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108 Questions MCQ Test Mock Test Series for NMAT - Practice Test for NMAT - 1

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Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 1

Read the passages carefully and answer the questions that follow:
It has recently been discovered that many attributions of paintings to the seventeenth-century Dutch artist Rembrandt may be false. The contested paintings are not minor works, whose removal from the Rembrandt corpus would leave it relatively unaffected: they are at its very center. In her recent book, Svetlana Alpers uses these cases of disputed attribution as a point of departure for her provocative discussion of the radical distinctiveness of Rembrandt's approach to painting.

Alpers argues that Rembrandt exercised an unprecedentedly firm control over his art, his students, and the distribution of his works. Despite Gary Schwartz's brilliant documentation of Rembrandt's complicated relations with a wide circle of patrons, Alpers takes the view that Rembrandt refused to submit to the prevailing patronage system. He preferred, she claims, to sell his works on the open market and to play the entrepreneur. At a time when Dutch artists were organizing into professional brotherhoods and academies, Rembrandt stood apart. In fact, Alpers portrait of Rembrandt shows virtually every aspect of his art pervaded by economic motives. Indeed, so complete was Rembrandt's involvement with the market, she argues, that he even presented himself as commodity, viewing his studio's products as extensions of himself, sent out into the world to earn money. Alpers asserts that Rembrandt's enterprise is found not just in his paintings, but in his refusal to limit his enterprise to those paintings he actually painted. He marketed Rembrandt.

Although there may be some truth in the view that Rembrandt was an entrepreneur who made some aesthetic decisions on the basis of what he knew the market wanted, Alpers' emphasis on economic factors sacrifices discussions of the aesthetic qualities that make Rembrandt's work unique. For example, Alpers asserts that Rembrandt deliberately left his works unfinished so as to get more money for their revision and completion. She implies that Rembrandt actually wished the Council of Amsterdam to refuse the great Claudius Civilis, which they had commissioned for their new town hall, and she argues that he must have calculated that he would be able to get more money by retouching the painting. Certainly the picture is painted with very broad strokes but there is no evidence that it was deliberately left unfinished. The fact is that the look of a work like Claudius Civilis must also be understood as the consequence of Rembrandt's powerful and profound meditations on painting itself. Alpers makes no mention of the pictorial dialectic that can be discerned between, say, the lessons Rembrandt absorbed from the Haarlem school of paintings and the styles of his native Leiden. The trouble is that while Rembrandt's artistic enterprise may indeed not be reducible to the works he himself painted, it is not reducible to marketing practices either.

Q. Which one of the following best summarizes the main conclusion of the author of the passage?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 1

► Option (a) can be eliminated because ‘other artists’ are not discussed by the author.

► Option (b) can be negated because the author refutes Alpers’ claim, that economic motives were the sole criterion which explained the art of Rembrandt by stating that aesthetic factors should also be taken into account.

► Option (d) stands eliminated as it is not mentioned in the passage. 

► Option (c) is the correct answer as it can be derived from the last sentence of the passage’. ‘The trouble …. practices either’.

Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 2

Read the passages carefully and answer the questions that follow:
It has recently been discovered that many attributions of paintings to the seventeenth-century Dutch artist Rembrandt may be false. The contested paintings are not minor works, whose removal from the Rembrandt corpus would leave it relatively unaffected: they are at its very center. In her recent book, Svetlana Alpers uses these cases of disputed attribution as a point of departure for her provocative discussion of the radical distinctiveness of Rembrandt's approach to painting.

Alpers argues that Rembrandt exercised an unprecedentedly firm control over his art, his students, and the distribution of his works. Despite Gary Schwartz's brilliant documentation of Rembrandt's complicated relations with a wide circle of patrons, Alpers takes the view that Rembrandt refused to submit to the prevailing patronage system. He preferred, she claims, to sell his works on the open market and to play the entrepreneur. At a time when Dutch artists were organizing into professional brotherhoods and academies, Rembrandt stood apart. In fact, Alpers portrait of Rembrandt shows virtually every aspect of his art pervaded by economic motives. Indeed, so complete was Rembrandt's involvement with the market, she argues, that he even presented himself as commodity, viewing his studio's products as extensions of himself, sent out into the world to earn money. Alpers asserts that Rembrandt's enterprise is found not just in his paintings, but in his refusal to limit his enterprise to those paintings he actually painted. He marketed Rembrandt.

Although there may be some truth in the view that Rembrandt was an entrepreneur who made some aesthetic decisions on the basis of what he knew the market wanted, Alpers' emphasis on economic factors sacrifices discussions of the aesthetic qualities that make Rembrandt's work unique. For example, Alpers asserts that Rembrandt deliberately left his works unfinished so as to get more money for their revision and completion. She implies that Rembrandt actually wished the Council of Amsterdam to refuse the great Claudius Civilis, which they had commissioned for their new town hall, and she argues that he must have calculated that he would be able to get more money by retouching the painting. Certainly the picture is painted with very broad strokes but there is no evidence that it was deliberately left unfinished. The fact is that the look of a work like Claudius Civilis must also be understood as the consequence of Rembrandt's powerful and profound meditations on painting itself. Alpers makes no mention of the pictorial dialectic that can be discerned between, say, the lessons Rembrandt absorbed from the Haarlem school of paintings and the styles of his native Leiden. The trouble is that while Rembrandt's artistic enterprise may indeed not be reducible to the works he himself painted, it is not reducible to marketing practices either.

Q. According to the passage, Alpers and Schwartz disagree about which one of the following?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 2

The area of conflict between Alpers and Schwartz finds mention in line 2 of Para – 2, “Despite Gary Schwartz ….. system”.

Now, options (a) & (c) can easily be eliminated as these were not the areas of conflict between the two.

Similarly option (b) can be negated as he did not play a role in those.

Only option (d) reflects the ideas that have been expressed in the above quoted lines.

Hence, it is the correct answer

Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 3

Read the passages carefully and answer the questions that follow:
It has recently been discovered that many attributions of paintings to the seventeenth-century Dutch artist Rembrandt may be false. The contested paintings are not minor works, whose removal from the Rembrandt corpus would leave it relatively unaffected: they are at its very center. In her recent book, Svetlana Alpers uses these cases of disputed attribution as a point of departure for her provocative discussion of the radical distinctiveness of Rembrandt's approach to painting.

Alpers argues that Rembrandt exercised an unprecedentedly firm control over his art, his students, and the distribution of his works. Despite Gary Schwartz's brilliant documentation of Rembrandt's complicated relations with a wide circle of patrons, Alpers takes the view that Rembrandt refused to submit to the prevailing patronage system. He preferred, she claims, to sell his works on the open market and to play the entrepreneur. At a time when Dutch artists were organizing into professional brotherhoods and academies, Rembrandt stood apart. In fact, Alpers portrait of Rembrandt shows virtually every aspect of his art pervaded by economic motives. Indeed, so complete was Rembrandt's involvement with the market, she argues, that he even presented himself as commodity, viewing his studio's products as extensions of himself, sent out into the world to earn money. Alpers asserts that Rembrandt's enterprise is found not just in his paintings, but in his refusal to limit his enterprise to those paintings he actually painted. He marketed Rembrandt.

Although there may be some truth in the view that Rembrandt was an entrepreneur who made some aesthetic decisions on the basis of what he knew the market wanted, Alpers' emphasis on economic factors sacrifices discussions of the aesthetic qualities that make Rembrandt's work unique. For example, Alpers asserts that Rembrandt deliberately left his works unfinished so as to get more money for their revision and completion. She implies that Rembrandt actually wished the Council of Amsterdam to refuse the great Claudius Civilis, which they had commissioned for their new town hall, and she argues that he must have calculated that he would be able to get more money by retouching the painting. Certainly the picture is painted with very broad strokes but there is no evidence that it was deliberately left unfinished. The fact is that the look of a work like Claudius Civilis must also be understood as the consequence of Rembrandt's powerful and profound meditations on painting itself. Alpers makes no mention of the pictorial dialectic that can be discerned between, say, the lessons Rembrandt absorbed from the Haarlem school of paintings and the styles of his native Leiden. The trouble is that while Rembrandt's artistic enterprise may indeed not be reducible to the works he himself painted, it is not reducible to marketing practices either.

Q. In the third paragraph, the author of the passage discusses aesthetic influences on Rembrandt's work most probably in order to

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 3

Option (a) is eliminated because it is not mentioned in the passage. The author gives an example of the Haarlem school but does not discuss it further. 

Option (d) is again not mentioned as no such similarity is presented by the author.

Option (c) is a wrong fact and hence can be eliminated.

Only option (b) can be inferred from the first two lines of the 3rd paragraph – ‘Although …. unique' . Hence, it is the correct answer.

Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 4

Read the passages carefully and answer the questions that follow:
It has recently been discovered that many attributions of paintings to the seventeenth-century Dutch artist Rembrandt may be false. The contested paintings are not minor works, whose removal from the Rembrandt corpus would leave it relatively unaffected: they are at its very center. In her recent book, Svetlana Alpers uses these cases of disputed attribution as a point of departure for her provocative discussion of the radical distinctiveness of Rembrandt's approach to painting.

Alpers argues that Rembrandt exercised an unprecedentedly firm control over his art, his students, and the distribution of his works. Despite Gary Schwartz's brilliant documentation of Rembrandt's complicated relations with a wide circle of patrons, Alpers takes the view that Rembrandt refused to submit to the prevailing patronage system. He preferred, she claims, to sell his works on the open market and to play the entrepreneur. At a time when Dutch artists were organizing into professional brotherhoods and academies, Rembrandt stood apart. In fact, Alpers portrait of Rembrandt shows virtually every aspect of his art pervaded by economic motives. Indeed, so complete was Rembrandt's involvement with the market, she argues, that he even presented himself as commodity, viewing his studio's products as extensions of himself, sent out into the world to earn money. Alpers asserts that Rembrandt's enterprise is found not just in his paintings, but in his refusal to limit his enterprise to those paintings he actually painted. He marketed Rembrandt.

Although there may be some truth in the view that Rembrandt was an entrepreneur who made some aesthetic decisions on the basis of what he knew the market wanted, Alpers' emphasis on economic factors sacrifices discussions of the aesthetic qualities that make Rembrandt's work unique. For example, Alpers asserts that Rembrandt deliberately left his works unfinished so as to get more money for their revision and completion. She implies that Rembrandt actually wished the Council of Amsterdam to refuse the great Claudius Civilis, which they had commissioned for their new town hall, and she argues that he must have calculated that he would be able to get more money by retouching the painting. Certainly the picture is painted with very broad strokes but there is no evidence that it was deliberately left unfinished. The fact is that the look of a work like Claudius Civilis must also be understood as the consequence of Rembrandt's powerful and profound meditations on painting itself. Alpers makes no mention of the pictorial dialectic that can be discerned between, say, the lessons Rembrandt absorbed from the Haarlem school of paintings and the styles of his native Leiden. The trouble is that while Rembrandt's artistic enterprise may indeed not be reducible to the works he himself painted, it is not reducible to marketing practices either.

Q. Which one of the following, if true, would provide the most support for Alpers' argument about Claudius Civilis?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 4

Alpers had claimed that Rembrandt, like other artists of his time tried to increase the sales of his paintings through revision and completion. The text relevant to this question can be found in the third line of the last Para – ‘Alpers asserts …..painting.’

Option (a) does not provide any support to Alpers’ argument, hence can be ruled out.

Option (b) supports the author’s argument against Alpers’ argument, hence it can be eliminated.

Option (c) is wrong fact, as Rembrandt chose this path and not the others.

Option (d) can be drawn from the information given in lines 3 – 7 of the last paragraph. Hence, it is the correct answer.

Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 5

Read the passages carefully and answer the questions that follow :

Time has many dimensions, is a concept often advanced to account for certain inexplicable happenings. The gist of the idea is that time - which seems to unfold in a linear way, with the past coming before the present and the present before the future - might, in another dimension, not be experienced sequentially. The past, present and future could exist simultaneously.

The concept that there are unfamiliar dimensions of time is most easily approached by way of those dimensions with which we are already familiar, those of length, height and breadth. These, in turn, are best approached, quite literally, from a starting point, which, geometrically speaking, has a location but no dimensions. It does, however, relate to figures with dimensions in the following way: If a point is moved through space, it marks a line, with the one dimension of length. If a line is moved through space, it traces the figure of a plane with the two dimensions of length and breadth. And, if a plane is moved in space, it traces a figure with the three dimensions of length, breadth and height.

We can also work backward to form a three-dimensional body and find that the cross section of the three-dimensional cube is a two-dimensional plane, the cross section of the two-dimensional plane is a one-dimensional line and that the cross section of the line is a dimensionless point. From this, we can infer that a body of three dimensions is the cross section of a body, when moved in a certain way, of four dimensions. Then comes the question, of what sort of body could a three-dimensional shape be the cross section? And, in what sort of new direction could a three-dimensional shape be moved to produce one of four dimensions, since a movement other than up and down, backward and forward or side to side would simply produce a larger figure, not one of a different dimension. The answer, of course, is the feature duration. For, as soon as something ceases to endure, it ceases to exit. To the three familiar dimensions, then, we should add duration in time as a fourth dimension. Ordinary, three-dimensional bodies should, therefore, be properly described as having only length, breadth and height but no duration. Is such a thing possible? It is, but only hypothetically. For in fact, the point, line and plane do not truly exist as such. Any line that can be seen has breadth as well as length (and duration), just as any physical plane has a certain thickness as well as length and breadth. What movement, then, must a figure of three dimensions undergo to produce a body of four dimensions?

We moved a plane in the dimension of height to produce a cube, so the movement of a (hypothetical) cube in the dimension of time should produce a (real) figure of four dimensions. What does movement in the dimension of time mean? As we said, it must mean movement in a new direction, not up, down or sideways. Are there any other kinds of movement? For a start, there is the movement that the Earth's rotation imparts to everything upon it and that puts even apparently motionless bodies in motion. Thus, we may say that the cross section of a real body, whose fourth dimension is duration, is inseparable from the motion that the turning world inevitably imparts to everything. Further, inevitable motions are that of the Earth around the Sun, of the Sun around the centre of the galaxy, and, perhaps, of the galaxy itself around some unknown point. Since any perceptible body is, in fact, undergoing all these motions simultaneously, we can say that it is ordinarily imperceptible. Because, motions and the dimensions, they imply, are only perceptible in a framework of time, they can be referred to as dimensions of time.

If duration is one aspect of time, what might the others be? Among several possibilities, we can suggest appearance and disappearance, change and recurrence. Of all possibilities, only duration is perceptible. When we say that something is perceptible, we mean that we suddenly note its existence, when something disappears we note its lack of existence. We perceive no intermediate condition of appearing or disappearing. In the same way, we talk of change, but actually only develop the concept, as we perceive aggregates of characteristics that exist or cease to exist. And so we infer, but do not observe, the recurrence of sunset and sunrise, the passage of seasons, the growth of a child. And yet, things really do appear and disappear, change and recur, although not actually perceived to do so. They are, so to speak, hypothetical to us and must have their reality in other dimensions of time, just as the hypothetical three-dimensional body becomes real, that is, perceptible, in the dimension of time we call duration.

If access to higher dimensions of time belongs to one body, it is at least theoretically possible that it belongs, though invisibly, to all bodies. We can further assume that such access is by way of unfamiliar modes or levels of consciousness – and that the name we give to one of these is prophecy.

Q. To understand the 'dimensions' of time, we have to 

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 5

The passage discusses the concept of dimensions of time and how we can understand them. It suggests that to comprehend the idea of unfamiliar dimensions of time, we should use concepts of dimensions with which we are already familiar, such as length, height, and breadth.
This means we should apply our understanding of familiar spatial dimensions to grasp the concept of time dimensions. The passage emphasizes that we can approach the understanding of time dimensions by building upon our existing knowledge of spatial dimensions.
Therefore, option B, which suggests using certain existing concepts of dimensions, aligns with the approach recommended in the passage. Options A, C, and D are not supported by the passage and are therefore incorrect.

Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 6

Read the passages carefully and answer the questions that follow :

Time has many dimensions, is a concept often advanced to account for certain inexplicable happenings. The gist of the idea is that time - which seems to unfold in a linear way, with the past coming before the present and the present before the future - might, in another dimension, not be experienced sequentially. The past, present and future could exist simultaneously.

The concept that there are unfamiliar dimensions of time is most easily approached by way of those dimensions with which we are already familiar, those of length, height and breadth. These, in turn, are best approached, quite literally, from a starting point, which, geometrically speaking, has a location but no dimensions. It does, however, relate to figures with dimensions in the following way: If a point is moved through space, it marks a line, with the one dimension of length. If a line is moved through space, it traces the figure of a plane with the two dimensions of length and breadth. And, if a plane is moved in space, it traces a figure with the three dimensions of length, breadth and height.

We can also work backward to form a three-dimensional body and find that the cross section of the three-dimensional cube is a two-dimensional plane, the cross section of the two-dimensional plane is a one-dimensional line and that the cross section of the line is a dimensionless point. From this, we can infer that a body of three dimensions is the cross section of a body, when moved in a certain way, of four dimensions. Then comes the question, of what sort of body could a three-dimensional shape be the cross section? And, in what sort of new direction could a three-dimensional shape be moved to produce one of four dimensions, since a movement other than up and down, backward and forward or side to side would simply produce a larger figure, not one of a different dimension. The answer, of course, is the feature duration. For, as soon as something ceases to endure, it ceases to exit. To the three familiar dimensions, then, we should add duration in time as a fourth dimension. Ordinary, three-dimensional bodies should, therefore, be properly described as having only length, breadth and height but no duration. Is such a thing possible? It is, but only hypothetically. For in fact, the point, line and plane do not truly exist as such. Any line that can be seen has breadth as well as length (and duration), just as any physical plane has a certain thickness as well as length and breadth. What movement, then, must a figure of three dimensions undergo to produce a body of four dimensions?

We moved a plane in the dimension of height to produce a cube, so the movement of a (hypothetical) cube in the dimension of time should produce a (real) figure of four dimensions. What does movement in the dimension of time mean? As we said, it must mean movement in a new direction, not up, down or sideways. Are there any other kinds of movement? For a start, there is the movement that the Earth's rotation imparts to everything upon it and that puts even apparently motionless bodies in motion. Thus, we may say that the cross section of a real body, whose fourth dimension is duration, is inseparable from the motion that the turning world inevitably imparts to everything. Further, inevitable motions are that of the Earth around the Sun, of the Sun around the centre of the galaxy, and, perhaps, of the galaxy itself around some unknown point. Since any perceptible body is, in fact, undergoing all these motions simultaneously, we can say that it is ordinarily imperceptible. Because, motions and the dimensions, they imply, are only perceptible in a framework of time, they can be referred to as dimensions of time.

If duration is one aspect of time, what might the others be? Among several possibilities, we can suggest appearance and disappearance, change and recurrence. Of all possibilities, only duration is perceptible. When we say that something is perceptible, we mean that we suddenly note its existence, when something disappears we note its lack of existence. We perceive no intermediate condition of appearing or disappearing. In the same way, we talk of change, but actually only develop the concept, as we perceive aggregates of characteristics that exist or cease to exist. And so we infer, but do not observe, the recurrence of sunset and sunrise, the passage of seasons, the growth of a child. And yet, things really do appear and disappear, change and recur, although not actually perceived to do so. They are, so to speak, hypothetical to us and must have their reality in other dimensions of time, just as the hypothetical three-dimensional body becomes real, that is, perceptible, in the dimension of time we call duration.

If access to higher dimensions of time belongs to one body, it is at least theoretically possible that it belongs, though invisibly, to all bodies. We can further assume that such access is by way of unfamiliar modes or levels of consciousness – and that the name we give to one of these is prophecy.

Q. In the passage, the author has 

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 6

Options (1), (2) and (3) can be rejected in context to this question because of usage of strong words namely ‘categorically’, ‘specifically’ and ‘intentionally’, which is certainly not the case as discussed in passage. The author has speculated about time to be considered as a dimension and has discussed its various aspects. This is best expressed in (4).

Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 7

Read the passages carefully and answer the questions that follow :

Time has many dimensions, is a concept often advanced to account for certain inexplicable happenings. The gist of the idea is that time - which seems to unfold in a linear way, with the past coming before the present and the present before the future - might, in another dimension, not be experienced sequentially. The past, present and future could exist simultaneously.

The concept that there are unfamiliar dimensions of time is most easily approached by way of those dimensions with which we are already familiar, those of length, height and breadth. These, in turn, are best approached, quite literally, from a starting point, which, geometrically speaking, has a location but no dimensions. It does, however, relate to figures with dimensions in the following way: If a point is moved through space, it marks a line, with the one dimension of length. If a line is moved through space, it traces the figure of a plane with the two dimensions of length and breadth. And, if a plane is moved in space, it traces a figure with the three dimensions of length, breadth and height.

We can also work backward to form a three-dimensional body and find that the cross section of the three-dimensional cube is a two-dimensional plane, the cross section of the two-dimensional plane is a one-dimensional line and that the cross section of the line is a dimensionless point. From this, we can infer that a body of three dimensions is the cross section of a body, when moved in a certain way, of four dimensions. Then comes the question, of what sort of body could a three-dimensional shape be the cross section? And, in what sort of new direction could a three-dimensional shape be moved to produce one of four dimensions, since a movement other than up and down, backward and forward or side to side would simply produce a larger figure, not one of a different dimension. The answer, of course, is the feature duration. For, as soon as something ceases to endure, it ceases to exit. To the three familiar dimensions, then, we should add duration in time as a fourth dimension. Ordinary, three-dimensional bodies should, therefore, be properly described as having only length, breadth and height but no duration. Is such a thing possible? It is, but only hypothetically. For in fact, the point, line and plane do not truly exist as such. Any line that can be seen has breadth as well as length (and duration), just as any physical plane has a certain thickness as well as length and breadth. What movement, then, must a figure of three dimensions undergo to produce a body of four dimensions?

We moved a plane in the dimension of height to produce a cube, so the movement of a (hypothetical) cube in the dimension of time should produce a (real) figure of four dimensions. What does movement in the dimension of time mean? As we said, it must mean movement in a new direction, not up, down or sideways. Are there any other kinds of movement? For a start, there is the movement that the Earth's rotation imparts to everything upon it and that puts even apparently motionless bodies in motion. Thus, we may say that the cross section of a real body, whose fourth dimension is duration, is inseparable from the motion that the turning world inevitably imparts to everything. Further, inevitable motions are that of the Earth around the Sun, of the Sun around the centre of the galaxy, and, perhaps, of the galaxy itself around some unknown point. Since any perceptible body is, in fact, undergoing all these motions simultaneously, we can say that it is ordinarily imperceptible. Because, motions and the dimensions, they imply, are only perceptible in a framework of time, they can be referred to as dimensions of time.

If duration is one aspect of time, what might the others be? Among several possibilities, we can suggest appearance and disappearance, change and recurrence. Of all possibilities, only duration is perceptible. When we say that something is perceptible, we mean that we suddenly note its existence, when something disappears we note its lack of existence. We perceive no intermediate condition of appearing or disappearing. In the same way, we talk of change, but actually only develop the concept, as we perceive aggregates of characteristics that exist or cease to exist. And so we infer, but do not observe, the recurrence of sunset and sunrise, the passage of seasons, the growth of a child. And yet, things really do appear and disappear, change and recur, although not actually perceived to do so. They are, so to speak, hypothetical to us and must have their reality in other dimensions of time, just as the hypothetical three-dimensional body becomes real, that is, perceptible, in the dimension of time we call duration.

If access to higher dimensions of time belongs to one body, it is at least theoretically possible that it belongs, though invisibly, to all bodies. We can further assume that such access is by way of unfamiliar modes or levels of consciousness – and that the name we give to one of these is prophecy.

Q. The author mainly agrees with the idea that 

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 7

► Refer last sentence of the passage – ‘We can further assume that such access is by way of unfamiliar modes or levels of consciousness – and that, the name we give to one of these is prophecy. Thus, prophecy is another higher dimension of time’. From these lines only option (1) can be inferred. 

► In the 1st sentence of the 2nd last paragraph – ‘If duration is one aspect of time, what might the others be?’, we can infer that (3) and (4) are false. 

► Refer the 2nd last paragraph "Of all possibilities, only duration is perceptible. We perceive no intermediate condition of appearing or disappearing. In the same way, we talk of change..."

► Thus, duration can be perceived, but change cannot. Thus, option (2) is incorrect. 

Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 8

Read the passages carefully and answer the questions that follow :

Time has many dimensions, is a concept often advanced to account for certain inexplicable happenings. The gist of the idea is that time - which seems to unfold in a linear way, with the past coming before the present and the present before the future - might, in another dimension, not be experienced sequentially. The past, present and future could exist simultaneously.

The concept that there are unfamiliar dimensions of time is most easily approached by way of those dimensions with which we are already familiar, those of length, height and breadth. These, in turn, are best approached, quite literally, from a starting point, which, geometrically speaking, has a location but no dimensions. It does, however, relate to figures with dimensions in the following way: If a point is moved through space, it marks a line, with the one dimension of length. If a line is moved through space, it traces the figure of a plane with the two dimensions of length and breadth. And, if a plane is moved in space, it traces a figure with the three dimensions of length, breadth and height.

We can also work backward to form a three-dimensional body and find that the cross section of the three-dimensional cube is a two-dimensional plane, the cross section of the two-dimensional plane is a one-dimensional line and that the cross section of the line is a dimensionless point. From this, we can infer that a body of three dimensions is the cross section of a body, when moved in a certain way, of four dimensions. Then comes the question, of what sort of body could a three-dimensional shape be the cross section? And, in what sort of new direction could a three-dimensional shape be moved to produce one of four dimensions, since a movement other than up and down, backward and forward or side to side would simply produce a larger figure, not one of a different dimension. The answer, of course, is the feature duration. For, as soon as something ceases to endure, it ceases to exit. To the three familiar dimensions, then, we should add duration in time as a fourth dimension. Ordinary, three-dimensional bodies should, therefore, be properly described as having only length, breadth and height but no duration. Is such a thing possible? It is, but only hypothetically. For in fact, the point, line and plane do not truly exist as such. Any line that can be seen has breadth as well as length (and duration), just as any physical plane has a certain thickness as well as length and breadth. What movement, then, must a figure of three dimensions undergo to produce a body of four dimensions?

We moved a plane in the dimension of height to produce a cube, so the movement of a (hypothetical) cube in the dimension of time should produce a (real) figure of four dimensions. What does movement in the dimension of time mean? As we said, it must mean movement in a new direction, not up, down or sideways. Are there any other kinds of movement? For a start, there is the movement that the Earth's rotation imparts to everything upon it and that puts even apparently motionless bodies in motion. Thus, we may say that the cross section of a real body, whose fourth dimension is duration, is inseparable from the motion that the turning world inevitably imparts to everything. Further, inevitable motions are that of the Earth around the Sun, of the Sun around the centre of the galaxy, and, perhaps, of the galaxy itself around some unknown point. Since any perceptible body is, in fact, undergoing all these motions simultaneously, we can say that it is ordinarily imperceptible. Because, motions and the dimensions, they imply, are only perceptible in a framework of time, they can be referred to as dimensions of time.

If duration is one aspect of time, what might the others be? Among several possibilities, we can suggest appearance and disappearance, change and recurrence. Of all possibilities, only duration is perceptible. When we say that something is perceptible, we mean that we suddenly note its existence, when something disappears we note its lack of existence. We perceive no intermediate condition of appearing or disappearing. In the same way, we talk of change, but actually only develop the concept, as we perceive aggregates of characteristics that exist or cease to exist. And so we infer, but do not observe, the recurrence of sunset and sunrise, the passage of seasons, the growth of a child. And yet, things really do appear and disappear, change and recur, although not actually perceived to do so. They are, so to speak, hypothetical to us and must have their reality in other dimensions of time, just as the hypothetical three-dimensional body becomes real, that is, perceptible, in the dimension of time we call duration.

If access to higher dimensions of time belongs to one body, it is at least theoretically possible that it belongs, though invisibly, to all bodies. We can further assume that such access is by way of unfamiliar modes or levels of consciousness – and that the name we give to one of these is prophecy.

Q. As per the passage, it is not possible to have a true line.

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 8

As per the information in the passage, "For in fact, the point, line and plane do not truly exist as such. Any line that can be seen has breadth as well as length (and duration), just as any physical plane has a certain thickness as well as length and breadth." Therefore, it is against the hypothetical concept of lines, in reality, there exists no such true line.

Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 9

Instructions: Select one sentence to complete the given statement in the form of a small paragraph. For each item you are given the frame of a 3-sentence paragraph. The middle sentence has been removed. Three possible fillers (A, B, C) are provided for this gap (…). Any one of them, OR more than one OR none of them might fit. The completed statement must be a compact and well organised presentation of the idea indicated by the first and third sentence. Select the appropriate answer option from (A) to (D) and indicate it.

Most people have certain prejudices against certain types or styles of writing.(…) But these are common and meaningful modes of communication that we need to study and understand. 

(A) For example, popular science and children’s fiction are considered unintellectual
(B) Some of us would regard ‘Sunday magazine’ journalism and advertising as cheap and even improper. 
(C) Great essayists have always been a source of inspiration to young writers 

The blank can be filled by – 

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 9

- The paragraph discusses how most people have prejudices against certain types or styles of writing, implying that they may view some forms of writing negatively. The statement in the blank should provide examples of such prejudices to support this idea.
- Both options A and B provide examples of writing styles that are commonly looked down upon or considered improper by some people. Therefore, either option A or B could fit in the blank to illustrate the point about prejudices against certain types of writing.
- Option C, on the other hand, discusses the influence of great essayists, which does not directly address the idea of prejudices against writing styles as mentioned in the paragraph.
- Thus, option D, which includes both A and B, is the correct choice.

Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 10

Instructions: Select one sentence to complete the given statement in the form of a small paragraph. For each item you are given the frame of a 3-sentence paragraph. The middle sentence has been removed. Three possible fillers (A, B, C) are provided for this gap (…). Any one of them, OR more than one OR none of them might fit. The completed statement must be a compact and well organised presentation of the idea indicated by the first and third sentence. Select the appropriate answer option from (A) to (D) and indicate it.

Teachers and professionals imparting technical training use speech, writing and diagrams in various combinations (…) Responding to this the Technical Education Council has recommended a course on “communication theory” as common core item. 
(A) Yet technical students receive no instruction in the theory and use of information structures in communication
(B) Soon interactive video will be a common feature of technical education
(C) Steadily failing costs have brought sophisticated information technology to the door of the typical classroom

The blank can be filled by –

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 10

- The paragraph discusses how teachers and professionals use various methods like speech, writing, and diagrams for technical training. The statement in the blank should complement this idea by discussing a deficiency or gap in technical education related to communication.
- Option A fits this context by highlighting the lack of instruction in the theory and use of information structures in communication for technical students. This deficiency contrasts with the diverse communication methods mentioned in the first sentence.
- Option B talks about the future introduction of interactive video in technical education, which does not directly address the current state of communication instruction.
- Option C mentions failing costs and information technology but does not connect directly with the need for communication theory in technical education.
- Therefore, option A is the most suitable choice.

Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 11

Instructions: Select one sentence to complete the given statement in the form of a small paragraph. For each item you are given the frame of a 3-sentence paragraph. The middle sentence has been removed. Three possible fillers (A, B, C) are provided for this gap (…). Any one of them, OR more than one OR none of them might fit. The completed statement must be a compact and well organised presentation of the idea indicated by the first and third sentence. Select the appropriate answer option from (A) to (D) and indicate it.

I am pleased that you have published my article ‘Managing Publicity. (…) As I have used company materials this omission has caused me some embarrassment.

(A) However, you have failed to indicate my company affiliation along with my name 
(B) The editor has done a good job as shortening my rather long original text 
(C) But there is no reference to my position as HRD head at AA Consultants

The blank can be filled by –

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 11

- The paragraph indicates that the speaker is pleased with the publication of their article but mentions a specific issue regarding the omission of their company affiliation.
- The statement in the blank should address this concern. Option A fits this context by highlighting the failure to indicate the speaker's company affiliation along with their name, which has caused embarrassment.This omission directly addresses the issue raised in the paragraph.
- Option B discusses the editor's job in shortening the article, which is not relevant to the concern about company affiliation. - Option C mentions the absence of the speaker's position as HRD head, which is related but not as directly relevant as the company affiliation.
- Therefore, option A is the most suitable choice.

Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 12

Instructions: Select one sentence to complete the given statement in the form of a small paragraph. For each item you are given the frame of a 3-sentence paragraph. The middle sentence has been removed. Three possible fillers (A, B, C) are provided for this gap (…). Any one of them, OR more than one OR none of them might fit. The completed statement must be a compact and well organised presentation of the idea indicated by the first and third sentence. Select the appropriate answer option from (A) to (D) and indicate it.

The new telecom companies take a radical approach to product development (..) They think instead of what consumers want and then develop the needed technology 

(A) They invest very heavily in state-of-art technology 
(B) They do not rely primarily on simulated studies product acceptability
(C) They do not invent a product with old technology and ask Marketing to sell it

The blank can be filled by –

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 12

- The paragraph discusses the radical approach of new telecom companies to product development, focusing on meeting consumer needs rather than relying on predetermined technology.
- The statement in the blank should complement this idea by highlighting another aspect of their approach.
- Option B fits this context by emphasizing that these companies do not primarily rely on simulated studies of product acceptability, suggesting a departure from traditional market research methods. This aligns with the idea of prioritizing consumer needs over preconceived notions.
- Option A talks about heavy investment in technology, which is mentioned but not directly relevant to the focus on consumer needs.
- Option C mentions not inventing products with old technology, which is related but not as directly relevant as the reliance on simulated studies.
- Therefore, option B is the most suitable choice.

Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 13

Instructions: Select one sentence to complete the given statement in the form of a small paragraph. For each item you are given the frame of a 3-sentence paragraph. The middle sentence has been removed. Three possible fillers (A, B, C) are provided for this gap (…). Any one of them, OR more than one OR none of them might fit. The completed statement must be a compact and well organised presentation of the idea indicated by the first and third sentence. Select the appropriate answer option from (A) to (D) and indicate it.

Herbal medicines worth Rs. 900 crores are produced annually in India (…) Even the office of the Drugs Controller of India acts only in response to specific complaints. 

(A) However the investment in R & D across the industry is low
(B) The present rules for ensuring quality are reasonably comprehensive and effective 
(C) The competition to corner the market has however led to some questionable practices that are to the consumer’s disadvantage

The blank can be filled by –

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 13

The completion of the paragraph indicates that while there is a significant production of herbal medicines in India, the intense competition in the industry has resulted in questionable practices that harm consumers. This suggests that the regulatory oversight by the Drugs Controller of India may not be proactive enough to address these issues effectively.

Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 14

Select the appropriate meaning of the phrase given in the question. 

Q. Of the first water 

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 14

The phrase "of the first water" originated from the diamond trade, where diamonds were graded based on their clarity and quality. Diamonds of the highest quality were referred to as "of the first water." Over time, the phrase has been extended to describe anything of exceptional quality or excellence. Therefore, in this context, "of the first water" means of the highest quality. Options A, B, and D are not accurate because they do not convey the idea of superior quality or excellence implied by the phrase.

Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 15

Select the appropriate meaning of the phrase given in the question. 

Q. To fit the bill

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 15

- The phrase "to fit the bill" originates from the idea of a bill or invoice, which represents the cost or requirements for a particular service or item. When something "fits the bill," it means that it meets the requirements or is suitable for a particular purpose or situation.
- For example, if you're looking for a new employee and someone's qualifications and experience match what you need, you might say they "fit the bill" for the job. Therefore, in this context, "to fit the bill" means to be suitable.
- Options A, B, and D are not accurate because they do not convey the idea of suitability or meeting requirements implied by the phrase.

Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 16

Select the appropriate meaning of the phrase given in the question. 

Q. A wild goose chase 

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 16

The phrase "a wild goose chase" refers to a futile or fruitless pursuit, similar to chasing after a wild goose, which is difficult to catch.
It implies that the effort expended in the pursuit will not lead to success or accomplishment. Therefore, in this context, "a wild goose chase" means an effort in vain.
Options A, C, and D are not accurate because they do not convey the idea of a futile pursuit implied by the phrase.

Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 17

Select the appropriate meaning of the phrase given in the question. 

Q. To kick the bucket

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 17

The phrase "to kick the bucket" is an idiomatic expression that means to die. Its origin is uncertain, but it likely comes from the idea of a person standing on a bucket and then kicking it away as a means of committing suicide.
Over time, the phrase has evolved to simply mean passing away or dying.
Therefore, in this context, "to kick the bucket" means to die. Options A, B, and D are not accurate because they do not convey the idea of death implied by the phrase.

Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 18

Select the option that most suitably fills ups the blanks

Q. Traffic signals in the country X operate in a reverse fashion : people move when it is ___ and have to stop when it is ___.

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 18

- In most countries, including country X, traffic signals follow the standard convention where vehicles stop at red lights and proceed at green lights.
- Therefore, when it is red, vehicles have to stop, and when it is green, they can move.
- Option C correctly fills the blanks to reflect this standard operation of traffic signals.
- Options A, B, and D do not align with the standard operation of traffic signals, as amber lights signal caution rather than movement, and red lights indicate stopping rather than a particular time or weather condition.

Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 19

Select the option that most suitably fills ups the blanks

Q. Can you call a ___ seeker of personal goals an ___? I doubt whether you can.

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 19

- In this sentence, the first blank needs a word that describes someone who pursues their personal goals vigorously or persistently, which is captured by the term "relentless."
- The second blank requires a term that contrasts with someone who actively pursues goals, suggesting aimlessness or lack of direction, which is appropriately filled by "aimless person."
- Option C fits both blanks correctly, resulting in a coherent sentence.
- Options A, B, and D do not provide suitable terms for the second blank that convey the idea of aimlessness or lack of direction.

Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 20

In the following questions, a related pair of words or phrases is followed by four lettered pair of words or phrases. Select by lettered pair that best expresses a relationship DISSIMILAR to that expressed in the original pair. 

MIGRANT : SETTLED

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 20

- The relationship between "migrant" and "settled" involves contrasting states or conditions—someone who migrates moves from one place to another, while someone who is settled remains in one place.
- Similarly, the relationship between "gallant" and "brave" implies similarity, as both terms describe courageous behavior or characteristics.
- Therefore, option D contrasts with the original pair because "gallant" and "brave" are similar in meaning, whereas "migrant" and "settled" represent contrasting states.
- Options A, B, and C do not present a dissimilar relationship to the original pair.

Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 21

In the following questions, a related pair of words or phrases is followed by four lettered pair of words or phrases. Select by lettered pair that best expresses a relationship DISSIMILAR to that expressed in the original pair. 

URSINE : BEAR 

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 21

- The relationship between "ursine" and "bear" indicates a characteristic association—the word "ursine" pertains to bears.
- Similarly, the word "vulpine" pertains to foxes, "porcine" to pigs, and "lupine" to wolves.
- However, "leucine" is a dissimilar term because it refers to an amino acid found in proteins and is not directly related to lions.
- Therefore, option A contrasts with the original pair because "leucine" and "lion" do not share a direct characteristic association, unlike the other pairs which are all related to specific animals.
- Options B, C, and D maintain a similar relationship to the original pair.

Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 22

In the following questions, a related pair of words or phrases is followed by four lettered pair of words or phrases. Select by lettered pair that best expresses a relationship DISSIMILAR to that expressed in the original pair. 

BUVETTE : TAVERN

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 22

- The relationship between "buvette" and "tavern" indicates a synonym relationship—they both refer to places where alcoholic beverages are served, although "buvette" is more commonly used in French-speaking regions.
- "Butte" and "hill" are synonymous terms, so they maintain a similar relationship.
- "Esemplastic" and "unifying" are both related to the concept of bringing things together, so they also maintain a similar relationship.
- "Folie" and "madness" are synonymous terms, indicating a similar relationship.
- However, "hymen" and "song" are unrelated terms—a hymen is a membrane in the female reproductive system, while a song is a piece of music.
- Therefore, option D contrasts with the original pair because "hymen" and "song" are not related in meaning. Options A, B, and C maintain a similar relationship to the original pair.

Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 23

In the following questions, a related pair of words or phrases is followed by four lettered pair of words or phrases. Select by lettered pair that best expresses a relationship DISSIMILAR to that expressed in the original pair. 

ASTROLATRY : CELESTIAL BODIES

Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 24

For each of the following questions mark the appropriate choice. 

Q. Amit can set questions for MBA exams because he has experience to set questions for Bank exams. This statement is based on the assumption that 

Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 25

For each of the following questions mark the appropriate choice. 

Q. My TV has an electronic child lock with an optional pass–word and cannot be opened in my absence. It therefore follows. 

Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 26

Which of the words/phrases (1), (2), and (3)  given below should replace the phrase underlined in the given sentence to make the sentence grammatically correct ? If the sentence is correct as it is and no correction is required, mark (4) as the answer.

Q. Bad movies affect people living in today’s society more than they did in previous years.

Practice Test for NMAT - 1 - Question 27

Which of the words/phrases (1), (2), and (3)  given below should replace the phrase underlined in the given sentence to make the sentence grammatically correct ? If the sentence is correct as it is and no correction is required, mark (4) as the answer.

Q. The reason he has been so fat is because he never takes exercise.