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Test: Development Experience of India- Assertion & Reason Type Questions - Commerce MCQ


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10 Questions MCQ Test Economics Class 12 - Test: Development Experience of India- Assertion & Reason Type Questions

Test: Development Experience of India- Assertion & Reason Type Questions for Commerce 2024 is part of Economics Class 12 preparation. The Test: Development Experience of India- Assertion & Reason Type Questions questions and answers have been prepared according to the Commerce exam syllabus.The Test: Development Experience of India- Assertion & Reason Type Questions MCQs are made for Commerce 2024 Exam. Find important definitions, questions, notes, meanings, examples, exercises, MCQs and online tests for Test: Development Experience of India- Assertion & Reason Type Questions below.
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Test: Development Experience of India- Assertion & Reason Type Questions - Question 1

______ adopted ‘One Child Policy ’ as a measure to control population.

Detailed Solution for Test: Development Experience of India- Assertion & Reason Type Questions - Question 1
The one-child policy was a national program based in China, introduced by the Chinese government in 1980 with the aim of placing most Chinese families to one child each. The policy was enacted to address the growing population growth rate in the country, which the government sees as rapid.
Test: Development Experience of India- Assertion & Reason Type Questions - Question 2

Directions : In the following questions, a statement of Assertion (A) is followed by a statement of Reason (R). Mark the correct choice as:

Assertion (A): In initial phase in China, reforms were initiated in agriculture, foreign trade and investment sectors.

Reason (R): India and Pakistan were busy fighting wars with each other.

Detailed Solution for Test: Development Experience of India- Assertion & Reason Type Questions - Question 2
Reforms were introduced in phases in China. In the first phase, reforms were initiated in agriculture, foreign trade and investment sector.
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Test: Development Experience of India- Assertion & Reason Type Questions - Question 3

Directions : In the following questions, a statement of Assertion (A) is followed by a statement of Reason (R). Mark the correct choice as:

Assertion (A): In order to attract foreign investors, special social zones were set up in China.

Reason (R): The government gives a lot of incentives for the industries set up in the special social zones.

Detailed Solution for Test: Development Experience of India- Assertion & Reason Type Questions - Question 3
In order to attract foreign investors, special social zones were set up in India.
Test: Development Experience of India- Assertion & Reason Type Questions - Question 4

Directions : In the following questions, a statement of Assertion (A) is followed by a statement of Reason (R). Mark the correct choice as:

Assertion (A): India and Pakistan adopted the mixed economy model.

Reason (R): All the countries in the world were adopting mixed economy model.

Detailed Solution for Test: Development Experience of India- Assertion & Reason Type Questions - Question 4
After independence, India had the option of being a capitalist or a socialist economy. The leaders of independent India wanted to give importance to both public and private sectors and hence decided to adopted the mixed economy principle.
Test: Development Experience of India- Assertion & Reason Type Questions - Question 5

Direction: Read the report given below and answer the questions that follow:

China and India are the two emerging economies of the world. As of 2019, China and India are 2nd and 5th largest country of the world, respectively in nominal basis. On PPP basis, China is at 1st and India is at 3rd place. Both countries together share 19.46% and 27.18% of total global wealth in nominal and PPP terms, respectively. Among Asian countries, China and India together contribute more than half of Asia’s GDP.

In 1987, GDP (Nominal) of both countries was almost equal. But in 2019, China’s GDP is 4.78 times greater than India. On PPP basis, GDP of China is 2.38x of India. China crossed $1 trillion mark in 1998 while India crossed 9 year later in 2007 at exchange rate basis.

Both countries have been neck-to-neck in GDP per capita terms. As per both methods, India was richer than China in 1990. Now in 2019, China is almost 4.61 times richer than India in nominal method and 2.30 times richer in PPP method. Per capita rank of China and India is 72th and 145th, resp, in nominal. Per capita rank of China and India is 75th and 126th, resp, in PPP.

China attains maximum GDP growth rate of 19.30% in year 1970 and minimum -27.27% in 1961. India reached an all time high of 9.63% in 1988 and a record low of -5.24% in 1979. During period 1961 to 2018, China grew by more than 10% in 22 years while India never. GDP growth rate was negative in five and four years for China and India, respectively.

According to CIA Factbook sector wise GDP composition of India in 2017 are as follows : Agriculture (15.4%), Industry (23%) and Services (61.5%). Sector wise GDP composition of China in 2017 are : Agriculture (8.3%), Industry (39.5%) and Services (52.2%).

- Comparing China and India by Economy – The Statistic Times – 28th August, 2019

India is dependent on ____________ sector for its GDP contribution.

Detailed Solution for Test: Development Experience of India- Assertion & Reason Type Questions - Question 5

The services sector accounts for 53.89% of total India's GDP composition.Sector wise GDP Composition of India

- Agriculture: 15.4%
- Industry: 23%
- Services: 61.5%

Sector wise GDP Composition of China

- Agriculture: 8.3%
- Industry: 39.5%
- Services: 52.2%

India is dependent on the Agriculture sector for its GDP contribution. This can be seen from the fact that Agriculture contributes a significant portion (15.4%) to India's GDP, which is higher compared to China. The Industry and Services sectors also play important roles in India's economy, but Agriculture remains a key sector in terms of GDP contribution.

Test: Development Experience of India- Assertion & Reason Type Questions - Question 6

Direction: Read the report given below and answer the questions that follow:

China and India are the two emerging economies of the world. As of 2019, China and India are 2nd and 5th largest country of the world, respectively in nominal basis. On PPP basis, China is at 1st and India is at 3rd place. Both countries together share 19.46% and 27.18% of total global wealth in nominal and PPP terms, respectively. Among Asian countries, China and India together contribute more than half of Asia’s GDP.

In 1987, GDP (Nominal) of both countries was almost equal. But in 2019, China’s GDP is 4.78 times greater than India. On PPP basis, GDP of China is 2.38x of India. China crossed $1 trillion mark in 1998 while India crossed 9 year later in 2007 at exchange rate basis.

Both countries have been neck-to-neck in GDP per capita terms. As per both methods, India was richer than China in 1990. Now in 2019, China is almost 4.61 times richer than India in nominal method and 2.30 times richer in PPP method. Per capita rank of China and India is 72th and 145th, resp, in nominal. Per capita rank of China and India is 75th and 126th, resp, in PPP.

China attains maximum GDP growth rate of 19.30% in year 1970 and minimum -27.27% in 1961. India reached an all time high of 9.63% in 1988 and a record low of -5.24% in 1979. During period 1961 to 2018, China grew by more than 10% in 22 years while India never. GDP growth rate was negative in five and four years for China and India, respectively.

According to CIA Factbook sector wise GDP composition of India in 2017 are as follows : Agriculture (15.4%), Industry (23%) and Services (61.5%). Sector wise GDP composition of China in 2017 are : Agriculture (8.3%), Industry (39.5%) and Services (52.2%).

- Comparing China and India by Economy – The Statistic Times – 28th August, 2019

More than ________ of Asia’s GDP is shared by India.

Detailed Solution for Test: Development Experience of India- Assertion & Reason Type Questions - Question 6
India’s share of the global economy today is still less than half of what it was at independence in 1948. India’s economy is expanding rapidly; but its trade is still less than 1 percent of the global total, whereas China’s trade is the second or third largest. A similar disparity exists in foreign investment.
Test: Development Experience of India- Assertion & Reason Type Questions - Question 7

Direction: Read the report given below and answer the questions that follow:

China and India are the two emerging economies of the world. As of 2019, China and India are 2nd and 5th largest country of the world, respectively in nominal basis. On PPP basis, China is at 1st and India is at 3rd place. Both countries together share 19.46% and 27.18% of total global wealth in nominal and PPP terms, respectively. Among Asian countries, China and India together contribute more than half of Asia’s GDP.

In 1987, GDP (Nominal) of both countries was almost equal. But in 2019, China’s GDP is 4.78 times greater than India. On PPP basis, GDP of China is 2.38x of India. China crossed $1 trillion mark in 1998 while India crossed 9 year later in 2007 at exchange rate basis.

Both countries have been neck-to-neck in GDP per capita terms. As per both methods, India was richer than China in 1990. Now in 2019, China is almost 4.61 times richer than India in nominal method and 2.30 times richer in PPP method. Per capita rank of China and India is 72th and 145th, resp, in nominal. Per capita rank of China and India is 75th and 126th, resp, in PPP.

China attains maximum GDP growth rate of 19.30% in year 1970 and minimum -27.27% in 1961. India reached an all time high of 9.63% in 1988 and a record low of -5.24% in 1979. During period 1961 to 2018, China grew by more than 10% in 22 years while India never. GDP growth rate was negative in five and four years for China and India, respectively.

According to CIA Factbook sector wise GDP composition of India in 2017 are as follows : Agriculture (15.4%), Industry (23%) and Services (61.5%). Sector wise GDP composition of China in 2017 are : Agriculture (8.3%), Industry (39.5%) and Services (52.2%).

- Comparing China and India by Economy – The Statistic Times – 28th August, 2019

China is ______________ economy.

Detailed Solution for Test: Development Experience of India- Assertion & Reason Type Questions - Question 7
Industry was 39.5% of China's gross domestic product (GDP).
Test: Development Experience of India- Assertion & Reason Type Questions - Question 8

Direction: Read the report given below and answer the questions that follow:

While many like to focus on the similarities between India and China, what’s more important are the differences. Most central to this article is that the two nations rely on entirely different systems of political economy. India is the world’s largest parliamentary democracy, while China is a one-party dictatorship. India’s reforms have scaled back state-run industries, while China’s reforms have created a pseudo-free-market command economy. India has courted the capitalist West while China has tried to counter it. Looking at how China and India have been simultaneously so successful yet maintained their differences can shed light on the “why.”

We’ll start with China. Once the Communist Party seized control in 1949 and declared the nation a People’s Republic, China embarked on a campaign of state-led industrialization that failed miserably. Mao Zedong’s most ambitious project was the “Great Leap Forward,” which attempted to develop China even faster than Stalin developed the USSR. The state collectivized agriculture and forced peasants to begin making steel in backyard furnaces. Lasting from 1958 to 1960, the Great Leap Forward led to the deaths of 45 million Chinese, mostly as a result of famine and disease. The “Cultural Revolution” from 1966 to 1976 resulted in huge political purges and a mass exodus of people from cities to the countryside. While countries like Japan, South Korea, Singapore, and Taiwan all began to approach Western living standards from the 1950’s to the 1970’s, China’s GDP per capita in 1978 was a meager $307 (measured in 2010 dollars). However, 1978 was also the year that Deng Xiaoping took control of the Communist Party and began creating modern China.

India and China: Two Very Different Paths to Development – Berkeley Economic Review – 30th April, 2018

The difference between India and China’s politics is:

Detailed Solution for Test: Development Experience of India- Assertion & Reason Type Questions - Question 8
India is the world's largest parliamentary democracy, while China is a one-party dictatorship. India's reforms have scaled back state-run industries, while China's reforms have created a pseudo-free-market command economy. India has courted the capitalist West while China has tried to counter it.
Test: Development Experience of India- Assertion & Reason Type Questions - Question 9

Direction: Read the report given below and answer the questions that follow:

While many like to focus on the similarities between India and China, what’s more important are the differences. Most central to this article is that the two nations rely on entirely different systems of political economy. India is the world’s largest parliamentary democracy, while China is a one-party dictatorship. India’s reforms have scaled back state-run industries, while China’s reforms have created a pseudo-free-market command economy. India has courted the capitalist West while China has tried to counter it. Looking at how China and India have been simultaneously so successful yet maintained their differences can shed light on the “why.”

We’ll start with China. Once the Communist Party seized control in 1949 and declared the nation a People’s Republic, China embarked on a campaign of state-led industrialization that failed miserably. Mao Zedong’s most ambitious project was the “Great Leap Forward,” which attempted to develop China even faster than Stalin developed the USSR. The state collectivized agriculture and forced peasants to begin making steel in backyard furnaces. Lasting from 1958 to 1960, the Great Leap Forward led to the deaths of 45 million Chinese, mostly as a result of famine and disease. The “Cultural Revolution” from 1966 to 1976 resulted in huge political purges and a mass exodus of people from cities to the countryside. While countries like Japan, South Korea, Singapore, and Taiwan all began to approach Western living standards from the 1950’s to the 1970’s, China’s GDP per capita in 1978 was a meager $307 (measured in 2010 dollars). However, 1978 was also the year that Deng Xiaoping took control of the Communist Party and began creating modern China.

India and China: Two Very Different Paths to Development – Berkeley Economic Review – 30th April, 2018

India has tried to ___________ the capitalist.

Detailed Solution for Test: Development Experience of India- Assertion & Reason Type Questions - Question 9
Socialism shaped the principal economic and social policies of the Indian government but mostly followed Dirigisme after independence until the early 1990s, when India moved towards a more market-based economy.
Test: Development Experience of India- Assertion & Reason Type Questions - Question 10

Direction: Read the report given below and answer the questions that follow:

While many like to focus on the similarities between India and China, what’s more important are the differences. Most central to this article is that the two nations rely on entirely different systems of political economy. India is the world’s largest parliamentary democracy, while China is a one-party dictatorship. India’s reforms have scaled back state-run industries, while China’s reforms have created a pseudo-free-market command economy. India has courted the capitalist West while China has tried to counter it. Looking at how China and India have been simultaneously so successful yet maintained their differences can shed light on the “why.”

We’ll start with China. Once the Communist Party seized control in 1949 and declared the nation a People’s Republic, China embarked on a campaign of state-led industrialization that failed miserably. Mao Zedong’s most ambitious project was the “Great Leap Forward,” which attempted to develop China even faster than Stalin developed the USSR. The state collectivized agriculture and forced peasants to begin making steel in backyard furnaces. Lasting from 1958 to 1960, the Great Leap Forward led to the deaths of 45 million Chinese, mostly as a result of famine and disease. The “Cultural Revolution” from 1966 to 1976 resulted in huge political purges and a mass exodus of people from cities to the countryside. While countries like Japan, South Korea, Singapore, and Taiwan all began to approach Western living standards from the 1950’s to the 1970’s, China’s GDP per capita in 1978 was a meager $307 (measured in 2010 dollars). However, 1978 was also the year that Deng Xiaoping took control of the Communist Party and began creating modern China.

India and China: Two Very Different Paths to Development – Berkeley Economic Review – 30th April, 2018

The Great Leap Forward was the ambitious project of ________ .

Detailed Solution for Test: Development Experience of India- Assertion & Reason Type Questions - Question 10
The initiative was led by Mao Zedong, also known as Mao Tse-tung and Chair Mao. Mao's official goal was to rapidly evolve China from an agrarian economy into a modern industrial society with greater ability to compete with Western industrialized nations.
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