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SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - SSC CGL MCQ


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30 Questions MCQ Test SSC CGL (Tier - 1) - Previous Year Papers (Topic Wise) - SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 for SSC CGL 2024 is part of SSC CGL (Tier - 1) - Previous Year Papers (Topic Wise) preparation. The SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 questions and answers have been prepared according to the SSC CGL exam syllabus.The SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 MCQs are made for SSC CGL 2024 Exam. Find important definitions, questions, notes, meanings, examples, exercises, MCQs and online tests for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 below.
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SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 1

DIRECTIONS: Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives and mark it by blackeing the appropriate circle.
True, it is the function of the army to maintain law and order in abnormal times. But in normal times, there is another force that compels citizens to  obey laws and to act with due regard to the rights of others. The force also protects the lives and properties of law abiding men. Laws are made to secure the personal safety of its subjects and to prevent murder and crimes of violence. They are made to secure the property of the citizens against theft and damage and to protect the rights of communities and castes to carry out their customs and ceremonies, so long as they do not conflict with the rights of others. Now the good citizen, of his own free will obey these  laws and he takes care that everything he does is done with due regard to the rights and well being of others.
But the bad citizen is only restrained from breaking these laws by fear of the consequence of his actions. And the necessary steps to compel the bad citizen to act as a good citizen are taken by this force. The supreme control of law and order in a State is in the hands of a Minister, who is responsible to the State Assembly and acts through the Inspector General of Police.       (SSC CGL 1st Sit. 2015)

Q. The expression "customs and ceremonies" means : 

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 2

DIRECTIONS: Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives and mark it by blackeing the appropriate circle.
True, it is the function of the army to maintain law and order in abnormal times. But in normal times, there is another force that compels citizens to  obey laws and to act with due regard to the rights of others. The force also protects the lives and properties of law abiding men. Laws are made to secure the personal safety of its subjects and to prevent murder and crimes of violence. They are made to secure the property of the citizens against theft and damage and to protect the rights of communities and castes to carry out their customs and ceremonies, so long as they do not conflict with the rights of others. Now the good citizen, of his own free will obey these  laws and he takes care that everything he does is done with due regard to the rights and well being of others.
But the bad citizen is only restrained from breaking these laws by fear of the consequence of his actions. And the necessary steps to compel the bad citizen to act as a good citizen are taken by this force. The supreme control of law and order in a State is in the hands of a Minister, who is responsible to the State Assembly and acts through the Inspector General of Police.       (SSC CGL 1st Sit. 2015)

Q. "They are made to secure the property of citizens against theft and damage" means that the law : 

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 3

DIRECTIONS: Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives and mark it by blackeing the appropriate circle.
True, it is the function of the army to maintain law and order in abnormal times. But in normal times, there is another force that compels citizens to  obey laws and to act with due regard to the rights of others. The force also protects the lives and properties of law abiding men. Laws are made to secure the personal safety of its subjects and to prevent murder and crimes of violence. They are made to secure the property of the citizens against theft and damage and to protect the rights of communities and castes to carry out their customs and ceremonies, so long as they do not conflict with the rights of others. Now the good citizen, of his own free will obey these  laws and he takes care that everything he does is done with due regard to the rights and well being of others.
But the bad citizen is only restrained from breaking these laws by fear of the consequence of his actions. And the necessary steps to compel the bad citizen to act as a good citizen are taken by this force. The supreme control of law and order in a State is in the hands of a Minister, who is responsible to the State Assembly and acts through the Inspector General of Police.       (SSC CGL 1st Sit. 2015)

Q. Which one of the following statement is implied in the passage?

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 4

DIRECTIONS: Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives and mark it by blackeing the appropriate circle.
True, it is the function of the army to maintain law and order in abnormal times. But in normal times, there is another force that compels citizens to  obey laws and to act with due regard to the rights of others. The force also protects the lives and properties of law abiding men. Laws are made to secure the personal safety of its subjects and to prevent murder and crimes of violence. They are made to secure the property of the citizens against theft and damage and to protect the rights of communities and castes to carry out their customs and ceremonies, so long as they do not conflict with the rights of others. Now the good citizen, of his own free will obey these  laws and he takes care that everything he does is done with due regard to the rights and well being of others.
But the bad citizen is only restrained from breaking these laws by fear of the consequence of his actions. And the necessary steps to compel the bad citizen to act as a good citizen are taken by this force. The supreme control of law and order in a State is in the hands of a Minister, who is responsible to the State Assembly and acts through the Inspector General of Police.       (SSC CGL 1st Sit. 2015)

Q. According to the writer, which one of the following is not the responsibility of the police?

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 5

DIRECTIONS: Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives and mark it by blackeing the appropriate circle.
True, it is the function of the army to maintain law and order in abnormal times. But in normal times, there is another force that compels citizens to  obey laws and to act with due regard to the rights of others. The force also protects the lives and properties of law abiding men. Laws are made to secure the personal safety of its subjects and to prevent murder and crimes of violence. They are made to secure the property of the citizens against theft and damage and to protect the rights of communities and castes to carry out their customs and ceremonies, so long as they do not conflict with the rights of others. Now the good citizen, of his own free will obey these  laws and he takes care that everything he does is done with due regard to the rights and well being of others.
But the bad citizen is only restrained from breaking these laws by fear of the consequence of his actions. And the necessary steps to compel the bad citizen to act as a good citizen are taken by this force. The supreme control of law and order in a State is in the hands of a Minister, who is responsible to the State Assembly and acts through the Inspector General of Police.       (SSC CGL 1st Sit. 2015)

Q. Which of the following statements is not implied in the passage?

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 6

The crowd surged forward through the narrow streets of Paris. There was a clatter of shutters being closed hastily by trembling hands the citizens of Paris knew that once the fury of the people was excited there was no telling what they might do. They came to an old house which had a workshop on the ground floor. A head popped out of the door to see what it was all about "Get him! Get Thimonier! Smash his devilish machines!" yelled the crowd.
They found the workshop without its owner. M. Thimonier had escaped by the back door. Now the fury of the demonstrators turned against the machines that were standing in the shop, ready to be delivered to buyers. They were systematically broken up and destroyed – dozens of them. Only when the last wheel and spindle had "been trampled under foot did the infuriated crowd recover their senses.
"That is the end of M'Sieur Thimonier and his sewing machines," they said to one another and went home satisfied.
Perhaps now they would find work, for they were all unemployed tailors and seamstresses who believed that their livelihood was threatened by that new invention.

Q.The passage throws light on

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 6

The passage throws light on how a well-means invention can be misunderstood.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 7

The crowd surged forward through the narrow streets of Paris. There was a clatter of shutters being closed hastily by trembling hands the citizens of Paris knew that once the fury of the people was excited there was no telling what they might do. They came to an old house which had a workshop on the ground floor. A head popped out of the door to see what it was all about "Get him! Get Thimonier! Smash his devilish machines!" yelled the crowd.
They found the workshop without its owner. M. Thimonier had escaped by the back door. Now the fury of the demonstrators turned against the machines that were standing in the shop, ready to be delivered to buyers. They were systematically broken up and destroyed – dozens of them. Only when the last wheel and spindle had "been trampled under foot did the infuriated crowd recover their senses.
"That is the end of M'Sieur Thimonier and his sewing machines," they said to one another and went home satisfied.
Perhaps now they would find work, for they were all unemployed tailors and seamstresses who believed that their livelihood was threatened by that new invention.

Q.The crowd was protesting against 

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 7

The crowd was protesting against the newly invented sewing machine.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 8

The crowd surged forward through the narrow streets of Paris. There was a clatter of shutters being closed hastily by trembling hands the citizens of Paris knew that once the fury of the people was excited there was no telling what they might do. They came to an old house which had a workshop on the ground floor. A head popped out of the door to see what it was all about "Get him! Get Thimonier! Smash his devilish machines!" yelled the crowd.
They found the workshop without its owner. M. Thimonier had escaped by the back door. Now the fury of the demonstrators turned against the machines that were standing in the shop, ready to be delivered to buyers. They were systematically broken up and destroyed – dozens of them. Only when the last wheel and spindle had "been trampled under foot did the infuriated crowd recover their senses.
"That is the end of M'Sieur Thimonier and his sewing machines," they said to one another and went home satisfied.
Perhaps now they would find work, for they were all unemployed tailors and seamstresses who believed that their livelihood was threatened by that new invention.

Q.The aim of the crowd was to 

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 8

The aim of the crowd was to destroy the sewing machines.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 9

The crowd surged forward through the narrow streets of Paris. There was a clatter of shutters being closed hastily by trembling hands the citizens of Paris knew that once the fury of the people was excited there was no telling what they might do. They came to an old house which had a workshop on the ground floor. A head popped out of the door to see what it was all about "Get him! Get Thimonier! Smash his devilish machines!" yelled the crowd.
They found the workshop without its owner. M. Thimonier had escaped by the back door. Now the fury of the demonstrators turned against the machines that were standing in the shop, ready to be delivered to buyers. They were systematically broken up and destroyed – dozens of them. Only when the last wheel and spindle had "been trampled under foot did the infuriated crowd recover their senses.
"That is the end of M'Sieur Thimonier and his sewing machines," they said to one another and went home satisfied.
Perhaps now they would find work, for they were all unemployed tailors and seamstresses who believed that their livelihood was threatened by that new invention.

Q. The people thought that

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 9

People thought they would be deprived of their livelihood.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 10

The crowd surged forward through the narrow streets of Paris. There was a clatter of shutters being closed hastily by trembling hands the citizens of Paris knew that once the fury of the people was excited there was no telling what they might do. They came to an old house which had a workshop on the ground floor. A head popped out of the door to see what it was all about "Get him! Get Thimonier! Smash his devilish machines!" yelled the crowd.
They found the workshop without its owner. M. Thimonier had escaped by the back door. Now the fury of the demonstrators turned against the machines that were standing in the shop, ready to be delivered to buyers. They were systematically broken up and destroyed – dozens of them. Only when the last wheel and spindle had "been trampled under foot did the infuriated crowd recover their senses.
"That is the end of M'Sieur Thimonier and his sewing machines," they said to one another and went home satisfied.
Perhaps now they would find work, for they were all unemployed tailors and seamstresses who believed that their livelihood was threatened by that new invention.

Q. Shutters were being closed because the shopkeepers 

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 10

Shutters were being closed because the shopkeepers feared their shops would be destroyed.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 11

DIRECTION: In the following Ten Questions, you have two passages with 5 questions following each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives and mark it by blackening the appropriate circle 
The instinctive, natural way to express anger is to respond aggressively. Anger is a natural, adaptive response to threats; It inspires powerful, often aggressive, feelings and behaviours, which allow us to fight and to defend ourselves when we are attacked. On the other hand, we can't physically lash out at every person or object that irritates or annoys us; laws, social norms and common sense place limits on how far our anger can take us.
People use a variety of both conscious and unconscious processes to deal with their angry feelings. The three main approaches are expressing, suppressing and calming. Expressing your angry feelings in an assertive – not aggressive manner is the healthiest way to express anger. Being assertive doesn't ' mean being 'pushy or demanding; It means being respectful of yourself and others.
Anger can be suppressed and then converted or redirected. This happens when you hold in your anger, stop thinking about it and focus on something positive.       (SSC CGL 1st Sit. 2015)

Q. How does a person naturally express anger? 

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 11

A person naturally expresses his anger by responding aggressively.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 12

DIRECTION: In the following Ten Questions, you have two passages with 5 questions following each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives and mark it by blackening the appropriate circle 
The instinctive, natural way to express anger is to respond aggressively. Anger is a natural, adaptive response to threats; It inspires powerful, often aggressive, feelings and behaviours, which allow us to fight and to defend ourselves when we are attacked. On the other hand, we can't physically lash out at every person or object that irritates or annoys us; laws, social norms and common sense place limits on how far our anger can take us.
People use a variety of both conscious and unconscious processes to deal with their angry feelings. The three main approaches are expressing, suppressing and calming. Expressing your angry feelings in an assertive – not aggressive manner is the healthiest way to express anger. Being assertive doesn't ' mean being 'pushy or demanding; It means being respectful of yourself and others.
Anger can be suppressed and then converted or redirected. This happens when you hold in your anger, stop thinking about it and focus on something positive.       (SSC CGL 1st Sit. 2015)

Q. Which one of the following places limits on how far we can take our anger? 

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 12

Laws, social norms and common sense limits on how far we can take our anger.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 13

DIRECTION: In the following Ten Questions, you have two passages with 5 questions following each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives and mark it by blackening the appropriate circle 
The instinctive, natural way to express anger is to respond aggressively. Anger is a natural, adaptive response to threats; It inspires powerful, often aggressive, feelings and behaviours, which allow us to fight and to defend ourselves when we are attacked. On the other hand, we can't physically lash out at every person or object that irritates or annoys us; laws, social norms and common sense place limits on how far our anger can take us.
People use a variety of both conscious and unconscious processes to deal with their angry feelings. The three main approaches are expressing, suppressing and calming. Expressing your angry feelings in an assertive – not aggressive manner is the healthiest way to express anger. Being assertive doesn't ' mean being 'pushy or demanding; It means being respectful of yourself and others.
Anger can be suppressed and then converted or redirected. This happens when you hold in your anger, stop thinking about it and focus on something positive.       (SSC CGL 1st Sit. 2015)

Q. According to the author, how should people deal with their anger?

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 13

People should deal with their anger by expressing it assertively.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 14

DIRECTION: In the following Ten Questions, you have two passages with 5 questions following each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives and mark it by blackening the appropriate circle 
The instinctive, natural way to express anger is to respond aggressively. Anger is a natural, adaptive response to threats; It inspires powerful, often aggressive, feelings and behaviours, which allow us to fight and to defend ourselves when we are attacked. On the other hand, we can't physically lash out at every person or object that irritates or annoys us; laws, social norms and common sense place limits on how far our anger can take us.
People use a variety of both conscious and unconscious processes to deal with their angry feelings. The three main approaches are expressing, suppressing and calming. Expressing your angry feelings in an assertive – not aggressive manner is the healthiest way to express anger. Being assertive doesn't ' mean being 'pushy or demanding; It means being respectful of yourself and others.
Anger can be suppressed and then converted or redirected. This happens when you hold in your anger, stop thinking about it and focus on something positive.       (SSC CGL 1st Sit. 2015)

Q. What does the author mean by being assertive? 

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 14

According to author, being assertive means to be respectful of yourself and others.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 15

DIRECTION: In the following Ten Questions, you have two passages with 5 questions following each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives and mark it by blackening the appropriate circle 
The instinctive, natural way to express anger is to respond aggressively. Anger is a natural, adaptive response to threats; It inspires powerful, often aggressive, feelings and behaviours, which allow us to fight and to defend ourselves when we are attacked. On the other hand, we can't physically lash out at every person or object that irritates or annoys us; laws, social norms and common sense place limits on how far our anger can take us.
People use a variety of both conscious and unconscious processes to deal with their angry feelings. The three main approaches are expressing, suppressing and calming. Expressing your angry feelings in an assertive – not aggressive manner is the healthiest way to express anger. Being assertive doesn't ' mean being 'pushy or demanding; It means being respectful of yourself and others.
Anger can be suppressed and then converted or redirected. This happens when you hold in your anger, stop thinking about it and focus on something positive.       (SSC CGL 1st Sit. 2015)

Q. How, according to the author, can one suppress anger?

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 15

One, according to author, can suppress his anger by holding his anger.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 16

Direction: It is sad that in country after country, progress should become synonymous with an assault on nature. We who are a part of nature and dependent on her for every need, speak constantly about 'exploiting' nature. When the highest mountain in the world was climbed in 1953, Jawaharlal  Nehru objected to the phrase 'conquest of Everest' which he thought was arrogant. Is it surprising that this lack of consideration and the constant need to prove one's superiority should be projected on to our treatment of our fellowmen? I remember Edward Thompson, a British writer and a good friend of India, once telling Mr. Gandhi that wildlife was fast disappearing. Remarked Mr. Gandhi: ‘It is decreasing in the jungles but it is increasing in the towns’ On the one hand, the rich look askance at our continuing poverty; on the other they warn us against their own methods. We do not wish to impoverish the environment any further and yet we cannot forget the grim poverty of large numbers of people.
Are not poverty and need the great polluters? For instance, unless we are in a position to provide employment and purchasing power for the daily necessities of the tribal people and those who live in and around our jungles, we cannot prevent them from combing the forest for food and livelihood, from poaching and from despoiling the vegetation.

Q. At the beginning of the passage, the writer expresses her opinion that in many countries progress is synonymous with 

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 16

At the beginning of the passage, the writer expresses her opinion that in many countries progress is synonymous with utmost cruelty to nature.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 17

Direction: It is sad that in country after country, progress should become synonymous with an assault on nature. We who are a part of nature and dependent on her for every need, speak constantly about 'exploiting' nature. When the highest mountain in the world was climbed in 1953, Jawaharlal  Nehru objected to the phrase 'conquest of Everest' which he thought was arrogant. Is it surprising that this lack of consideration and the constant need to prove one's superiority should be projected on to our treatment of our fellowmen? I remember Edward Thompson, a British writer and a good friend of India, once telling Mr. Gandhi that wildlife was fast disappearing. Remarked Mr. Gandhi: ‘It is decreasing in the jungles but it is increasing in the towns’ On the one hand, the rich look askance at our continuing poverty; on the other they warn us against their own methods. We do not wish to impoverish the environment any further and yet we cannot forget the grim poverty of large numbers of people.
Are not poverty and need the great polluters? For instance, unless we are in a position to provide employment and purchasing power for the daily necessities of the tribal people and those who live in and around our jungles, we cannot prevent them from combing the forest for food and livelihood, from poaching and from despoiling the vegetation.

Q. In the passage, the term 'exploiting' nature suggests 

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 17

In the passage, the term 'exploiting' nature suggests 'sarcasm'.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 18

Direction: It is sad that in country after country, progress should become synonymous with an assault on nature. We who are a part of nature and dependent on her for every need, speak constantly about 'exploiting' nature. When the highest mountain in the world was climbed in 1953, Jawaharlal  Nehru objected to the phrase 'conquest of Everest' which he thought was arrogant. Is it surprising that this lack of consideration and the constant need to prove one's superiority should be projected on to our treatment of our fellowmen? I remember Edward Thompson, a British writer and a good friend of India, once telling Mr. Gandhi that wildlife was fast disappearing. Remarked Mr. Gandhi: ‘It is decreasing in the jungles but it is increasing in the towns’ On the one hand, the rich look askance at our continuing poverty; on the other they warn us against their own methods. We do not wish to impoverish the environment any further and yet we cannot forget the grim poverty of large numbers of people.
Are not poverty and need the great polluters? For instance, unless we are in a position to provide employment and purchasing power for the daily necessities of the tribal people and those who live in and around our jungles, we cannot prevent them from combing the forest for food and livelihood, from poaching and from despoiling the vegetation.

Q. Nehru objected to the phrase 'conquest of Everest' since 

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 18

Nehru objected to the phrase 'conquest of Everest' since it sounds pompous and boastful.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 19

Direction: It is sad that in country after country, progress should become synonymous with an assault on nature. We who are a part of nature and dependent on her for every need, speak constantly about 'exploiting' nature. When the highest mountain in the world was climbed in 1953, Jawaharlal  Nehru objected to the phrase 'conquest of Everest' which he thought was arrogant. Is it surprising that this lack of consideration and the constant need to prove one's superiority should be projected on to our treatment of our fellowmen? I remember Edward Thompson, a British writer and a good friend of India, once telling Mr. Gandhi that wildlife was fast disappearing. Remarked Mr. Gandhi: ‘It is decreasing in the jungles but it is increasing in the towns’ On the one hand, the rich look askance at our continuing poverty; on the other they warn us against their own methods. We do not wish to impoverish the environment any further and yet we cannot forget the grim poverty of large numbers of people.
Are not poverty and need the great polluters? For instance, unless we are in a position to provide employment and purchasing power for the daily necessities of the tribal people and those who live in and around our jungles, we cannot prevent them from combing the forest for food and livelihood, from poaching and from despoiling the vegetation.

Q. Gandhi's statement 'It is decreasing in the jungles but it is increasing in the towns.

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 19

Gandhiji's statement 'It is decreasing in the jungles but it is increasing in the towns!' refers to man's selfishness.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 20

Direction: It is sad that in country after country, progress should become synonymous with an assault on nature. We who are a part of nature and dependent on her for every need, speak constantly about 'exploiting' nature. When the highest mountain in the world was climbed in 1953, Jawaharlal  Nehru objected to the phrase 'conquest of Everest' which he thought was arrogant. Is it surprising that this lack of consideration and the constant need to prove one's superiority should be projected on to our treatment of our fellowmen? I remember Edward Thompson, a British writer and a good friend of India, once telling Mr. Gandhi that wildlife was fast disappearing. Remarked Mr. Gandhi: ‘It is decreasing in the jungles but it is increasing in the towns’ On the one hand, the rich look askance at our continuing poverty; on the other they warn us against their own methods. We do not wish to impoverish the environment any further and yet we cannot forget the grim poverty of large numbers of people.
Are not poverty and need the great polluters? For instance, unless we are in a position to provide employment and purchasing power for the daily necessities of the tribal people and those who live in and around our jungles, we cannot prevent them from combing the forest for food and livelihood, from poaching and from despoiling the vegetation.

Q. The writer is of opinion that tribal people can be prevented from combing forest for food 

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 20

The writer is of the opinion that tribal people can be prevented from combing forest or food to provide employment and purchasing power for daily necessities.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 21

DIRECTIONS: You have two brief passages with 5 questions following each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives and mark it by blackening the appropriate oval [•].
As I stepped out of the train, I felt unusually solitary  since I was the only passenger to alight. I was accustomed to arriving in the summer, when holiday-makers throng coastal resorts and this was my first visit when the season was over. My destination was a little village which was eight miles by road. It took only a few minutes for me to come to the foot of the cliff path. When I reached the top I had left all signs of habitation behind me. I was surprised to notice that the sky was already a flame with the sunset. It seemed to be getting dark amazingly quickly. I was at a loss to account for the exceptionally early end of daylight since I did not think I had walked unduly slowly. Then I recollected that on previous visits I had walked in high summer and how it was October.
All at once it was night. The track was grassy and even in daylight showed up hardly at all. I was terrified of hurtling over the edge of the cliff to the rocks below. I felt my feet squelching and sticking in something soggy. Then I bumped into a little clump of trees that loomed up in front of me. I climbed up the nearest trunk and managed to find a tolerabley comfortable fork to sit on. The waiting was spent by my attempts to identify the little stirrings and noises of animal life that I could hear. I grew colder and colder and managed to sleep only in uneasy fitful starts. At last when the moon came up I was on my way again.       (SSC CGL 1st Sit. 2014)

Q. The writer felt unusually solitary because 

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 21

The writer felt unusually solitary because he was missing the company of other holiday makers.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 22

DIRECTIONS: You have two brief passages with 5 questions following each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives and mark it by blackening the appropriate oval [•].
As I stepped out of the train, I felt unusually solitary  since I was the only passenger to alight. I was accustomed to arriving in the summer, when holiday-makers throng coastal resorts and this was my first visit when the season was over. My destination was a little village which was eight miles by road. It took only a few minutes for me to come to the foot of the cliff path. When I reached the top I had left all signs of habitation behind me. I was surprised to notice that the sky was already a flame with the sunset. It seemed to be getting dark amazingly quickly. I was at a loss to account for the exceptionally early end of daylight since I did not think I had walked unduly slowly. Then I recollected that on previous visits I had walked in high summer and how it was October.
All at once it was night. The track was grassy and even in daylight showed up hardly at all. I was terrified of hurtling over the edge of the cliff to the rocks below. I felt my feet squelching and sticking in something soggy. Then I bumped into a little clump of trees that loomed up in front of me. I climbed up the nearest trunk and managed to find a tolerabley comfortable fork to sit on. The waiting was spent by my attempts to identify the little stirrings and noises of animal life that I could hear. I grew colder and colder and managed to sleep only in uneasy fitful starts. At last when the moon came up I was on my way again.       (SSC CGL 1st Sit. 2014)

Q. "I left all signs of habitation behind me." This means that he 

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 22

"I left all signs of habitation behind me" This means that he had come very far from places where people lived.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 23

DIRECTIONS: You have two brief passages with 5 questions following each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives and mark it by blackening the appropriate oval [•].
As I stepped out of the train, I felt unusually solitary  since I was the only passenger to alight. I was accustomed to arriving in the summer, when holiday-makers throng coastal resorts and this was my first visit when the season was over. My destination was a little village which was eight miles by road. It took only a few minutes for me to come to the foot of the cliff path. When I reached the top I had left all signs of habitation behind me. I was surprised to notice that the sky was already a flame with the sunset. It seemed to be getting dark amazingly quickly. I was at a loss to account for the exceptionally early end of daylight since I did not think I had walked unduly slowly. Then I recollected that on previous visits I had walked in high summer and how it was October.
All at once it was night. The track was grassy and even in daylight showed up hardly at all. I was terrified of hurtling over the edge of the cliff to the rocks below. I felt my feet squelching and sticking in something soggy. Then I bumped into a little clump of trees that loomed up in front of me. I climbed up the nearest trunk and managed to find a tolerabley comfortable fork to sit on. The waiting was spent by my attempts to identify the little stirrings and noises of animal life that I could hear. I grew colder and colder and managed to sleep only in uneasy fitful starts. At last when the moon came up I was on my way again.       (SSC CGL 1st Sit. 2014)

Q. It became darker than the writer expected because

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 23

It became darker than the writer expected because the nights are longer in October than midsummer.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 24

DIRECTIONS: You have two brief passages with 5 questions following each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives and mark it by blackening the appropriate oval [•].
As I stepped out of the train, I felt unusually solitary  since I was the only passenger to alight. I was accustomed to arriving in the summer, when holiday-makers throng coastal resorts and this was my first visit when the season was over. My destination was a little village which was eight miles by road. It took only a few minutes for me to come to the foot of the cliff path. When I reached the top I had left all signs of habitation behind me. I was surprised to notice that the sky was already a flame with the sunset. It seemed to be getting dark amazingly quickly. I was at a loss to account for the exceptionally early end of daylight since I did not think I had walked unduly slowly. Then I recollected that on previous visits I had walked in high summer and how it was October.
All at once it was night. The track was grassy and even in daylight showed up hardly at all. I was terrified of hurtling over the edge of the cliff to the rocks below. I felt my feet squelching and sticking in something soggy. Then I bumped into a little clump of trees that loomed up in front of me. I climbed up the nearest trunk and managed to find a tolerabley comfortable fork to sit on. The waiting was spent by my attempts to identify the little stirrings and noises of animal life that I could hear. I grew colder and colder and managed to sleep only in uneasy fitful starts. At last when the moon came up I was on my way again.       (SSC CGL 1st Sit. 2014)

Q. The writer found it difficult to keep to the path because of 

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 24

The writer found it difficult to keep to the path because of poor visibility and grassy track.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 25

DIRECTIONS: You have two brief passages with 5 questions following each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives and mark it by blackening the appropriate oval [•].
As I stepped out of the train, I felt unusually solitary  since I was the only passenger to alight. I was accustomed to arriving in the summer, when holiday-makers throng coastal resorts and this was my first visit when the season was over. My destination was a little village which was eight miles by road. It took only a few minutes for me to come to the foot of the cliff path. When I reached the top I had left all signs of habitation behind me. I was surprised to notice that the sky was already a flame with the sunset. It seemed to be getting dark amazingly quickly. I was at a loss to account for the exceptionally early end of daylight since I did not think I had walked unduly slowly. Then I recollected that on previous visits I had walked in high summer and how it was October.
All at once it was night. The track was grassy and even in daylight showed up hardly at all. I was terrified of hurtling over the edge of the cliff to the rocks below. I felt my feet squelching and sticking in something soggy. Then I bumped into a little clump of trees that loomed up in front of me. I climbed up the nearest trunk and managed to find a tolerabley comfortable fork to sit on. The waiting was spent by my attempts to identify the little stirrings and noises of animal life that I could hear. I grew colder and colder and managed to sleep only in uneasy fitful starts. At last when the moon came up I was on my way again.       (SSC CGL 1st Sit. 2014)

Q. When he settled himself on the fork of the tree, the writer ________

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 25

When he settled himself on the fork of the tree the writer tried to sleep but without much success.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 26

DIRECTIONS: You have a passage with questions. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
The cyber–world is ultimately ungovernable. This is alarming as well as convenient; sometimes, convenient because alarming.
Some Indian politicians use this to great advantage. When there is an obvious failure in governance during a crisis they deflect attention from their own incompetence towards the ungovernable. So, having failed to prevent nervous citizens from fleeing their cities of work by assuring them of proper protection, some national leaders are now busy trying to prove to one another, and to panic-prone Indians, that a mischievous neighbour has been using the internet and social networking sites to spread dangerous rumours. And the Centre's automatic reaction is to start blocking these sites and begin elaborate and potentially endless negotiations with Google, Twitter and Facebook about access to information. If this is the official idea of prompt action at a time of crisis among communities, then Indians have more reason to fear their protectors than the nebulous mischief-makers of the cyber world. Wasting time gathering proof, blocking vaguely suspiciopus websites, hurling accusations across the border and worrying about bilateral relations are ways of keeping busy with inessentials because one does not quite know what to do about the essentials of a difficult situation. Besides, only a fifth of the 245 websites blocked by the Centre mention the people of the Northeast or the violence in Assam. And if a few morphed images and spurious texts can unsettle an entire nation, then there is something deeply wrong with the nation and with how it is being governed. This is what its leaders should be addressig immediately, rather than making a wrongheaded display of their powers of censorship.
It is just as absurd, and part of the same syndrome, to try to ban Twitter accounts that parody despatches from the Prime Minister's Office. To describe such forms of humour and dissent as "misrepresenting" the PMO–as if Twitter would take these parodies for genuine despatches from the PMO — makes the PMO look more ridiculous than its parodists manage to. With the precedent for such action set recently by the chief minister of West Bengal, this is yet another proof that what Bengal thinks today India will think tomorrow. Using the cyber–world for flexing the wrong muscles is essentially not funny. It might even prove to be quite danger ously distracting.        (SSC CGL 1st Sit. 2013)

Q. According to the passage, the cyber-world is 

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 27

DIRECTIONS: You have a passage with questions. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
The cyber–world is ultimately ungovernable. This is alarming as well as convenient; sometimes, convenient because alarming.
Some Indian politicians use this to great advantage. When there is an obvious failure in governance during a crisis they deflect attention from their own incompetence towards the ungovernable. So, having failed to prevent nervous citizens from fleeing their cities of work by assuring them of proper protection, some national leaders are now busy trying to prove to one another, and to panic-prone Indians, that a mischievous neighbour has been using the internet and social networking sites to spread dangerous rumours. And the Centre's automatic reaction is to start blocking these sites and begin elaborate and potentially endless negotiations with Google, Twitter and Facebook about access to information. If this is the official idea of prompt action at a time of crisis among communities, then Indians have more reason to fear their protectors than the nebulous mischief-makers of the cyber world. Wasting time gathering proof, blocking vaguely suspiciopus websites, hurling accusations across the border and worrying about bilateral relations are ways of keeping busy with inessentials because one does not quite know what to do about the essentials of a difficult situation. Besides, only a fifth of the 245 websites blocked by the Centre mention the people of the Northeast or the violence in Assam. And if a few morphed images and spurious texts can unsettle an entire nation, then there is something deeply wrong with the nation and with how it is being governed. This is what its leaders should be addressig immediately, rather than making a wrongheaded display of their powers of censorship.
It is just as absurd, and part of the same syndrome, to try to ban Twitter accounts that parody despatches from the Prime Minister's Office. To describe such forms of humour and dissent as "misrepresenting" the PMO–as if Twitter would take these parodies for genuine despatches from the PMO — makes the PMO look more ridiculous than its parodists manage to. With the precedent for such action set recently by the chief minister of West Bengal, this is yet another proof that what Bengal thinks today India will think tomorrow. Using the cyber–world for flexing the wrong muscles is essentially not funny. It might even prove to be quite danger ously distracting.        (SSC CGL 1st Sit. 2013)

Q. The author is of the opinion that 

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 28

DIRECTIONS: You have a passage with questions. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
The cyber–world is ultimately ungovernable. This is alarming as well as convenient; sometimes, convenient because alarming.
Some Indian politicians use this to great advantage. When there is an obvious failure in governance during a crisis they deflect attention from their own incompetence towards the ungovernable. So, having failed to prevent nervous citizens from fleeing their cities of work by assuring them of proper protection, some national leaders are now busy trying to prove to one another, and to panic-prone Indians, that a mischievous neighbour has been using the internet and social networking sites to spread dangerous rumours. And the Centre's automatic reaction is to start blocking these sites and begin elaborate and potentially endless negotiations with Google, Twitter and Facebook about access to information. If this is the official idea of prompt action at a time of crisis among communities, then Indians have more reason to fear their protectors than the nebulous mischief-makers of the cyber world. Wasting time gathering proof, blocking vaguely suspiciopus websites, hurling accusations across the border and worrying about bilateral relations are ways of keeping busy with inessentials because one does not quite know what to do about the essentials of a difficult situation. Besides, only a fifth of the 245 websites blocked by the Centre mention the people of the Northeast or the violence in Assam. And if a few morphed images and spurious texts can unsettle an entire nation, then there is something deeply wrong with the nation and with how it is being governed. This is what its leaders should be addressig immediately, rather than making a wrongheaded display of their powers of censorship.
It is just as absurd, and part of the same syndrome, to try to ban Twitter accounts that parody despatches from the Prime Minister's Office. To describe such forms of humour and dissent as "misrepresenting" the PMO–as if Twitter would take these parodies for genuine despatches from the PMO — makes the PMO look more ridiculous than its parodists manage to. With the precedent for such action set recently by the chief minister of West Bengal, this is yet another proof that what Bengal thinks today India will think tomorrow. Using the cyber–world for flexing the wrong muscles is essentially not funny. It might even prove to be quite danger ously distracting.        (SSC CGL 1st Sit. 2013)

Q. Which of the following is closest to the meaning of 'nebulous'? 

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 29

DIRECTIONS: You have a passage with questions. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
The cyber–world is ultimately ungovernable. This is alarming as well as convenient; sometimes, convenient because alarming.
Some Indian politicians use this to great advantage. When there is an obvious failure in governance during a crisis they deflect attention from their own incompetence towards the ungovernable. So, having failed to prevent nervous citizens from fleeing their cities of work by assuring them of proper protection, some national leaders are now busy trying to prove to one another, and to panic-prone Indians, that a mischievous neighbour has been using the internet and social networking sites to spread dangerous rumours. And the Centre's automatic reaction is to start blocking these sites and begin elaborate and potentially endless negotiations with Google, Twitter and Facebook about access to information. If this is the official idea of prompt action at a time of crisis among communities, then Indians have more reason to fear their protectors than the nebulous mischief-makers of the cyber world. Wasting time gathering proof, blocking vaguely suspiciopus websites, hurling accusations across the border and worrying about bilateral relations are ways of keeping busy with inessentials because one does not quite know what to do about the essentials of a difficult situation. Besides, only a fifth of the 245 websites blocked by the Centre mention the people of the Northeast or the violence in Assam. And if a few morphed images and spurious texts can unsettle an entire nation, then there is something deeply wrong with the nation and with how it is being governed. This is what its leaders should be addressig immediately, rather than making a wrongheaded display of their powers of censorship.
It is just as absurd, and part of the same syndrome, to try to ban Twitter accounts that parody despatches from the Prime Minister's Office. To describe such forms of humour and dissent as "misrepresenting" the PMO–as if Twitter would take these parodies for genuine despatches from the PMO — makes the PMO look more ridiculous than its parodists manage to. With the precedent for such action set recently by the chief minister of West Bengal, this is yet another proof that what Bengal thinks today India will think tomorrow. Using the cyber–world for flexing the wrong muscles is essentially not funny. It might even prove to be quite danger ously distracting.        (SSC CGL 1st Sit. 2013)

Q. The author's seriousness regarding the situation can best be described in the following sentences. Pick the odd one out. 

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 6 - Question 30

DIRECTIONS: You have a passage with questions. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
The cyber–world is ultimately ungovernable. This is alarming as well as convenient; sometimes, convenient because alarming.
Some Indian politicians use this to great advantage. When there is an obvious failure in governance during a crisis they deflect attention from their own incompetence towards the ungovernable. So, having failed to prevent nervous citizens from fleeing their cities of work by assuring them of proper protection, some national leaders are now busy trying to prove to one another, and to panic-prone Indians, that a mischievous neighbour has been using the internet and social networking sites to spread dangerous rumours. And the Centre's automatic reaction is to start blocking these sites and begin elaborate and potentially endless negotiations with Google, Twitter and Facebook about access to information. If this is the official idea of prompt action at a time of crisis among communities, then Indians have more reason to fear their protectors than the nebulous mischief-makers of the cyber world. Wasting time gathering proof, blocking vaguely suspiciopus websites, hurling accusations across the border and worrying about bilateral relations are ways of keeping busy with inessentials because one does not quite know what to do about the essentials of a difficult situation. Besides, only a fifth of the 245 websites blocked by the Centre mention the people of the Northeast or the violence in Assam. And if a few morphed images and spurious texts can unsettle an entire nation, then there is something deeply wrong with the nation and with how it is being governed. This is what its leaders should be addressig immediately, rather than making a wrongheaded display of their powers of censorship.
It is just as absurd, and part of the same syndrome, to try to ban Twitter accounts that parody despatches from the Prime Minister's Office. To describe such forms of humour and dissent as "misrepresenting" the PMO–as if Twitter would take these parodies for genuine despatches from the PMO — makes the PMO look more ridiculous than its parodists manage to. With the precedent for such action set recently by the chief minister of West Bengal, this is yet another proof that what Bengal thinks today India will think tomorrow. Using the cyber–world for flexing the wrong muscles is essentially not funny. It might even prove to be quite danger ously distracting.        (SSC CGL 1st Sit. 2013)

Q. The word 'spurious' means 

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