics of an ill- structured problem are gained during the (26) process of designing a computer model, rather than after the model is finished. Another important reason is that most information in an organization (27) in the mental models of organization members. To support policy- making in organization it is this knowledge which needs to be (28) and represented in the model. An important topic in client-oriented or (29) model building thus becomes the (30) of relevant knowledge contained in the mental models of participants

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 22

Directions: In the following passage, some of the words have been left out, each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraph meaningful.

Studies (21) the impact of computer models to support policy—making processes in organizations have (22) that client involvement in the model-building process is often a (23) for effective model-building. One important reason is that the process of model-building is frequently more important than the resulting model. Model-building itself is largely a (24) process about the problem. Most (25) about the characteristics of an ill- structured problem are gained during the (26) process of designing a computer model, rather than after the model is finished. Another important reason is that most information in an organization (27) in the mental models of organization members. To support policy- making in organization it is this knowledge which needs to be (28) and represented in the model. An important topic in client-oriented or (29) model building thus becomes the (30) of relevant knowledge contained in the mental models of participants

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 23

Directions: In the following passage, some of the words have been left out, each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraph meaningful.

Studies (21) the impact of computer models to support policy—making processes in organizations have (22) that client involvement in the model-building process is often a (23) for effective model-building. One important reason is that the process of model-building is frequently more important than the resulting model. Model-building itself is largely a (24) process about the problem. Most (25) about the characteristics of an ill- structured problem are gained during the (26) process of designing a computer model, rather than after the model is finished. Another important reason is that most information in an organization (27) in the mental models of organization members. To support policy- making in organization it is this knowledge which needs to be (28) and represented in the model. An important topic in client-oriented or (29) model building thus becomes the (30) of relevant knowledge contained in the mental models of participants

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 24

Directions: In the following passage, some of the words have been left out, each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraph meaningful.

Studies (21) the impact of computer models to support policy—making processes in organizations have (22) that client involvement in the model-building process is often a (23) for effective model-building. One important reason is that the process of model-building is frequently more important than the resulting model. Model-building itself is largely a (24) process about the problem. Most (25) about the characteristics of an ill- structured problem are gained during the (26) process of designing a computer model, rather than after the model is finished. Another important reason is that most information in an organization (27) in the mental models of organization members. To support policy- making in organization it is this knowledge which needs to be (28) and represented in the model. An important topic in client-oriented or (29) model building thus becomes the (30) of relevant knowledge contained in the mental models of participants

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 25

Directions: In the following passage, some of the words have been left out, each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraph meaningful.

Studies (21) the impact of computer models to support policy—making processes in organizations have (22) that client involvement in the model-building process is often a (23) for effective model-building. One important reason is that the process of model-building is frequently more important than the resulting model. Model-building itself is largely a (24) process about the problem. Most (25) about the characteristics of an ill- structured problem are gained during the (26) process of designing a computer model, rather than after the model is finished. Another important reason is that most information in an organization (27) in the mental models of organization members. To support policy- making in organization it is this knowledge which needs to be (28) and represented in the model. An important topic in client-oriented or (29) model building thus becomes the (30) of relevant knowledge contained in the mental models of participants

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 26

Directions: In the following passage, some of the words have been left out, each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraph meaningful.

Studies (21) the impact of computer models to support policy—making processes in organizations have (22) that client involvement in the model-building process is often a (23) for effective model-building. One important reason is that the process of model-building is frequently more important than the resulting model. Model-building itself is largely a (24) process about the problem. Most (25) about the characteristics of an ill- structured problem are gained during the (26) process of designing a computer model, rather than after the model is finished. Another important reason is that most information in an organization (27) in the mental models of organization members. To support policy- making in organization it is this knowledge which needs to be (28) and represented in the model. An important topic in client-oriented or (29) model building thus becomes the (30) of relevant knowledge contained in the mental models of participants

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 27

Directions: In the following passage, some of the words have been left out, each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraph meaningful.

Studies (21) the impact of computer models to support policy—making processes in organizations have (22) that client involvement in the model-building process is often a (23) for effective model-building. One important reason is that the process of model-building is frequently more important than the resulting model. Model-building itself is largely a (24) process about the problem. Most (25) about the characteristics of an ill- structured problem are gained during the (26) process of designing a computer model, rather than after the model is finished. Another important reason is that most information in an organization (27) in the mental models of organization members. To support policy- making in organization it is this knowledge which needs to be (28) and represented in the model. An important topic in client-oriented or (29) model building thus becomes the (30) of relevant knowledge contained in the mental models of participants

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 28

Directions: In the following passage, some of the words have been left out, each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraph meaningful.

Studies (21) the impact of computer models to support policy—making processes in organizations have (22) that client involvement in the model-building process is often a (23) for effective model-building. One important reason is that the process of model-building is frequently more important than the resulting model. Model-building itself is largely a (24) process about the problem. Most (25) about the characteristics of an ill- structured problem are gained during the (26) process of designing a computer model, rather than after the model is finished. Another important reason is that most information in an organization (27) in the mental models of organization members. To support policy- making in organization it is this knowledge which needs to be (28) and represented in the model. An important topic in client-oriented or (29) model building thus becomes the (30) of relevant knowledge contained in the mental models of participants

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 29

Directions: In the following passage, some of the words have been left out, each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraph meaningful.

Studies (21) the impact of computer models to support policy—making processes in organizations have (22) that client involvement in the model-building process is often a (23) for effective model-building. One important reason is that the process of model-building is frequently more important than the resulting model. Model-building itself is largely a (24) process about the problem. Most (25) about the characteristics of an ill- structured problem are gained during the (26) process of designing a computer model, rather than after the model is finished. Another important reason is that most information in an organization (27) in the mental models of organization members. To support policy- making in organization it is this knowledge which needs to be (28) and represented in the model. An important topic in client-oriented or (29) model building thus becomes the (30) of relevant knowledge contained in the mental models of participants

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 30

Directions: In the following passage, some of the words have been left out, each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraph meaningful.

Studies (21) the impact of computer models to support policy—making processes in organizations have (22) that client involvement in the model-building process is often a (23) for effective model-building. One important reason is that the process of model-building is frequently more important than the resulting model. Model-building itself is largely a (24) process about the problem. Most (25) about the characteristics of an ill- structured problem are gained during the (26) process of designing a computer model, rather than after the model is finished. Another important reason is that most information in an organization (27) in the mental models of organization members. To support policy- making in organization it is this knowledge which needs to be (28) and represented in the model. An important topic in client-oriented or (29) model building thus becomes the (30) of relevant knowledge contained in the mental models of participants

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 31

Directions: Study the following graph carefully to answer the questions that follow—

The following line graph gives distance (in km) travelled by five different trucks in a day.

What is the respective ratio of the distance travelled by Truck A to the distance travelled by Truck D?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 31

Required ratio = 475 : 425 = 19 : 17

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 32

Directions: Study the following graph carefully to answer the questions that follow

The following line graph gives distance (in km) travelled by five different trucks in a day.

What is the average distance travelled by all the Trucks together ?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 32

Total distance travelled by all trucks = 475 + 350 + 550 + 425 + 525 = 2325 km

Average distance = 2325/5 = 465 km 

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 33

Directions: Study the following graph carefully to answer the questions that follow

The following line graph gives distance (in km) travelled by five different trucks in a day.

If Truck C covered the given distance at the average speed of 55 km/hr, what was the time taken by it to cover this distance?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 33

Time taken by truck C = 550/55 = 10 hours.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 34

Directions: Study the following graph carefully to answer the questions that follow

The following line graph gives distance (in km) travelled by five different trucks in a day.

 

The distance travelled by Truck A is approximately what per cent of the total distance travelled by Truck E and C together ?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 34

Required percentage =( 475)/ ( 550 + 525) ] X 100 = 44% ( approx)

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 35

Directions: Study the following graph carefully to answer the questions that follow

The following line graph gives distance (in km) travelled by five different trucks in a day.

Q. If the time taken by Truck B to cover the given distance was 8 hours, what was the average speed of the truck ?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 35

Speed of truck B = 350/8 = 43.75 km/hr

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 36

Direction: Study the following table carefully and answer the questions given below it.

Number of six types of electronic products sold by six different stores in a month and price per product (P)(price in Rs. 000 ) charged by each store.

The number of L products sold by Store F is what percent of the total number of the same type of the products sold by Store E?     

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 36

Number of L types products sold by Store F=48
by Store E=40
Required percentage= (48) / (40) x 100 = 120

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 37

Direction: Study the following table carefully and answer the questions given below it.

Number of six types of electronic products sold by six different stores in a month and price per product (P)(price in Rs. 000 ) charged by each store.

What is the ratio of total number of N and L type products together sold by Store D and that of the same product sold by Store A?     

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 37

Reqd. ratio = (61+54) : (54+48)

=115:102

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 38

Direction: Study the following table carefully and answer the questions given below it.

Number of six types of electronic products sold by six different stores in a month and price per product (P)(price in Rs. 000 ) charged by each store.

 

What is the average price per product charged by all the stores together for Product Q?     

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 38

Average price = Rs (16+15+14.5+16+18+15)/6*1000 = 15750

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 39

Direction: Study the following table carefully and answer the questions given below it.

Number of six types of electronic products sold by six different stores in a month and price per product (P)(price in Rs. 000 ) charged by each store.

What is the difference in the amount earned by Store A though the sale of P type products and that earned by Store B through the sale of Q type products?     

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 39

Reqd. difference = (60*75-44*15)*1000 = (4500-660)*1000 = Rs = 38.4 lakhs

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 40

Direction: Study the following table carefully and answer the questions given below it.

Number of six types of electronic products sold by six different stores in a month and price per product (P)(price in Rs. 000 ) charged by each store.

What is the total amount earned by Store C through the sale of M and O types product together?     

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 41

Monica, Veronica and Rachat begin to jog around a circular stadium. They complete their revolutions in 42 s, 56 s and 63 s, respectively. After how many seconds will they be together at the starting point?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 41

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 42

Find the side of the largest possible square slabs which can be paved on the floor of a room 2m 50cm long and 1m 50 cm broad. Also find the number of such slabs to pave the floor.

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 42

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 43

If the numerator of a fraction is increased by 200% and the denominator of the fraction is increased by 150%, the resultant fraction is 9/35. What is the original fraction?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 43

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 44

A, B, C and D purchase a gift worth Rs.60. A pays ½ of what others are paying, B pays 1/3rd of what others are paying and C pays 1/4th of what others are paying. What is the amount paid by D?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 44

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 45

It is required to get 40% marks to qualify an exam. A candidate scored 200 marks and failed by 8 marks. What were the maximum marks of that exam?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 45

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 46

In a park, there are some cows and some ducks. If total number of heads in the park are 68 and number of their legs together is 198, then find the number of ducks in the park.

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 46

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 47

The difference between a two-digit number and the number obtained by interchanging the two digits of the number is 18. The sum of the two digits of the number is 12. What is the product of the digits of two-digit number?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 47

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 48

If a class, there are 75 students and their average marks in the annual examination is 35. If the average marks of passed students is 55 and average marks of failed students is 30, then find out the number of students who failed. 

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 48

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 49

A candidate scores 25% and fails by 60 marks, while an another candidate who scores 50% marks, gets 40 marks more than the minimum required marks to pass the examination. Find the maximum marks for the examination.

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 49

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 50

The price of rice decreases by 6.25% and because of this reduction, Vandana is able to buy 1 kg more for Rs. 120. Find the reduced rate of rice.

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 50

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 51

165, 195, 255, 285, 345, ?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 51

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 52

4, 13, 29, 54, 90, 139, ?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 52

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 53

2, 4, 12, 48, 240, ?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 53

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 54

8, 7, 11, 12, 14, 17, 17, 22, ?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 54

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 55

10, 5, 13, 10, 16, 20, 19, ?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 55

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 56

(232 % of 585) ÷ 150 = ? 

 

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 56

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 57

9845 = 5620 + 65 × ?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 57

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 58

134 × 17 = [? × 40] + 177 

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 58

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 59

250/15 * 300/20 / 25/100 = ? 

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 59

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 60

√(729) + 52= ? × 13 

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 60

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 61

Two cards are drawn from a well-shuffled pack of 52 cards. Find the probability that both of them are either red or Kings.

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 61

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 62

Two dice are tossed. What is the probability that the sum total is a prime number?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 62

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 63

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 63

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 64

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 64

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 65

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 65

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 66

Directions: Study the following information carefully to answer the given questions.

Seven cricket players viz. Sachin, Dhoni, Hardik, Rahul, Ishant, Zaheer and Virender played in seven different matches in a week starting from Monday and ending on Sunday. Some of them are bowlers and some of them are the batsman. Their Run/Wickets in the seven matches are – 50, 5, 4, 16, 8, 4 and 25. No bowler can take more than 10 wickets.

Zaheer plays on Thursday. Two matches are played between the matches played by player Zaheer and player Sachin. On the first day of the week, the batsman scored half century played in the match.The sum of Runs/Wickets of the player Virender and Dhoni is equalled to the Runs/Wickets of Rahul. All the bowlers should be preceded and succeeded by batsman and Ishant is the only bowler which cannot be succeeded by anyone. Sachin is the only batsman which is followed by another batsman.Only one match is played between the matches played by the player Ishant and Rahul. The score of the batsman who played the match on Thursday is the perfect square of the score of the player who played on Saturday.

The match played by Ishant is not played on the day immediately before or immediately after the day when the match of player Zaheer is played. The match played by Hardik is played on the day immediately before the day when the match of player Virender is played. Match played by Rahul is not played after the match of player Dhoni.

Q. As per the given arrangement which of the following combination represents only the people who are bowlers?.

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 66

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 67

Directions: Study the following information carefully to answer the given questions.

Seven cricket players viz. Sachin, Dhoni, Hardik, Rahul, Ishant, Zaheer and Virender played in seven different matches in a week starting from Monday and ending on Sunday. Some of them are bowlers and some of them are the batsman. Their Run/Wickets in the seven matches are – 50, 5, 4, 16, 8, 4 and 25. No bowler can take more than 10 wickets.

Zaheer plays on Thursday. Two matches are played between the matches played by player Zaheer and player Sachin. On the first day of the week, the batsman scored half century played in the match.The sum of Runs/Wickets of the player Virender and Dhoni is equalled to the Runs/Wickets of Rahul. All the bowlers should be preceded and succeeded by batsman and Ishant is the only bowler which cannot be succeeded by anyone. Sachin is the only batsman which is followed by another batsman.Only one match is played between the matches played by the player Ishant and Rahul. The score of the batsman who played the match on Thursday is the perfect square of the score of the player who played on Saturday.

The match played by Ishant is not played on the day immediately before or immediately after the day when the match of player Zaheer is played. The match played by Hardik is played on the day immediately before the day when the match of player Virender is played. Match played by Rahul is not played after the match of player Dhoni.

Q. As per the given arrangement which of the following person represent the one who was played in between the Virender and Rahul?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 67

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 68

Directions: Study the following information carefully to answer the given questions.

Seven cricket players viz. Sachin, Dhoni, Hardik, Rahul, Ishant, Zaheer and Virender played in seven different matches in a week starting from Monday and ending on Sunday. Some of them are bowlers and some of them are the batsman. Their Run/Wickets in the seven matches are – 50, 5, 4, 16, 8, 4 and 25. No bowler can take more than 10 wickets.

Zaheer plays on Thursday. Two matches are played between the matches played by player Zaheer and player Sachin. On the first day of the week, the batsman scored half century played in the match.The sum of Runs/Wickets of the player Virender and Dhoni is equalled to the Runs/Wickets of Rahul. All the bowlers should be preceded and succeeded by batsman and Ishant is the only bowler which cannot be succeeded by anyone. Sachin is the only batsman which is followed by another batsman.Only one match is played between the matches played by the player Ishant and Rahul. The score of the batsman who played the match on Thursday is the perfect square of the score of the player who played on Saturday.

The match played by Ishant is not played on the day immediately before or immediately after the day when the match of player Zaheer is played. The match played by Hardik is played on the day immediately before the day when the match of player Virender is played. Match played by Rahul is not played after the match of player Dhoni.

Q. Who among the following takes 8 wicket?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 68

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 69

Directions: Study the following information carefully to answer the given questions.

Seven cricket players viz. Sachin, Dhoni, Hardik, Rahul, Ishant, Zaheer and Virender played in seven different matches in a week starting from Monday and ending on Sunday. Some of them are bowlers and some of them are the batsman. Their Run/Wickets in the seven matches are – 50, 5, 4, 16, 8, 4 and 25. No bowler can take more than 10 wickets.

Zaheer plays on Thursday. Two matches are played between the matches played by player Zaheer and player Sachin. On the first day of the week, the batsman scored half century played in the match.The sum of Runs/Wickets of the player Virender and Dhoni is equalled to the Runs/Wickets of Rahul. All the bowlers should be preceded and succeeded by batsman and Ishant is the only bowler which cannot be succeeded by anyone. Sachin is the only batsman which is followed by another batsman.Only one match is played between the matches played by the player Ishant and Rahul. The score of the batsman who played the match on Thursday is the perfect square of the score of the player who played on Saturday.

The match played by Ishant is not played on the day immediately before or immediately after the day when the match of player Zaheer is played. The match played by Hardik is played on the day immediately before the day when the match of player Virender is played. Match played by Rahul is not played after the match of player Dhoni.

Q. Which of the following combinations is correct as per the given arrangement?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 69

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 70

Directions: Study the following information carefully to answer the given questions.

Seven cricket players viz. Sachin, Dhoni, Hardik, Rahul, Ishant, Zaheer and Virender played in seven different matches in a week starting from Monday and ending on Sunday. Some of them are bowlers and some of them are the batsman. Their Run/Wickets in the seven matches are – 50, 5, 4, 16, 8, 4 and 25. No bowler can take more than 10 wickets.

Zaheer plays on Thursday. Two matches are played between the matches played by player Zaheer and player Sachin. On the first day of the week, the batsman scored half century played in the match.The sum of Runs/Wickets of the player Virender and Dhoni is equalled to the Runs/Wickets of Rahul. All the bowlers should be preceded and succeeded by batsman and Ishant is the only bowler which cannot be succeeded by anyone. Sachin is the only batsman which is followed by another batsman.Only one match is played between the matches played by the player Ishant and Rahul. The score of the batsman who played the match on Thursday is the perfect square of the score of the player who played on Saturday.

The match played by Ishant is not played on the day immediately before or immediately after the day when the match of player Zaheer is played. The match played by Hardik is played on the day immediately before the day when the match of player Virender is played. Match played by Rahul is not played after the match of player Dhoni.

Q. Who amongst the following scored half century?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 70

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 71

Direction: Study the following information to answer the given Questions

Ten persons from ten different cities viz. Darbhanga, Pune, Goa, Kolkata, Guna, Noida, Ranchi, Gaya, Kanpur and Lucknow are sitting in two parallel rows containing five people each, in such a way that there is an equal distance between adjacent persons. In row 1- A, B, C, D and E are seated and all of them are facing south. In row 2 – P, Q, R, S and T are seated and all of them are facing north. Therefore in the given seating arrangement, each member seated in a row faces another member of the other row.(All the information given above does not necessarily represent the order of seating in the final arrangement.)

The person from Kolkata sits to the immediate right of Q. P faces one of the immediate neighbors of the person who is from Pune. D faces one of the immediate neighbors of the person from Goa. S is not from Goa. D is not from Guna. R sits second to the left of the persons who is from Lucknow. A sits third to the right of person who is from Noida.Only One person sits between the person from Kanpur and Q. C sits to the immediate left of the person who faces Q. Only two people sit between B and E. The person from Guna sits second to the right of the one who faces S. S does not sit at an extreme end of the line. One of the immediate neighbors of the person from Guna faces Kanpur. P does not face A. The person from Darbhanga sits second to the right of the person from Gaya.

Q. Who amongst the following faces the person from Ranchi?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 71

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 72

Direction: Study the following information to answer the given Questions

Ten persons from ten different cities viz. Darbhanga, Pune, Goa, Kolkata, Guna, Noida, Ranchi, Gaya, Kanpur and Lucknow are sitting in two parallel rows containing five people each, in such a way that there is an equal distance between adjacent persons. In row 1- A, B, C, D and E are seated and all of them are facing south. In row 2 – P, Q, R, S and T are seated and all of them are facing north. Therefore in the given seating arrangement, each member seated in a row faces another member of the other row.(All the information given above does not necessarily represent the order of seating in the final arrangement.)

The person from Kolkata sits to the immediate right of Q. P faces one of the immediate neighbors of the person who is from Pune. D faces one of the immediate neighbors of the person from Goa. S is not from Goa. D is not from Guna. R sits second to the left of the persons who is from Lucknow. A sits third to the right of person who is from Noida.Only One person sits between the person from Kanpur and Q. C sits to the immediate left of the person who faces Q. Only two people sit between B and E. The person from Guna sits second to the right of the one who faces S. S does not sit at an extreme end of the line. One of the immediate neighbors of the person from Guna faces Kanpur. P does not face A. The person from Darbhanga sits second to the right of the person from Gaya.

Q. T is from which of the following Cities?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 72

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 73

Direction: Study the following information to answer the given Questions

Ten persons from ten different cities viz. Darbhanga, Pune, Goa, Kolkata, Guna, Noida, Ranchi, Gaya, Kanpur and Lucknow are sitting in two parallel rows containing five people each, in such a way that there is an equal distance between adjacent persons. In row 1- A, B, C, D and E are seated and all of them are facing south. In row 2 – P, Q, R, S and T are seated and all of them are facing north. Therefore in the given seating arrangement, each member seated in a row faces another member of the other row.(All the information given above does not necessarily represent the order of seating in the final arrangement.)

The person from Kolkata sits to the immediate right of Q. P faces one of the immediate neighbors of the person who is from Pune. D faces one of the immediate neighbors of the person from Goa. S is not from Goa. D is not from Guna. R sits second to the left of the persons who is from Lucknow. A sits third to the right of person who is from Noida.Only One person sits between the person from Kanpur and Q. C sits to the immediate left of the person who faces Q. Only two people sit between B and E. The person from Guna sits second to the right of the one who faces S. S does not sit at an extreme end of the line. One of the immediate neighbors of the person from Guna faces Kanpur. P does not face A. The person from Darbhanga sits second to the right of the person from Gaya.

Q. Which of the following is true regarding C?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 73

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 74

Direction: Study the following information to answer the given Questions

Ten persons from ten different cities viz. Darbhanga, Pune, Goa, Kolkata, Guna, Noida, Ranchi, Gaya, Kanpur and Lucknow are sitting in two parallel rows containing five people each, in such a way that there is an equal distance between adjacent persons. In row 1- A, B, C, D and E are seated and all of them are facing south. In row 2 – P, Q, R, S and T are seated and all of them are facing north. Therefore in the given seating arrangement, each member seated in a row faces another member of the other row.(All the information given above does not necessarily represent the order of seating in the final arrangement.)

The person from Kolkata sits to the immediate right of Q. P faces one of the immediate neighbors of the person who is from Pune. D faces one of the immediate neighbors of the person from Goa. S is not from Goa. D is not from Guna. R sits second to the left of the persons who is from Lucknow. A sits third to the right of person who is from Noida.Only One person sits between the person from Kanpur and Q. C sits to the immediate left of the person who faces Q. Only two people sit between B and E. The person from Guna sits second to the right of the one who faces S. S does not sit at an extreme end of the line. One of the immediate neighbors of the person from Guna faces Kanpur. P does not face A. The person from Darbhanga sits second to the right of the person from Gaya.

Q. If R is related to A and Q is related to D then in the same way S is related to?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 74

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 75

Direction: Study the following information to answer the given Questions

Ten persons from ten different cities viz. Darbhanga, Pune, Goa, Kolkata, Guna, Noida, Ranchi, Gaya, Kanpur and Lucknow are sitting in two parallel rows containing five people each, in such a way that there is an equal distance between adjacent persons. In row 1- A, B, C, D and E are seated and all of them are facing south. In row 2 – P, Q, R, S and T are seated and all of them are facing north. Therefore in the given seating arrangement, each member seated in a row faces another member of the other row.(All the information given above does not necessarily represent the order of seating in the final arrangement.)

The person from Kolkata sits to the immediate right of Q. P faces one of the immediate neighbors of the person who is from Pune. D faces one of the immediate neighbors of the person from Goa. S is not from Goa. D is not from Guna. R sits second to the left of the persons who is from Lucknow. A sits third to the right of person who is from Noida.Only One person sits between the person from Kanpur and Q. C sits to the immediate left of the person who faces Q. Only two people sit between B and E. The person from Guna sits second to the right of the one who faces S. S does not sit at an extreme end of the line. One of the immediate neighbors of the person from Guna faces Kanpur. P does not face A. The person from Darbhanga sits second to the right of the person from Gaya.

Q. Who amongst the following sit at extreme end of the row?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 75

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 76

Directions : Question consists of five statements followed by five conclusions. Consider the given statements to be true even if they seem to be at variance with commonly known facts. Read all the conclusions and then decide which of the given conclusions does not logically follow from the given statements using all statements together.

Q. Statements: All sony are dell. Some dell are kite. No kite are hour. Some hour are time. All time are month.

Conclusions:

 (a) Some month are hour.

(b) All sony being kite is a possibility.

(c) Some dell is not hour.

(d) Some sony is not hour.

(e) All hour being month is a possibility.

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 76

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 77

Directions : Question consists of five statements followed by five conclusions. Consider the given statements to be true even if they seem to be at variance with commonly known facts. Read all the conclusions and then decide which of the given conclusions does not logically follow from the given statements using all statements together.

Q. Statements: Some kite are dry. No dry is road. All road is large. Some large is Note. All note is pen.

Conclusions:

(a) All dry being large is a possibility.

(b) All kite being road is a possibility.

(c) Some pen is large.

(d) All road being pen is a possibility.

(e) Some kite is not road.

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 77

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 78

Directions : Question consists of five statements followed by five conclusions. Consider the given statements to be true even if they seem to be at variance with commonly known facts. Read all the conclusions and then decide which of the given conclusions does not logically follow from the given statements using all statements together.

Q. Statements: Some mouse is server. Some server is word. Some word is file. Some file is tax. All tax are joy.

Conclusions:

(a) All mouse being word is possibility.

(b) All word being tax is a possibility.

(c) Some joy is file.

(d) Some server being joy is a posibility.

(e) Some server is a file.

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 78

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 79

Directions : Question consists of five statements followed by five conclusions. Consider the given statements to be true even if they seem to be at variance with commonly known facts. Read all the conclusions and then decide which of the given conclusions does not logically follow from the given statements using all statements together.

Q. Statements: All pink are blue. No pink is white. Some white is kite. All kite is dog. Some dog are camel.

Conclusions:

(a). Some white is dog.

(b) All white being camel is a possibility.

(c) All kite being camel is a possibility.

(d) All white being blue is a possibility.

(e) All blue being white is a possbility.

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 79

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 80

Directions : Question consists of five statements followed by five conclusions. Consider the given statements to be true even if they seem to be at variance with commonly known facts. Read all the conclusions and then decide which of the given conclusions does not logically follow from the given statements using all statements together.

Q. Statements: All toy is car. Some car is good. Some good is joy. No joy is year. No year is white.

Conclusions: 

(a) All toy being joy is a possibility.

(b) All joy being white is a possibility.

(c) Some good is not year.

(d) Some car is a joy.

(e) All toy being good is a possibility

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 80

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 81

Directions : A word arrangement Machine, when given a particular input, rearranges it following a particular rule. The following is the illustration of the input and the steps of rearrangement. 

Input: we again 36 early 17 morning in day 7 11

Step I: again we 36 early 17 morning in day 7 11

Step II:again 36 we early 17 morning in day 7 11

Step III:again 36 early we 17 morning in day 7 11

Step IV:again 36 early 7 we 17 morning in day 11

Step V: again 36 early 7 in we 17 morning day 11

Step VI:again 36 early 7 in 17 we morning day 11

Step VII: again 36 early 7 in 17 day we morning 11

Step VIII: again 36 early 7 in 17 day 11 we morning 

Step IX: again 36 early 7 in 17 day 11 morning we 

And Step IX is the last step. 

Q. If the following is the II step of an input what will be Vth step?

Step II: After 89 she 38 wins 11 Olympic 22 the 7

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 81

Step II: after 89 she 38 wins 11 olympic 22 the 7
Step III: after 89 olympic she 38 wins 11 22 the 7
Step IV: after 89 olympic 7 she 38 wins 11 22 the
Step V: after 89 olympic 7 she 38 the wins 11 22

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 82

Directions : A word arrangement Machine, when given a particular input, rearranges it following a particular rule. The following is the illustration of the input and the steps of rearrangement. 

Input: we again 36 early 17 morning in day 7 11

Step I: again we 36 early 17 morning in day 7 11

Step II:again 36 we early 17 morning in day 7 11

Step III:again 36 early we 17 morning in day 7 11

Step IV:again 36 early 7 we 17 morning in day 11

Step V: again 36 early 7 in we 17 morning day 11

Step VI:again 36 early 7 in 17 we morning day 11

Step VII: again 36 early 7 in 17 day we morning 11

Step VIII: again 36 early 7 in 17 day 11 we morning 

Step IX: again 36 early 7 in 17 day 11 morning we 

And Step IX is the last step. 

Q. Which of the following is the last step for the Input ‘eat 9 fast icecream 22 3 umbrella cat 5’?

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 83

Directions : A word arrangement Machine, when given a particular input, rearranges it following a particular rule. The following is the illustration of the input and the steps of rearrangement. 

Input: we again 36 early 17 morning in day 7 11

Step I: again we 36 early 17 morning in day 7 11

Step II:again 36 we early 17 morning in day 7 11

Step III:again 36 early we 17 morning in day 7 11

Step IV:again 36 early 7 we 17 morning in day 11

Step V: again 36 early 7 in we 17 morning day 11

Step VI:again 36 early 7 in 17 we morning day 11

Step VII: again 36 early 7 in 17 day we morning 11

Step VIII: again 36 early 7 in 17 day 11 we morning 

Step IX: again 36 early 7 in 17 day 11 morning we 

And Step IX is the last step. 

Q. Which step will be the last step for the Input ‘elephant 17 free open 41 27 danger 15’?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 83

Input: elephant 17 free open 41 27 danger 15
Step I: elephant 41 17 free open 27 danger 15
Step II: elephant 41 open 17 free 27 danger 15
Step III: elephant 41 open 15 17 free 27 danger
Step IV: elephant 41 open 15 danger 17 free 27
Step V: elephant 41 open 15 danger 27 17 free
Step VI: elephant 41 open 15 danger 27 free 17

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 84

Directions : A word arrangement Machine, when given a particular input, rearranges it following a particular rule. The following is the illustration of the input and the steps of rearrangement. 

Input: we again 36 early 17 morning in day 7 11

Step I: again we 36 early 17 morning in day 7 11

Step II:again 36 we early 17 morning in day 7 11

Step III:again 36 early we 17 morning in day 7 11

Step IV:again 36 early 7 we 17 morning in day 11

Step V: again 36 early 7 in we 17 morning day 11

Step VI:again 36 early 7 in 17 we morning day 11

Step VII: again 36 early 7 in 17 day we morning 11

Step VIII: again 36 early 7 in 17 day 11 we morning 

Step IX: again 36 early 7 in 17 day 11 morning we 

And Step IX is the last step. 

Q. Which word/number will be at 4th from the left in step V for the given input in above question number (8)?

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 85

Directions : A word arrangement Machine, when given a particular input, rearranges it following a particular rule. The following is the illustration of the input and the steps of rearrangement. 

Input: we again 36 early 17 morning in day 7 11

Step I: again we 36 early 17 morning in day 7 11

Step II:again 36 we early 17 morning in day 7 11

Step III:again 36 early we 17 morning in day 7 11

Step IV:again 36 early 7 we 17 morning in day 11

Step V: again 36 early 7 in we 17 morning day 11

Step VI:again 36 early 7 in 17 we morning day 11

Step VII: again 36 early 7 in 17 day we morning 11

Step VIII: again 36 early 7 in 17 day 11 we morning 

Step IX: again 36 early 7 in 17 day 11 morning we 

And Step IX is the last step. 

Q. Which word/number will be 3rd to the right of “41” in step IV for the given input in question number (8)?

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 86

Directions : Study the following information and answer the question given.Six members of a family A, B, C, D, E and F are enjoying in a garden; B is the son of C but C is not the mother of B. A and C are a married couple. E is the brother of C. D is the daughter of A. F is the brother of B.

Q.How many children does A have?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 86

A have 3 children i.e. F, B, D.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 87

Directions : Study the following information and answer the question given.Six members of a family A, B, C, D, E and F are enjoying in a garden; B is the son of C but C is not the mother of B. A and C are a married couple. E is the brother of C. D is the daughter of A. F is the brother of B.

Q.Who is the wife of E?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 87

About wife of E, there is nothing mentioned in the passage.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 88

Directions : Study the following information and answer the question given.Six members of a family A, B, C, D, E and F are enjoying in a garden; B is the son of C but C is not the mother of B. A and C are a married couple. E is the brother of C. D is the daughter of A. F is the brother of B.

Q.Which of the following is a pair of females?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 88

Only A and D are females.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 89

Q.Statement: The minimum qualification for this job is graduation. However, candidates who have appeared for the final year of graduation can also apply.

Conclusions:

 I. All candidates who are yet to graduate will be there in the list of selected candidates.

II. All candidates having graduation as their minimum qualification will be there in the list of selected candidates.

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 89

It cannot be concluded from the given statement that all candidates who complete graduation and who are appeared for the final year of graduation will be there in the list of selected candidates as it is not sure. So neither conclusion I nor II follow.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 90

Q.Statement: Company 'X' had asked its employees to declare their income and assets but it has been strongly opposed by the employees' union and no employee is going to declare his/her income.

Conclusions: 

I. The employees of the company 'X' do not seem to have any additional income besides their salary.

II. The employees union want all the senior officers to declare their income first.

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 90

It is not cleared in the statement that employees of company “X” have any additional income or employees union want declaration of salary by senior officers first. So neither conclusion I nor II follow.  

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 91

Directions : Study the following information to answer the given questions.

In a certain code 

'king say to lion' is written as 'ad mi ja no', 

' the say to surrender' is written as 'ku ja ig ad'.

 'lion of the day' is written as 'be ku zo mi' 

'to winner of night' is written as 'be Ii ya ja'

Q. What is the code for 'winner'? 

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 92

Directions : Study the following information to answer the given questions.

In a certain code 

'king say to lion' is written as 'ad mi ja no', 

' the say to surrender' is written as 'ku ja ig ad'.

 'lion of the day' is written as 'be ku zo mi' 

'to winner of night' is written as 'be Ii ya ja'

Q. Which of the following code may represent 'surrender is say'? 

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 93

Directions : Study the following information to answer the given questions.

In a certain code 

'king say to lion' is written as 'ad mi ja no', 

' the say to surrender' is written as 'ku ja ig ad'.

 'lion of the day' is written as 'be ku zo mi' 

'to winner of night' is written as 'be Ii ya ja'

Q. ‘mi’ is the code for

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 94

Directions : Study the following information to answer the given questions.

In a certain code 

'king say to lion' is written as 'ad mi ja no', 

' the say to surrender' is written as 'ku ja ig ad'.

 'lion of the day' is written as 'be ku zo mi' 

'to winner of night' is written as 'be Ii ya ja'

Q. What is the code for' king'? 

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 95

Directions : Study the following information to answer the given questions.

In a certain code 

'king say to lion' is written as 'ad mi ja no', 

' the say to surrender' is written as 'ku ja ig ad'.

 'lion of the day' is written as 'be ku zo mi' 

'to winner of night' is written as 'be Ii ya ja'

Q. Which of the following code represents 'of the say'?

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 96

Directions: Study the following arrangement and answer the following quetions

Q. If all the symbols are dropped from the above arrangement, which of the following will be tenth from the right end? 

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 97

Directions: Study the following arrangement and answer the following quetions

Q. How many such consonants are there in the above arrangement each of which is not immediately preceded by a symbol? 

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 98

Directions: Study the following arrangement and answer the following quetions

Q. How many such letters are there in the above arrangement each of which is immediately followed by a number? 

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 98

K2, B3

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 99

Directions: Study the following arrangement and answer the following quetions

How many such symbols are there in the above arrangement each of which is not immediately preceded by a consonant but followed by a vowel? 

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 100

Directions: Study the following arrangement and answer the following quetions

Q. Which of the following element is 4th to left of 13th from left in the above given series? 

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 15 (21-01-2023) - Question 100

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