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Languages: Mock Test - 3 - CUET MCQ


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40 Questions MCQ Test English Language Preparation for CUET - Languages: Mock Test - 3

Languages: Mock Test - 3 for CUET 2024 is part of English Language Preparation for CUET preparation. The Languages: Mock Test - 3 questions and answers have been prepared according to the CUET exam syllabus.The Languages: Mock Test - 3 MCQs are made for CUET 2024 Exam. Find important definitions, questions, notes, meanings, examples, exercises, MCQs and online tests for Languages: Mock Test - 3 below.
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Languages: Mock Test - 3 - Question 1

Power in all its forms is irrational; - it is like the horse that drags the carriage blindfolded. The moral element in it is only represented in the man who drives the horse.

Passive resistance is a force which is not necessarily moral in itself; it can be used against truth as well as for it. The danger inherent in all force grows stronger when it is likely to gain success, for then it becomes temptation.

I know your teaching is to fight against evil by the help of good. But such a fight is for heroes and not for men led by impulses of the moment. Evil on one side naturally begets evil on the other, injustice leading to violence and insult to vengefulness. Unfortunately, such a force has already been started, and either through panic or through wrath our authorities has shown us the claws whose sure effect is to drive some of us into the secret path of resentment and others into utter demoralization. In this crisis you, as a great leader of men, have stood among us to proclaim your faith in the ideal which you know to be that of India, the ideal which is both against the cowardliness of hidden revenge and the cowed submissiveness of the terror-stricken. This power of good must prove its truth and strength by its fearlessness, by its refusal to accept any imposition which depends for its success upon its power to produce frightfulness and is not ashamed to use its machines of destruction to terrorize a population completely disarmed. We must know that moral conquest does not consist in success, that failure does not deprive it of its dignity and worth.

Those who believe in spiritual life know that to stand against wrong which has overwhelming material power behind it is victory itself, it is the victory of the active faith in the ideal in the teeth of evident defeat.

Q. Which of the following problems has been cited by Tagore?

Detailed Solution for Languages: Mock Test - 3 - Question 1

Option (b) is correct as Tagore refers to the problem of people acting on their impulses. These impulses of resentment and demoralization are triggered by authorities using panic as a tool.

Option (a) is incorrect as it does not specify the reason behind the incapability of men in fighting evil.

Option (c) is incorrect as it specifies the qualities of evil rather than referring to the problem.

Option (d) is incorrect as it does not clarify the context of the words it contains, which is necessary to describe the concerned problem.

Languages: Mock Test - 3 - Question 2

Power in all its forms is irrational; - it is like the horse that drags the carriage blindfolded. The moral element in it is only represented in the man who drives the horse.

Passive resistance is a force which is not necessarily moral in itself; it can be used against truth as well as for it. The danger inherent in all force grows stronger when it is likely to gain success, for then it becomes temptation.

I know your teaching is to fight against evil by the help of good. But such a fight is for heroes and not for men led by impulses of the moment. Evil on one side naturally begets evil on the other, injustice leading to violence and insult to vengefulness. Unfortunately, such a force has already been started, and either through panic or through wrath our authorities has shown us the claws whose sure effect is to drive some of us into the secret path of resentment and others into utter demoralization. In this crisis you, as a great leader of men, have stood among us to proclaim your faith in the ideal which you know to be that of India, the ideal which is both against the cowardliness of hidden revenge and the cowed submissiveness of the terror-stricken. This power of good must prove its truth and strength by its fearlessness, by its refusal to accept any imposition which depends for its success upon its power to produce frightfulness and is not ashamed to use its machines of destruction to terrorize a population completely disarmed. We must know that moral conquest does not consist in success, that failure does not deprive it of its dignity and worth.

Those who believe in spiritual life know that to stand against wrong which has overwhelming material power behind it is victory itself, it is the victory of the active faith in the ideal in the teeth of evident defeat.

Q. How has the passage defined victory?

Detailed Solution for Languages: Mock Test - 3 - Question 2

Option (c) is correct as the passage specifically mentions that to face something wrong which is overwhelmingly powerful is a victory in itself.

Languages: Mock Test - 3 - Question 3

Power in all its forms is irrational; - it is like the horse that drags the carriage blindfolded. The moral element in it is only represented in the man who drives the horse.

Passive resistance is a force which is not necessarily moral in itself; it can be used against truth as well as for it. The danger inherent in all force grows stronger when it is likely to gain success, for then it becomes temptation.

I know your teaching is to fight against evil by the help of good. But such a fight is for heroes and not for men led by impulses of the moment. Evil on one side naturally begets evil on the other, injustice leading to violence and insult to vengefulness. Unfortunately, such a force has already been started, and either through panic or through wrath our authorities has shown us the claws whose sure effect is to drive some of us into the secret path of resentment and others into utter demoralization. In this crisis you, as a great leader of men, have stood among us to proclaim your faith in the ideal which you know to be that of India, the ideal which is both against the cowardliness of hidden revenge and the cowed submissiveness of the terror-stricken. This power of good must prove its truth and strength by its fearlessness, by its refusal to accept any imposition which depends for its success upon its power to produce frightfulness and is not ashamed to use its machines of destruction to terrorize a population completely disarmed. We must know that moral conquest does not consist in success, that failure does not deprive it of its dignity and worth.

Those who believe in spiritual life know that to stand against wrong which has overwhelming material power behind it is victory itself, it is the victory of the active faith in the ideal in the teeth of evident defeat.

Q. Which of the following best reflects the ideals of Gandhi as mentioned in the passage?

Detailed Solution for Languages: Mock Test - 3 - Question 3

Option (b) is correct as the passage argues that treading the middle path which is both against the cowardliness of hidden revenge and the cowed submissiveness of the terror-stricken, are the ideals of Gandhi.

Option (a) is incorrect as it only mentions the adjectives associated with the ideals in the passage.

Options (c) and (d) are incorrect as they do not find reference in the passage.

Languages: Mock Test - 3 - Question 4

Power in all its forms is irrational; - it is like the horse that drags the carriage blindfolded. The moral element in it is only represented in the man who drives the horse.

Passive resistance is a force which is not necessarily moral in itself; it can be used against truth as well as for it. The danger inherent in all force grows stronger when it is likely to gain success, for then it becomes temptation.

I know your teaching is to fight against evil by the help of good. But such a fight is for heroes and not for men led by impulses of the moment. Evil on one side naturally begets evil on the other, injustice leading to violence and insult to vengefulness. Unfortunately, such a force has already been started, and either through panic or through wrath our authorities has shown us the claws whose sure effect is to drive some of us into the secret path of resentment and others into utter demoralization. In this crisis you, as a great leader of men, have stood among us to proclaim your faith in the ideal which you know to be that of India, the ideal which is both against the cowardliness of hidden revenge and the cowed submissiveness of the terror-stricken. This power of good must prove its truth and strength by its fearlessness, by its refusal to accept any imposition which depends for its success upon its power to produce frightfulness and is not ashamed to use its machines of destruction to terrorize a population completely disarmed. We must know that moral conquest does not consist in success, that failure does not deprive it of its dignity and worth.

Those who believe in spiritual life know that to stand against wrong which has overwhelming material power behind it is victory itself, it is the victory of the active faith in the ideal in the teeth of evident defeat.

Q. Which of the following converts the dangers of power into a temptation?

Detailed Solution for Languages: Mock Test - 3 - Question 4

Option (a) is correct as the passage mentions that it is when power is likely to succeed, that the dangers inherent in that power tend to become a temptation.

All other options are incorrect as none of them mention the likelihood of success through power as the cause of conversion of power into temptation.

Languages: Mock Test - 3 - Question 5

One of the most critical yet troublesome social policy questions is how many actually suffer because of labor market problems. Our social statistics, in many ways, exaggerate the degree of difficulty. Today unemployment does not have similar effects as compared to it in the 1930's. Then, most of the unemployed were primary earning member of their respective families, when income was usually at the level of subsistence, and when there were no social programs for those not succeeding in the labor market. Increasing affluence, arising out of increase in the families with more than single wage earner, the rising predominance of secondary earners among the unemployed, and new social welfare protection schemes have no doubt mitigated the effect of being without a job.

Earnings and income data also exaggerate the extent of suffering. Among many with hourly wage at or below the minimum wage level, the overwhelming majority is from relatively well to do families having multiple-earners. Most of those taken into account by the poverty statistics either have family responsibilities or are elderly or handicapped which keep them out of the labor force, so the poverty statistics are by no means correct indicators of labor market indices.

Yet, our social statistics underrate the degree of hardships in the labor-market in many ways. The unemployment counts do not include the millions of fulltime employed workers with wages so low that their families remain in poverty. Low wages and frequent or long time unemployment often cause lack of ability to support oneself. Because the number of people facing unemployment at some time during the year is many times the number unemployed across the year, those who bear the brunt of forced joblessness can equal or surpass average annual unemployment, even though only a small number of the unemployed in any month actually suffer. For every person included in the monthly data, there is one working part-time because of his incapability to find full-time work, or else outside the labor force but looking for an employment. Finally, social welfare schemes in our country have always focused on the elderly, disabled, and dependent, so that the unusual expansion of cash and in-kind transfers does not necessarily mean that those not succeeding are effectively protected.

As a result of such contradicting evidence, number of those suffering seriously as a result of labor market problems is uncertain, and, hence, it is debatable if high levels of unemployment can be tolerated or must be countered by job creation and economic stimulus. There is only one unanimous agreement in this deliberation that the extant poverty, employment, and earnings statistics are not adequate for measuring the consequences of labor market problems, their primary applications.

Q. Which of the following is the most appropriate response to the issue raised by the author in the passage?

Detailed Solution for Languages: Mock Test - 3 - Question 5

The author's main concern is that social statistics do not take care of 'employed yet poor' people. As a result they do not reflect a true picture of poverty or hardship due to labor market problems. Therefore, the author is most likely to agree to developing new statistical indices that would offer a more accurate picture of the real situation. The other options do not tackle the issue at hand. Thus, option (c) is the correct answer.

Languages: Mock Test - 3 - Question 6

One of the most critical yet troublesome social policy questions is how many actually suffer because of labor market problems. Our social statistics, in many ways, exaggerate the degree of difficulty. Today unemployment does not have similar effects as compared to it in the 1930's. Then, most of the unemployed were primary earning member of their respective families, when income was usually at the level of subsistence, and when there were no social programs for those not succeeding in the labor market. Increasing affluence, arising out of increase in the families with more than single wage earner, the rising predominance of secondary earners among the unemployed, and new social welfare protection schemes have no doubt mitigated the effect of being without a job.

Earnings and income data also exaggerate the extent of suffering. Among many with hourly wage at or below the minimum wage level, the overwhelming majority is from relatively well to do families having multiple-earners. Most of those taken into account by the poverty statistics either have family responsibilities or are elderly or handicapped which keep them out of the labor force, so the poverty statistics are by no means correct indicators of labor market indices.

Yet, our social statistics underrate the degree of hardships in the labor-market in many ways. The unemployment counts do not include the millions of fulltime employed workers with wages so low that their families remain in poverty. Low wages and frequent or long time unemployment often cause lack of ability to support oneself. Because the number of people facing unemployment at some time during the year is many times the number unemployed across the year, those who bear the brunt of forced joblessness can equal or surpass average annual unemployment, even though only a small number of the unemployed in any month actually suffer. For every person included in the monthly data, there is one working part-time because of his incapability to find full-time work, or else outside the labor force but looking for an employment. Finally, social welfare schemes in our country have always focused on the elderly, disabled, and dependent, so that the unusual expansion of cash and in-kind transfers does not necessarily mean that those not succeeding are effectively protected.

As a result of such contradicting evidence, number of those suffering seriously as a result of labor market problems is uncertain, and, hence, it is debatable if high levels of unemployment can be tolerated or must be countered by job creation and economic stimulus. There is only one unanimous agreement in this deliberation that the extant poverty, employment, and earnings statistics are not adequate for measuring the consequences of labor market problems, their primary applications.

Q. Which of the following reflects the main idea of the passage?

Detailed Solution for Languages: Mock Test - 3 - Question 6

Options (a), (b) and (c) are all discussed in the passage but none are complete so as to be called the central theme of the passage. Option (d) is the correct choice; the passage talks about how social statistics are not adequate for measuring the consequences of labor market problems. The same has been elaborated by the author in the passage.

Thus, option (d) is the correct answer.

Languages: Mock Test - 3 - Question 7

One of the most critical yet troublesome social policy questions is how many actually suffer because of labor market problems. Our social statistics, in many ways, exaggerate the degree of difficulty. Today unemployment does not have similar effects as compared to it in the 1930's. Then, most of the unemployed were primary earning member of their respective families, when income was usually at the level of subsistence, and when there were no social programs for those not succeeding in the labor market. Increasing affluence, arising out of increase in the families with more than single wage earner, the rising predominance of secondary earners among the unemployed, and new social welfare protection schemes have no doubt mitigated the effect of being without a job.

Earnings and income data also exaggerate the extent of suffering. Among many with hourly wage at or below the minimum wage level, the overwhelming majority is from relatively well to do families having multiple-earners. Most of those taken into account by the poverty statistics either have family responsibilities or are elderly or handicapped which keep them out of the labor force, so the poverty statistics are by no means correct indicators of labor market indices.

Yet, our social statistics underrate the degree of hardships in the labor-market in many ways. The unemployment counts do not include the millions of fulltime employed workers with wages so low that their families remain in poverty. Low wages and frequent or long time unemployment often cause lack of ability to support oneself. Because the number of people facing unemployment at some time during the year is many times the number unemployed across the year, those who bear the brunt of forced joblessness can equal or surpass average annual unemployment, even though only a small number of the unemployed in any month actually suffer. For every person included in the monthly data, there is one working part-time because of his incapability to find full-time work, or else outside the labor force but looking for an employment. Finally, social welfare schemes in our country have always focused on the elderly, disabled, and dependent, so that the unusual expansion of cash and in-kind transfers does not necessarily mean that those not succeeding are effectively protected.

As a result of such contradicting evidence, number of those suffering seriously as a result of labor market problems is uncertain, and, hence, it is debatable if high levels of unemployment can be tolerated or must be countered by job creation and economic stimulus. There is only one unanimous agreement in this deliberation that the extant poverty, employment, and earnings statistics are not adequate for measuring the consequences of labor market problems, their primary applications.

Q. According to the passage, the effect of social welfare schemes for the low-income people is not often felt by:

Detailed Solution for Languages: Mock Test - 3 - Question 7

The passage clearly states that social welfare schemes in our country have always focused on "the elderly, disabled, and dependent". Also, it is mentioned that "the unemployment counts do not include the millions of full-time employed workers with wages so low that their families remain in poverty". Thus, it is the employed poor who end up being outside the purview of social welfare schemes.

Therefore, option (a) is the correct answer.

Languages: Mock Test - 3 - Question 8

The NITI Aayog's Sustainable Development Goals Index for 2019, released on Monday, does not reveal any surprising information. Kerala, Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh, Telangana and Karnataka are joined by Himachal Pradesh, Sikkim and Goa as the best performers while the northern/north-central and northeastern States have been sluggish in achieving the U.N.-mandated goals by 2030. Poor performers such as Uttar Pradesh have shown discernible advances in the indices measured between 2018-19 - especially in adopting cleaner energy and improving sanitation. But the regional divide is stark in basic livelihood goals such as "eradication of poverty", and "good health and well-being" or even in measures such as "industry, innovation and infrastructure".

This points to variances in both State governance and in administrative structures and implementation of welfare policies. The South, led by Kerala and Tamil Nadu, has done much more in orienting administrative institutions to deliver on basic welfare, leading to actions on health care, education, poverty eradication and hunger, with a governance structure tuned to competitively monitoring actions on these fronts. The converse is true of northern states Bihar and Uttar Pradesh, where outcomes have remained relatively poor despite there not being much of a difference in the governance structure. The obvious answer to the puzzle could be the presence of historical socio-political movements that have resulted in greater circulation of elites in power and which have addressed issues related to welfare more thoroughly in the South -Kerala and T.N in particular. Yet even these States need to go further in reaching the UN's SDGs and achieving the living standards of both the first world and other developing nations.

The western States, especially Gujarat and Maharashtra, are also better off in economic growth and industry, indicating a diversified economy, higher employment ratios, skilled labour and better entrepreneurial culture.

A major fault-line in India is in achieving gender equality, where barring middling performers such as Himachal Pradesh, Kerala and Jammu & Kashmir, the rest of the country falls short. Low sex ratio (896 females per 1,000 males), poor labour force participation and presence in managerial positions (only 17.5% and 30%, according to the report), high level of informality of labour, a major gender pay gap (females earn 78% of wages earned by males in regular salaried employment), lack of adequate representation in governance (14.4% in Parliament, but 44.4% in local government) besides high crime rates against women and girls are among the major national level indicators that have contributed to this. States need to climb a mountain to achieve gender equality, but immediate steps such as enhancing women's participation in governance through parliamentary reservations would go a long way in addressing several of the issues faced by them.

Q. Which of the following choices best captures the essence of the passage?

Detailed Solution for Languages: Mock Test - 3 - Question 8

Option (c) is correct as the passage mentions details that point to the regional disparity in the achievements across various states.
Option (a) in incorrect as it omits the key detail about the issue of gender equality discussed in the passage. Option (b) is incorrect as the governance model between the states is quite similar if not same, as stated in the passage. Option (d) is incorrect as it mentions the detail of living standards, which is not central to the idea of the passage.

Languages: Mock Test - 3 - Question 9

The NITI Aayog's Sustainable Development Goals Index for 2019, released on Monday, does not reveal any surprising information. Kerala, Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh, Telangana and Karnataka are joined by Himachal Pradesh, Sikkim and Goa as the best performers while the northern/north-central and northeastern States have been sluggish in achieving the U.N.-mandated goals by 2030. Poor performers such as Uttar Pradesh have shown discernible advances in the indices measured between 2018-19 - especially in adopting cleaner energy and improving sanitation. But the regional divide is stark in basic livelihood goals such as "eradication of poverty", and "good health and well-being" or even in measures such as "industry, innovation and infrastructure".

This points to variances in both State governance and in administrative structures and implementation of welfare policies. The South, led by Kerala and Tamil Nadu, has done much more in orienting administrative institutions to deliver on basic welfare, leading to actions on health care, education, poverty eradication and hunger, with a governance structure tuned to competitively monitoring actions on these fronts. The converse is true of northern states Bihar and Uttar Pradesh, where outcomes have remained relatively poor despite there not being much of a difference in the governance structure. The obvious answer to the puzzle could be the presence of historical socio-political movements that have resulted in greater circulation of elites in power and which have addressed issues related to welfare more thoroughly in the South -Kerala and T.N in particular. Yet even these States need to go further in reaching the UN's SDGs and achieving the living standards of both the first world and other developing nations.

The western States, especially Gujarat and Maharashtra, are also better off in economic growth and industry, indicating a diversified economy, higher employment ratios, skilled labour and better entrepreneurial culture.

A major fault-line in India is in achieving gender equality, where barring middling performers such as Himachal Pradesh, Kerala and Jammu & Kashmir, the rest of the country falls short. Low sex ratio (896 females per 1,000 males), poor labour force participation and presence in managerial positions (only 17.5% and 30%, according to the report), high level of informality of labour, a major gender pay gap (females earn 78% of wages earned by males in regular salaried employment), lack of adequate representation in governance (14.4% in Parliament, but 44.4% in local government) besides high crime rates against women and girls are among the major national level indicators that have contributed to this. States need to climb a mountain to achieve gender equality, but immediate steps such as enhancing women's participation in governance through parliamentary reservations would go a long way in addressing several of the issues faced by them.

Q. Which of the following reason have been cited in the passage for the better performance of the Southern States?

Detailed Solution for Languages: Mock Test - 3 - Question 9

Option (b) is correct as the passage specifically mentions that the point of difference between these states and others is that the social movements in these states promoted wide-spread welfare.

Option (a) is incorrect because it has not been mentioned in the passage. Option (c) is incorrect as the passage mentions no unique point in the governance of these states. Refer to the second paragraph of the passage, option (d) misinterprets the role of the elites. Thus, it is the correct answer.

Languages: Mock Test - 3 - Question 10

The NITI Aayog's Sustainable Development Goals Index for 2019, released on Monday, does not reveal any surprising information. Kerala, Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh, Telangana and Karnataka are joined by Himachal Pradesh, Sikkim and Goa as the best performers while the northern/north-central and northeastern States have been sluggish in achieving the U.N.-mandated goals by 2030. Poor performers such as Uttar Pradesh have shown discernible advances in the indices measured between 2018-19 - especially in adopting cleaner energy and improving sanitation. But the regional divide is stark in basic livelihood goals such as "eradication of poverty", and "good health and well-being" or even in measures such as "industry, innovation and infrastructure".

This points to variances in both State governance and in administrative structures and implementation of welfare policies. The South, led by Kerala and Tamil Nadu, has done much more in orienting administrative institutions to deliver on basic welfare, leading to actions on health care, education, poverty eradication and hunger, with a governance structure tuned to competitively monitoring actions on these fronts. The converse is true of northern states Bihar and Uttar Pradesh, where outcomes have remained relatively poor despite there not being much of a difference in the governance structure. The obvious answer to the puzzle could be the presence of historical socio-political movements that have resulted in greater circulation of elites in power and which have addressed issues related to welfare more thoroughly in the South -Kerala and T.N in particular. Yet even these States need to go further in reaching the UN's SDGs and achieving the living standards of both the first world and other developing nations.

The western States, especially Gujarat and Maharashtra, are also better off in economic growth and industry, indicating a diversified economy, higher employment ratios, skilled labour and better entrepreneurial culture.

A major fault-line in India is in achieving gender equality, where barring middling performers such as Himachal Pradesh, Kerala and Jammu & Kashmir, the rest of the country falls short. Low sex ratio (896 females per 1,000 males), poor labour force participation and presence in managerial positions (only 17.5% and 30%, according to the report), high level of informality of labour, a major gender pay gap (females earn 78% of wages earned by males in regular salaried employment), lack of adequate representation in governance (14.4% in Parliament, but 44.4% in local government) besides high crime rates against women and girls are among the major national level indicators that have contributed to this. States need to climb a mountain to achieve gender equality, but immediate steps such as enhancing women's participation in governance through parliamentary reservations would go a long way in addressing several of the issues faced by them.

Q. As used in the passage, the word "sluggish" most nearly means

Detailed Solution for Languages: Mock Test - 3 - Question 10

Option (b) is correct as the passage is conveying that some states have been slow in achieving the UN 2030 goals. The word "sluggish" has been used in this context only.

Languages: Mock Test - 3 - Question 11

The NITI Aayog's Sustainable Development Goals Index for 2019, released on Monday, does not reveal any surprising information. Kerala, Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh, Telangana and Karnataka are joined by Himachal Pradesh, Sikkim and Goa as the best performers while the northern/north-central and northeastern States have been sluggish in achieving the U.N.-mandated goals by 2030. Poor performers such as Uttar Pradesh have shown discernible advances in the indices measured between 2018-19 - especially in adopting cleaner energy and improving sanitation. But the regional divide is stark in basic livelihood goals such as "eradication of poverty", and "good health and well-being" or even in measures such as "industry, innovation and infrastructure".

This points to variances in both State governance and in administrative structures and implementation of welfare policies. The South, led by Kerala and Tamil Nadu, has done much more in orienting administrative institutions to deliver on basic welfare, leading to actions on health care, education, poverty eradication and hunger, with a governance structure tuned to competitively monitoring actions on these fronts. The converse is true of northern states Bihar and Uttar Pradesh, where outcomes have remained relatively poor despite there not being much of a difference in the governance structure. The obvious answer to the puzzle could be the presence of historical socio-political movements that have resulted in greater circulation of elites in power and which have addressed issues related to welfare more thoroughly in the South -Kerala and T.N in particular. Yet even these States need to go further in reaching the UN's SDGs and achieving the living standards of both the first world and other developing nations.

The western States, especially Gujarat and Maharashtra, are also better off in economic growth and industry, indicating a diversified economy, higher employment ratios, skilled labour and better entrepreneurial culture.

A major fault-line in India is in achieving gender equality, where barring middling performers such as Himachal Pradesh, Kerala and Jammu & Kashmir, the rest of the country falls short. Low sex ratio (896 females per 1,000 males), poor labour force participation and presence in managerial positions (only 17.5% and 30%, according to the report), high level of informality of labour, a major gender pay gap (females earn 78% of wages earned by males in regular salaried employment), lack of adequate representation in governance (14.4% in Parliament, but 44.4% in local government) besides high crime rates against women and girls are among the major national level indicators that have contributed to this. States need to climb a mountain to achieve gender equality, but immediate steps such as enhancing women's participation in governance through parliamentary reservations would go a long way in addressing several of the issues faced by them.

Q. The passage puts forth its points using which of the following?

Detailed Solution for Languages: Mock Test - 3 - Question 11

Option (a) is the correct choice as the passage makes comparisons repeatedly in the form of factual statistical data.

Languages: Mock Test - 3 - Question 12

Since the dawn of civilization mankind has always been plagued by some or the other form of disease. The number of lives accounted for by each disease has, through the decades, varied continually, though none of them can be singled out as the leading cause of death, collectively they are the leading cause of deaths. The origin or evolution of diseases has never been too clearcut a phenomenon, though some wishful dreamers even attribute it to Pandora's box of troubles. A survey of the five leading causes of deaths during a period from the early 1900s to the mid 1900s shows a distinct and significant trend. In the early 1900s these causes in order of number of death's caused were:

i. Tuberculosis,

ii. Pneumonia,

iii. Intestinal diseases,

iv. Heart diseases,

v. and Cerebral haemorrhage and thrombosis.

A decade later the only change was that heart disease had moved from fourth to fifth place, tuberculosis now being second, and pneumonia third. Toward the later part of this period, however, the list had changed profoundly.

Heart diseases were far out in front; cancer, which had come up from eighth place, was second; and cerebral haemorrhage and thrombosis, third. Fatal accidents, which had been well down the list, were now fourth, and nephritis was fifth. All of these are, of course, composites rather than single diseases, and it is significant that, except for accidents, they are characteristic of the advanced rather than the early or middle years of life.

Q. On the basis of the passage, which of the following statements is most tenable?

Detailed Solution for Languages: Mock Test - 3 - Question 12

Towards the end of the passage, it is clearly mentioned that with the exception of accidents, the other diseases are more likely to afflict those in advanced years or old age.

Languages: Mock Test - 3 - Question 13

Since the dawn of civilization mankind has always been plagued by some or the other form of disease. The number of lives accounted for by each disease has, through the decades, varied continually, though none of them can be singled out as the leading cause of death, collectively they are the leading cause of deaths. The origin or evolution of diseases has never been too clearcut a phenomenon, though some wishful dreamers even attribute it to Pandora's box of troubles. A survey of the five leading causes of deaths during a period from the early 1900s to the mid 1900s shows a distinct and significant trend. In the early 1900s these causes in order of number of death's caused were:

i. Tuberculosis,

ii. Pneumonia,

iii. Intestinal diseases,

iv. Heart diseases,

v. and Cerebral haemorrhage and thrombosis.

A decade later the only change was that heart disease had moved from fourth to fifth place, tuberculosis now being second, and pneumonia third. Toward the later part of this period, however, the list had changed profoundly.

Heart diseases were far out in front; cancer, which had come up from eighth place, was second; and cerebral haemorrhage and thrombosis, third. Fatal accidents, which had been well down the list, were now fourth, and nephritis was fifth. All of these are, of course, composites rather than single diseases, and it is significant that, except for accidents, they are characteristic of the advanced rather than the early or middle years of life.

Q. Which one of the following statements is most nearly correct?

Detailed Solution for Languages: Mock Test - 3 - Question 13

As per the passage, during the decade after 1900s (upto 1910 or so) there were 5 main diseases which merely changed in order of importance. However, towards the latter part of the period from 1900 to 1950, the list of main diseases underwent profound change. Hence, option (d) is the correct answer.

Languages: Mock Test - 3 - Question 14

Since the dawn of civilization mankind has always been plagued by some or the other form of disease. The number of lives accounted for by each disease has, through the decades, varied continually, though none of them can be singled out as the leading cause of death, collectively they are the leading cause of deaths. The origin or evolution of diseases has never been too clearcut a phenomenon, though some wishful dreamers even attribute it to Pandora's box of troubles. A survey of the five leading causes of deaths during a period from the early 1900s to the mid 1900s shows a distinct and significant trend. In the early 1900s these causes in order of number of death's caused were:

i. Tuberculosis,

ii. Pneumonia,

iii. Intestinal diseases,

iv. Heart diseases,

v. and Cerebral haemorrhage and thrombosis.

A decade later the only change was that heart disease had moved from fourth to fifth place, tuberculosis now being second, and pneumonia third. Toward the later part of this period, however, the list had changed profoundly.

Heart diseases were far out in front; cancer, which had come up from eighth place, was second; and cerebral haemorrhage and thrombosis, third. Fatal accidents, which had been well down the list, were now fourth, and nephritis was fifth. All of these are, of course, composites rather than single diseases, and it is significant that, except for accidents, they are characteristic of the advanced rather than the early or middle years of life.

Q. The word 'wishful', given in the passage means

Detailed Solution for Languages: Mock Test - 3 - Question 14

'Wishful' means 'expressive of a wish'; desirous.

Hence, 'hopeful' is the most appropriate option.

Languages: Mock Test - 3 - Question 15

Since the dawn of civilization mankind has always been plagued by some or the other form of disease. The number of lives accounted for by each disease has, through the decades, varied continually, though none of them can be singled out as the leading cause of death, collectively they are the leading cause of deaths. The origin or evolution of diseases has never been too clearcut a phenomenon, though some wishful dreamers even attribute it to Pandora's box of troubles. A survey of the five leading causes of deaths during a period from the early 1900s to the mid 1900s shows a distinct and significant trend. In the early 1900s these causes in order of number of death's caused were:

i. Tuberculosis,

ii. Pneumonia,

iii. Intestinal diseases,

iv. Heart diseases,

v. and Cerebral haemorrhage and thrombosis.

A decade later the only change was that heart disease had moved from fourth to fifth place, tuberculosis now being second, and pneumonia third. Toward the later part of this period, however, the list had changed profoundly.

Heart diseases were far out in front; cancer, which had come up from eighth place, was second; and cerebral haemorrhage and thrombosis, third. Fatal accidents, which had been well down the list, were now fourth, and nephritis was fifth. All of these are, of course, composites rather than single diseases, and it is significant that, except for accidents, they are characteristic of the advanced rather than the early or middle years of life.

Q. Which one of the following trends is least indicated in the passage?

Detailed Solution for Languages: Mock Test - 3 - Question 15

Options (b), (c) and (d) can all be clearly deduced from the passage which leaves only option (a) which has not been indicated at all.

Languages: Mock Test - 3 - Question 16

India really cannot handle tension in West Asia right now.

That may seem obvious: after all, any escalation in hostilities between Iran and the United States, after the latter killed top Iranian military commander Qassem Soleimani, will have a huge impact across the region and beyond. It's not for nothing that "World War 3" trended on Twitter on Friday.

There are two primary dangers for India, other than the extremely destabilising effects of any outright war in the region.

One, there are 8 million Indians living and working in West Asia, the vast majority of whom live in the Arabian Gulf. Conflict would put them all in danger, as it did at the start of the 1990s, when the US went to war with Iraq and New Delhi had to arrange an airlift of more than 110,000 Indian citizens.

But even if there isn't all-out conflict, heightened tensions could hurt the economies of the region, and endanger the jobs of many Indians. Already the events of the last few years, including inter-regional conflict between Saudi Arabia and Qatar, employment nationalisation drives in a number of countries and Dubai's struggles to recover from economic crisis, have hurt the diaspora.

Kerala has already begun coming to terms with the idea that many more will return. A sudden jolt would put pressure on the places Indians return to, and also endanger the $40 billion in remittances India receives from West Asia - more than 50% of all remittances to the country, a key source of foreign exchange.

Then there is the question of oil prices. Though international prices have gone up by 4% since the strike on Soleimani, analysts do not currently expect them to get much higher - presuming it is in no one's interests for that to happen and that both the US and Iran will back down from outright conflict.

Yet if that presumption is wrong, India will face some difficult times. Although India does not now import much oil from Iran, it is still heavily reliant on the Strait of Hormuz - the tiny span of water through which a quarter of the world's oil and a third of its natural gas travels. Higher oil prices would automatically mean inflation in India, where analysts are already worried about rising food prices.

Even if India's economy were on a more stable footing, conflict in the region would be dangerous. But the current tensions, coming as they do when the Indian economy seems poised on a precipice, should be even more alarming for policymakers.

Q. What does the word 'precipice' as used in the passage mean?