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SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023)


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100 Questions MCQ Test Mock Tests for Banking Exam and Past Year Papers | SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023)

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SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 1

Directions: There are five students who appeared for RBI Grade B exam. Paper consists of 100 questions with 1 mark for each correct answer and 0.25 marks for each wrong answer. 

 

Q. Difference between total right number of questions of all students together and total wrong no. of questions of all students together is

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 1

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 2

Directions: There are five students who appeared for RBI Grade B exam. Paper consists of 100 questions with 1 mark for each correct answer and 0.25 marks for each wrong answer. 

 

Q. Marks obtained by Aditya and Puskar together is what % of the marks obtained by Anshuman, Avanish and Alka together ? (rounded off to 2 decimal places)

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 2

= 106.54%

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 3

Directions: There are five students who appeared for RBI Grade B exam. Paper consists of 100 questions with 1 mark for each correct answer and 0.25 marks for each wrong answer. 

 

Q.  If the penalty of the wrong answer is 0.33 then marks obtained by Aditya, Anshuman and Puskar together is 

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 3

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 4

Directions: There are five students who appeared for RBI Grade B exam. Paper consists of 100 questions with 1 mark for each correct answer and 0.25 marks for each wrong answer. 

 

Q. If the passing % marks in the exam is 50 marks than at least how many questions has to be answered right by Puskar? (He attempted 92 questions) 

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 4

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 5

Directions: There are five students who appeared for RBI Grade B exam. Paper consists of 100 questions with 1 mark for each correct answer and 0.25 marks for each wrong answer. 

 

Q. What is the percent of marks obtained by all of them together? 

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 5

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 6

Directions : Study the following pie chart and answer the following questions.

Percentage distribution of Income of 7 firms in year 2010 and 2013 is given below in pie chart. Percentage distribution of some firms is not given. You have to calculate these values if required to answer the questions.

  

Note: Ratio of total Income of all 7 firms in 2010 to 2013 is 5 : 7.

Q. If expenditure of B in 2010 is 80% of its income and expenditure of E in 2013 is 60% of its income and income of E in 2013 is 100/3% more than the income of E in 2010 then saving of B in 2010 is what percent of saving of E in 2013. 

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 6

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 7

Directions : Study the following pie chart and answer the following questions.

Percentage distribution of Income of 7 firms in year 2010 and 2013 is given below in pie chart. Percentage distribution of some firms is not given. You have to calculate these values if required to answer the questions.

  

Note: Ratio of total Income of all 7 firms in 2010 to 2013 is 5 : 7.

Q. If difference between the total income of all firms in 2010 and total income of all firms in 2013 is ‘D’, then what is the ratio of average income of firm A, B and E together in 2010 to the average of income of firm B, C and D together in 2013.

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 7

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 8

Directions : Study the following pie chart and answer the following questions.

Percentage distribution of Income of 7 firms in year 2010 and 2013 is given below in pie chart. Percentage distribution of some firms is not given. You have to calculate these values if required to answer the questions.

   

Note: Ratio of total Income of all 7 firms in 2010 to 2013 is 5 : 7.

Q. If income of firm E in 2013 is 400/7% of income of E in 2010 and ratio between percentage distribution of income of firm F and G is 11 : 8 in 2013 then what is the percentage distribution of income of firm F in 2013? 

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 8

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 9

Directions : Study the following pie chart and answer the following questions.

Percentage distribution of Income of 7 firms in year 2010 and 2013 is given below in pie chart. Percentage distribution of some firms is not given. You have to calculate these values if required to answer the questions.

   

Note: Ratio of total Income of all 7 firms in 2010 to 2013 is 5 : 7.

Q. Income of firm A, B and E together in 2010 is what % more or less than income of firm C, D and E together if the income of firm E in 2013 is 50% more than income of firm A in 2010? (approximately) 

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 9

= 7%

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 10

Directions : Study the following pie chart and answer the following questions.

Percentage distribution of Income of 7 firms in year 2010 and 2013 is given below in pie chart. Percentage distribution of some firms is not given. You have to calculate these values if required to answer the questions.

   

Note: Ratio of total Income of all 7 firms in 2010 to 2013 is 5 : 7.

Q. If income of firm A and B together in 2013 is 120% of income of firm A and B together in 2012 then income of firm A and B together increase/decrease by what percent in 2012 with respect to 2010. 

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 10

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 11

Simplified the following problems.

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 11

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 12

Simplified the following problems.

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 12

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 13

Simplified the following problems.

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 13

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 14

Simplified the following problems.

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 14

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 15

Simplified the following problems.

?/1089 = 64/?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 15

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 16

In what ratio milk & water should be mixed so that after selling this mixture at its cost price there is a profit of 100/9%?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 16

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 17

In a 40 litre mixture of alcohol & water, the ratio of alcohol and water is 5 : 3. If 20% of this mixture is taken out and the same amount of water is added then what will be the ratio of alcohol and water in final mixture?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 17

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 18

Three friends A, B & C started a business by investing on amount of 10500, 11000 & 12500 respectively. After 9 months, B leaved the business & also C after 6 months. At the end of year, there was a total profit of 24500. Find the share of B in the profit?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 18

Profit of A : Profit of B : Profit of C :

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 19

Two merchants A & B start a business together. In beginning, A invests Rs. 23250 & after 4 months he debited an amount of Rs. 3750. B invests some amount in starting and drops Rs. 3000 after 7 months. At the end of year, if total profit is divided equally between them then find what amounts B had invested in the start?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 19

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 20

9 men working 7 hours a day can complete a piece of work in 15 day. In how many days can 6 men working for 9 hours a day, complete the same piece of work? 

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 20

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 21

Two pipes A and B can fill a tank in 24 minutes and 32 minutes respectively. If both the pipes are opened simultaneously, after how much time should B be closed so that the tank is full in 18 minutes ? 

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 21

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 22

A man goes uphill with an average speed of 24 kmph and comes down with an average speed of 36 kmph. The distance travelled in both the cases being the same, the average speed for the entire journey is: 

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 22

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 23

A person travels one-fourth of a certain distance AE at x kmph, one-third of the remaining distance at 3x kmph and the remaining distance at 2x kmph. If his average speed for the entire journey is (x + 14) kmph, then find the total distance he covers? 

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 23

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 24

The ratio of the age of a father’s to that of his son is 5 : 2. If the product of their ages in years is 1000, then the father’s age (in years) after 10 years will be : 

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 24

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 25

A milkman makes 20% profit by selling milk mixed with water at Rs. 9 per litre. If the cost price of 1 litre pure milk is Rs. 10, then the ratio of milk to water in the sold mixture is 

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 25

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 26

Directions : In the following number series only one number is wrong. Find out the wrong number. 

8835, 9023, 9213, 9405, 9598, 9795

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 26

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 27

Directions : In the following number series only one number is wrong. Find out the wrong number. 

1250, 500, 200, 80, 33, 12.8

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 27

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 28

Directions : In the following number series only one number is wrong. Find out the wrong number.

1716, 2185, 2730, 3360, 4080, 4896

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 28

                                                               

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 29

Directions : In the following number series only one number is wrong. Find out the wrong number.

137, 274, 411, 548, 684, 822, 959

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 29

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 30

Directions : In the following number series only one number is wrong. Find out the wrong number.

8, 12, 18, 27, 40.5, 60, 91.125

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 30

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 31

Directions : In each of the following questions two equations are given. Solve the equations and give answer—

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 31

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 32

Directions : In each of the following questions two equations are given. Solve the equations and give answer—

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 32

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 33

Directions : In each of the following questions two equations are given. Solve the equations and give answer—

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 33

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 34

Directions : In each of the following questions two equations are given. Solve the equations and give answer—

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 34

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 35

Directions : In each of the following questions two equations are given. Solve the equations and give answer—

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 35

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 36

Directions : Study the following information carefully and answer the questions given below: 

Eight friends A, B, C, D, E, F, G and H are sitting around a circular table, but not necessarily in the same order all are seated at equal distance, all are facing in same direction. All of them have a lucky number i.e. 141, 242, 324, 384, 427, 835, 844, and 960 but not necessarily in the same order.
E’s lucky number is 2.5 times of D’s lucky number. D is not an immediate neighbor of C and the one whose lucky number is 835. There is an angle of 1800 degree between H and G who is not an immediate neighbor of D. The one whose lucky number is 844 and the one whose lucky number is an odd number as well as not divisible by 7 sit opposite to each other. There is an angle of 135 ̊ between F and the one whose lucky number is 141. C sits at 900 degree clockwise direction of A. F’s lucky number is 7th highest and is not an immediate neighbor of C. Lucky number of the one, who sits 2nd to right of C is an odd palindrome number. G’s lucky number is perfect square. There is an angle of 90 ̊ between A and B. C’s lucky number is 7th lowest number. 

Q. How many persons sit between E and the one, whose lucky number is 242?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 36

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 37

Directions : Study the following information carefully and answer the questions given below: 

Eight friends A, B, C, D, E, F, G and H are sitting around a circular table, but not necessarily in the same order all are seated at equal distance, all are facing in same direction. All of them have a lucky number i.e. 141, 242, 324, 384, 427, 835, 844, and 960 but not necessarily in the same order.
E’s lucky number is 2.5 times of D’s lucky number. D is not an immediate neighbor of C and the one whose lucky number is 835. There is an angle of 1800 degree between H and G who is not an immediate neighbor of D. The one whose lucky number is 844 and the one whose lucky number is an odd number as well as not divisible by 7 sit opposite to each other. There is an angle of 135 ̊ between F and the one whose lucky number is 141. C sits at 900 degree clockwise direction of A. F’s lucky number is 7th highest and is not an immediate neighbor of C. Lucky number of the one, who sits 2nd to right of C is an odd palindrome number. G’s lucky number is perfect square. There is an angle of 90 ̊ between A and B. C’s lucky number is 7th lowest number. 

Q. Who among the followings sits immediate left of the one who is 3rd to the left of H?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 37

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 38

Directions : Study the following information carefully and answer the questions given below: 

Eight friends A, B, C, D, E, F, G and H are sitting around a circular table, but not necessarily in the same order all are seated at equal distance, all are facing in same direction. All of them have a lucky number i.e. 141, 242, 324, 384, 427, 835, 844, and 960 but not necessarily in the same order.
E’s lucky number is 2.5 times of D’s lucky number. D is not an immediate neighbor of C and the one whose lucky number is 835. There is an angle of 1800 degree between H and G who is not an immediate neighbor of D. The one whose lucky number is 844 and the one whose lucky number is an odd number as well as not divisible by 7 sit opposite to each other. There is an angle of 135 ̊ between F and the one whose lucky number is 141. C sits at 900 degree clockwise direction of A. F’s lucky number is 7th highest and is not an immediate neighbor of C. Lucky number of the one, who sits 2nd to right of C is an odd palindrome number. G’s lucky number is perfect square. There is an angle of 90 ̊ between A and B. C’s lucky number is 7th lowest number. 

Q. What is the lucky number of E?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 38

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 39

Directions : Study the following information carefully and answer the questions given below: 

Eight friends A, B, C, D, E, F, G and H are sitting around a circular table, but not necessarily in the same order all are seated at equal distance, all are facing in same direction. All of them have a lucky number i.e. 141, 242, 324, 384, 427, 835, 844, and 960 but not necessarily in the same order.
E’s lucky number is 2.5 times of D’s lucky number. D is not an immediate neighbor of C and the one whose lucky number is 835. There is an angle of 1800 degree between H and G who is not an immediate neighbor of D. The one whose lucky number is 844 and the one whose lucky number is an odd number as well as not divisible by 7 sit opposite to each other. There is an angle of 135 ̊ between F and the one whose lucky number is 141. C sits at 900 degree clockwise direction of A. F’s lucky number is 7th highest and is not an immediate neighbor of C. Lucky number of the one, who sits 2nd to right of C is an odd palindrome number. G’s lucky number is perfect square. There is an angle of 90 ̊ between A and B. C’s lucky number is 7th lowest number. 

Q. Who sits immediate left of C?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 39

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 40

Directions : Study the following information carefully and answer the questions given below: 

Eight friends A, B, C, D, E, F, G and H are sitting around a circular table, but not necessarily in the same order all are seated at equal distance, all are facing in same direction. All of them have a lucky number i.e. 141, 242, 324, 384, 427, 835, 844, and 960 but not necessarily in the same order.
E’s lucky number is 2.5 times of D’s lucky number. D is not an immediate neighbor of C and the one whose lucky number is 835. There is an angle of 1800 degree between H and G who is not an immediate neighbor of D. The one whose lucky number is 844 and the one whose lucky number is an odd number as well as not divisible by 7 sit opposite to each other. There is an angle of 135 ̊ between F and the one whose lucky number is 141. C sits at 900 degree clockwise direction of A. F’s lucky number is 7th highest and is not an immediate neighbor of C. Lucky number of the one, who sits 2nd to right of C is an odd palindrome number. G’s lucky number is perfect square. There is an angle of 90 ̊ between A and B. C’s lucky number is 7th lowest number. 

Q. What is the lucky number of the one who sits 2nd right of F?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 40

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 41

Directions: In the given questions, assuming the given statements to be true. Find which of the given four conclusions numbered I, II, III and IV is/are definitely true and give your answer accordingly.

Q. Statement: S > M ≥ D > H ≤ R ≤ T < W

Conclusions

I. S > H 

II. W > H 

III. R < W 

IV. M > T

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 41

Conclusions:

I. S > H (  True)

II. W > H(  True)

III. R < W(  True)

IV. M > T( Not True)

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 42

Directions: In the given questions, assuming the given statements to be true. Find which of the given four conclusions numbered I, II, III and IV is/are definitely true and give your answer accordingly.

Q. Statement: M > U > L ≤ N; L ≥ Y > A

Conclusions

I. Y < N 

II. M>N 

III. N = Y 

IV. M > A

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 42

Conclusions:

I. Y < N ( Not True)

II. M>N( Not True)

III. N = Y( Not True)

IV. M > A(  True)

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 43

Directions: In the given questions, assuming the given statements to be true. Find which of the given four conclusions numbered I, II, III and IV is/are definitely true and give your answer accordingly.

Q. Statement: J ≥ A > D = E; L < A < M

Conclusions

I. M < J 

II. J > L 

III. D > L 

IV. E < M

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 43

Conclusions:

I. M < J ( Not True)

II. J > L(  True)

III. D > L( Not True)

IV. E < M(  True)

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 44

Directions: In the given questions, assuming the given statements to be true. Find which of the given four conclusions numbered I, II, III and IV is/are definitely true and give your answer accordingly.

Q. Statement: Y > F ≤ O ≤ P; F ≥ U < T

Conclusions

I. Y > P 

II. T < F 

III. O > T 

IV. P < U

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 44

Conclusions:

I. Y > P( Not True)

II. T < F( Not True)

III. O > T( Not True)

IV. P < U( Not True)

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 45

Directions: In the given questions, assuming the given statements to be true. Find which of the given four conclusions numbered I, II, III and IV is/are definitely true and give your answer accordingly.

Q. Statement: K ≤ O < M D = T; 

Conclusions

I. T < E 

II. K > J 

III. T > O 

IV. E < M

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 45

Conclusions:

I. T < E (True)

II. K > J (Not True)

III. T > O (Not True)

IV. E < M (Not True)

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 46

Directions : Study the information carefully and answer the questions given below.

Six persons A, B, C, D, E and F are comparing their weights and each of them is having a different weight. D is heavier than only two persons. E is the only person heavier than F and lighter than D. C’s weight is less than only B’s weight. The third heaviest weight is 150kgs and the fifth heaviest weight is 110kgs.

Q. What is the possible weight of D?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 46

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 47

Directions : Study the information carefully and answer the questions given below.

Six persons A, B, C, D, E and F are comparing their weights and each of them is having a different weight. D is heavier than only two persons. E is the only person heavier than F and lighter than D. C’s weight is less than only B’s weight. The third heaviest weight is 150kgs and the fifth heaviest weight is 110kgs.

Q. If the heaviest weight is 50kgs more than A’s weight, then what is the possible weight of C?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 47

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 48

If 2 is subtracted from each odd digit in the number 7854392 and 1 is added to each even digit in number then which of the following digit is repeated in the digits so obtained?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 48

7854392=5935173

(Repeated digits are 5,3)

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 49

How many such pairs of letters are there in the word “MANGO” each of which has as many letters between them in the word as in the English alphabet? 

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 50

In a certain code, MAIN is written as IMNA and GOAL is written as AGLO. How is DUSK written in that code?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 50

DUSK is written as = SDKU

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 51

Directions : Study the information and answer the following questions.

In a certain code 

‘always to be right’ is written as ‘4 9 3 2’ 

‘right is also just’ is written as ‘9 7 6 5’ 

‘come to terms is written as ‘1 3 8’, 

terms are just’ is written as ‘0 1 6’ and 

‘always is’ is written as ‘7 4’.

Q. What does ‘6’ represent in this code?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 51

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 52

Directions : Study the information and answer the following questions.

In a certain code 

‘always to be right’ is written as ‘4 9 3 2’ 

‘right is also just’ is written as ‘9 7 6 5’ 

‘come to terms is written as ‘1 3 8’, 

terms are just’ is written as ‘0 1 6’ and 

‘always is’ is written as ‘7 4’.

Q. Which of the following is the code for ‘right’?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 52

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 53

Directions : Study the information and answer the following questions.

In a certain code 

‘always to be right’ is written as ‘4 9 3 2’ 

‘right is also just’ is written as ‘9 7 6 5’ 

‘come to terms is written as ‘1 3 8’, 

terms are just’ is written as ‘0 1 6’ and 

‘always is’ is written as ‘7 4’.

Q. Which of the following represents ‘always be right terms’?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 53

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 54

Directions : Study the information and answer the following questions.

In a certain code 

‘always to be right’ is written as ‘4 9 3 2’ 

‘right is also just’ is written as ‘9 7 6 5’ 

‘come to terms is written as ‘1 3 8’, 

terms are just’ is written as ‘0 1 6’ and 

‘always is’ is written as ‘7 4’.

Q. Which of the following can be coded as ‘86315’ ?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 54

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 55

Directions : Study the information and answer the following questions.

In a certain code 

‘always to be right’ is written as ‘4 9 3 2’ 

‘right is also just’ is written as ‘9 7 6 5’ 

‘come to terms is written as ‘1 3 8’, 

terms are just’ is written as ‘0 1 6’ and 

‘always is’ is written as ‘7 4’.

Q. Which of the following is the code for ‘come’?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 55

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 56

Directions : Study the given information carefully to answer the given questions :

Ten persons are sitting in two parallel rows containing five persons each, in such a way that there is an equal distance between adjacent persons. In row —1, J, K, L, M, and N are seated (not necessarily in the same order) and all or them are facing south. In row-2, V, W, X, Y and Z are seated (not necessarily in the same order) and all of them are facing north. Therefore in the given seating arrangement each member seated in row faces another member of the other row. Z sits third to the right of W. V sits second to the left of Z. The person facing V sits to the immediate right of K. Only one person sits between K and M. J is not an immediate neighbour of K. Only two persons sit between J and L. Neither K nor J faces Y. 

Q. Who amongst the following is facing N?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 56

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 57

Directions : Study the given information carefully to answer the given questions :

Ten persons are sitting in two parallel rows containing five persons each, in such a way that there is an equal distance between adjacent persons. In row —1, J, K, L, M, and N are seated (not necessarily in the same order) and all or them are facing south. In row-2, V, W, X, Y and Z are seated (not necessarily in the same order) and all of them are facing north. Therefore in the given seating arrangement each member seated in row faces another member of the other row. Z sits third to the right of W. V sits second to the left of Z. The person facing V sits to the immediate right of K. Only one person sits between K and M. J is not an immediate neighbour of K. Only two persons sit between J and L. Neither K nor J faces Y. 

Q. Which of the following statements is true regarding M?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 57

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 58

Directions : Study the given information carefully to answer the given questions :

Ten persons are sitting in two parallel rows containing five persons each, in such a way that there is an equal distance between adjacent persons. In row —1, J, K, L, M, and N are seated (not necessarily in the same order) and all or them are facing south. In row-2, V, W, X, Y and Z are seated (not necessarily in the same order) and all of them are facing north. Therefore in the given seating arrangement each member seated in row faces another member of the other row. Z sits third to the right of W. V sits second to the left of Z. The person facing V sits to the immediate right of K. Only one person sits between K and M. J is not an immediate neighbour of K. Only two persons sit between J and L. Neither K nor J faces Y. 

Q. Who amongst the following is facing X?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 58

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 59

Directions : Study the given information carefully to answer the given questions :

Ten persons are sitting in two parallel rows containing five persons each, in such a way that there is an equal distance between adjacent persons. In row —1, J, K, L, M, and N are seated (not necessarily in the same order) and all or them are facing south. In row-2, V, W, X, Y and Z are seated (not necessarily in the same order) and all of them are facing north. Therefore in the given seating arrangement each member seated in row faces another member of the other row. Z sits third to the right of W. V sits second to the left of Z. The person facing V sits to the immediate right of K. Only one person sits between K and M. J is not an immediate neighbour of K. Only two persons sit between J and L. Neither K nor J faces Y. 

Q. What is the position of Z with respect of Y?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 59

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 60

Directions : Study the given information carefully to answer the given questions :

Ten persons are sitting in two parallel rows containing five persons each, in such a way that there is an equal distance between adjacent persons. In row —1, J, K, L, M, and N are seated (not necessarily in the same order) and all or them are facing south. In row-2, V, W, X, Y and Z are seated (not necessarily in the same order) and all of them are facing north. Therefore in the given seating arrangement each member seated in row faces another member of the other row. Z sits third to the right of W. V sits second to the left of Z. The person facing V sits to the immediate right of K. Only one person sits between K and M. J is not an immediate neighbour of K. Only two persons sit between J and L. Neither K nor J faces Y. 

Q. Four of the following five are alike in a certain way based on the given arrangement and hence form a group. Which of them does not belong to that group?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 60

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 61

Directions : In each question below are given three statements followed by four conclusions numbered I, II, III and IV. You have to take the given statements to be true even if they seem to be at variance with commonly known facts. Read all the conclusion and and then decide which of the given conclusions logically follows from the given statements, disregarding commonly known facts.

Q. Statements: No Pre are Mains.
All Tier are Mains.
All Tier are Exam.
Conclusions: I.   Some Tier are not Pre.
II.  Some Mains are Exam.
III. Some Exam are not Pre.
IV.  No Pre are Tier.

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 61

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 62

Directions : In each question below are given three statements followed by four conclusions numbered I, II, III and IV. You have to take the given statements to be true even if they seem to be at variance with commonly known facts. Read all the conclusion and and then decide which of the given conclusions logically follows from the given statements, disregarding commonly known facts.

Q. Statements: No Row is Column.
All Labels are Row.
All Cells are Label.
Conclusions: I.   Some Row is not Cell.
II.  Some Label are not Cell.
III. All Row is Cell.
IV.  No Cell are Column.

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 62

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 63

Directions : In each question below are given three statements followed by four conclusions numbered I, II, III and IV. You have to take the given statements to be true even if they seem to be at variance with commonly known facts. Read all the conclusion and and then decide which of the given conclusions logically follows from the given statements, disregarding commonly known facts.

Q. Statements: All Blue are Green.
No Green are Pink.
All Pink are Yellow.
Conclusions: I.   Some Blue are not Pink.
II.  Some Pink are not Blue.
III. Some Yellow are not Blue.
IV.  Some Blue are not Yellow.

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 63

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 64

Directions : In each question below are given three statements followed by four conclusions numbered I, II, III and IV. You have to take the given statements to be true even if they seem to be at variance with commonly known facts. Read all the conclusion and and then decide which of the given conclusions logically follows from the given statements, disregarding commonly known facts.

Q. Statements: All She are He.
No We are She.
All You are We.
Conclusions: I.   Some He are You.
II.  No You are She.
III. Some He are not You.
IV.  No He are You.

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 64

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 65

Directions : In each question below are given three statements followed by four conclusions numbered I, II, III and IV. You have to take the given statements to be true even if they seem to be at variance with commonly known facts. Read all the conclusion and and then decide which of the given conclusions logically follows from the given statements, disregarding commonly known facts.

Q. Statements: All P is Q.
Some P is R.
No pins is R.
Conclusions: I.   Some P is pins.
II. Some Q is pins.
III. Some R is not Q.
IV.  Some P is not R.

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 65

 

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 66

A boy travel 100m towards south direction from railway station and then he turn to his right and walk 50m and reach to his coaching class and then he walks again 40m in the same direction and then takes to his right again and walk 100 metre. How many metres was he away from the railway station?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 66

He is 90m away from post-office.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 67

Starting from a point P, Mona walked 20m towards South and then she turned left and walked 30m. She then turned again left and walked 20m. She again turned left and walked 40m and reached a point Q. How far and in which direction is the point Q from the point P?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 67

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 68

Directions : These questions are based on the following information.

(i) ‘P × Q’ means ‘P is brother of Q’.

(ii) ‘P ÷ Q’ means ‘P is mother of Q’.

(iii) ‘P – Q’ means ‘P is father of Q’.

(iv) ‘P + Q’ means ‘P is sister of Q’.

Q. Which of the following means ‘M is the daughter of T’?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 68

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 69

Directions : These questions are based on the following information.

(i) ‘P × Q’ means ‘P is brother of Q’.

(ii) ‘P ÷ Q’ means ‘P is mother of Q’.

(iii) ‘P – Q’ means ‘P is father of Q’.

(iv) ‘P + Q’ means ‘P is sister of Q’.

Q. How is K related to R in the expression: R ÷ T + K?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 69

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 70

Directions : These questions are based on the following information.

(i) ‘P × Q’ means ‘P is brother of Q’.

(ii) ‘P ÷ Q’ means ‘P is mother of Q’.

(iii) ‘P – Q’ means ‘P is father of Q’.

(iv) ‘P + Q’ means ‘P is sister of Q’.

Q. Which of the following means D is the grandfather of W?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 70

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 71

Directions (: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

Two principles are involved in the controversy about the presence of foreign controlled media in the country; the free flow of ideas and images across national borders and the need to safeguard the national interest and preserve cultural autonomy. Both are valid but both are at loggerheads because each has been used to promote less lofty goals.

The first principle conforms to a moral imperative: freedom to expression cannot rhyme with restrictions imposed by any government. But the free flow rhetoric also clouds the fact that the powerful Western, and especially American media, can and often do present, subtly or brazenly, news in a manner that promotes Western political, ideological and strategic interests. Besides, Western entertainment programmes present lifestyles and values that runcounter to the lifestyles and values cherished by traditional societies. All this explains why so many Indian newspapers, magazines and news agencies have sought protection from the courts to prevent foreign publications and news agencies from operating in the country. Their arguments are weak on two counts. As the bitter debate on a new world information and communication order demonstrated in the late seventies and early eighties, many of those who resent Western ‘invasion’ in the fields of information and culture are no great friends of democracy. Secondly, the threat of such an ‘invasion’ has been aired by those media groups in the developing countries that fear that their business interests will be harmed if Western groups, equipped with large financial and technological resources and superior management skills, are allowed to operate in the country without let.

The fear is valid but it goes against the grain of the economic reform programme. The presence of foreign newspapers and television channels will increase competition, which, in the course of time, can only lead to the upgradation of dynamic Indian newspapers and television channels, even while they drive the rest out of the market. One way to strike a balance between the two antagonistic principles would be to allow foreign media entry into the country, provided the India state treats them at par with the domestic media on all fronts. On the import of technology, for instance, foreign media cannot be allowed duty concessions denied to their Indian counterparts. Foreign media will also have to face legal consequences should they run foul of Indian laws. Why, for example, should the BBC, or Time magazine or The Economist get away by showing a map of Kashmir, which is at variance with the official Indian map? Why should they go scot-free when they allow secessionists and terrorists to air their views without giving the government the right to reply, or when they depict sexually explicit scenes, which would otherwise not be cleared by the Censor Board? Since the government can do precious little in the matter, especially about satellite broadcasts, what if it should consider attaching the properties of the offending parties? Demands of this kind are bound to be voiced unless New Delhi makes it clear to the foreign media that they will have to respect Indian susceptibilities, especially where it concerns the country’s integrity and its culture. It may be able to derive some inspiration from France’s successful attempts in the recent GATT to protect its cinematography industry.

Q. Which of the following is one of the points weakening the argument to prevent the entry of foreign media?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 71

The threat being voiced by those whose business will be harmed by such an entry 

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 72

Directions : Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

Two principles are involved in the controversy about the presence of foreign controlled media in the country; the free flow of ideas and images across national borders and the need to safeguard the national interest and preserve cultural autonomy. Both are valid but both are at loggerheads because each has been used to promote less lofty goals.

The first principle conforms to a moral imperative: freedom to expression cannot rhyme with restrictions imposed by any government. But the free flow rhetoric also clouds the fact that the powerful Western, and especially American media, can and often do present, subtly or brazenly, news in a manner that promotes Western political, ideological and strategic interests. Besides, Western entertainment programmes present lifestyles and values that runcounter to the lifestyles and values cherished by traditional societies. All this explains why so many Indian newspapers, magazines and news agencies have sought protection from the courts to prevent foreign publications and news agencies from operating in the country. Their arguments are weak on two counts. As the bitter debate on a new world information and communication order demonstrated in the late seventies and early eighties, many of those who resent Western ‘invasion’ in the fields of information and culture are no great friends of democracy. Secondly, the threat of such an ‘invasion’ has been aired by those media groups in the developing countries that fear that their business interests will be harmed if Western groups, equipped with large financial and technological resources and superior management skills, are allowed to operate in the country without let.

The fear is valid but it goes against the grain of the economic reform programme. The presence of foreign newspapers and television channels will increase competition, which, in the course of time, can only lead to the upgradation of dynamic Indian newspapers and television channels, even while they drive the rest out of the market. One way to strike a balance between the two antagonistic principles would be to allow foreign media entry into the country, provided the India state treats them at par with the domestic media on all fronts. On the import of technology, for instance, foreign media cannot be allowed duty concessions denied to their Indian counterparts. Foreign media will also have to face legal consequences should they run foul of Indian laws. Why, for example, should the BBC, or Time magazine or The Economist get away by showing a map of Kashmir, which is at variance with the official Indian map? Why should they go scot-free when they allow secessionists and terrorists to air their views without giving the government the right to reply, or when they depict sexually explicit scenes, which would otherwise not be cleared by the Censor Board? Since the government can do precious little in the matter, especially about satellite broadcasts, what if it should consider attaching the properties of the offending parties? Demands of this kind are bound to be voiced unless New Delhi makes it clear to the foreign media that they will have to respect Indian susceptibilities, especially where it concerns the country’s integrity and its culture. It may be able to derive some inspiration from France’s successful attempts in the recent GATT to protect its cinematography industry.

Q. What will be the impact of increasing competition?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 72

It will improve Indian newspapers and television 

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 73

Directions (: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

Two principles are involved in the controversy about the presence of foreign controlled media in the country; the free flow of ideas and images across national borders and the need to safeguard the national interest and preserve cultural autonomy. Both are valid but both are at loggerheads because each has been used to promote less lofty goals.

The first principle conforms to a moral imperative: freedom to expression cannot rhyme with restrictions imposed by any government. But the free flow rhetoric also clouds the fact that the powerful Western, and especially American media, can and often do present, subtly or brazenly, news in a manner that promotes Western political, ideological and strategic interests. Besides, Western entertainment programmes present lifestyles and values that runcounter to the lifestyles and values cherished by traditional societies. All this explains why so many Indian newspapers, magazines and news agencies have sought protection from the courts to prevent foreign publications and news agencies from operating in the country. Their arguments are weak on two counts. As the bitter debate on a new world information and communication order demonstrated in the late seventies and early eighties, many of those who resent Western ‘invasion’ in the fields of information and culture are no great friends of democracy. Secondly, the threat of such an ‘invasion’ has been aired by those media groups in the developing countries that fear that their business interests will be harmed if Western groups, equipped with large financial and technological resources and superior management skills, are allowed to operate in the country without let.

The fear is valid but it goes against the grain of the economic reform programme. The presence of foreign newspapers and television channels will increase competition, which, in the course of time, can only lead to the upgradation of dynamic Indian newspapers and television channels, even while they drive the rest out of the market. One way to strike a balance between the two antagonistic principles would be to allow foreign media entry into the country, provided the India state treats them at par with the domestic media on all fronts. On the import of technology, for instance, foreign media cannot be allowed duty concessions denied to their Indian counterparts. Foreign media will also have to face legal consequences should they run foul of Indian laws. Why, for example, should the BBC, or Time magazine or The Economist get away by showing a map of Kashmir, which is at variance with the official Indian map? Why should they go scot-free when they allow secessionists and terrorists to air their views without giving the government the right to reply, or when they depict sexually explicit scenes, which would otherwise not be cleared by the Censor Board? Since the government can do precious little in the matter, especially about satellite broadcasts, what if it should consider attaching the properties of the offending parties? Demands of this kind are bound to be voiced unless New Delhi makes it clear to the foreign media that they will have to respect Indian susceptibilities, especially where it concerns the country’s integrity and its culture. It may be able to derive some inspiration from France’s successful attempts in the recent GATT to protect its cinematography industry.

Q. Which of the following has been cited as having succeeded in protecting country?

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 74

Directions : Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

Two principles are involved in the controversy about the presence of foreign controlled media in the country; the free flow of ideas and images across national borders and the need to safeguard the national interest and preserve cultural autonomy. Both are valid but both are at loggerheads because each has been used to promote less lofty goals.

The first principle conforms to a moral imperative: freedom to expression cannot rhyme with restrictions imposed by any government. But the free flow rhetoric also clouds the fact that the powerful Western, and especially American media, can and often do present, subtly or brazenly, news in a manner that promotes Western political, ideological and strategic interests. Besides, Western entertainment programmes present lifestyles and values that runcounter to the lifestyles and values cherished by traditional societies. All this explains why so many Indian newspapers, magazines and news agencies have sought protection from the courts to prevent foreign publications and news agencies from operating in the country. Their arguments are weak on two counts. As the bitter debate on a new world information and communication order demonstrated in the late seventies and early eighties, many of those who resent Western ‘invasion’ in the fields of information and culture are no great friends of democracy. Secondly, the threat of such an ‘invasion’ has been aired by those media groups in the developing countries that fear that their business interests will be harmed if Western groups, equipped with large financial and technological resources and superior management skills, are allowed to operate in the country without let.

The fear is valid but it goes against the grain of the economic reform programme. The presence of foreign newspapers and television channels will increase competition, which, in the course of time, can only lead to the upgradation of dynamic Indian newspapers and television channels, even while they drive the rest out of the market. One way to strike a balance between the two antagonistic principles would be to allow foreign media entry into the country, provided the India state treats them at par with the domestic media on all fronts. On the import of technology, for instance, foreign media cannot be allowed duty concessions denied to their Indian counterparts. Foreign media will also have to face legal consequences should they run foul of Indian laws. Why, for example, should the BBC, or Time magazine or The Economist get away by showing a map of Kashmir, which is at variance with the official Indian map? Why should they go scot-free when they allow secessionists and terrorists to air their views without giving the government the right to reply, or when they depict sexually explicit scenes, which would otherwise not be cleared by the Censor Board? Since the government can do precious little in the matter, especially about satellite broadcasts, what if it should consider attaching the properties of the offending parties? Demands of this kind are bound to be voiced unless New Delhi makes it clear to the foreign media that they will have to respect Indian susceptibilities, especially where it concerns the country’s integrity and its culture. It may be able to derive some inspiration from France’s successful attempts in the recent GATT to protect its cinematography industry.

Q. Which of the following has been the major recommendation regarding the entry of foreign media?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 74

Allow entry, treating them on par with domestic media        

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 75

Directions : Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

Two principles are involved in the controversy about the presence of foreign controlled media in the country; the free flow of ideas and images across national borders and the need to safeguard the national interest and preserve cultural autonomy. Both are valid but both are at loggerheads because each has been used to promote less lofty goals.

The first principle conforms to a moral imperative: freedom to expression cannot rhyme with restrictions imposed by any government. But the free flow rhetoric also clouds the fact that the powerful Western, and especially American media, can and often do present, subtly or brazenly, news in a manner that promotes Western political, ideological and strategic interests. Besides, Western entertainment programmes present lifestyles and values that runcounter to the lifestyles and values cherished by traditional societies. All this explains why so many Indian newspapers, magazines and news agencies have sought protection from the courts to prevent foreign publications and news agencies from operating in the country. Their arguments are weak on two counts. As the bitter debate on a new world information and communication order demonstrated in the late seventies and early eighties, many of those who resent Western ‘invasion’ in the fields of information and culture are no great friends of democracy. Secondly, the threat of such an ‘invasion’ has been aired by those media groups in the developing countries that fear that their business interests will be harmed if Western groups, equipped with large financial and technological resources and superior management skills, are allowed to operate in the country without let.

The fear is valid but it goes against the grain of the economic reform programme. The presence of foreign newspapers and television channels will increase competition, which, in the course of time, can only lead to the upgradation of dynamic Indian newspapers and television channels, even while they drive the rest out of the market. One way to strike a balance between the two antagonistic principles would be to allow foreign media entry into the country, provided the India state treats them at par with the domestic media on all fronts. On the import of technology, for instance, foreign media cannot be allowed duty concessions denied to their Indian counterparts. Foreign media will also have to face legal consequences should they run foul of Indian laws. Why, for example, should the BBC, or Time magazine or The Economist get away by showing a map of Kashmir, which is at variance with the official Indian map? Why should they go scot-free when they allow secessionists and terrorists to air their views without giving the government the right to reply, or when they depict sexually explicit scenes, which would otherwise not be cleared by the Censor Board? Since the government can do precious little in the matter, especially about satellite broadcasts, what if it should consider attaching the properties of the offending parties? Demands of this kind are bound to be voiced unless New Delhi makes it clear to the foreign media that they will have to respect Indian susceptibilities, especially where it concerns the country’s integrity and its culture. It may be able to derive some inspiration from France’s successful attempts in the recent GATT to protect its cinematography industry.

Q. In the controversy involving two principles regarding allowing foreign media, which of the following is against its entry?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 75

Preserve culture       

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 76

Directions : Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

Two principles are involved in the controversy about the presence of foreign controlled media in the country; the free flow of ideas and images across national borders and the need to safeguard the national interest and preserve cultural autonomy. Both are valid but both are at loggerheads because each has been used to promote less lofty goals.

The first principle conforms to a moral imperative: freedom to expression cannot rhyme with restrictions imposed by any government. But the free flow rhetoric also clouds the fact that the powerful Western, and especially American media, can and often do present, subtly or brazenly, news in a manner that promotes Western political, ideological and strategic interests. Besides, Western entertainment programmes present lifestyles and values that runcounter to the lifestyles and values cherished by traditional societies. All this explains why so many Indian newspapers, magazines and news agencies have sought protection from the courts to prevent foreign publications and news agencies from operating in the country. Their arguments are weak on two counts. As the bitter debate on a new world information and communication order demonstrated in the late seventies and early eighties, many of those who resent Western ‘invasion’ in the fields of information and culture are no great friends of democracy. Secondly, the threat of such an ‘invasion’ has been aired by those media groups in the developing countries that fear that their business interests will be harmed if Western groups, equipped with large financial and technological resources and superior management skills, are allowed to operate in the country without let.

The fear is valid but it goes against the grain of the economic reform programme. The presence of foreign newspapers and television channels will increase competition, which, in the course of time, can only lead to the upgradation of dynamic Indian newspapers and television channels, even while they drive the rest out of the market. One way to strike a balance between the two antagonistic principles would be to allow foreign media entry into the country, provided the India state treats them at par with the domestic media on all fronts. On the import of technology, for instance, foreign media cannot be allowed duty concessions denied to their Indian counterparts. Foreign media will also have to face legal consequences should they run foul of Indian laws. Why, for example, should the BBC, or Time magazine or The Economist get away by showing a map of Kashmir, which is at variance with the official Indian map? Why should they go scot-free when they allow secessionists and terrorists to air their views without giving the government the right to reply, or when they depict sexually explicit scenes, which would otherwise not be cleared by the Censor Board? Since the government can do precious little in the matter, especially about satellite broadcasts, what if it should consider attaching the properties of the offending parties? Demands of this kind are bound to be voiced unless New Delhi makes it clear to the foreign media that they will have to respect Indian susceptibilities, especially where it concerns the country’s integrity and its culture. It may be able to derive some inspiration from France’s successful attempts in the recent GATT to protect its cinematography industry.

Q. According to the passage, which media in particular promotes Western interests?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 76

American  

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 77

Directions : Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

Two principles are involved in the controversy about the presence of foreign controlled media in the country; the free flow of ideas and images across national borders and the need to safeguard the national interest and preserve cultural autonomy. Both are valid but both are at loggerheads because each has been used to promote less lofty goals.

The first principle conforms to a moral imperative: freedom to expression cannot rhyme with restrictions imposed by any government. But the free flow rhetoric also clouds the fact that the powerful Western, and especially American media, can and often do present, subtly or brazenly, news in a manner that promotes Western political, ideological and strategic interests. Besides, Western entertainment programmes present lifestyles and values that runcounter to the lifestyles and values cherished by traditional societies. All this explains why so many Indian newspapers, magazines and news agencies have sought protection from the courts to prevent foreign publications and news agencies from operating in the country. Their arguments are weak on two counts. As the bitter debate on a new world information and communication order demonstrated in the late seventies and early eighties, many of those who resent Western ‘invasion’ in the fields of information and culture are no great friends of democracy. Secondly, the threat of such an ‘invasion’ has been aired by those media groups in the developing countries that fear that their business interests will be harmed if Western groups, equipped with large financial and technological resources and superior management skills, are allowed to operate in the country without let.

The fear is valid but it goes against the grain of the economic reform programme. The presence of foreign newspapers and television channels will increase competition, which, in the course of time, can only lead to the upgradation of dynamic Indian newspapers and television channels, even while they drive the rest out of the market. One way to strike a balance between the two antagonistic principles would be to allow foreign media entry into the country, provided the India state treats them at par with the domestic media on all fronts. On the import of technology, for instance, foreign media cannot be allowed duty concessions denied to their Indian counterparts. Foreign media will also have to face legal consequences should they run foul of Indian laws. Why, for example, should the BBC, or Time magazine or The Economist get away by showing a map of Kashmir, which is at variance with the official Indian map? Why should they go scot-free when they allow secessionists and terrorists to air their views without giving the government the right to reply, or when they depict sexually explicit scenes, which would otherwise not be cleared by the Censor Board? Since the government can do precious little in the matter, especially about satellite broadcasts, what if it should consider attaching the properties of the offending parties? Demands of this kind are bound to be voiced unless New Delhi makes it clear to the foreign media that they will have to respect Indian susceptibilities, especially where it concerns the country’s integrity and its culture. It may be able to derive some inspiration from France’s successful attempts in the recent GATT to protect its cinematography industry.

Q. Which of the following is the meaning of the phrase “without let”, as used in the passage?

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 78

Directions : Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

Two principles are involved in the controversy about the presence of foreign controlled media in the country; the free flow of ideas and images across national borders and the need to safeguard the national interest and preserve cultural autonomy. Both are valid but both are at loggerheads because each has been used to promote less lofty goals.

The first principle conforms to a moral imperative: freedom to expression cannot rhyme with restrictions imposed by any government. But the free flow rhetoric also clouds the fact that the powerful Western, and especially American media, can and often do present, subtly or brazenly, news in a manner that promotes Western political, ideological and strategic interests. Besides, Western entertainment programmes present lifestyles and values that runcounter to the lifestyles and values cherished by traditional societies. All this explains why so many Indian newspapers, magazines and news agencies have sought protection from the courts to prevent foreign publications and news agencies from operating in the country. Their arguments are weak on two counts. As the bitter debate on a new world information and communication order demonstrated in the late seventies and early eighties, many of those who resent Western ‘invasion’ in the fields of information and culture are no great friends of democracy. Secondly, the threat of such an ‘invasion’ has been aired by those media groups in the developing countries that fear that their business interests will be harmed if Western groups, equipped with large financial and technological resources and superior management skills, are allowed to operate in the country without let.

The fear is valid but it goes against the grain of the economic reform programme. The presence of foreign newspapers and television channels will increase competition, which, in the course of time, can only lead to the upgradation of dynamic Indian newspapers and television channels, even while they drive the rest out of the market. One way to strike a balance between the two antagonistic principles would be to allow foreign media entry into the country, provided the India state treats them at par with the domestic media on all fronts. On the import of technology, for instance, foreign media cannot be allowed duty concessions denied to their Indian counterparts. Foreign media will also have to face legal consequences should they run foul of Indian laws. Why, for example, should the BBC, or Time magazine or The Economist get away by showing a map of Kashmir, which is at variance with the official Indian map? Why should they go scot-free when they allow secessionists and terrorists to air their views without giving the government the right to reply, or when they depict sexually explicit scenes, which would otherwise not be cleared by the Censor Board? Since the government can do precious little in the matter, especially about satellite broadcasts, what if it should consider attaching the properties of the offending parties? Demands of this kind are bound to be voiced unless New Delhi makes it clear to the foreign media that they will have to respect Indian susceptibilities, especially where it concerns the country’s integrity and its culture. It may be able to derive some inspiration from France’s successful attempts in the recent GATT to protect its cinematography industry.

Q. Why would the entry of foreign media harm local interests?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 78

They are better equipped managerially and technologically   

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 79

Directions : Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

Two principles are involved in the controversy about the presence of foreign controlled media in the country; the free flow of ideas and images across national borders and the need to safeguard the national interest and preserve cultural autonomy. Both are valid but both are at loggerheads because each has been used to promote less lofty goals.

The first principle conforms to a moral imperative: freedom to expression cannot rhyme with restrictions imposed by any government. But the free flow rhetoric also clouds the fact that the powerful Western, and especially American media, can and often do present, subtly or brazenly, news in a manner that promotes Western political, ideological and strategic interests. Besides, Western entertainment programmes present lifestyles and values that runcounter to the lifestyles and values cherished by traditional societies. All this explains why so many Indian newspapers, magazines and news agencies have sought protection from the courts to prevent foreign publications and news agencies from operating in the country. Their arguments are weak on two counts. As the bitter debate on a new world information and communication order demonstrated in the late seventies and early eighties, many of those who resent Western ‘invasion’ in the fields of information and culture are no great friends of democracy. Secondly, the threat of such an ‘invasion’ has been aired by those media groups in the developing countries that fear that their business interests will be harmed if Western groups, equipped with large financial and technological resources and superior management skills, are allowed to operate in the country without let.

The fear is valid but it goes against the grain of the economic reform programme. The presence of foreign newspapers and television channels will increase competition, which, in the course of time, can only lead to the upgradation of dynamic Indian newspapers and television channels, even while they drive the rest out of the market. One way to strike a balance between the two antagonistic principles would be to allow foreign media entry into the country, provided the India state treats them at par with the domestic media on all fronts. On the import of technology, for instance, foreign media cannot be allowed duty concessions denied to their Indian counterparts. Foreign media will also have to face legal consequences should they run foul of Indian laws. Why, for example, should the BBC, or Time magazine or The Economist get away by showing a map of Kashmir, which is at variance with the official Indian map? Why should they go scot-free when they allow secessionists and terrorists to air their views without giving the government the right to reply, or when they depict sexually explicit scenes, which would otherwise not be cleared by the Censor Board? Since the government can do precious little in the matter, especially about satellite broadcasts, what if it should consider attaching the properties of the offending parties? Demands of this kind are bound to be voiced unless New Delhi makes it clear to the foreign media that they will have to respect Indian susceptibilities, especially where it concerns the country’s integrity and its culture. It may be able to derive some inspiration from France’s successful attempts in the recent GATT to protect its cinematography industry.

Q. Which of the following is the meaning of the phrase “at variance”, as used in the passage?

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 80

Directions : Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

Two principles are involved in the controversy about the presence of foreign controlled media in the country; the free flow of ideas and images across national borders and the need to safeguard the national interest and preserve cultural autonomy. Both are valid but both are at loggerheads because each has been used to promote less lofty goals.

The first principle conforms to a moral imperative: freedom to expression cannot rhyme with restrictions imposed by any government. But the free flow rhetoric also clouds the fact that the powerful Western, and especially American media, can and often do present, subtly or brazenly, news in a manner that promotes Western political, ideological and strategic interests. Besides, Western entertainment programmes present lifestyles and values that runcounter to the lifestyles and values cherished by traditional societies. All this explains why so many Indian newspapers, magazines and news agencies have sought protection from the courts to prevent foreign publications and news agencies from operating in the country. Their arguments are weak on two counts. As the bitter debate on a new world information and communication order demonstrated in the late seventies and early eighties, many of those who resent Western ‘invasion’ in the fields of information and culture are no great friends of democracy. Secondly, the threat of such an ‘invasion’ has been aired by those media groups in the developing countries that fear that their business interests will be harmed if Western groups, equipped with large financial and technological resources and superior management skills, are allowed to operate in the country without let.

The fear is valid but it goes against the grain of the economic reform programme. The presence of foreign newspapers and television channels will increase competition, which, in the course of time, can only lead to the upgradation of dynamic Indian newspapers and television channels, even while they drive the rest out of the market. One way to strike a balance between the two antagonistic principles would be to allow foreign media entry into the country, provided the India state treats them at par with the domestic media on all fronts. On the import of technology, for instance, foreign media cannot be allowed duty concessions denied to their Indian counterparts. Foreign media will also have to face legal consequences should they run foul of Indian laws. Why, for example, should the BBC, or Time magazine or The Economist get away by showing a map of Kashmir, which is at variance with the official Indian map? Why should they go scot-free when they allow secessionists and terrorists to air their views without giving the government the right to reply, or when they depict sexually explicit scenes, which would otherwise not be cleared by the Censor Board? Since the government can do precious little in the matter, especially about satellite broadcasts, what if it should consider attaching the properties of the offending parties? Demands of this kind are bound to be voiced unless New Delhi makes it clear to the foreign media that they will have to respect Indian susceptibilities, especially where it concerns the country’s integrity and its culture. It may be able to derive some inspiration from France’s successful attempts in the recent GATT to protect its cinematography industry.

Q. Which of the following seems to be the most likely purpose of writing this passage?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 80

To highlight the steps and caution to be taken about the entry of foreign media   

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 81

Directions : Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

Two principles are involved in the controversy about the presence of foreign controlled media in the country; the free flow of ideas and images across national borders and the need to safeguard the national interest and preserve cultural autonomy. Both are valid but both are at loggerheads because each has been used to promote less lofty goals.

The first principle conforms to a moral imperative: freedom to expression cannot rhyme with restrictions imposed by any government. But the free flow rhetoric also clouds the fact that the powerful Western, and especially American media, can and often do present, subtly or brazenly, news in a manner that promotes Western political, ideological and strategic interests. Besides, Western entertainment programmes present lifestyles and values that runcounter to the lifestyles and values cherished by traditional societies. All this explains why so many Indian newspapers, magazines and news agencies have sought protection from the courts to prevent foreign publications and news agencies from operating in the country. Their arguments are weak on two counts. As the bitter debate on a new world information and communication order demonstrated in the late seventies and early eighties, many of those who resent Western ‘invasion’ in the fields of information and culture are no great friends of democracy. Secondly, the threat of such an ‘invasion’ has been aired by those media groups in the developing countries that fear that their business interests will be harmed if Western groups, equipped with large financial and technological resources and superior management skills, are allowed to operate in the country without let.

The fear is valid but it goes against the grain of the economic reform programme. The presence of foreign newspapers and television channels will increase competition, which, in the course of time, can only lead to the upgradation of dynamic Indian newspapers and television channels, even while they drive the rest out of the market. One way to strike a balance between the two antagonistic principles would be to allow foreign media entry into the country, provided the India state treats them at par with the domestic media on all fronts. On the import of technology, for instance, foreign media cannot be allowed duty concessions denied to their Indian counterparts. Foreign media will also have to face legal consequences should they run foul of Indian laws. Why, for example, should the BBC, or Time magazine or The Economist get away by showing a map of Kashmir, which is at variance with the official Indian map? Why should they go scot-free when they allow secessionists and terrorists to air their views without giving the government the right to reply, or when they depict sexually explicit scenes, which would otherwise not be cleared by the Censor Board? Since the government can do precious little in the matter, especially about satellite broadcasts, what if it should consider attaching the properties of the offending parties? Demands of this kind are bound to be voiced unless New Delhi makes it clear to the foreign media that they will have to respect Indian susceptibilities, especially where it concerns the country’s integrity and its culture. It may be able to derive some inspiration from France’s successful attempts in the recent GATT to protect its cinematography industry.

Q. Which of the following is the meaning of the phrase “at loggerheads”, as used in the passage?

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 82

Directions : Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

Two principles are involved in the controversy about the presence of foreign controlled media in the country; the free flow of ideas and images across national borders and the need to safeguard the national interest and preserve cultural autonomy. Both are valid but both are at loggerheads because each has been used to promote less lofty goals.

The first principle conforms to a moral imperative: freedom to expression cannot rhyme with restrictions imposed by any government. But the free flow rhetoric also clouds the fact that the powerful Western, and especially American media, can and often do present, subtly or brazenly, news in a manner that promotes Western political, ideological and strategic interests. Besides, Western entertainment programmes present lifestyles and values that runcounter to the lifestyles and values cherished by traditional societies. All this explains why so many Indian newspapers, magazines and news agencies have sought protection from the courts to prevent foreign publications and news agencies from operating in the country. Their arguments are weak on two counts. As the bitter debate on a new world information and communication order demonstrated in the late seventies and early eighties, many of those who resent Western ‘invasion’ in the fields of information and culture are no great friends of democracy. Secondly, the threat of such an ‘invasion’ has been aired by those media groups in the developing countries that fear that their business interests will be harmed if Western groups, equipped with large financial and technological resources and superior management skills, are allowed to operate in the country without let.

The fear is valid but it goes against the grain of the economic reform programme. The presence of foreign newspapers and television channels will increase competition, which, in the course of time, can only lead to the upgradation of dynamic Indian newspapers and television channels, even while they drive the rest out of the market. One way to strike a balance between the two antagonistic principles would be to allow foreign media entry into the country, provided the India state treats them at par with the domestic media on all fronts. On the import of technology, for instance, foreign media cannot be allowed duty concessions denied to their Indian counterparts. Foreign media will also have to face legal consequences should they run foul of Indian laws. Why, for example, should the BBC, or Time magazine or The Economist get away by showing a map of Kashmir, which is at variance with the official Indian map? Why should they go scot-free when they allow secessionists and terrorists to air their views without giving the government the right to reply, or when they depict sexually explicit scenes, which would otherwise not be cleared by the Censor Board? Since the government can do precious little in the matter, especially about satellite broadcasts, what if it should consider attaching the properties of the offending parties? Demands of this kind are bound to be voiced unless New Delhi makes it clear to the foreign media that they will have to respect Indian susceptibilities, especially where it concerns the country’s integrity and its culture. It may be able to derive some inspiration from France’s successful attempts in the recent GATT to protect its cinematography industry.

Directions : Choose the word that is most opposite in meaning to the word given in the passage.

Q. COUNTER

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 82

COUNTER-Contrary; opposing

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 83

Directions : Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

Two principles are involved in the controversy about the presence of foreign controlled media in the country; the free flow of ideas and images across national borders and the need to safeguard the national interest and preserve cultural autonomy. Both are valid but both are at loggerheads because each has been used to promote less lofty goals.

The first principle conforms to a moral imperative: freedom to expression cannot rhyme with restrictions imposed by any government. But the free flow rhetoric also clouds the fact that the powerful Western, and especially American media, can and often do present, subtly or brazenly, news in a manner that promotes Western political, ideological and strategic interests. Besides, Western entertainment programmes present lifestyles and values that runcounter to the lifestyles and values cherished by traditional societies. All this explains why so many Indian newspapers, magazines and news agencies have sought protection from the courts to prevent foreign publications and news agencies from operating in the country. Their arguments are weak on two counts. As the bitter debate on a new world information and communication order demonstrated in the late seventies and early eighties, many of those who resent Western ‘invasion’ in the fields of information and culture are no great friends of democracy. Secondly, the threat of such an ‘invasion’ has been aired by those media groups in the developing countries that fear that their business interests will be harmed if Western groups, equipped with large financial and technological resources and superior management skills, are allowed to operate in the country without let.

The fear is valid but it goes against the grain of the economic reform programme. The presence of foreign newspapers and television channels will increase competition, which, in the course of time, can only lead to the upgradation of dynamic Indian newspapers and television channels, even while they drive the rest out of the market. One way to strike a balance between the two antagonistic principles would be to allow foreign media entry into the country, provided the India state treats them at par with the domestic media on all fronts. On the import of technology, for instance, foreign media cannot be allowed duty concessions denied to their Indian counterparts. Foreign media will also have to face legal consequences should they run foul of Indian laws. Why, for example, should the BBC, or Time magazine or The Economist get away by showing a map of Kashmir, which is at variance with the official Indian map? Why should they go scot-free when they allow secessionists and terrorists to air their views without giving the government the right to reply, or when they depict sexually explicit scenes, which would otherwise not be cleared by the Censor Board? Since the government can do precious little in the matter, especially about satellite broadcasts, what if it should consider attaching the properties of the offending parties? Demands of this kind are bound to be voiced unless New Delhi makes it clear to the foreign media that they will have to respect Indian susceptibilities, especially where it concerns the country’s integrity and its culture. It may be able to derive some inspiration from France’s successful attempts in the recent GATT to protect its cinematography industry.

Directions : Choose the word that is most opposite in meaning to the word given in the passage.

Q. ANTAGONISTIC

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 83

ANTAGONISTIC- showing or feeling active opposition or hostility towards someone or something.

corresponding-analogous or equivalent in character, form, or function; comparable.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 84

Directions : Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

Two principles are involved in the controversy about the presence of foreign controlled media in the country; the free flow of ideas and images across national borders and the need to safeguard the national interest and preserve cultural autonomy. Both are valid but both are at loggerheads because each has been used to promote less lofty goals.

The first principle conforms to a moral imperative: freedom to expression cannot rhyme with restrictions imposed by any government. But the free flow rhetoric also clouds the fact that the powerful Western, and especially American media, can and often do present, subtly or brazenly, news in a manner that promotes Western political, ideological and strategic interests. Besides, Western entertainment programmes present lifestyles and values that runcounter to the lifestyles and values cherished by traditional societies. All this explains why so many Indian newspapers, magazines and news agencies have sought protection from the courts to prevent foreign publications and news agencies from operating in the country. Their arguments are weak on two counts. As the bitter debate on a new world information and communication order demonstrated in the late seventies and early eighties, many of those who resent Western ‘invasion’ in the fields of information and culture are no great friends of democracy. Secondly, the threat of such an ‘invasion’ has been aired by those media groups in the developing countries that fear that their business interests will be harmed if Western groups, equipped with large financial and technological resources and superior management skills, are allowed to operate in the country without let.

The fear is valid but it goes against the grain of the economic reform programme. The presence of foreign newspapers and television channels will increase competition, which, in the course of time, can only lead to the upgradation of dynamic Indian newspapers and television channels, even while they drive the rest out of the market. One way to strike a balance between the two antagonistic principles would be to allow foreign media entry into the country, provided the India state treats them at par with the domestic media on all fronts. On the import of technology, for instance, foreign media cannot be allowed duty concessions denied to their Indian counterparts. Foreign media will also have to face legal consequences should they run foul of Indian laws. Why, for example, should the BBC, or Time magazine or The Economist get away by showing a map of Kashmir, which is at variance with the official Indian map? Why should they go scot-free when they allow secessionists and terrorists to air their views without giving the government the right to reply, or when they depict sexually explicit scenes, which would otherwise not be cleared by the Censor Board? Since the government can do precious little in the matter, especially about satellite broadcasts, what if it should consider attaching the properties of the offending parties? Demands of this kind are bound to be voiced unless New Delhi makes it clear to the foreign media that they will have to respect Indian susceptibilities, especially where it concerns the country’s integrity and its culture. It may be able to derive some inspiration from France’s successful attempts in the recent GATT to protect its cinematography industry.

Directions : Choose the word or group of words that is most similar in meaning to the word given in the passage.

Q. SUSCEPTIBILITIES

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 84

susceptibility-the state or fact of being likely or liable to be influenced or harmed by a particular thing.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 85

Directions : Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

Two principles are involved in the controversy about the presence of foreign controlled media in the country; the free flow of ideas and images across national borders and the need to safeguard the national interest and preserve cultural autonomy. Both are valid but both are at loggerheads because each has been used to promote less lofty goals.

The first principle conforms to a moral imperative: freedom to expression cannot rhyme with restrictions imposed by any government. But the free flow rhetoric also clouds the fact that the powerful Western, and especially American media, can and often do present, subtly or brazenly, news in a manner that promotes Western political, ideological and strategic interests. Besides, Western entertainment programmes present lifestyles and values that runcounter to the lifestyles and values cherished by traditional societies. All this explains why so many Indian newspapers, magazines and news agencies have sought protection from the courts to prevent foreign publications and news agencies from operating in the country. Their arguments are weak on two counts. As the bitter debate on a new world information and communication order demonstrated in the late seventies and early eighties, many of those who resent Western ‘invasion’ in the fields of information and culture are no great friends of democracy. Secondly, the threat of such an ‘invasion’ has been aired by those media groups in the developing countries that fear that their business interests will be harmed if Western groups, equipped with large financial and technological resources and superior management skills, are allowed to operate in the country without let.

The fear is valid but it goes against the grain of the economic reform programme. The presence of foreign newspapers and television channels will increase competition, which, in the course of time, can only lead to the upgradation of dynamic Indian newspapers and television channels, even while they drive the rest out of the market. One way to strike a balance between the two antagonistic principles would be to allow foreign media entry into the country, provided the India state treats them at par with the domestic media on all fronts. On the import of technology, for instance, foreign media cannot be allowed duty concessions denied to their Indian counterparts. Foreign media will also have to face legal consequences should they run foul of Indian laws. Why, for example, should the BBC, or Time magazine or The Economist get away by showing a map of Kashmir, which is at variance with the official Indian map? Why should they go scot-free when they allow secessionists and terrorists to air their views without giving the government the right to reply, or when they depict sexually explicit scenes, which would otherwise not be cleared by the Censor Board? Since the government can do precious little in the matter, especially about satellite broadcasts, what if it should consider attaching the properties of the offending parties? Demands of this kind are bound to be voiced unless New Delhi makes it clear to the foreign media that they will have to respect Indian susceptibilities, especially where it concerns the country’s integrity and its culture. It may be able to derive some inspiration from France’s successful attempts in the recent GATT to protect its cinematography industry.

Directions : Choose the word or group of words that is most similar in meaning to the word given in the passage.

Q. RHETORIC

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 85

RHETORIC-the art of effective or persuasive speaking or writing, especially the exploitation of figures of speech and other compositional techniques.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 86

Directions : In the passage given below there are 10 blanks, each followed by a word given in bold. Each blank has four alternative words given in options (A), (B),(C) and (D). You have to tell which word will best suit the respective blank. Mark (E) as your answer if the word given in bold after the blank is your answer i.e “No change required”.

The idea of the documentary was …86…(deceive) by Anubhav in the year 2007 while he was …87…(attaining) to his undergraduate course …88…(off) the Western International University, New Delhi, India as a possible …89…(enmity) for an annual inter-university competition …90…(furor) SIFE (Students in Free Enterprise) …91…(as well as) his institution rejected his …92…(prosperous) on account of non-feasibility. …93…(sincere) then he is independently working on this documentary and has …94…(likewise) interviewed famous personalities from all walks of …95…(sphere).

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 86

conceive- form or devise (a plan or idea) in the mind

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 87

Directions : In the passage given below there are 10 blanks, each followed by a word given in bold. Each blank has four alternative words given in options (A), (B),(C) and (D). You have to tell which word will best suit the respective blank. Mark (E) as your answer if the word given in bold after the blank is your answer i.e “No change required”.

The idea of the documentary was …86…(deceive) by Anubhav in the year 2007 while he was …87…(attaining) to his undergraduate course …88…(off) the Western International University, New Delhi, India as a possible …89…(enmity) for an annual inter-university competition …90…(furor) SIFE (Students in Free Enterprise) …91…(as well as) his institution rejected his …92…(prosperous) on account of non-feasibility. …93…(sincere) then he is independently working on this documentary and has …94…(likewise) interviewed famous personalities from all walks of …95…(sphere).

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 87

 to attend - be present at (an event, meeting, or function

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 88

Directions : In the passage given below there are 10 blanks, each followed by a word given in bold. Each blank has four alternative words given in options (A), (B),(C) and (D). You have to tell which word will best suit the respective blank. Mark (E) as your answer if the word given in bold after the blank is your answer i.e “No change required”.

The idea of the documentary was …86…(deceive) by Anubhav in the year 2007 while he was …87…(attaining) to his undergraduate course …88…(off) the Western International University, New Delhi, India as a possible …89…(enmity) for an annual inter-university competition …90…(furor) SIFE (Students in Free Enterprise) …91…(as well as) his institution rejected his …92…(prosperous) on account of non-feasibility. …93…(sincere) then he is independently working on this documentary and has …94…(likewise) interviewed famous personalities from all walks of …95…(sphere).

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 88

preposition ‘at' is correct here.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 89

Directions : In the passage given below there are 10 blanks, each followed by a word given in bold. Each blank has four alternative words given in options (A), (B),(C) and (D). You have to tell which word will best suit the respective blank. Mark (E) as your answer if the word given in bold after the blank is your answer i.e “No change required”.

The idea of the documentary was …86…(deceive) by Anubhav in the year 2007 while he was …87…(attaining) to his undergraduate course …88…(off) the Western International University, New Delhi, India as a possible …89…(enmity) for an annual inter-university competition …90…(furor) SIFE (Students in Free Enterprise) …91…(as well as) his institution rejected his …92…(prosperous) on account of non-feasibility. …93…(sincere) then he is independently working on this documentary and has …94…(likewise) interviewed famous personalities from all walks of …95…(sphere).

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 89

 'entry' in the competition.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 90

Directions : In the passage given below there are 10 blanks, each followed by a word given in bold. Each blank has four alternative words given in options (A), (B),(C) and (D). You have to tell which word will best suit the respective blank. Mark (E) as your answer if the word given in bold after the blank is your answer i.e “No change required”.

The idea of the documentary was …86…(deceive) by Anubhav in the year 2007 while he was …87…(attaining) to his undergraduate course …88…(off) the Western International University, New Delhi, India as a possible …89…(enmity) for an annual inter-university competition …90…(furor) SIFE (Students in Free Enterprise) …91…(as well as) his institution rejected his …92…(prosperous) on account of non-feasibility. …93…(sincere) then he is independently working on this documentary and has …94…(likewise) interviewed famous personalities from all walks of …95…(sphere).

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 90

 'for' preposition is apt here.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 91

Directions : In the passage given below there are 10 blanks, each followed by a word given in bold. Each blank has four alternative words given in options (A), (B),(C) and (D). You have to tell which word will best suit the respective blank. Mark (E) as your answer if the word given in bold after the blank is your answer i.e “No change required”.

The idea of the documentary was …86…(deceive) by Anubhav in the year 2007 while he was …87…(attaining) to his undergraduate course …88…(off) the Western International University, New Delhi, India as a possible …89…(enmity) for an annual inter-university competition …90…(furor) SIFE (Students in Free Enterprise) …91…(as well as) his institution rejected his …92…(prosperous) on account of non-feasibility. …93…(sincere) then he is independently working on this documentary and has …94…(likewise) interviewed famous personalities from all walks of …95…(sphere).

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 91

'but' shows contradiction in the idea

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 92

Directions : In the passage given below there are 10 blanks, each followed by a word given in bold. Each blank has four alternative words given in options (A), (B),(C) and (D). You have to tell which word will best suit the respective blank. Mark (E) as your answer if the word given in bold after the blank is your answer i.e “No change required”.

The idea of the documentary was …86…(deceive) by Anubhav in the year 2007 while he was …87…(attaining) to his undergraduate course …88…(off) the Western International University, New Delhi, India as a possible …89…(enmity) for an annual inter-university competition …90…(furor) SIFE (Students in Free Enterprise) …91…(as well as) his institution rejected his …92…(prosperous) on account of non-feasibility. …93…(sincere) then he is independently working on this documentary and has …94…(likewise) interviewed famous personalities from all walks of …95…(sphere).

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 92

rejected his proposal is right phrase.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 93

Directions : In the passage given below there are 10 blanks, each followed by a word given in bold. Each blank has four alternative words given in options (A), (B),(C) and (D). You have to tell which word will best suit the respective blank. Mark (E) as your answer if the word given in bold after the blank is your answer i.e “No change required”.

The idea of the documentary was …86…(deceive) by Anubhav in the year 2007 while he was …87…(attaining) to his undergraduate course …88…(off) the Western International University, New Delhi, India as a possible …89…(enmity) for an annual inter-university competition …90…(furor) SIFE (Students in Free Enterprise) …91…(as well as) his institution rejected his …92…(prosperous) on account of non-feasibility. …93…(sincere) then he is independently working on this documentary and has …94…(likewise) interviewed famous personalities from all walks of …95…(sphere).

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 93

'Since then' shows period of time

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 94

Directions : In the passage given below there are 10 blanks, each followed by a word given in bold. Each blank has four alternative words given in options (A), (B),(C) and (D). You have to tell which word will best suit the respective blank. Mark (E) as your answer if the word given in bold after the blank is your answer i.e “No change required”.

The idea of the documentary was …86…(deceive) by Anubhav in the year 2007 while he was …87…(attaining) to his undergraduate course …88…(off) the Western International University, New Delhi, India as a possible …89…(enmity) for an annual inter-university competition …90…(furor) SIFE (Students in Free Enterprise) …91…(as well as) his institution rejected his …92…(prosperous) on account of non-feasibility. …93…(sincere) then he is independently working on this documentary and has …94…(likewise) interviewed famous personalities from all walks of …95…(sphere).

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 94

already is correct adverb

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 95

Directions : In the passage given below there are 10 blanks, each followed by a word given in bold. Each blank has four alternative words given in options (A), (B),(C) and (D). You have to tell which word will best suit the respective blank. Mark (E) as your answer if the word given in bold after the blank is your answer i.e “No change required”.

The idea of the documentary was …86…(deceive) by Anubhav in the year 2007 while he was …87…(attaining) to his undergraduate course …88…(off) the Western International University, New Delhi, India as a possible …89…(enmity) for an annual inter-university competition …90…(furor) SIFE (Students in Free Enterprise) …91…(as well as) his institution rejected his …92…(prosperous) on account of non-feasibility. …93…(sincere) then he is independently working on this documentary and has …94…(likewise) interviewed famous personalities from all walks of …95…(sphere).

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 95

'all walks of life' is correct phrase.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 96

Directions : Read each sentence to find out whether there is any grammatical error in it. The error if any will be in one part of the sentence, the number of that part will be the answer. If there is no error, mark (e) as the answer. (Ignore errors of punctuation, if any.)

If South Asian nations has spectrum (a)/to spare after keeping open channels for disaster (b)/ warning, intelligence sharing and other communications, Indian television (c)/ programming could acquire a larger footprint with SAS’ launch. (d)/No error (e)

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 96

Plural verb is needed here.
If South Asian nations 'have' spectrum

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 97

Directions : Read each sentence to find out whether there is any grammatical error in it. The error if any will be in one part of the sentence, the number of that part will be the answer. If there is no error, mark (e) as the answer. (Ignore errors of punctuation, if any.)

There could be many gains(a)/ to be had from the communication (b)/satellite’s transponders be made available (c)/ to the neighbourhood.(d)/No error (e)

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 97

Tense related error here
satellite’s transponders 'being' made available

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 98

Directions : Read each sentence to find out whether there is any grammatical error in it. The error if any will be in one part of the sentence, the number of that part will be the answer. If there is no error, mark (e) as the answer. (Ignore errors of punctuation, if any.)

By sharing some of the (a)/ ground tracking tech and training personnel from the neighboring (b)/nations who want that service, India would enhance its reputation not only for (c)/ technological capability but also meaningful multilateral cooperation.(d)/No error (e)

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 98

For is omitted from here.
technological capability but also 'for' meaningful multilateral cooperation.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 99

Directions : Read each sentence to find out whether there is any grammatical error in it. The error if any will be in one part of the sentence, the number of that part will be the answer. If there is no error, mark (e) as the answer. (Ignore errors of punctuation, if any.)

More police and a larger (a)/ judiciary can both reduce (b)/ crime as well as speed up the process (c)/of justice for the ordinary citizen.(d)/No error 

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 100

Directions : Read each sentence to find out whether there is any grammatical error in it. The error if any will be in one part of the sentence, the number of that part will be the answer. If there is no error, mark (e) as the answer. (Ignore errors of punctuation, if any.)

We take tens of thousand of breaths(a)/ per day; yet, it is quite possible that we may (b)/ spend our whole lifetime without ever(c)/ pondering about whether we can improve the quality of breathing.(d)/No error (e)

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 21 (27-01-2023) - Question 100

Correct sentence is- We take tens of 'thousands' of breaths

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