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Test: Secondary Activities- Source Based Type Questions - Humanities/Arts MCQ


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12 Questions MCQ Test Geography Class 12 - Test: Secondary Activities- Source Based Type Questions

Test: Secondary Activities- Source Based Type Questions for Humanities/Arts 2024 is part of Geography Class 12 preparation. The Test: Secondary Activities- Source Based Type Questions questions and answers have been prepared according to the Humanities/Arts exam syllabus.The Test: Secondary Activities- Source Based Type Questions MCQs are made for Humanities/Arts 2024 Exam. Find important definitions, questions, notes, meanings, examples, exercises, MCQs and online tests for Test: Secondary Activities- Source Based Type Questions below.
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Test: Secondary Activities- Source Based Type Questions - Question 1

Read the case study given below and answer the questions that follow:

Household industries are the smallest manufacturing units. The artisans use local raw materials and simple tools to produce everyday goods in their homes with the help of their family members or part-time labour. Finished products may be for consumption in the same household or, for sale in local (village) markets, or, for barter. Capital and transportation do not wield much influence as this type of manufacturing has low commercial significance and most of the tools are devised locally. Some common everyday

products produced in this sector of manufacturing include foodstuffs, fabrics, mats, containers, tools, furniture, shoes, and figurines from woodlot and forest, shoes, thongs and other articles from leather; pottery and bricks from clays and stones. Goldsmiths make jewellery of gold, silver and bronze. Some artefacts and crafts are made out of bamboo, wood obtained locally from the forests.

Q. Which one is the example of household industries?

Detailed Solution for Test: Secondary Activities- Source Based Type Questions - Question 1
Cottage industries are also known as household industries. These are a type of small scale industry where the products are manufactured by hand, by the artisans. Basket weaving, pottery and other handicrafts are examples of cottage industry.
Test: Secondary Activities- Source Based Type Questions - Question 2

Read the case study given below and answer the questions that follow:

Household industries are the smallest manufacturing units. The artisans use local raw materials and simple tools to produce everyday goods in their homes with the help of their family members or part-time labour. Finished products may be for consumption in the same household or, for sale in local (village) markets, or, for barter. Capital and transportation do not wield much influence as this type of manufacturing has low commercial significance and most of the tools are devised locally. Some common everyday

products produced in this sector of manufacturing include foodstuffs, fabrics, mats, containers, tools, furniture, shoes, and figurines from woodlot and forest, shoes, thongs and other articles from leather; pottery and bricks from clays and stones. Goldsmiths make jewellery of gold, silver and bronze. Some artefacts and crafts are made out of bamboo, wood obtained locally from the forests.

Q. What is the other name of household industries?

Detailed Solution for Test: Secondary Activities- Source Based Type Questions - Question 2
A cottage industry is a small-scale, decentralized manufacturing business often operated out of a home rather than a purpose-built facility. Cottage industries are defined by the amount of investment required to start, as well as the number of people employed.
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Test: Secondary Activities- Source Based Type Questions - Question 3

Read the case study given below and answer the questions that follow:

Household industries are the smallest manufacturing units. The artisans use local raw materials and simple tools to produce everyday goods in their homes with the help of their family members or part-time labour. Finished products may be for consumption in the same household or, for sale in local (village) markets, or, for barter. Capital and transportation do not wield much influence as this type of manufacturing has low commercial significance and most of the tools are devised locally. Some common everyday

products produced in this sector of manufacturing include foodstuffs, fabrics, mats, containers, tools, furniture, shoes, and figurines from woodlot and forest, shoes, thongs and other articles from leather; pottery and bricks from clays and stones. Goldsmiths make jewellery of gold, silver and bronze. Some artefacts and crafts are made out of bamboo, wood obtained locally from the forests.

Q. Production in household industries takes place in:

Detailed Solution for Test: Secondary Activities- Source Based Type Questions - Question 3
Footloose industries can be located in a wide variety of places. They are not dependent on any specific raw material, weight losing or otherwise. They largely depend on component parts which can be obtained anywhere. They produce in small quantity and also employ a small labour force. These are generally not polluting industries. The important factor in their location is accessibility by road network.
Test: Secondary Activities- Source Based Type Questions - Question 4

Read the case study given below and answer the questions that follow:

Household industries are the smallest manufacturing units. The artisans use local raw materials and simple tools to produce everyday goods in their homes with the help of their family members or part-time labour. Finished products may be for consumption in the same household or, for sale in local (village) markets, or, for barter. Capital and transportation do not wield much influence as this type of manufacturing has low commercial significance and most of the tools are devised locally. Some common everyday

products produced in this sector of manufacturing include foodstuffs, fabrics, mats, containers, tools, furniture, shoes, and figurines from woodlot and forest, shoes, thongs and other articles from leather; pottery and bricks from clays and stones. Goldsmiths make jewellery of gold, silver and bronze. Some artefacts and crafts are made out of bamboo, wood obtained locally from the forests.

Q. Household industries are conducted by:

Detailed Solution for Test: Secondary Activities- Source Based Type Questions - Question 4
Household industry was defined as an industry conducted by the head of the household himself/herself and/or by the members of the household at home or within the village in rural areas, and only within the precincts of the house where the household lived in urban areas. the larger proportion of workers in a household industry should consist of members of the household including the head. The industry should not be run on the scale of a registered factory.

The main criterion of a household industry was the participation of one or more members of a household. This criterion applied in urban areas too. Even if the industry was not actually located in the house but was located somewhere within the village limits in the rural areas, there was greater possibility of the members of the household participating in the industry. In the urban areas where organized industry was more prominent, the household industry was to be confined to the precincts of the house where the participants lived. In urban areas even if the members of the household by themselves ran an industry but at a place away from the precincts of their home, it was not considered a household industry.

Test: Secondary Activities- Source Based Type Questions - Question 5

Read the case study given below and answer the questions that follow:

Small scale manufacturing is distinguished from household industries by its production techniques and place of manufacture (a workshop outside the home/cottage of the producer). This type of manufacturing uses local raw material, simple power-driven machines and semi-skilled labour. It provides employment and raises local purchasing power. Therefore, countries like India, China, Indonesia and Brazil, etc. have developed labour intensive small-scale manufacturing in order to provide employment to their population.

Q. Which is the correct example of small-scale industry?

Detailed Solution for Test: Secondary Activities- Source Based Type Questions - Question 5

Pickles are a traditional food item in India, and heavily consumed in every household. Pickles become more helpful for a single person staying distant from family as pickles come in the range of varieties and tastes which can suit anyone. Pickle manufacturing is very simple and any individual with small start-up capital can start this business. With consideration of the availability of fruits and vegetables and the popularity of tastes and acceptance of certain varieties, the business can be very successful.

Test: Secondary Activities- Source Based Type Questions - Question 6

Read the case study given below and answer the questions that follow:

Small scale manufacturing is distinguished from household industries by its production techniques and place of manufacture (a workshop outside the home/cottage of the producer). This type of manufacturing uses local raw material, simple power-driven machines and semi-skilled labour. It provides employment and raises local purchasing power. Therefore, countries like India, China, Indonesia and Brazil, etc. have developed labour intensive small-scale manufacturing in order to provide employment to their population.

Q. How are small scale industries distinguished from household industries?

Detailed Solution for Test: Secondary Activities- Source Based Type Questions - Question 6
Small scale manufacturing is distinguished from household industries by its production techniques and place of manufacture (a workshop outside the home/cottage of the producer).
Test: Secondary Activities- Source Based Type Questions - Question 7

Read the case study given below and answer the questions that follow:

Small scale manufacturing is distinguished from household industries by its production techniques and place of manufacture (a workshop outside the home/cottage of the producer). This type of manufacturing uses local raw material, simple power-driven machines and semi-skilled labour. It provides employment and raises local purchasing power. Therefore, countries like India, China, Indonesia and Brazil, etc. have developed labour intensive small-scale manufacturing in order to provide employment to their population.

Q. State one characteristic of small-scale industry.

Test: Secondary Activities- Source Based Type Questions - Question 8

Read the case study given below and answer the questions that follow:

Small scale manufacturing is distinguished from household industries by its production techniques and place of manufacture (a workshop outside the home/cottage of the producer). This type of manufacturing uses local raw material, simple power-driven machines and semi-skilled labour. It provides employment and raises local purchasing power. Therefore, countries like India, China, Indonesia and Brazil, etc. have developed labour intensive small-scale manufacturing in order to provide employment to their population.

Q. In small scale industries the manufacturing is done on:

Detailed Solution for Test: Secondary Activities- Source Based Type Questions - Question 8
Small Scale Industries (SSI) are those industries in which the manufacturing, production and rendering of services are done on a small or micro scale. These industries make a one-time investment in machinery, plant, and equipment, but it does not exceed Rs. 10 crore and annual turnover does not exceed Rs.
Test: Secondary Activities- Source Based Type Questions - Question 9

Read the case study given below and answer the questions that follow:

Cotton textile industry has three sub-sectors i.e. handloom, power loom and mill sectors. Handloom sector is labour-intensive and provides employment to semi-skilled workers. It requires small capital investment. The power loom sector introduces machines and becomes less labour intensive and the volume of production increases. Cotton textile mill sector is highly capital intensive and produces fine clothes in bulk.

Cotton textile manufacturing requires good quality cotton as raw material. India, China, U.S.A, Pakistan, Uzbekistan, Egypt produces more than half of the world’s raw cotton. The U.K, NW European countries and Japan also produce cotton textile made from imported yarn. Europe alone accounts for nearly half of the world’s cotton imports. The industry has to face very stiff competition with synthetic fibres hence it has now shown a declining trend in many countries. With the scientific advancement and technological improvements, the structure of industries changes. For example, Germany recorded constant growth in the cotton textile industry from the Second World War till the seventies but now it has declined. It has shifted to less developed countries where labour costs are low.

Q. State one major requirement for the establishment of the cotton industry.

Detailed Solution for Test: Secondary Activities- Source Based Type Questions - Question 9
This region is a cotton growing tract and is dominated by the cotton textile industry.

Its development was also dependent on the Pykara hydro-electric plant which was built in 1932.

Cheap skilled labour and proximity to a vast local market as well as good climate have also favoured the concentration of industries in this region.

Test: Secondary Activities- Source Based Type Questions - Question 10

Read the case study given below and answer the questions that follow:

Cotton textile industry has three sub-sectors i.e. handloom, power loom and mill sectors. Handloom sector is labour-intensive and provides employment to semi-skilled workers. It requires small capital investment. The power loom sector introduces machines and becomes less labour intensive and the volume of production increases. Cotton textile mill sector is highly capital intensive and produces fine clothes in bulk.

Cotton textile manufacturing requires good quality cotton as raw material. India, China, U.S.A, Pakistan, Uzbekistan, Egypt produces more than half of the world’s raw cotton. The U.K, NW European countries and Japan also produce cotton textile made from imported yarn. Europe alone accounts for nearly half of the world’s cotton imports. The industry has to face very stiff competition with synthetic fibres hence it has now shown a declining trend in many countries. With the scientific advancement and technological improvements, the structure of industries changes. For example, Germany recorded constant growth in the cotton textile industry from the Second World War till the seventies but now it has declined. It has shifted to less developed countries where labour costs are low.

Q. How many sub sectors does the cotton industry have?

Detailed Solution for Test: Secondary Activities- Source Based Type Questions - Question 10
Cotton textile industry has three sub sectors i.e. handloom, powerloom and mill sectors.
Test: Secondary Activities- Source Based Type Questions - Question 11

Read the case study given below and answer the questions that follow:

Cotton textile industry has three sub-sectors i.e. handloom, power loom and mill sectors. Handloom sector is labour-intensive and provides employment to semi-skilled workers. It requires small capital investment. The power loom sector introduces machines and becomes less labour intensive and the volume of production increases. Cotton textile mill sector is highly capital intensive and produces fine clothes in bulk.

Cotton textile manufacturing requires good quality cotton as raw material. India, China, U.S.A, Pakistan, Uzbekistan, Egypt produces more than half of the world’s raw cotton. The U.K, NW European countries and Japan also produce cotton textile made from imported yarn. Europe alone accounts for nearly half of the world’s cotton imports. The industry has to face very stiff competition with synthetic fibres hence it has now shown a declining trend in many countries. With the scientific advancement and technological improvements, the structure of industries changes. For example, Germany recorded constant growth in the cotton textile industry from the Second World War till the seventies but now it has declined. It has shifted to less developed countries where labour costs are low.

Q. Why has the cotton textile industry shifted to less developed countries?

Detailed Solution for Test: Secondary Activities- Source Based Type Questions - Question 11
It is a labour-intensive industry and requires cheap labour. It is an important source of employment to a large number of the population in the country. India enjoys a critical advantage over China due to low labour cost in the textile sector.
Test: Secondary Activities- Source Based Type Questions - Question 12

Read the case study given below and answer the questions that follow:

Cotton textile industry has three sub-sectors i.e. handloom, power loom and mill sectors. Handloom sector is labour-intensive and provides employment to semi-skilled workers. It requires small capital investment. The power loom sector introduces machines and becomes less labour intensive and the volume of production increases. Cotton textile mill sector is highly capital intensive and produces fine clothes in bulk.

Cotton textile manufacturing requires good quality cotton as raw material. India, China, U.S.A, Pakistan, Uzbekistan, Egypt produces more than half of the world’s raw cotton. The U.K, NW European countries and Japan also produce cotton textile made from imported yarn. Europe alone accounts for nearly half of the world’s cotton imports. The industry has to face very stiff competition with synthetic fibres hence it has now shown a declining trend in many countries. With the scientific advancement and technological improvements, the structure of industries changes. For example, Germany recorded constant growth in the cotton textile industry from the Second World War till the seventies but now it has declined. It has shifted to less developed countries where labour costs are low.

Q. The cotton sector in India is considered the _______ most developed sector in the textile industry.

Detailed Solution for Test: Secondary Activities- Source Based Type Questions - Question 12
The cotton sector in India is considered the second most developed sector in the textile industry (after man-made fibres). At 18% of the global total, India is the world's largest producer of cotton.
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