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SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023)


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100 Questions MCQ Test Mock Tests for Banking Exam and Past Year Papers | SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023)

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SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 1

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

The debate over the moves by the Central and the Jammu and Kashmir governments to resettle Kashmiri Pandits in Kashmir is one that will only bring pain to any well-wisher of the State. To understand this, one has to go back in time, when the second half of the 1980s saw Kashmir spiral out of control, gripped by violence, suspicion and dread. What had begun as an ethnic conflict was soon imparted a religious colour by Pakistan’s Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI). The Pandits, a Hindu minority in the Kashmir Valley, were targeted by the Jammu Kashmir Liberation Front (JKLF), even though the organisation had sought to build on the original secular foundations of the National Conference, and by the Hizb-ul-Mujahideen, a secessionist outfit, which sparked their exodus. By 2008, their population, as assessed by the Kashmiri Pandit Sangharsh Samiti (KPSS), was reduced to 651 families from 75,343 families on January 1, 1990. Nearly 70,000 families fled in the turmoil of 1990-92, and even though the violence was brought under control, most of the remaining families left thereafter.

By 1990 — I was Special Commissioner, Anantnag, in South Kashmir then — the public had ceased to visit government offices. But in early March, several hundred people from the Nai Basti neighbourhood went to the Special Commissioner’s office in Khannabal demanding to see me. Because of the disturbed circumstances, I had set up office and residence in the rest house in the district headquarters. Mohammad Syed Shah, generally known as Syed Shah, the brother of the separatist leader, Shabbir Shah, and Muslim United Front (MUF) member of the dissolved State Assembly, demanded to know why Pandits were leaving en masse and in turn why the administration was doing nothing about it. Mr. Shah accused the administration of encouraging the migration so that the Army would be left free to unleash its heavy artillery on all habitations. When I asked the delegation if it believed that I would be party to such a plan, this was their response: ‘I had been kept in the dark, while they were privy to “secret” information’. That the Pandits were apprehensive was hardly surprising, I said. Places of worship, like the one in Anantnag, where the majority went, were being used to issue threats to them over loudspeakers. I learnt later that these inflammatory sermons, and their reverberating public applause, were audio recordings circulated to mosques to be played over loudspeakers at prayer time. Local Muslims needed to reassure the Pandits of their safety, I said. The administration would provide security whenever a threat to the Pandits was anticipated, but how effective it would all be would depend on unstinted public support, given that the residences of the Pandits were scattered. The gathering concurred and dispersed. I requested State Governor Jagmohan that he appeal to the Pandits, in a telecast, that they stay on in Kashmir, and assure them of their safety on the basis of the assurances of the Anantnag residents. Unfortunately, the only announcement to this effect was that “refugee” camps were being set up in every district, and Pandits who felt threatened could move to them rather than leave the Valley. Pandits in service who felt threatened were free to leave their stations; they would continue to be paid their salaries. I relate this story because the present flurry of allegations brings a sense of de-ja-vu. The Pandits — more than 1,20,000 in the early 1980s — numbered about 7,000 in the Kashmir Valley, in 2005.

Q. Which of the following is the meaning of the word “Exodus”?

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 2

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

The debate over the moves by the Central and the Jammu and Kashmir governments to resettle Kashmiri Pandits in Kashmir is one that will only bring pain to any well-wisher of the State. To understand this, one has to go back in time, when the second half of the 1980s saw Kashmir spiral out of control, gripped by violence, suspicion and dread. What had begun as an ethnic conflict was soon imparted a religious colour by Pakistan’s Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI). The Pandits, a Hindu minority in the Kashmir Valley, were targeted by the Jammu Kashmir Liberation Front (JKLF), even though the organisation had sought to build on the original secular foundations of the National Conference, and by the Hizb-ul-Mujahideen, a secessionist outfit, which sparked their exodus. By 2008, their population, as assessed by the Kashmiri Pandit Sangharsh Samiti (KPSS), was reduced to 651 families from 75,343 families on January 1, 1990. Nearly 70,000 families fled in the turmoil of 1990-92, and even though the violence was brought under control, most of the remaining families left thereafter.

By 1990 — I was Special Commissioner, Anantnag, in South Kashmir then — the public had ceased to visit government offices. But in early March, several hundred people from the Nai Basti neighbourhood went to the Special Commissioner’s office in Khannabal demanding to see me. Because of the disturbed circumstances, I had set up office and residence in the rest house in the district headquarters. Mohammad Syed Shah, generally known as Syed Shah, the brother of the separatist leader, Shabbir Shah, and Muslim United Front (MUF) member of the dissolved State Assembly, demanded to know why Pandits were leaving en masse and in turn why the administration was doing nothing about it. Mr. Shah accused the administration of encouraging the migration so that the Army would be left free to unleash its heavy artillery on all habitations. When I asked the delegation if it believed that I would be party to such a plan, this was their response: ‘I had been kept in the dark, while they were privy to “secret” information’. That the Pandits were apprehensive was hardly surprising, I said. Places of worship, like the one in Anantnag, where the majority went, were being used to issue threats to them over loudspeakers. I learnt later that these inflammatory sermons, and their reverberating public applause, were audio recordings circulated to mosques to be played over loudspeakers at prayer time. Local Muslims needed to reassure the Pandits of their safety, I said. The administration would provide security whenever a threat to the Pandits was anticipated, but how effective it would all be would depend on unstinted public support, given that the residences of the Pandits were scattered. The gathering concurred and dispersed. I requested State Governor Jagmohan that he appeal to the Pandits, in a telecast, that they stay on in Kashmir, and assure them of their safety on the basis of the assurances of the Anantnag residents. Unfortunately, the only announcement to this effect was that “refugee” camps were being set up in every district, and Pandits who felt threatened could move to them rather than leave the Valley. Pandits in service who felt threatened were free to leave their stations; they would continue to be paid their salaries. I relate this story because the present flurry of allegations brings a sense of de-ja-vu. The Pandits — more than 1,20,000 in the early 1980s — numbered about 7,000 in the Kashmir Valley, in 2005.

Q. Which of the following is the synonym of the word “Dread”?

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 3

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

The debate over the moves by the Central and the Jammu and Kashmir governments to resettle Kashmiri Pandits in Kashmir is one that will only bring pain to any well-wisher of the State. To understand this, one has to go back in time, when the second half of the 1980s saw Kashmir spiral out of control, gripped by violence, suspicion and dread. What had begun as an ethnic conflict was soon imparted a religious colour by Pakistan’s Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI). The Pandits, a Hindu minority in the Kashmir Valley, were targeted by the Jammu Kashmir Liberation Front (JKLF), even though the organisation had sought to build on the original secular foundations of the National Conference, and by the Hizb-ul-Mujahideen, a secessionist outfit, which sparked their exodus. By 2008, their population, as assessed by the Kashmiri Pandit Sangharsh Samiti (KPSS), was reduced to 651 families from 75,343 families on January 1, 1990. Nearly 70,000 families fled in the turmoil of 1990-92, and even though the violence was brought under control, most of the remaining families left thereafter.

By 1990 — I was Special Commissioner, Anantnag, in South Kashmir then — the public had ceased to visit government offices. But in early March, several hundred people from the Nai Basti neighbourhood went to the Special Commissioner’s office in Khannabal demanding to see me. Because of the disturbed circumstances, I had set up office and residence in the rest house in the district headquarters. Mohammad Syed Shah, generally known as Syed Shah, the brother of the separatist leader, Shabbir Shah, and Muslim United Front (MUF) member of the dissolved State Assembly, demanded to know why Pandits were leaving en masse and in turn why the administration was doing nothing about it. Mr. Shah accused the administration of encouraging the migration so that the Army would be left free to unleash its heavy artillery on all habitations. When I asked the delegation if it believed that I would be party to such a plan, this was their response: ‘I had been kept in the dark, while they were privy to “secret” information’. That the Pandits were apprehensive was hardly surprising, I said. Places of worship, like the one in Anantnag, where the majority went, were being used to issue threats to them over loudspeakers. I learnt later that these inflammatory sermons, and their reverberating public applause, were audio recordings circulated to mosques to be played over loudspeakers at prayer time. Local Muslims needed to reassure the Pandits of their safety, I said. The administration would provide security whenever a threat to the Pandits was anticipated, but how effective it would all be would depend on unstinted public support, given that the residences of the Pandits were scattered. The gathering concurred and dispersed. I requested State Governor Jagmohan that he appeal to the Pandits, in a telecast, that they stay on in Kashmir, and assure them of their safety on the basis of the assurances of the Anantnag residents. Unfortunately, the only announcement to this effect was that “refugee” camps were being set up in every district, and Pandits who felt threatened could move to them rather than leave the Valley. Pandits in service who felt threatened were free to leave their stations; they would continue to be paid their salaries. I relate this story because the present flurry of allegations brings a sense of de-ja-vu. The Pandits — more than 1,20,000 in the early 1980s — numbered about 7,000 in the Kashmir Valley, in 2005.

Q. Choose an appropriate Title for the above passage :

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 4

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

The debate over the moves by the Central and the Jammu and Kashmir governments to resettle Kashmiri Pandits in Kashmir is one that will only bring pain to any well-wisher of the State. To understand this, one has to go back in time, when the second half of the 1980s saw Kashmir spiral out of control, gripped by violence, suspicion and dread. What had begun as an ethnic conflict was soon imparted a religious colour by Pakistan’s Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI). The Pandits, a Hindu minority in the Kashmir Valley, were targeted by the Jammu Kashmir Liberation Front (JKLF), even though the organisation had sought to build on the original secular foundations of the National Conference, and by the Hizb-ul-Mujahideen, a secessionist outfit, which sparked their exodus. By 2008, their population, as assessed by the Kashmiri Pandit Sangharsh Samiti (KPSS), was reduced to 651 families from 75,343 families on January 1, 1990. Nearly 70,000 families fled in the turmoil of 1990-92, and even though the violence was brought under control, most of the remaining families left thereafter.

By 1990 — I was Special Commissioner, Anantnag, in South Kashmir then — the public had ceased to visit government offices. But in early March, several hundred people from the Nai Basti neighbourhood went to the Special Commissioner’s office in Khannabal demanding to see me. Because of the disturbed circumstances, I had set up office and residence in the rest house in the district headquarters. Mohammad Syed Shah, generally known as Syed Shah, the brother of the separatist leader, Shabbir Shah, and Muslim United Front (MUF) member of the dissolved State Assembly, demanded to know why Pandits were leaving en masse and in turn why the administration was doing nothing about it. Mr. Shah accused the administration of encouraging the migration so that the Army would be left free to unleash its heavy artillery on all habitations. When I asked the delegation if it believed that I would be party to such a plan, this was their response: ‘I had been kept in the dark, while they were privy to “secret” information’. That the Pandits were apprehensive was hardly surprising, I said. Places of worship, like the one in Anantnag, where the majority went, were being used to issue threats to them over loudspeakers. I learnt later that these inflammatory sermons, and their reverberating public applause, were audio recordings circulated to mosques to be played over loudspeakers at prayer time. Local Muslims needed to reassure the Pandits of their safety, I said. The administration would provide security whenever a threat to the Pandits was anticipated, but how effective it would all be would depend on unstinted public support, given that the residences of the Pandits were scattered. The gathering concurred and dispersed. I requested State Governor Jagmohan that he appeal to the Pandits, in a telecast, that they stay on in Kashmir, and assure them of their safety on the basis of the assurances of the Anantnag residents. Unfortunately, the only announcement to this effect was that “refugee” camps were being set up in every district, and Pandits who felt threatened could move to them rather than leave the Valley. Pandits in service who felt threatened were free to leave their stations; they would continue to be paid their salaries. I relate this story because the present flurry of allegations brings a sense of de-ja-vu. The Pandits — more than 1,20,000 in the early 1980s — numbered about 7,000 in the Kashmir Valley, in 2005.

Q. Which of the following options best describes the meaning of the phrase “privy to secret information”.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 5

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

The debate over the moves by the Central and the Jammu and Kashmir governments to resettle Kashmiri Pandits in Kashmir is one that will only bring pain to any well-wisher of the State. To understand this, one has to go back in time, when the second half of the 1980s saw Kashmir spiral out of control, gripped by violence, suspicion and dread. What had begun as an ethnic conflict was soon imparted a religious colour by Pakistan’s Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI). The Pandits, a Hindu minority in the Kashmir Valley, were targeted by the Jammu Kashmir Liberation Front (JKLF), even though the organisation had sought to build on the original secular foundations of the National Conference, and by the Hizb-ul-Mujahideen, a secessionist outfit, which sparked their exodus. By 2008, their population, as assessed by the Kashmiri Pandit Sangharsh Samiti (KPSS), was reduced to 651 families from 75,343 families on January 1, 1990. Nearly 70,000 families fled in the turmoil of 1990-92, and even though the violence was brought under control, most of the remaining families left thereafter.

By 1990 — I was Special Commissioner, Anantnag, in South Kashmir then — the public had ceased to visit government offices. But in early March, several hundred people from the Nai Basti neighbourhood went to the Special Commissioner’s office in Khannabal demanding to see me. Because of the disturbed circumstances, I had set up office and residence in the rest house in the district headquarters. Mohammad Syed Shah, generally known as Syed Shah, the brother of the separatist leader, Shabbir Shah, and Muslim United Front (MUF) member of the dissolved State Assembly, demanded to know why Pandits were leaving en masse and in turn why the administration was doing nothing about it. Mr. Shah accused the administration of encouraging the migration so that the Army would be left free to unleash its heavy artillery on all habitations. When I asked the delegation if it believed that I would be party to such a plan, this was their response: ‘I had been kept in the dark, while they were privy to “secret” information’. That the Pandits were apprehensive was hardly surprising, I said. Places of worship, like the one in Anantnag, where the majority went, were being used to issue threats to them over loudspeakers. I learnt later that these inflammatory sermons, and their reverberating public applause, were audio recordings circulated to mosques to be played over loudspeakers at prayer time. Local Muslims needed to reassure the Pandits of their safety, I said. The administration would provide security whenever a threat to the Pandits was anticipated, but how effective it would all be would depend on unstinted public support, given that the residences of the Pandits were scattered. The gathering concurred and dispersed. I requested State Governor Jagmohan that he appeal to the Pandits, in a telecast, that they stay on in Kashmir, and assure them of their safety on the basis of the assurances of the Anantnag residents. Unfortunately, the only announcement to this effect was that “refugee” camps were being set up in every district, and Pandits who felt threatened could move to them rather than leave the Valley. Pandits in service who felt threatened were free to leave their stations; they would continue to be paid their salaries. I relate this story because the present flurry of allegations brings a sense of de-ja-vu. The Pandits — more than 1,20,000 in the early 1980s — numbered about 7,000 in the Kashmir Valley, in 2005.

Q. Which of the following is not true according to the passage?

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 6

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

The debate over the moves by the Central and the Jammu and Kashmir governments to resettle Kashmiri Pandits in Kashmir is one that will only bring pain to any well-wisher of the State. To understand this, one has to go back in time, when the second half of the 1980s saw Kashmir spiral out of control, gripped by violence, suspicion and dread. What had begun as an ethnic conflict was soon imparted a religious colour by Pakistan’s Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI). The Pandits, a Hindu minority in the Kashmir Valley, were targeted by the Jammu Kashmir Liberation Front (JKLF), even though the organisation had sought to build on the original secular foundations of the National Conference, and by the Hizb-ul-Mujahideen, a secessionist outfit, which sparked their exodus. By 2008, their population, as assessed by the Kashmiri Pandit Sangharsh Samiti (KPSS), was reduced to 651 families from 75,343 families on January 1, 1990. Nearly 70,000 families fled in the turmoil of 1990-92, and even though the violence was brought under control, most of the remaining families left thereafter.

By 1990 — I was Special Commissioner, Anantnag, in South Kashmir then — the public had ceased to visit government offices. But in early March, several hundred people from the Nai Basti neighbourhood went to the Special Commissioner’s office in Khannabal demanding to see me. Because of the disturbed circumstances, I had set up office and residence in the rest house in the district headquarters. Mohammad Syed Shah, generally known as Syed Shah, the brother of the separatist leader, Shabbir Shah, and Muslim United Front (MUF) member of the dissolved State Assembly, demanded to know why Pandits were leaving en masse and in turn why the administration was doing nothing about it. Mr. Shah accused the administration of encouraging the migration so that the Army would be left free to unleash its heavy artillery on all habitations. When I asked the delegation if it believed that I would be party to such a plan, this was their response: ‘I had been kept in the dark, while they were privy to “secret” information’. That the Pandits were apprehensive was hardly surprising, I said. Places of worship, like the one in Anantnag, where the majority went, were being used to issue threats to them over loudspeakers. I learnt later that these inflammatory sermons, and their reverberating public applause, were audio recordings circulated to mosques to be played over loudspeakers at prayer time. Local Muslims needed to reassure the Pandits of their safety, I said. The administration would provide security whenever a threat to the Pandits was anticipated, but how effective it would all be would depend on unstinted public support, given that the residences of the Pandits were scattered. The gathering concurred and dispersed. I requested State Governor Jagmohan that he appeal to the Pandits, in a telecast, that they stay on in Kashmir, and assure them of their safety on the basis of the assurances of the Anantnag residents. Unfortunately, the only announcement to this effect was that “refugee” camps were being set up in every district, and Pandits who felt threatened could move to them rather than leave the Valley. Pandits in service who felt threatened were free to leave their stations; they would continue to be paid their salaries. I relate this story because the present flurry of allegations brings a sense of de-ja-vu. The Pandits — more than 1,20,000 in the early 1980s — numbered about 7,000 in the Kashmir Valley, in 2005.

Q. Which of the following is not the synonym of the word “turmoil”?

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 7

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

The debate over the moves by the Central and the Jammu and Kashmir governments to resettle Kashmiri Pandits in Kashmir is one that will only bring pain to any well-wisher of the State. To understand this, one has to go back in time, when the second half of the 1980s saw Kashmir spiral out of control, gripped by violence, suspicion and dread. What had begun as an ethnic conflict was soon imparted a religious colour by Pakistan’s Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI). The Pandits, a Hindu minority in the Kashmir Valley, were targeted by the Jammu Kashmir Liberation Front (JKLF), even though the organisation had sought to build on the original secular foundations of the National Conference, and by the Hizb-ul-Mujahideen, a secessionist outfit, which sparked their exodus. By 2008, their population, as assessed by the Kashmiri Pandit Sangharsh Samiti (KPSS), was reduced to 651 families from 75,343 families on January 1, 1990. Nearly 70,000 families fled in the turmoil of 1990-92, and even though the violence was brought under control, most of the remaining families left thereafter.

By 1990 — I was Special Commissioner, Anantnag, in South Kashmir then — the public had ceased to visit government offices. But in early March, several hundred people from the Nai Basti neighbourhood went to the Special Commissioner’s office in Khannabal demanding to see me. Because of the disturbed circumstances, I had set up office and residence in the rest house in the district headquarters. Mohammad Syed Shah, generally known as Syed Shah, the brother of the separatist leader, Shabbir Shah, and Muslim United Front (MUF) member of the dissolved State Assembly, demanded to know why Pandits were leaving en masse and in turn why the administration was doing nothing about it. Mr. Shah accused the administration of encouraging the migration so that the Army would be left free to unleash its heavy artillery on all habitations. When I asked the delegation if it believed that I would be party to such a plan, this was their response: ‘I had been kept in the dark, while they were privy to “secret” information’. That the Pandits were apprehensive was hardly surprising, I said. Places of worship, like the one in Anantnag, where the majority went, were being used to issue threats to them over loudspeakers. I learnt later that these inflammatory sermons, and their reverberating public applause, were audio recordings circulated to mosques to be played over loudspeakers at prayer time. Local Muslims needed to reassure the Pandits of their safety, I said. The administration would provide security whenever a threat to the Pandits was anticipated, but how effective it would all be would depend on unstinted public support, given that the residences of the Pandits were scattered. The gathering concurred and dispersed. I requested State Governor Jagmohan that he appeal to the Pandits, in a telecast, that they stay on in Kashmir, and assure them of their safety on the basis of the assurances of the Anantnag residents. Unfortunately, the only announcement to this effect was that “refugee” camps were being set up in every district, and Pandits who felt threatened could move to them rather than leave the Valley. Pandits in service who felt threatened were free to leave their stations; they would continue to be paid their salaries. I relate this story because the present flurry of allegations brings a sense of de-ja-vu. The Pandits — more than 1,20,000 in the early 1980s — numbered about 7,000 in the Kashmir Valley, in 2005.

Q. What is the synonym of the word “apprehensive”?

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 8

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

The debate over the moves by the Central and the Jammu and Kashmir governments to resettle Kashmiri Pandits in Kashmir is one that will only bring pain to any well-wisher of the State. To understand this, one has to go back in time, when the second half of the 1980s saw Kashmir spiral out of control, gripped by violence, suspicion and dread. What had begun as an ethnic conflict was soon imparted a religious colour by Pakistan’s Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI). The Pandits, a Hindu minority in the Kashmir Valley, were targeted by the Jammu Kashmir Liberation Front (JKLF), even though the organisation had sought to build on the original secular foundations of the National Conference, and by the Hizb-ul-Mujahideen, a secessionist outfit, which sparked their exodus. By 2008, their population, as assessed by the Kashmiri Pandit Sangharsh Samiti (KPSS), was reduced to 651 families from 75,343 families on January 1, 1990. Nearly 70,000 families fled in the turmoil of 1990-92, and even though the violence was brought under control, most of the remaining families left thereafter.

By 1990 — I was Special Commissioner, Anantnag, in South Kashmir then — the public had ceased to visit government offices. But in early March, several hundred people from the Nai Basti neighbourhood went to the Special Commissioner’s office in Khannabal demanding to see me. Because of the disturbed circumstances, I had set up office and residence in the rest house in the district headquarters. Mohammad Syed Shah, generally known as Syed Shah, the brother of the separatist leader, Shabbir Shah, and Muslim United Front (MUF) member of the dissolved State Assembly, demanded to know why Pandits were leaving en masse and in turn why the administration was doing nothing about it. Mr. Shah accused the administration of encouraging the migration so that the Army would be left free to unleash its heavy artillery on all habitations. When I asked the delegation if it believed that I would be party to such a plan, this was their response: ‘I had been kept in the dark, while they were privy to “secret” information’. That the Pandits were apprehensive was hardly surprising, I said. Places of worship, like the one in Anantnag, where the majority went, were being used to issue threats to them over loudspeakers. I learnt later that these inflammatory sermons, and their reverberating public applause, were audio recordings circulated to mosques to be played over loudspeakers at prayer time. Local Muslims needed to reassure the Pandits of their safety, I said. The administration would provide security whenever a threat to the Pandits was anticipated, but how effective it would all be would depend on unstinted public support, given that the residences of the Pandits were scattered. The gathering concurred and dispersed. I requested State Governor Jagmohan that he appeal to the Pandits, in a telecast, that they stay on in Kashmir, and assure them of their safety on the basis of the assurances of the Anantnag residents. Unfortunately, the only announcement to this effect was that “refugee” camps were being set up in every district, and Pandits who felt threatened could move to them rather than leave the Valley. Pandits in service who felt threatened were free to leave their stations; they would continue to be paid their salaries. I relate this story because the present flurry of allegations brings a sense of de-ja-vu. The Pandits — more than 1,20,000 in the early 1980s — numbered about 7,000 in the Kashmir Valley, in 2005.

Q. In the passage, Mr Shah accused the administration for………….. .

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 9

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

The debate over the moves by the Central and the Jammu and Kashmir governments to resettle Kashmiri Pandits in Kashmir is one that will only bring pain to any well-wisher of the State. To understand this, one has to go back in time, when the second half of the 1980s saw Kashmir spiral out of control, gripped by violence, suspicion and dread. What had begun as an ethnic conflict was soon imparted a religious colour by Pakistan’s Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI). The Pandits, a Hindu minority in the Kashmir Valley, were targeted by the Jammu Kashmir Liberation Front (JKLF), even though the organisation had sought to build on the original secular foundations of the National Conference, and by the Hizb-ul-Mujahideen, a secessionist outfit, which sparked their exodus. By 2008, their population, as assessed by the Kashmiri Pandit Sangharsh Samiti (KPSS), was reduced to 651 families from 75,343 families on January 1, 1990. Nearly 70,000 families fled in the turmoil of 1990-92, and even though the violence was brought under control, most of the remaining families left thereafter.

By 1990 — I was Special Commissioner, Anantnag, in South Kashmir then — the public had ceased to visit government offices. But in early March, several hundred people from the Nai Basti neighbourhood went to the Special Commissioner’s office in Khannabal demanding to see me. Because of the disturbed circumstances, I had set up office and residence in the rest house in the district headquarters. Mohammad Syed Shah, generally known as Syed Shah, the brother of the separatist leader, Shabbir Shah, and Muslim United Front (MUF) member of the dissolved State Assembly, demanded to know why Pandits were leaving en masse and in turn why the administration was doing nothing about it. Mr. Shah accused the administration of encouraging the migration so that the Army would be left free to unleash its heavy artillery on all habitations. When I asked the delegation if it believed that I would be party to such a plan, this was their response: ‘I had been kept in the dark, while they were privy to “secret” information’. That the Pandits were apprehensive was hardly surprising, I said. Places of worship, like the one in Anantnag, where the majority went, were being used to issue threats to them over loudspeakers. I learnt later that these inflammatory sermons, and their reverberating public applause, were audio recordings circulated to mosques to be played over loudspeakers at prayer time. Local Muslims needed to reassure the Pandits of their safety, I said. The administration would provide security whenever a threat to the Pandits was anticipated, but how effective it would all be would depend on unstinted public support, given that the residences of the Pandits were scattered. The gathering concurred and dispersed. I requested State Governor Jagmohan that he appeal to the Pandits, in a telecast, that they stay on in Kashmir, and assure them of their safety on the basis of the assurances of the Anantnag residents. Unfortunately, the only announcement to this effect was that “refugee” camps were being set up in every district, and Pandits who felt threatened could move to them rather than leave the Valley. Pandits in service who felt threatened were free to leave their stations; they would continue to be paid their salaries. I relate this story because the present flurry of allegations brings a sense of de-ja-vu. The Pandits — more than 1,20,000 in the early 1980s — numbered about 7,000 in the Kashmir Valley, in 2005.

Q. What is not the synonym of word “unstinted”?

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 10

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

The debate over the moves by the Central and the Jammu and Kashmir governments to resettle Kashmiri Pandits in Kashmir is one that will only bring pain to any well-wisher of the State. To understand this, one has to go back in time, when the second half of the 1980s saw Kashmir spiral out of control, gripped by violence, suspicion and dread. What had begun as an ethnic conflict was soon imparted a religious colour by Pakistan’s Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI). The Pandits, a Hindu minority in the Kashmir Valley, were targeted by the Jammu Kashmir Liberation Front (JKLF), even though the organisation had sought to build on the original secular foundations of the National Conference, and by the Hizb-ul-Mujahideen, a secessionist outfit, which sparked their exodus. By 2008, their population, as assessed by the Kashmiri Pandit Sangharsh Samiti (KPSS), was reduced to 651 families from 75,343 families on January 1, 1990. Nearly 70,000 families fled in the turmoil of 1990-92, and even though the violence was brought under control, most of the remaining families left thereafter.

By 1990 — I was Special Commissioner, Anantnag, in South Kashmir then — the public had ceased to visit government offices. But in early March, several hundred people from the Nai Basti neighbourhood went to the Special Commissioner’s office in Khannabal demanding to see me. Because of the disturbed circumstances, I had set up office and residence in the rest house in the district headquarters. Mohammad Syed Shah, generally known as Syed Shah, the brother of the separatist leader, Shabbir Shah, and Muslim United Front (MUF) member of the dissolved State Assembly, demanded to know why Pandits were leaving en masse and in turn why the administration was doing nothing about it. Mr. Shah accused the administration of encouraging the migration so that the Army would be left free to unleash its heavy artillery on all habitations. When I asked the delegation if it believed that I would be party to such a plan, this was their response: ‘I had been kept in the dark, while they were privy to “secret” information’. That the Pandits were apprehensive was hardly surprising, I said. Places of worship, like the one in Anantnag, where the majority went, were being used to issue threats to them over loudspeakers. I learnt later that these inflammatory sermons, and their reverberating public applause, were audio recordings circulated to mosques to be played over loudspeakers at prayer time. Local Muslims needed to reassure the Pandits of their safety, I said. The administration would provide security whenever a threat to the Pandits was anticipated, but how effective it would all be would depend on unstinted public support, given that the residences of the Pandits were scattered. The gathering concurred and dispersed. I requested State Governor Jagmohan that he appeal to the Pandits, in a telecast, that they stay on in Kashmir, and assure them of their safety on the basis of the assurances of the Anantnag residents. Unfortunately, the only announcement to this effect was that “refugee” camps were being set up in every district, and Pandits who felt threatened could move to them rather than leave the Valley. Pandits in service who felt threatened were free to leave their stations; they would continue to be paid their salaries. I relate this story because the present flurry of allegations brings a sense of de-ja-vu. The Pandits — more than 1,20,000 in the early 1980s — numbered about 7,000 in the Kashmir Valley, in 2005.

Q. Which of the following organizations is not mentioned in the passage?

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 11

Find the Error in the following .If No error found select (E) as the answer. 

They had to (A)/ face much troubles (B) during their (C)/ journey to West (D)/ Bengal. No error (E)

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 11

much trouble (not troubles) 

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 12

Find the Error in the following .If No error found select (E) as the answer.

Most of (A)/ the five-years (B)/plans of India (C)/ have been (D)/ successful. No error (E)

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 12

five year plans (not five-years) 

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 13

Find the Error in the following .If No error found select (E) as the answer.

One of (A)/ my student (B)/ tells me (C)/ that she has failed (D)/in English. No error (E)

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 13

Students (not student) 

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 14

Find the Error in the following .If No error found select (E) as the answer.

She is (A)/ more cleverer (B)/ than any (C)/ other girl of (D)/ her age. No error (E)

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 14

 Delete ‘more’ 

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 15

Find the Error in the following .If No error found select (E) as the answer.

Harder (A)/ you work (B)/, the better (C)/ division you (D)/ get. No error (E)

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 15

Add ‘The’ before ‘harder’ 

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 16

Directions : In the following passage, some of the words have been left out, each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraph meaningful.

(16) stringent anti-pollution laws, mass awareness levels in India about the need to (17) the environment are low. Which is (18) many people insist that mere laws won’t do; what we (19) need are “environment conscious” citizens. It is in this context that the University’s (20) to introduce environment studies as a compulsory paper at the undergraduate level (21) significance. There was some (22) initially about who would teach the paper because financial (23) make it impossible for colleges to (24) approval for new teaching posts. In fact, in August 1999, the University Grants commission (UGC) imposed a ban on the creation of new teaching posts in colleges. (25) with the problem, authorities at the university have decided that serving teachers belonging to various disciplines will teach the paper. 

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 17

Directions : In the following passage, some of the words have been left out, each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraph meaningful.

(16) stringent anti-pollution laws, mass awareness levels in India about the need to (17) the environment are low. Which is (18) many people insist that mere laws won’t do; what we (19) need are “environment conscious” citizens. It is in this context that the University’s (20) to introduce environment studies as a compulsory paper at the undergraduate level (21) significance. There was some (22) initially about who would teach the paper because financial (23) make it impossible for colleges to (24) approval for new teaching posts. In fact, in August 1999, the University Grants commission (UGC) imposed a ban on the creation of new teaching posts in colleges. (25) with the problem, authorities at the university have decided that serving teachers belonging to various disciplines will teach the paper. 

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 18

Directions : In the following passage, some of the words have been left out, each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraph meaningful.

(16) stringent anti-pollution laws, mass awareness levels in India about the need to (17) the environment are low. Which is (18) many people insist that mere laws won’t do; what we (19) need are “environment conscious” citizens. It is in this context that the University’s (20) to introduce environment studies as a compulsory paper at the undergraduate level (21) significance. There was some (22) initially about who would teach the paper because financial (23) make it impossible for colleges to (24) approval for new teaching posts. In fact, in August 1999, the University Grants commission (UGC) imposed a ban on the creation of new teaching posts in colleges. (25) with the problem, authorities at the university have decided that serving teachers belonging to various disciplines will teach the paper. 

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 19

Directions : In the following passage, some of the words have been left out, each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraph meaningful.

(16) stringent anti-pollution laws, mass awareness levels in India about the need to (17) the environment are low. Which is (18) many people insist that mere laws won’t do; what we (19) need are “environment conscious” citizens. It is in this context that the University’s (20) to introduce environment studies as a compulsory paper at the undergraduate level (21) significance. There was some (22) initially about who would teach the paper because financial (23) make it impossible for colleges to (24) approval for new teaching posts. In fact, in August 1999, the University Grants commission (UGC) imposed a ban on the creation of new teaching posts in colleges. (25) with the problem, authorities at the university have decided that serving teachers belonging to various disciplines will teach the paper. 

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 20

Directions : In the following passage, some of the words have been left out, each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraph meaningful.

(16) stringent anti-pollution laws, mass awareness levels in India about the need to (17) the environment are low. Which is (18) many people insist that mere laws won’t do; what we (19) need are “environment conscious” citizens. It is in this context that the University’s (20) to introduce environment studies as a compulsory paper at the undergraduate level (21) significance. There was some (22) initially about who would teach the paper because financial (23) make it impossible for colleges to (24) approval for new teaching posts. In fact, in August 1999, the University Grants commission (UGC) imposed a ban on the creation of new teaching posts in colleges. (25) with the problem, authorities at the university have decided that serving teachers belonging to various disciplines will teach the paper. 

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 21

Directions : In the following passage, some of the words have been left out, each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraph meaningful.

(16) stringent anti-pollution laws, mass awareness levels in India about the need to (17) the environment are low. Which is (18) many people insist that mere laws won’t do; what we (19) need are “environment conscious” citizens. It is in this context that the University’s (20) to introduce environment studies as a compulsory paper at the undergraduate level (21) significance. There was some (22) initially about who would teach the paper because financial (23) make it impossible for colleges to (24) approval for new teaching posts. In fact, in August 1999, the University Grants commission (UGC) imposed a ban on the creation of new teaching posts in colleges. (25) with the problem, authorities at the university have decided that serving teachers belonging to various disciplines will teach the paper. 

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 22

Directions : In the following passage, some of the words have been left out, each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraph meaningful.

(16) stringent anti-pollution laws, mass awareness levels in India about the need to (17) the environment are low. Which is (18) many people insist that mere laws won’t do; what we (19) need are “environment conscious” citizens. It is in this context that the University’s (20) to introduce environment studies as a compulsory paper at the undergraduate level (21) significance. There was some (22) initially about who would teach the paper because financial (23) make it impossible for colleges to (24) approval for new teaching posts. In fact, in August 1999, the University Grants commission (UGC) imposed a ban on the creation of new teaching posts in colleges. (25) with the problem, authorities at the university have decided that serving teachers belonging to various disciplines will teach the paper. 

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 23

Directions : In the following passage, some of the words have been left out, each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraph meaningful.

(16) stringent anti-pollution laws, mass awareness levels in India about the need to (17) the environment are low. Which is (18) many people insist that mere laws won’t do; what we (19) need are “environment conscious” citizens. It is in this context that the University’s (20) to introduce environment studies as a compulsory paper at the undergraduate level (21) significance. There was some (22) initially about who would teach the paper because financial (23) make it impossible for colleges to (24) approval for new teaching posts. In fact, in August 1999, the University Grants commission (UGC) imposed a ban on the creation of new teaching posts in colleges. (25) with the problem, authorities at the university have decided that serving teachers belonging to various disciplines will teach the paper. 

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 24

Directions : In the following passage, some of the words have been left out, each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraph meaningful.

(16) stringent anti-pollution laws, mass awareness levels in India about the need to (17) the environment are low. Which is (18) many people insist that mere laws won’t do; what we (19) need are “environment conscious” citizens. It is in this context that the University’s (20) to introduce environment studies as a compulsory paper at the undergraduate level (21) significance. There was some (22) initially about who would teach the paper because financial (23) make it impossible for colleges to (24) approval for new teaching posts. In fact, in August 1999, the University Grants commission (UGC) imposed a ban on the creation of new teaching posts in colleges. (25) with the problem, authorities at the university have decided that serving teachers belonging to various disciplines will teach the paper. 

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 25

Directions : In the following passage, some of the words have been left out, each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraph meaningful.

(16) stringent anti-pollution laws, mass awareness levels in India about the need to (17) the environment are low. Which is (18) many people insist that mere laws won’t do; what we (19) need are “environment conscious” citizens. It is in this context that the University’s (20) to introduce environment studies as a compulsory paper at the undergraduate level (21) significance. There was some (22) initially about who would teach the paper because financial (23) make it impossible for colleges to (24) approval for new teaching posts. In fact, in August 1999, the University Grants commission (UGC) imposed a ban on the creation of new teaching posts in colleges. (25) with the problem, authorities at the university have decided that serving teachers belonging to various disciplines will teach the paper. 

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 26

DIRECTIONS: Which of the phrases (a), (b), (c) and (d) given below each sentence should replace the phrase printed in bold in the sentence to make it grammatically correct? If the sentence is correct as it is given and no correction is required, mark (e) as the answer.

If sense permits, it is safe to use short sentences than long ones.  

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 27

DIRECTIONS: Which of the phrases (a), (b), (c) and (d) given below each sentence should replace the phrase printed in bold in the sentence to make it grammatically correct? If the sentence is correct as it is given and no correction is required, mark (e) as the answer.

He was absolute ruining by that unlucky business.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 28

DIRECTIONS: Which of the phrases (a), (b), (c) and (d) given below each sentence should replace the phrase printed in bold in the sentence to make it grammatically correct? If the sentence is correct as it is given and no correction is required, mark (e) as the answer.

He told the police that he had been robbed of all his money by a stranger.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 29

DIRECTIONS: Which of the phrases (a), (b), (c) and (d) given below each sentence should replace the phrase printed in bold in the sentence to make it grammatically correct? If the sentence is correct as it is given and no correction is required, mark (e) as the answer.

If the accused was guilty for the crime, he should be punished. 

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 30

DIRECTIONS: Which of the phrases (a), (b), (c) and (d) given below each sentence should replace the phrase printed in bold in the sentence to make it grammatically correct? If the sentence is correct as it is given and no correction is required, mark (e) as the answer.

Nothing will do him so much good as a change of air.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 31

Directions: Two different finance companies declare fixed annual rate of interest on the amounts invested with them by investors. The rate of interest offered by these companies may differ from year to year depending on the variation in the economy of the country and the banks rate of interest. The annual rate of interest offered by the two Companies P and Q over the years is shown by the line graph provided below.

Q. A sum of Rs. 4.75 lakhs was invested in Company Q in 1999 for one year. How much more interest would have been earned if the sum was invested in Company P?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 31

DIFFERENCE = Rs. [(10% of 4.75) - (8% of 4.75)]

= Rs. (2% of 4.75) lakhs

= Rs. 0.095 lakhs

= Rs. 9500.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 32

Directions: Two different finance companies declare fixed annual rate of interest on the amounts invested with them by investors. The rate of interest offered by these companies may differ from year to year depending on the variation in the economy of the country and the banks rate of interest. The annual rate of interest offered by the two Companies P and Q over the years is shown by the line graph provided below.

Q.  If two different amounts in the ratio 8:9 are invested in Companies P and Q respectively in 2002, then the amounts received after one year as interests from Companies P and Q are respectively in the ratio?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 32

Let the amounts invested in 2002 in Companies P and Q be Rs. 8x and Rs. 9xrespectively.

Then, interest received after one year from Company P = Rs. (6% of 8x)

= Rs. (48x/100)

and interest received after one year from Company Q  = Rs. (4% of 9x)

= Rs. (36x/100)

Required ratio = 4/3

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 33

Directions: Two different finance companies declare fixed annual rate of interest on the amounts invested with them by investors. The rate of interest offered by these companies may differ from year to year depending on the variation in the economy of the country and the banks rate of interest. The annual rate of interest offered by the two Companies P and Q over the years is shown by the line graph provided below.

Q. In 2000, a part of Rs. 30 lakhs was invested in Company P and the rest was invested in Company Q for one year. The total interest received was Rs. 2.43 lakhs. What was the amount invested in Company P?

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 34

Directions: Two different finance companies declare fixed annual rate of interest on the amounts invested with them by investors. The rate of interest offered by these companies may differ from year to year depending on the variation in the economy of the country and the banks rate of interest. The annual rate of interest offered by the two Companies P and Q over the years is shown by the line graph provided below.

Q. An investor invested a sum of Rs. 12 lakhs in Company P in 1998. The total amount received after one year was re-invested in the same Company for one more year. The total appreciation received by the investor on his investment was?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 34

Amount received from Company P after one year (i.e., in 199) on investing Rs. 12 lakhs in it

= Rs. [12 + (8% of 12)] lakhs

= Rs. 12.96 lakhs.

Appreciation received on investment during the period of two years

= Rs. (14.256 - 12) lakhs

= Rs. 2.256 lakhs = Rs. 2, 25,600

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 35

Directions: Two different finance companies declare fixed annual rate of interest on the amounts invested with them by investors. The rate of interest offered by these companies may differ from year to year depending on the variation in the economy of the country and the banks rate of interest. The annual rate of interest offered by the two Companies P and Q over the years is shown by the line graph provided below.

Q. An investor invested Rs. 5 lakhs in Company Q in 1996. After one year, the entire amount along with the interest was transferred as investment to Company P in 1997 for one year. What amount will be received from Company P, by the investor?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 35

Amount received from Company Q after one year on investment of Rs. 5 lakhs in the year

1996

= Rs. [5 + (6.5% of 5)] lakhs

= Rs. 5.325 lakhs.

Amount received from Company P after one year on investment of Rs. 5.325 lakhs in the year 1997

= Rs. [5.325 + (9% of 5.325)] lakhs

= Rs. 5.80425 lakhs

= Rs. 5, 80, 425

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 36

Direction: The following line graph gives the annual percent profit earned by a Company during the period 1995 - 2000.

Percent Profit Earned by a Company over the Years.

%Profit = [(Income – Expenditure)/ (Expenditure)] x 100

 

Q. If the expenditures in 1996 and 1999 are equal, then the approximate ratio of the income in 1996 and 1999 respectively is?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 36

Let the expenditure in 1996 = x.

Also, let the incomes in 1996 and 1999 be I1 and I2 respectively.

Then, for the year 1996, we have:

55 =( I1 – x)/(x)*100 ⇒ I1= 155x/100 --- (1)

70 = ( I2 – x )/(x) * 100 ⇒ I2 = 170x/100 ----- (2)

From (i) and (ii), we get:

I1 /II2 = 155/170  @ 0.91/1 @ 9/10

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 37

Direction: The following line graph gives the annual percent profit earned by a Company during the period 1995 - 2000.Percent Profit Earned by a Company over the Years.

%Profit = [(Income – Expenditure)/ (Expenditure)] x 100

Q. If the income in 1998 was Rs. 264 crores, what was the expenditure in 1998?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 37

Let the expenditure is 1998 be Rs. x crores.

Then, [65 =( 264 –x)/ x] * 100

x = 160

Expenditure in 1998 = Rs. 160 crores

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 38

Direction: The following line graph gives the annual percent profit earned by a Company during the period 1995 - 2000.

Percent Profit Earned by a Company over the Years.

%Profit = [(Income – Expenditure)/ (Expenditure)] x 100

Q. In which year is the expenditure minimum?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 38

The line-graph gives the comparison of percent profit for different years.

But the comparison of the expenditures is not possible without more data.

Therefore, the year with minimum expenditure cannot be determined.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 39

Direction: The following line graph gives the annual percent profit earned by a Company during the period 1995 - 2000.

Percent Profit Earned by a Company over the Years.

%Profit = [(Income – Expenditure)/ (Expenditure)] x 100

Q. If the profit in 1999 was Rs. 4 crores, what was the profit in 2000?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 39

From the line-graph we obtain information about the percentage profit only. To find the profit in 2000 we must have the data for the income or expenditure in 2000.

Therefore the profit for 2000 cannot be determined.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 40

Direction: The following line graph gives the annual percent profit earned by a Company during the period 1995 - 2000.

Percent Profit Earned by a Company over the Years.

%Profit = [(Income – Expenditure)/ (Expenditure)] x 100

Q. What is the average profit earned for the given years?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 40

Average percent profit earned for the given years

= (1/6) x [40 + 55 + 45 + 65 + 70 + 60] = 55  5/6 

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 41

Directions: From the given alternatives select the one which gives an approximate value to replace the question mark (?) 

105.24 × 35.31 – 90.12 × 3 + 55.33 × 27.34 = ?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 41

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 42

Directions: From the given alternatives select the one which gives an approximate value to replace the question mark (?)

51% of 603 – 13.25% of 757 = (?)2 + 3 

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 42

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 43

Directions: From the given alternatives select the one which gives an approximate value to replace the question mark (?)

3√13827 + √2700 * 48=(?)2+20

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 43

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 44

Directions: From the given alternatives select the one which gives an approximate value to replace the question mark (?)

7.32% of 3198 + 43.12% of 501 = (?)2
 

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 44

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 45

Directions: From the given alternatives select the one which gives an approximate value to replace the question mark (?)

{(1/9) of 704} / {(1/5) of 43+(1/8) of 26+3(1/4) of (8/13)} 

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 45

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 46

A sum of money is to be divided equally among A, B and C in the respective ratio of 5 : 6 : 7 and another sum of money is to be divided between D and E equally. If D got Rs 2100 less than A, then how much amount did C receive?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 46

Could’t be determined, since the total amount of money is not given in either of the case.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 47

Naresh scores 80% marks in five subjects together, viz, Hindi, Science, Maths, English and Computer, where in the maximum marks of each subject were 100. How many marks did Naresh score in Science, if he scored 89 marks in Hindi, 92 marks in Computer, 98 marks in Mathematics and 81 marks in English ?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 47

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 48

An elder gave 2/5 part of his income to his elder son and 30% part to his younger son. He saved his remaining money in three trusts X, Y and Z in the ratio of 3 : 5 : 2. If difference between the amount got by his both sons is Rs 2000, how much amount he saved trust X?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 48

Let the elder have Rs x

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 49

Number of workers in a company decreases in the ratio of 8 : 7 and salary of them increases in the ratio of 5 : 6. Find whether the total salary given to the workers is increased or decreased and in what ratio?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 49

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 50

The average of three consecutive even numbers is 30. What is the sum of the three numbers?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 50

Sum of the three number = 30 × 3 = 90

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 51

Which of the following values of x will satisfy the inequality x2 – x – 12 > 0 ?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 51

x2 – x – 12 > 0

x2 – 4x + 3x – 12 > 0

(x – 4) (x + 3) > 0

x < – 3 or x > 4

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 52

Directions: In each of the following questions two equations I and II are given. You have to solve both the equations and give answer

I. x2 - 5x + 4 = 0 

II. y2 + 13y + 12 = 0

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 52

From equation I ----> x2 - 5x + 4 = 0

(x - 4) (x - 1) = 0

x = 4 or 1

From statement II ----> y+ 13y + 12 = 0

(y + 12) (y + 1) = 0

y = –12 or –1

x > y

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 53

Directions: In each of the following questions two equations I and II are given. You have to solve both the equations and give answer

I. x = 1.6

II. y2 = 2.56

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 53

I. x = 1.6

II. y2 = 2.56

y = +/-√2.56

= 1.6 or –1.6

x ≥ y

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 54

Three cubes of metal, whose edges are 3 cm, 4 cm and 5 cm respectively, are melted to form a new cube. What is the surface area of the new cube?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 54

Volume of new cube = 33 + 43 + 53 = 216 cm3

Each edge of the new cube = 3√216 = 6cm

and hence surface area = 6 × 62 = 216 cm2

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 55

The radius of an iron rod decreased to one–third. If its volume remains constant, the length will become?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 55

π(3x)2 * h1 = π(x)2 * h2

= h2 = 9h1

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 56

There are five containers. The weight of the first container is 400 kg and the weight of the second container is 20% higher than the weight of the third container, whose weight is 25% higher than the first container’s weight. The fourth container at 350 kg is 30% lighter than the fifth one. Find the difference in the average weight of the four heaviest and the four lightest containers. 

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 56

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 57

Hardik is given a quadratic equation px2 + qx + r = 0 and is asked to make another quadratic equation from this with p = 1. Also, one root of the second quadratic one is same as one of the roots of the first equation but opposite in sign and the other root of the second equation is two times the second root of the first one. Find the percentage change in the constant term of the second equation as compared to the first equation? 

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 57

Let the two equations be

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 58

Aasha borrows two equal sums at the same time at 6% and 5% p.a. respectively. She finds that if she pays the former sum with simple interest on a certain date exactly one year before the latter, she will have to pay in each case the same amount i.e., Rs. 3900. Find the sum. 

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 58

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 59

A weather department studying the weather for x days observed that 

(a) it rained on 7 days, morning or afternoon; 

(b) when it rained in the afternoon, it was clear in the morning; 

(c) there were five clear afternoons; 

(d) there were six clear mornings. 

Then x equals to:-

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 59

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 60

Out of 20 points in a plane, no three are in a straight line except 5 which are collinear. How many straight lines can be formed from given condition? 

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 60

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 61

In the following number series only one number is wrong. Find out the wrong number.

118, 137, 176, 238, 314, 413

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 61

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 62

In the following number series only one number is wrong. Find out the wrong number.

2, 3, 12, 39, 172, 885

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 62

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 63

In the following number series only one number is wrong. Find out the wrong number.

1434, 1484, 717, 239, 59.75, 11.95

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 63

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 64

In the following number series only one number is wrong. Find out the wrong number.

219, 340, 484, 653, 849, 1067, 1330

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 64

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 65

In the following number series only one number is wrong. Find out the wrong number.

29, 43, 71, 113, 169, 248

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 65

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 66

Directions: Study the information and answer the given questions:

Eight persons A, B, C, D, E, F, G, and H are sitting in a straight line but not necessarily in the same order. Some of them are facing north while some are facing south. All of them like different car viz. Audi, Tata, Ford, Renault, Honda, Maruti, Datsun and Mahindra but not necessarily in the same order. The following information is known about them.

A sits fourth to right of the person who likes Mahindra car. H likes Datsun car and sits second to right of A. There are two persons sit between H and G, who likes Maruti car. One of immediate neighbor of G sits extreme end. There are four persons sit between A and F, who likes Honda car. Immediate neighbor of G faces opposite direction (opposite direction means if one neighbor of G faces north then other neighbor of G faces south and vice-versa). E likes Renault car and does not sit adjacent to H. The person who likes Tata car sits second to right of G. A does not like Audi car. The persons who sits on the extreme ends of the line faces opposite direction (Faces opposite direction means if one friend faces north then other friend faces south and vice-versa). B sits immediate left of C. The one who likes Tata car sits immediate right of H who faces south direction. C and D face same direction.

Q. A likes which of the following car?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 66

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 67

Directions: Study the information and answer the given questions:

Eight persons A, B, C, D, E, F, G, and H are sitting in a straight line but not necessarily in the same order. Some of them are facing north while some are facing south. All of them like different car viz. Audi, Tata, Ford, Renault, Honda, Maruti, Datsun and Mahindra but not necessarily in the same order. The following information is known about them.

A sits fourth to right of the person who likes Mahindra car. H likes Datsun car and sits second to right of A. There are two persons sit between H and G, who likes Maruti car. One of immediate neighbor of G sits extreme end. There are four persons sit between A and F, who likes Honda car. Immediate neighbor of G faces opposite direction (opposite direction means if one neighbor of G faces north then other neighbor of G faces south and vice-versa). E likes Renault car and does not sit adjacent to H. The person who likes Tata car sits second to right of G. A does not like Audi car. The persons who sits on the extreme ends of the line faces opposite direction (Faces opposite direction means if one friend faces north then other friend faces south and vice-versa). B sits immediate left of C. The one who likes Tata car sits immediate right of H who faces south direction. C and D face same direction.

Q. How many persons face north direction?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 67

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 68

Directions: Study the information and answer the given questions:

Eight persons A, B, C, D, E, F, G, and H are sitting in a straight line but not necessarily in the same order. Some of them are facing north while some are facing south. All of them like different car viz. Audi, Tata, Ford, Renault, Honda, Maruti, Datsun and Mahindra but not necessarily in the same order. The following information is known about them.

A sits fourth to right of the person who likes Mahindra car. H likes Datsun car and sits second to right of A. There are two persons sit between H and G, who likes Maruti car. One of immediate neighbor of G sits extreme end. There are four persons sit between A and F, who likes Honda car. Immediate neighbor of G faces opposite direction (opposite direction means if one neighbor of G faces north then other neighbor of G faces south and vice-versa). E likes Renault car and does not sit adjacent to H. The person who likes Tata car sits second to right of G. A does not like Audi car. The persons who sits on the extreme ends of the line faces opposite direction (Faces opposite direction means if one friend faces north then other friend faces south and vice-versa). B sits immediate left of C. The one who likes Tata car sits immediate right of H who faces south direction. C and D face same direction.

Q. Who among following sits fifth to right of G?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 68

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 69

Directions: Study the information and answer the given questions:

Eight persons A, B, C, D, E, F, G, and H are sitting in a straight line but not necessarily in the same order. Some of them are facing north while some are facing south. All of them like different car viz. Audi, Tata, Ford, Renault, Honda, Maruti, Datsun and Mahindra but not necessarily in the same order. The following information is known about them.

A sits fourth to right of the person who likes Mahindra car. H likes Datsun car and sits second to right of A. There are two persons sit between H and G, who likes Maruti car. One of immediate neighbor of G sits extreme end. There are four persons sit between A and F, who likes Honda car. Immediate neighbor of G faces opposite direction (opposite direction means if one neighbor of G faces north then other neighbor of G faces south and vice-versa). E likes Renault car and does not sit adjacent to H. The person who likes Tata car sits second to right of G. A does not like Audi car. The persons who sits on the extreme ends of the line faces opposite direction (Faces opposite direction means if one friend faces north then other friend faces south and vice-versa). B sits immediate left of C. The one who likes Tata car sits immediate right of H who faces south direction. C and D face same direction.

Q. Who among following likes Audi car?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 69

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 70

Directions: Study the information and answer the given questions:

Eight persons A, B, C, D, E, F, G, and H are sitting in a straight line but not necessarily in the same order. Some of them are facing north while some are facing south. All of them like different car viz. Audi, Tata, Ford, Renault, Honda, Maruti, Datsun and Mahindra but not necessarily in the same order. The following information is known about them.

A sits fourth to right of the person who likes Mahindra car. H likes Datsun car and sits second to right of A. There are two persons sit between H and G, who likes Maruti car. One of immediate neighbor of G sits extreme end. There are four persons sit between A and F, who likes Honda car. Immediate neighbor of G faces opposite direction (opposite direction means if one neighbor of G faces north then other neighbor of G faces south and vice-versa). E likes Renault car and does not sit adjacent to H. The person who likes Tata car sits second to right of G. A does not like Audi car. The persons who sits on the extreme ends of the line faces opposite direction (Faces opposite direction means if one friend faces north then other friend faces south and vice-versa). B sits immediate left of C. The one who likes Tata car sits immediate right of H who faces south direction. C and D face same direction.

Q. If F is related to Audi and A is related to Renault, in the same way H is related to?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 70

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 71

Directions : Study the information and answer the given questions:

Seven people A, B, C, D, E, F and G live on separate floors of a 7-floor building. Ground floor is numbered 1, first floor is numbered 2 and so on until the topmost floor is numbered 7. Each one of them likes different colour viz. red, black, green, pink, white, grey and orange but not necessarily in the same order. They also earn different amount in a month viz. $175, $200, $225, $350, $400, $500 and $1000 but not necessarily in the same order. 

A likes pink colour and he lives on even numbered floor but not on the floor number 2. There are two floor between the A and the one who likes orange, who earns $500. There are three floor between the one who likes orange colour and the G who likes green colour. The one who likes green colour does not live on top most floor. B earns highest amount and he does not live adjacent to floor on which G lives. B lives on even numbered floor. The one who likes red color live immediately above the floor on which the person who likes black lives. The one who likes black colour live on even number floor. B does not like black colour. D likes white colour and he earns $225. C earns $350 and he lives on even numbered floor. There is only one floor between the E and the one who earns the amount which is perfect square. E lives one of the above floor on which B lives. E does not earn the least amount.

Q. D lives on which of the following floor?

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 72

Directions : Study the information and answer the given questions:

Seven people A, B, C, D, E, F and G live on separate floors of a 7-floor building. Ground floor is numbered 1, first floor is numbered 2 and so on until the topmost floor is numbered 7. Each one of them likes different colour viz. red, black, green, pink, white, grey and orange but not necessarily in the same order. They also earn different amount in a month viz. $175, $200, $225, $350, $400, $500 and $1000 but not necessarily in the same order. 

A likes pink colour and he lives on even numbered floor but not on the floor number 2. There are two floor between the A and the one who likes orange, who earns $500. There are three floor between the one who likes orange colour and the G who likes green colour. The one who likes green colour does not live on top most floor. B earns highest amount and he does not live adjacent to floor on which G lives. B lives on even numbered floor. The one who likes red color live immediately above the floor on which the person who likes black lives. The one who likes black colour live on even number floor. B does not like black colour. D likes white colour and he earns $225. C earns $350 and he lives on even numbered floor. There is only one floor between the E and the one who earns the amount which is perfect square. E lives one of the above floor on which B lives. E does not earn the least amount.

Q. Who among following likes grey colour?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 72

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 73

Directions : Study the information and answer the given questions:

Seven people A, B, C, D, E, F and G live on separate floors of a 7-floor building. Ground floor is numbered 1, first floor is numbered 2 and so on until the topmost floor is numbered 7. Each one of them likes different colour viz. red, black, green, pink, white, grey and orange but not necessarily in the same order. They also earn different amount in a month viz. $175, $200, $225, $350, $400, $500 and $1000 but not necessarily in the same order. 

A likes pink colour and he lives on even numbered floor but not on the floor number 2. There are two floor between the A and the one who likes orange, who earns $500. There are three floor between the one who likes orange colour and the G who likes green colour. The one who likes green colour does not live on top most floor. B earns highest amount and he does not live adjacent to floor on which G lives. B lives on even numbered floor. The one who likes red color live immediately above the floor on which the person who likes black lives. The one who likes black colour live on even number floor. B does not like black colour. D likes white colour and he earns $225. C earns $350 and he lives on even numbered floor. There is only one floor between the E and the one who earns the amount which is perfect square. E lives one of the above floor on which B lives. E does not earn the least amount.

Q. C likes which of the following colour?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 73

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 74

Directions : Study the information and answer the given questions:

Seven people A, B, C, D, E, F and G live on separate floors of a 7-floor building. Ground floor is numbered 1, first floor is numbered 2 and so on until the topmost floor is numbered 7. Each one of them likes different colour viz. red, black, green, pink, white, grey and orange but not necessarily in the same order. They also earn different amount in a month viz. $175, $200, $225, $350, $400, $500 and $1000 but not necessarily in the same order. 

A likes pink colour and he lives on even numbered floor but not on the floor number 2. There are two floor between the A and the one who likes orange, who earns $500. There are three floor between the one who likes orange colour and the G who likes green colour. The one who likes green colour does not live on top most floor. B earns highest amount and he does not live adjacent to floor on which G lives. B lives on even numbered floor. The one who likes red color live immediately above the floor on which the person who likes black lives. The one who likes black colour live on even number floor. B does not like black colour. D likes white colour and he earns $225. C earns $350 and he lives on even numbered floor. There is only one floor between the E and the one who earns the amount which is perfect square. E lives one of the above floor on which B lives. E does not earn the least amount.

Q. Who among following earns $200?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 74

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 75

Directions : Study the information and answer the given questions:

Seven people A, B, C, D, E, F and G live on separate floors of a 7-floor building. Ground floor is numbered 1, first floor is numbered 2 and so on until the topmost floor is numbered 7. Each one of them likes different colour viz. red, black, green, pink, white, grey and orange but not necessarily in the same order. They also earn different amount in a month viz. $175, $200, $225, $350, $400, $500 and $1000 but not necessarily in the same order. 

A likes pink colour and he lives on even numbered floor but not on the floor number 2. There are two floor between the A and the one who likes orange, who earns $500. There are three floor between the one who likes orange colour and the G who likes green colour. The one who likes green colour does not live on top most floor. B earns highest amount and he does not live adjacent to floor on which G lives. B lives on even numbered floor. The one who likes red color live immediately above the floor on which the person who likes black lives. The one who likes black colour live on even number floor. B does not like black colour. D likes white colour and he earns $225. C earns $350 and he lives on even numbered floor. There is only one floor between the E and the one who earns the amount which is perfect square. E lives one of the above floor on which B lives. E does not earn the least amount.

Q. A earns how much amount?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 75

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 76

Directions : A word and number arrangement machine when given an input line of words and numbers rearranges them following a particular rule in each step. The following is an illustration of an input and rearrangement.

Input: 17 put short on 39 27 84 gain

Step I: short 17 put on 39 27 84 gain

Step II: short 84 17 put on 39 27 gain

Step III: short 84 put 17 on 39 27 gain

Step IV: short 84 put 39 17 on 27 gain

Step V: short 84 put 39 on 17 27 gain

Step VI: short 84 put 39 on 27 17 gain

Step VII: short 84 put 39 on 27 gain 17

and Step VII is the last step of the rearrangement of the above input.

As per the rules followed in the above steps, find out in each of the following questions the appropriate step for the given input

Input: glass fine 15 37 watch not 85 65

Which of the following will be step VI of the above input?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 76

Input:     glass fine 15 37 watch not 85 65
      Step I:    watch glass fine 15 37 not 85 65
      Step II:   watch 85 glass fine 15 37 not 65
      Step III:  watch 85 not glass fine 15 37 65
      Step IV:  watch 85 not 65 glass fine 15 37
      Step V:   watch 85 not 65 glass 37 fine 15

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 77

Directions : A word and number arrangement machine when given an input line of words and numbers rearranges them following a particular rule in each step. The following is an illustration of an input and rearrangement.

Input: 17 put short on 39 27 84 gain

Step I: short 17 put on 39 27 84 gain

Step II: short 84 17 put on 39 27 gain

Step III: short 84 put 17 on 39 27 gain

Step IV: short 84 put 39 17 on 27 gain

Step V: short 84 put 39 on 17 27 gain

Step VI: short 84 put 39 on 27 17 gain

Step VII: short 84 put 39 on 27 gain 17

and Step VII is the last step of the rearrangement of the above input.

As per the rules followed in the above steps, find out in each of the following questions the appropriate step for the given input

Step II of an input is : ultra 73 16 kite sort 39 32 mail

Which of the following steps will be the last step?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 77

Step II:  ultra 73 16 kite sort 39 32 mail
Step III: ultra 73 sort 16 kite 39 32 mail
Step IV: ultra 73 sort 39 16 kite 32 mail
Step V:  ultra 73 sort 39 mail 16 kite 32
Step VI: ultra 73 sort 39 mail 32 16 kite
Step VII:ultra  73 sort 39 mail 32 kite 16

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 78

Directions : A word and number arrangement machine when given an input line of words and numbers rearranges them following a particular rule in each step. The following is an illustration of an input and rearrangement.

Input: 17 put short on 39 27 84 gain

Step I: short 17 put on 39 27 84 gain

Step II: short 84 17 put on 39 27 gain

Step III: short 84 put 17 on 39 27 gain

Step IV: short 84 put 39 17 on 27 gain

Step V: short 84 put 39 on 17 27 gain

Step VI: short 84 put 39 on 27 17 gain

Step VII: short 84 put 39 on 27 gain 17

and Step VII is the last step of the rearrangement of the above input.

As per the rules followed in the above steps, find out in each of the following questions the appropriate step for the given input

Step III of an input is : want 75 voice 15 39 style gap 26

Which of the following is definitely the input?

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 79

Directions : A word and number arrangement machine when given an input line of words and numbers rearranges them following a particular rule in each step. The following is an illustration of an input and rearrangement.

Input: 17 put short on 39 27 84 gain

Step I: short 17 put on 39 27 84 gain

Step II: short 84 17 put on 39 27 gain

Step III: short 84 put 17 on 39 27 gain

Step IV: short 84 put 39 17 on 27 gain

Step V: short 84 put 39 on 17 27 gain

Step VI: short 84 put 39 on 27 17 gain

Step VII: short 84 put 39 on 27 gain 17

and Step VII is the last step of the rearrangement of the above input.

As per the rules followed in the above steps, find out in each of the following questions the appropriate step for the given input

Step II of an input is : time 82 48 34 garden frame rat 56

How many steps will be required to complete the rearrangement?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 79

Step II:   time 82 48 34 garden frame rat 56
Step III:  time 82 rat 48 34 garden frame 56
Step IV:  time 82 rat 56 48 34 garden frame
Step V:   time 82 rat 56 garden 48 34 frame
Step VI:  time 82 rat 56 garden 48 frame 34

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 80

Directions : A word and number arrangement machine when given an input line of words and numbers rearranges them following a particular rule in each step. The following is an illustration of an input and rearrangement.

Input: 17 put short on 39 27 84 gain

Step I: short 17 put on 39 27 84 gain

Step II: short 84 17 put on 39 27 gain

Step III: short 84 put 17 on 39 27 gain

Step IV: short 84 put 39 17 on 27 gain

Step V: short 84 put 39 on 17 27 gain

Step VI: short 84 put 39 on 27 17 gain

Step VII: short 84 put 39 on 27 gain 17

and Step VII is the last step of the rearrangement of the above input.

As per the rules followed in the above steps, find out in each of the following questions the appropriate step for the given input

Input: hour fix 94 37 great 29 48 book

How many steps will be required to complete the rearrangement?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 80

Input:    hour fix 94 37 great 29 48 book
Step I:   hour 94 fix 37 great 29 48 book
Step II:  hour 94 great fix 37 29 48 book 
Step III: hour 94 great 48 fix 37 29 book 
Step IV: hour 94 great 48 fix 37 book 29

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 81

Directions: Question consists of Six statements followed by five conclusions. Consider the given statements to be true even if they seem to be at variance with commonly known facts. Read all the conclusions and then decide which of the given conclusions does not logically follow from the given statements using all statements together.

Q. Statements: Some earth are tree. All tree are forest. No tree is carbon. All carbon are air. Some carbon are oxygen. No oxygen is ozone.

Conclusions: 

(a) Some earth are forest.

(b)Some earth is not carbon.

(c) All earth being ozone is a possibility.

(d) All oxygen being tree is a possibility.

(e)Some forest is not carbon

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 81

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 82

Directions: Question consists of Six statements followed by five conclusions. Consider the given statements to be true even if they seem to be at variance with commonly known facts. Read all the conclusions and then decide which of the given conclusions does not logically follow from the given statements using all statements together.

Q. Statements: All moon are star. All star are bright. Some bright is dark. Some forest is blue. No blue is kite. All kite is machine.

Conclusions: 

(a) All moon being forest is a possibility.

(b) All moon being blue is a possibility.

(c) Some forest is not kite.

(d) All blue being machine is a possibility.

(e) All forest being kite is a possibility.

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 82

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 83

Directions: Question consists of Six statements followed by five conclusions. Consider the given statements to be true even if they seem to be at variance with commonly known facts. Read all the conclusions and then decide which of the given conclusions does not logically follow from the given statements using all statements together.

Q. Statements: Some finger is hair. No hair is leg. All hand is leg. No hand is eye. Some eye is nose. All nose are elbow. 

Conclusions: 

(a)No hair is hand.

(b)Some finger is not leg.

(c) Some nose is not hand.

(d)Some eye is elbow.

(e) All finger being leg is a possibility.

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 83

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 84

Directions: Question consists of Six statements followed by five conclusions. Consider the given statements to be true even if they seem to be at variance with commonly known facts. Read all the conclusions and then decide which of the given conclusions does not logically follow from the given statements using all statements together.

Q. Statements: Some book are pen. All book are copy. All pen are pencils. No pencils is paper. Some paper is bag. No bag is box. 

Conclusions:  

(a)Some book is pencil.

(b)Some paper is box.

(c) Some pen is not paper.

(d) Some bag is not pencil.

(e) Some bag is  paper.

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 84

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 85

Directions: Question consists of Six statements followed by five conclusions. Consider the given statements to be true even if they seem to be at variance with commonly known facts. Read all the conclusions and then decide which of the given conclusions does not logically follow from the given statements using all statements together.

Q. Statements: Some man is not white. All white is black. Some black is not brown. Some brown are red. All red are yellow. No yellow is orange.

Conclusions: 

(a) All man being orange is possibility.

(b) All white being man is a possibility.

(c) Some red is not man.

(d) Some yellow is brown.

(e) Some brown is not orange.

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 85

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 86

Directions: Below in each question are given two statements I and II. These statements may be either independent causes or may be effects of independent causes. One of these statements may be the effect of the other statement. Read both the statements and decide which of the following answer choices correctly depicts the relationship between these two statements.

Mark answer

Q. I. The prices of vegetables have increased substantially during the past few weeks.

II. Government had reduced the prices of petroleum products about a month back.

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 86

From the given two statement I and II, it is clear that there is no connection between the two events mentioned in both the statements.
Therefore, both the statements I and II are effects of independent causes.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 87

Directions: Below in each question are given two statements I and II. These statements may be either independent causes or may be effects of independent causes. One of these statements may be the effect of the other statement. Read both the statements and decide which of the following answer choices correctly depicts the relationship between these two statements

.Mark answer

Q. I. The health department has advised people to drink boiled and filtered water and maintain hygiene during the monsoon.

II. The health department has instructed the civic hospitals to equip themselves with adequate stock of medicines during monsoon.

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 87

From the given two statement I and II, it is clear that both statements are effects of a common cause is the fear of outbreak of diseases during monsoon.
Therefore, both the statements I and II are effects of a common causes.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 88

Q. Statement: “Buy pure and natural honey of company X.” – An advertisement in a newspaper.

Assumptions:

I. Artificial honey can be prepared.

II. People do not mind paying more for pure and natural honey.

III. No other company supplies pure honey.

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 88

Assumption I is implicit because of the word “natural” used in the given statement.
Assumption II is not implicit because it is irrelevant.
Assumption III is not implicit because nothing about “the quality of honey of other companies” can be assumed from the given statement.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 89

Q. Statement: Should all the school teachers be debarred from giving private tuitions?

Arguments:

I. No. The needy students will be deprived of the expertise of these teachers.

II. Yes. This is an injustice to the unemployed educated people who can earn their living by giving tuitions.

III. Yes. Only then the quality of teaching in schools will improve.

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 89

Argument I is weak because it does not provide a convincing reason.
Argument II is weak because it is vague.
The use of ‘only’ keyword in argument III makes it weak.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 90

Q. Statement: Should all the youngsters below 21 years of age be disallowed from going to a beer bar?

Arguments:

I. No. It is not correct to prevent matured youngsters above 18 years of age who can vote, from having fun.

II. Yes. The entry fee to such pubs should also be hiked.

III. No. There is no such curb in western countries.

IV. Yes. This will help in preventing youngsters from getting into bad company and imbibing bad habits.

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 90

Argument I is strong because it states genuine reason.
Argument II is weak because it is vague.
Argument III is weak because it is an argument by giving example.
Argument IV is strong because it provides very convincing reason.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 91

In a certain code ‘ke pa lo ti’ means ‘lamp is burning bright’ and ‘lo si ti ba ke’ means ‘bright light is from lamp’. Which of the following is the code for ‘burning’ in that language?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 91

burning=pa

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 92

Town D is towards East to town F. Town B is towards North of town D. Town H is towards South of town B. Towards which direction is town H from town F? 

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 92

The position of H is not fixed. H can be come between B and D or H can be come below D.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 93

If the letters in the word ‘DOLPHIN’ are rearranged as they appear in increasing English alphabetical order, which of the following letters will be the fifth from left?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 93

 Fifth from left is N.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 94

Directions: Study the following statements and answer the questions given below:

(i) ‘A × B’ means ‘A is brother of B’.

(ii) ‘A – B’ means ‘A is mother of B’.

(iii) ‘A + B’ means ‘A is father of B’.

(iv) ‘A ÷ B’ means ‘A is sister of B’.

Q. M is maternal uncle of J’ will be written as which of the following?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 94

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 95

Directions: Study the following statements and answer the questions given below:

(i) ‘A × B’ means ‘A is brother of B’.

(ii) ‘A – B’ means ‘A is mother of B’.

(iii) ‘A + B’ means ‘A is father of B’.

(iv) ‘A ÷ B’ means ‘A is sister of B’.

Q. P is niece of J will be written as which of the following?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 95

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 96

Directions: Study the following statements and answer the questions given below:

(i) ‘A × B’ means ‘A is brother of B’.

(ii) ‘A – B’ means ‘A is mother of B’.

(iii) ‘A + B’ means ‘A is father of B’.

(iv) ‘A ÷ B’ means ‘A is sister of B’.

Q. Which of the following represents ‘K is nephew of R’?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 96

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 97

Directions: Study the following statements and answer the questions given below:

(i) ‘A × B’ means ‘A is brother of B’.

(ii) ‘A – B’ means ‘A is mother of B’.

(iii) ‘A + B’ means ‘A is father of B’.

(iv) ‘A ÷ B’ means ‘A is sister of B’.

Q. Which of the following relationship between T and R is represented by ‘T + J – R’?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 97

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 98

Directions: Study the following statements and answer the questions given below:

(i) ‘A × B’ means ‘A is brother of B’.

(ii) ‘A – B’ means ‘A is mother of B’.

(iii) ‘A + B’ means ‘A is father of B’.

(iv) ‘A ÷ B’ means ‘A is sister of B’.

Q. Which of the following relationship between S and P is represented by ‘S+ J ×P – R’?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 98

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 99

If it is possible to make only one meaningful word from the third, the sixth, the ninth and the tenth letters of the word PARENTHESIS using each letter only once, last letter of the word is your answer. If no such word can be formed your answer is X and if more than one such word can be formed your answer is Y.

SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 100

How many such pairs of letters are there in the word JAUNPUR, each of which has as many letters between them in the word, as they have in the English alphabet?

Detailed Solution for SBI PO Prelims Mock Test - 9 (15-01-2023) - Question 100

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