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Test: Accounts From Incomplete Records - 1 - SSC CGL MCQ


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10 Questions MCQ Test SSC CGL Tier 2 - Study Material, Online Tests, Previous Year - Test: Accounts From Incomplete Records - 1

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Test: Accounts From Incomplete Records - 1 - Question 1

If capital in the beginning is more than at the end then it will be

Detailed Solution for Test: Accounts From Incomplete Records - 1 - Question 1
Explanation:
To determine whether there is a loss or profit, we need to compare the capital at the beginning and the capital at the end. Let's consider the following scenarios:
1. If the capital at the beginning is greater than the capital at the end, then it means there is a loss.
2. If the capital at the beginning is equal to the capital at the end, then it means there is neither profit nor loss.
3. If the capital at the beginning is less than the capital at the end, then it means there is a profit.
In this case, the statement mentions that the capital in the beginning is more than at the end. Therefore, we can conclude that there is a loss.
So, the correct answer is option A: Loss.
Test: Accounts From Incomplete Records - 1 - Question 2

Which method is used under single entry system to find out the profit or loss?

Detailed Solution for Test: Accounts From Incomplete Records - 1 - Question 2
Method used under single entry system to find out the profit or loss:
- Statement of affairs method: This method is used under single entry system to determine the profit or loss of a business. It involves preparing a statement of affairs at the beginning and end of an accounting period and comparing the two to calculate the profit or loss.
Steps in the statement of affairs method:
1. Prepare a statement of affairs at the beginning of the accounting period:
- List all the assets of the business along with their respective values.
- List all the liabilities of the business along with their respective values.
- Calculate the capital by subtracting the total liabilities from the total assets.
2. Prepare a statement of affairs at the end of the accounting period:
- List all the assets of the business along with their respective values.
- List all the liabilities of the business along with their respective values.
- Calculate the capital by subtracting the total liabilities from the total assets.
3. Calculate the change in capital:
- Compare the capital at the end of the accounting period with the capital at the beginning of the accounting period.
- If the capital at the end is higher than the capital at the beginning, it represents a profit.
- If the capital at the end is lower than the capital at the beginning, it represents a loss.
4. Determine the profit or loss:
- The difference between the capital at the end and the capital at the beginning represents the profit or loss for the accounting period.
Advantages of the statement of affairs method:
- Simple and easy to understand.
- Does not require detailed record keeping like the double entry system.
- Can be used by small businesses with limited transactions.
Disadvantages of the statement of affairs method:
- Does not provide detailed information about the financial position of the business.
- Does not provide information about individual income and expense items.
- Cannot be used for businesses with complex transactions.
In conclusion, the statement of affairs method is used under single entry system to find out the profit or loss of a business. It involves preparing a statement of affairs at the beginning and end of an accounting period and comparing the two to calculate the change in capital, which represents the profit or loss.
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Test: Accounts From Incomplete Records - 1 - Question 3

In single entry system, it is not possible to prepare:

Detailed Solution for Test: Accounts From Incomplete Records - 1 - Question 3
Single Entry System: What Cannot be Prepared?
In a single entry system, there are certain financial statements and reports that cannot be prepared due to the limitations of the system. One such limitation is the inability to generate a complete and accurate trial balance. Let's explore in detail what cannot be prepared in a single entry system:
1. Trial Balance:
- The trial balance is a statement that lists all the accounts and their balances, both debit and credit, at a given point in time.
- It helps in ensuring the accuracy of bookkeeping and acts as a basis for preparing other financial statements.
- In a single entry system, where only one aspect of a transaction is recorded, it becomes difficult to determine the complete picture and prepare a trial balance.
2. Balance Sheet:
- The balance sheet provides a snapshot of a company's financial position at a specific date, showing its assets, liabilities, and equity.
- It is prepared based on the information obtained from the trial balance, which is not available in a single entry system.
- Without a trial balance, it is challenging to ascertain the accurate values of assets, liabilities, and equity, hence making it impossible to create a balance sheet.
3. Account Sales:
- Account sales, also known as sales day book or sales journal, records all the sales transactions of a business.
- It helps in analyzing sales patterns, identifying customers, and calculating the total sales made during a specific period.
- In a single entry system, where only cash or credit sales are recorded, detailed account sales cannot be prepared as it requires a double entry recording system.
4. Receipts and Payments Account:
- The receipts and payments account is a summary of cash receipts and payments made by an organization during a particular period.
- It helps in tracking the cash flow and analyzing the financial activities of the business.
- In a single entry system, where only cash transactions are recorded, it becomes difficult to prepare a comprehensive receipts and payments account.
Therefore, in a single entry system, it is not possible to prepare a trial balance, balance sheet, detailed account sales, and receipts and payments account due to the inherent limitations of the system.
Test: Accounts From Incomplete Records - 1 - Question 4

Which of the following transactions are false regarding Accounting from Incomplete records system

Detailed Solution for Test: Accounts From Incomplete Records - 1 - Question 4

The false transaction regarding Accounting from Incomplete records system is B: Two aspects of all transactions are recorded.
Explanation:
- Some financial events are not recorded at all: In an incomplete records system, it is possible that certain financial events are not recorded due to incomplete or missing information. This can lead to gaps in the records and make it difficult to accurately determine the financial position of the business.
- Original vouchers provide base for preparing the accounts: Original vouchers such as invoices, receipts, and bank statements are still used as a basis for preparing the accounts in an incomplete records system. These vouchers serve as evidence of the financial transactions and help in reconstructing the accounts.
- Accounting Principles and Accounting Standards are not followed properly under this system: One of the limitations of an incomplete records system is that it may not adhere to the accounting principles and standards followed in a complete double-entry system. This can result in inconsistencies and inaccuracies in the financial statements.
- Two aspects of all transactions are recorded: This statement is false. In an incomplete records system, only one aspect of each transaction is recorded, usually the cash aspect. The non-cash aspect of the transaction is often not recorded, leading to an incomplete representation of the financial transactions.
Therefore, the false transaction regarding Accounting from Incomplete records system is B: Two aspects of all transactions are recorded.
Test: Accounts From Incomplete Records - 1 - Question 5

Books according to Incomplete records system can be maintained only by those small entities in the form of

Detailed Solution for Test: Accounts From Incomplete Records - 1 - Question 5
Explanation:
The correct answer is B: Sole proprietor and partnership.
Here is a detailed solution explaining why the answer is B:
1. Definition of Incomplete Records System: Incomplete records system is a method of bookkeeping where financial records are not maintained according to the double-entry system. It is commonly used by small businesses or entities that do not have the resources or expertise to maintain a complete set of books.
2. Sole Proprietorship: A sole proprietorship is a business structure where a single individual owns and operates the business. In this form of business, the owner is personally liable for all debts and obligations of the business. Since sole proprietorships are typically small entities, they often use the incomplete records system to maintain their financial records.
3. Partnership: A partnership is a business structure where two or more individuals share ownership and responsibility for the business. Like sole proprietorships, partnerships are often small entities and may choose to use the incomplete records system for bookkeeping purposes.
4. Company: A company, also known as a corporation, is a separate legal entity from its owners. It can be owned by shareholders and managed by directors. Unlike sole proprietorships and partnerships, companies are required to maintain proper accounting records according to the double-entry system. Therefore, companies cannot use the incomplete records system.
5. Conclusion: Based on the definition of the incomplete records system and the characteristics of different business structures, the correct answer is B: Sole proprietor and partnership. These small entities often use the incomplete records system for bookkeeping purposes due to their size and resources.
Test: Accounts From Incomplete Records - 1 - Question 6

Following are the Limitations of Incomplete Records except

Detailed Solution for Test: Accounts From Incomplete Records - 1 - Question 6
Limitations of Incomplete Records
Incomplete records refer to the method of maintaining accounting records where real and nominal accounts are not fully recorded or maintained. While this method may have its advantages in terms of flexibility, it also has several limitations, as outlined below:
1. Incomplete method of maintaining accounting records:
- The records maintained under this method are incomplete, as certain transactions or accounts may be omitted or not properly recorded.
- This can result in inaccuracies and gaps in financial information, making it difficult to assess the true financial position of the business.
2. Lack of real and nominal accounts:
- In incomplete records, real and nominal accounts, which are essential for accurate financial reporting, are not maintained.
- Real accounts track assets, liabilities, and capital, while nominal accounts record revenue, expenses, and gains/losses.
- Without these accounts, it becomes challenging to analyze the performance, profitability, and financial stability of the business.
3. Difficulty in preparing a balance sheet:
- Due to the incomplete nature of the records, it is not possible to prepare a balance sheet that accurately reflects the financial position of the business.
- A balance sheet provides a snapshot of assets, liabilities, and equity, and helps stakeholders assess the financial health of the company.
- Without complete records, it is challenging to determine the accurate values of these components and present a comprehensive balance sheet.
4. Limited financial analysis and decision-making:
- Incomplete records restrict the ability to conduct in-depth financial analysis and make informed decisions.
- Financial ratios, trend analysis, and other tools used for evaluating financial performance may be unreliable or unavailable without complete and accurate records.
- This limitation can hinder effective financial planning, forecasting, and strategic decision-making.
In conclusion, while incomplete records may offer flexibility, they come with significant limitations. The lack of real and nominal accounts, incomplete financial information, and the inability to prepare a comprehensive balance sheet all pose challenges for accurate financial reporting and analysis.
Test: Accounts From Incomplete Records - 1 - Question 7

How DOUBLE ENTRY SYSTEM is differ from INCOMPLETE RECORDS

Detailed Solution for Test: Accounts From Incomplete Records - 1 - Question 7
Double Entry System vs Incomplete Records
The double-entry system and incomplete records are two different methods of accounting that have distinct characteristics. Here is a detailed explanation of how they differ from each other:
Double Entry System:
1. Recording: In the double-entry system, both aspects of every transaction are recorded. This means that every transaction has a debit entry and a corresponding credit entry.
2. Completeness: It ensures the completeness of financial records as every transaction is recorded in detail.
3. Accuracy: The system allows for the verification of the arithmetic accuracy of the accounts. The debit and credit entries should always balance, ensuring accuracy in recording transactions.
4. Financial Position: It provides a true and fair view of the financial position of the business by maintaining all relevant accounts, including personal, real, and nominal accounts.
Incomplete Records:
1. Recording: In incomplete records, only personal accounts are maintained. Personal accounts include accounts of individuals, creditors, and debtors.
2. Completeness: It lacks completeness as other types of accounts, such as real and nominal accounts, are not recorded.
3. Accuracy: The system does not allow for the verification of the arithmetic accuracy of the accounts as only partial information is recorded.
4. Financial Position: It is difficult to determine the true and fair financial position of the business as important aspects of the accounts, such as assets, liabilities, and expenses, may not be recorded.
In conclusion, the main difference between the double-entry system and incomplete records lies in the completeness, accuracy, and maintenance of various types of accounts. The double-entry system ensures the recording of both aspects of every transaction, maintains completeness and accuracy, and provides a true and fair financial position. On the other hand, incomplete records only maintain personal accounts, lack completeness and accuracy, and make it difficult to determine the true financial position.
Test: Accounts From Incomplete Records - 1 - Question 8

How statement of affairs is differ from balance sheet

Detailed Solution for Test: Accounts From Incomplete Records - 1 - Question 8
Statement of Affairs vs Balance Sheet:
1. Purpose:
- Statement of Affairs: It is prepared to ascertain the capital amount at a specific point in time, usually during insolvency or bankruptcy proceedings.
- Balance Sheet: It provides a snapshot of a company's financial position, showing its assets, liabilities, and equity at a given date.
2. System of Maintenance:
- Statement of Affairs: It may or may not be maintained under the double-entry system of accounting.
- Balance Sheet: It is always maintained under the double-entry system of accounting.
3. Completeness of Records:
- Statement of Affairs: It is based on incomplete records, estimates, and valuations of assets and liabilities.
- Balance Sheet: It is prepared using complete and accurate records of all financial transactions.
4. Arithmetical Accuracy:
- Statement of Affairs: It does not prove the arithmetical accuracy as it may involve estimates and valuations.
- Balance Sheet: It ensures the arithmetical accuracy as it is prepared based on complete and accurate records.
In summary, the main differences between a Statement of Affairs and a Balance Sheet lie in their purpose, system of maintenance, completeness of records, and arithmetical accuracy. While a Statement of Affairs is prepared to determine the capital amount during insolvency, it may not be maintained under the double-entry system and relies on estimates. On the other hand, a Balance Sheet provides a comprehensive overview of a company's financial position, is always maintained under the double-entry system, and is based on complete and accurate records.
Test: Accounts From Incomplete Records - 1 - Question 9

When Statement of affairs is prepared _______ is not prepared.

Detailed Solution for Test: Accounts From Incomplete Records - 1 - Question 9
Statement of Affairs and Trial Balance:


When preparing a statement of affairs, the trial balance is not prepared. Here's why:
Definition:


A statement of affairs is a financial statement that shows the assets, liabilities, and capital of a business or individual at a specific point in time. It provides an overview of the financial position and helps to determine the net worth or insolvency of the entity.
Role of Trial Balance:


A trial balance is a list of all the general ledger accounts and their balances. It is prepared to check the accuracy of the accounting records before preparing the financial statements. The trial balance ensures that the debits and credits are equal and that all transactions have been properly recorded.
Reasons for Not Preparing Trial Balance:


When preparing a statement of affairs, the trial balance is not prepared due to the following reasons:
1. Different Objectives: The statement of affairs focuses on determining the financial position of the entity, while the trial balance is used to ensure the accuracy of the accounts. Both serve different purposes and are prepared at different stages of the accounting process.
2. Valuation of Assets and Liabilities: The statement of affairs requires a detailed valuation of assets and liabilities at their current market values. This may involve appraisals, estimates, and adjustments, which are not reflected in the trial balance.
3. Non-Accrual Basis: The statement of affairs is prepared on a non-accrual basis, meaning that it does not consider the matching principle or the recognition of revenues and expenses. It focuses on the current value of assets and liabilities, rather than their historical costs.
4. Limited Scope: The statement of affairs covers only the balance sheet items, such as assets, liabilities, and capital. It does not include income and expense accounts, which are necessary for preparing the trial balance.
Therefore, when preparing a statement of affairs, the trial balance is not prepared as they serve different purposes and involve different accounting principles and procedures.
Test: Accounts From Incomplete Records - 1 - Question 10

When only closing and opening capital is given and closing capital is greater than opening capital it denotes

Detailed Solution for Test: Accounts From Incomplete Records - 1 - Question 10
Explanation:
When only closing and opening capital is given and the closing capital is greater than the opening capital, it denotes profit if there is no introduction of fresh capital. Here's a detailed explanation:
Opening Capital:
- The opening capital refers to the initial amount of capital invested by the owner(s) in a business at the beginning of a specific accounting period.
- It represents the total value of the owner's investment or equity in the business.
Closing Capital:
- The closing capital refers to the amount of capital remaining at the end of a specific accounting period, after considering all the profits, losses, and any additional investments or drawings made by the owner(s).
- It represents the updated value of the owner's investment or equity in the business after accounting for the changes during the period.
Interpretation:
- If the closing capital is greater than the opening capital, it indicates that the business has made a profit during the accounting period.
- However, it is important to note that this interpretation assumes that no additional capital has been introduced into the business during the period.
- If fresh capital has been introduced, the increase in closing capital may be attributed to the infusion of new funds rather than profit alone.
Inference:
Therefore, when only the closing and opening capital is given and the closing capital is greater than the opening capital, it denotes a profit. However, this interpretation may change if there is an introduction of fresh capital into the business.
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