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SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 - SSC CGL MCQ


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30 Questions MCQ Test SSC CGL (Tier - 1) - Previous Year Papers (Topic Wise) - SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 for SSC CGL 2024 is part of SSC CGL (Tier - 1) - Previous Year Papers (Topic Wise) preparation. The SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 questions and answers have been prepared according to the SSC CGL exam syllabus.The SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 MCQs are made for SSC CGL 2024 Exam. Find important definitions, questions, notes, meanings, examples, exercises, MCQs and online tests for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 below.
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SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 - Question 1

DIRECTIONS : In question nos. you have two brief passages with questions in each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives and mark it by blackening the appropriate oval
Pidgins are languages that are not, acquired as mother tongues and that are used for a restricted set of communicative functions. They are formed from a mixture of languages and have a limited vocabulary and a simplified grammar. Pidgins serve as a means of communication between speakers of mutually unintelligible languages and may become essential, in multilingual areas. A creole develops from a pidgin when the pidgin becomes the mother tongue of the community. To cope with the consequent expansion of communicative functions, the vocabulary is increased and the grammar becomes more complex. Where a creole and the standard variety of English coexist, as in the Carribbean, there is a continuum from the most extreme form of creole to the form that is closest to the standard language. Linguists mark off the relative positions on the creole continuum as the ‘basilect’ (the furthest from the standard language), the ‘mesolect’ and the ‘acrolet’. In such situations, most creole speakers can vary their speech along the continuum and many are also competent in the standard English of their country.        (SSC CGL 2nd Sit. 2013)

Q. A pidgin develops in a situation when 

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 - Question 2

DIRECTIONS : In question nos. you have two brief passages with questions in each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives and mark it by blackening the appropriate oval
Pidgins are languages that are not, acquired as mother tongues and that are used for a restricted set of communicative functions. They are formed from a mixture of languages and have a limited vocabulary and a simplified grammar. Pidgins serve as a means of communication between speakers of mutually unintelligible languages and may become essential, in multilingual areas. A creole develops from a pidgin when the pidgin becomes the mother tongue of the community. To cope with the consequent expansion of communicative functions, the vocabulary is increased and the grammar becomes more complex. Where a creole and the standard variety of English coexist, as in the Carribbean, there is a continuum from the most extreme form of creole to the form that is closest to the standard language. Linguists mark off the relative positions on the creole continuum as the ‘basilect’ (the furthest from the standard language), the ‘mesolect’ and the ‘acrolet’. In such situations, most creole speakers can vary their speech along the continuum and many are also competent in the standard English of their country.        (SSC CGL 2nd Sit. 2013)

Q. According to the given passage, a pidgin becomes a creole when 

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 - Question 3

DIRECTIONS : In question nos. you have two brief passages with questions in each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives and mark it by blackening the appropriate oval
Pidgins are languages that are not, acquired as mother tongues and that are used for a restricted set of communicative functions. They are formed from a mixture of languages and have a limited vocabulary and a simplified grammar. Pidgins serve as a means of communication between speakers of mutually unintelligible languages and may become essential, in multilingual areas. A creole develops from a pidgin when the pidgin becomes the mother tongue of the community. To cope with the consequent expansion of communicative functions, the vocabulary is increased and the grammar becomes more complex. Where a creole and the standard variety of English coexist, as in the Carribbean, there is a continuum from the most extreme form of creole to the form that is closest to the standard language. Linguists mark off the relative positions on the creole continuum as the ‘basilect’ (the furthest from the standard language), the ‘mesolect’ and the ‘acrolet’. In such situations, most creole speakers can vary their speech along the continuum and many are also competent in the standard English of their country.        (SSC CGL 2nd Sit. 2013)

Q. According to the passage, a creole continuum is

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 - Question 4

DIRECTIONS : In question nos. you have two brief passages with questions in each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives and mark it by blackening the appropriate oval
Pidgins are languages that are not, acquired as mother tongues and that are used for a restricted set of communicative functions. They are formed from a mixture of languages and have a limited vocabulary and a simplified grammar. Pidgins serve as a means of communication between speakers of mutually unintelligible languages and may become essential, in multilingual areas. A creole develops from a pidgin when the pidgin becomes the mother tongue of the community. To cope with the consequent expansion of communicative functions, the vocabulary is increased and the grammar becomes more complex. Where a creole and the standard variety of English coexist, as in the Carribbean, there is a continuum from the most extreme form of creole to the form that is closest to the standard language. Linguists mark off the relative positions on the creole continuum as the ‘basilect’ (the furthest from the standard language), the ‘mesolect’ and the ‘acrolet’. In such situations, most creole speakers can vary their speech along the continuum and many are also competent in the standard English of their country.        (SSC CGL 2nd Sit. 2013)

Q. According to the passage ‘basilect’ means 

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 - Question 5

DIRECTIONS : In question nos. you have two brief passages with questions in each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives and mark it by blackening the appropriate oval
Pidgins are languages that are not, acquired as mother tongues and that are used for a restricted set of communicative functions. They are formed from a mixture of languages and have a limited vocabulary and a simplified grammar. Pidgins serve as a means of communication between speakers of mutually unintelligible languages and may become essential, in multilingual areas. A creole develops from a pidgin when the pidgin becomes the mother tongue of the community. To cope with the consequent expansion of communicative functions, the vocabulary is increased and the grammar becomes more complex. Where a creole and the standard variety of English coexist, as in the Carribbean, there is a continuum from the most extreme form of creole to the form that is closest to the standard language. Linguists mark off the relative positions on the creole continuum as the ‘basilect’ (the furthest from the standard language), the ‘mesolect’ and the ‘acrolet’. In such situations, most creole speakers can vary their speech along the continuum and many are also competent in the standard English of their country.        (SSC CGL 2nd Sit. 2013)

Q. Find out a word in the passage which is opposite in meaning to the word - ‘Simplified’ 

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 - Question 6

Why don't I have a telephone? No because I pretend to be wise or pose as unusual. There are two chief reasons: because I don't really like the telephone, and because I find I can still work and play, eat, breathe, and sleep without it. Why don't I like the telephone? because I think it is a pest and time waster. It may create unnecessary suspense and anxiety, as when you wait for an expected call, that doesn't come; or irritating delay, as when you keep ringing a number that is always engaged. As for speaking in a public telephone booth, it seems to me really horrible. you would not use it unless you were in a hurry, and because you are in a hurry, you will find other people waiting before you. When you do get into the booth, you are half suffocated by the stale, unventilated air, flavored with cheap face powder and chain smoking; and by the time you have began your conversation your back is chilled by the cold looks of somebody who is moving about restlessly to make your place.
If you have a telephone in your house, you will admit that it tends to ring when you least want it to ring; when you are asleep, or in the middle of a meal or a conversation, or when you are just going out, or when you are in your bath. Are you strong minded enough to ignore it, to say to yourself." Ah well, it will be all the same in hundred years time". You are not. You think there may be some important news or message for you. Have you never rushed dropping from the bath, of chewing from the table, or dazed from bed, only to be told that you are a wrong number? You were told the truth. In my opinion all telephone numbers are wrong numbers. If, of course, your telephone rings and you decide not to answer it, then you will have to listen to an idiotic bell ringing and ringing in what is supposed to be the privacy of your own home. You might as well buy a bicycle bell and ring it yourself.

Q. The author does not have a telephone because :

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 - Question 6

In the first paragraph, it is clearly mentioned that the author considers telephone a pest and time waster. He
is of the view that a telephone may create unnecessary suspense and anxiety.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 - Question 7

Why don't I have a telephone? No because I pretend to be wise or pose as unusual. There are two chief reasons: because I don't really like the telephone, and because I find I can still work and play, eat, breathe, and sleep without it. Why don't I like the telephone? because I think it is a pest and time waster. It may create unnecessary suspense and anxiety, as when you wait for an expected call, that doesn't come; or irritating delay, as when you keep ringing a number that is always engaged. As for speaking in a public telephone booth, it seems to me really horrible. you would not use it unless you were in a hurry, and because you are in a hurry, you will find other people waiting before you. When you do get into the booth, you are half suffocated by the stale, unventilated air, flavored with cheap face powder and chain smoking; and by the time you have began your conversation your back is chilled by the cold looks of somebody who is moving about restlessly to make your place.
If you have a telephone in your house, you will admit that it tends to ring when you least want it to ring; when you are asleep, or in the middle of a meal or a conversation, or when you are just going out, or when you are in your bath. Are you strong minded enough to ignore it, to say to yourself." Ah well, it will be all the same in hundred years time". You are not. You think there may be some important news or message for you. Have you never rushed dropping from the bath, of chewing from the table, or dazed from bed, only to be told that you are a wrong number? You were told the truth. In my opinion all telephone numbers are wrong numbers. If, of course, your telephone rings and you decide not to answer it, then you will have to listen to an idiotic bell ringing and ringing in what is supposed to be the privacy of your own home. You might as well buy a bicycle bell and ring it yourself.

Q. He hates speaking in a public telephone booth because : 

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 - Question 7

Second half of the first paragraph clearly explains this option and is the reason why he hates speaking in public telephone booth.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 - Question 8

Why don't I have a telephone? No because I pretend to be wise or pose as unusual. There are two chief reasons: because I don't really like the telephone, and because I find I can still work and play, eat, breathe, and sleep without it. Why don't I like the telephone? because I think it is a pest and time waster. It may create unnecessary suspense and anxiety, as when you wait for an expected call, that doesn't come; or irritating delay, as when you keep ringing a number that is always engaged. As for speaking in a public telephone booth, it seems to me really horrible. you would not use it unless you were in a hurry, and because you are in a hurry, you will find other people waiting before you. When you do get into the booth, you are half suffocated by the stale, unventilated air, flavored with cheap face powder and chain smoking; and by the time you have began your conversation your back is chilled by the cold looks of somebody who is moving about restlessly to make your place.
If you have a telephone in your house, you will admit that it tends to ring when you least want it to ring; when you are asleep, or in the middle of a meal or a conversation, or when you are just going out, or when you are in your bath. Are you strong minded enough to ignore it, to say to yourself." Ah well, it will be all the same in hundred years time". You are not. You think there may be some important news or message for you. Have you never rushed dropping from the bath, of chewing from the table, or dazed from bed, only to be told that you are a wrong number? You were told the truth. In my opinion all telephone numbers are wrong numbers. If, of course, your telephone rings and you decide not to answer it, then you will have to listen to an idiotic bell ringing and ringing in what is supposed to be the privacy of your own home. You might as well buy a bicycle bell and ring it yourself.

Q. _____ your back is chilled by the cold look of somebody means: 

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 - Question 8

The line explains one’s frustration when one goes to a telephone booth. ‘____ Chilled by the cold look ____’ refers to the situation. When one feels uneasy because the person next in the queue looks at him restlessly.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 - Question 9

Why don't I have a telephone? No because I pretend to be wise or pose as unusual. There are two chief reasons: because I don't really like the telephone, and because I find I can still work and play, eat, breathe, and sleep without it. Why don't I like the telephone? because I think it is a pest and time waster. It may create unnecessary suspense and anxiety, as when you wait for an expected call, that doesn't come; or irritating delay, as when you keep ringing a number that is always engaged. As for speaking in a public telephone booth, it seems to me really horrible. you would not use it unless you were in a hurry, and because you are in a hurry, you will find other people waiting before you. When you do get into the booth, you are half suffocated by the stale, unventilated air, flavored with cheap face powder and chain smoking; and by the time you have began your conversation your back is chilled by the cold looks of somebody who is moving about restlessly to make your place.
If you have a telephone in your house, you will admit that it tends to ring when you least want it to ring; when you are asleep, or in the middle of a meal or a conversation, or when you are just going out, or when you are in your bath. Are you strong minded enough to ignore it, to say to yourself." Ah well, it will be all the same in hundred years time". You are not. You think there may be some important news or message for you. Have you never rushed dropping from the bath, of chewing from the table, or dazed from bed, only to be told that you are a wrong number? You were told the truth. In my opinion all telephone numbers are wrong numbers. If, of course, your telephone rings and you decide not to answer it, then you will have to listen to an idiotic bell ringing and ringing in what is supposed to be the privacy of your own home. You might as well buy a bicycle bell and ring it yourself.

Q. 'Ah well, it will be all the same in hundred years time'. This sentence means:

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 - Question 9

The sentence means that one should be strong minded.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 - Question 10

Why don't I have a telephone? No because I pretend to be wise or pose as unusual. There are two chief reasons: because I don't really like the telephone, and because I find I can still work and play, eat, breathe, and sleep without it. Why don't I like the telephone? because I think it is a pest and time waster. It may create unnecessary suspense and anxiety, as when you wait for an expected call, that doesn't come; or irritating delay, as when you keep ringing a number that is always engaged. As for speaking in a public telephone booth, it seems to me really horrible. you would not use it unless you were in a hurry, and because you are in a hurry, you will find other people waiting before you. When you do get into the booth, you are half suffocated by the stale, unventilated air, flavored with cheap face powder and chain smoking; and by the time you have began your conversation your back is chilled by the cold looks of somebody who is moving about restlessly to make your place.
If you have a telephone in your house, you will admit that it tends to ring when you least want it to ring; when you are asleep, or in the middle of a meal or a conversation, or when you are just going out, or when you are in your bath. Are you strong minded enough to ignore it, to say to yourself." Ah well, it will be all the same in hundred years time". You are not. You think there may be some important news or message for you. Have you never rushed dropping from the bath, of chewing from the table, or dazed from bed, only to be told that you are a wrong number? You were told the truth. In my opinion all telephone numbers are wrong numbers. If, of course, your telephone rings and you decide not to answer it, then you will have to listen to an idiotic bell ringing and ringing in what is supposed to be the privacy of your own home. You might as well buy a bicycle bell and ring it yourself.

Q. 'All telephone numbers are wrong numbers', because :

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 - Question 10

None of the options gives the correct reason as to why all telephone numbers are wrong numbers. The author considers all telephone numbers as wrong numbers because after an unanswered telephone ring, it will ring continuously thereby, creating hindrance in the privacy of his own home.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 - Question 11

DIRECTIONS : In question number you have two passages with questions in each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
The World health Organisation is briefly called W.H.O. It is a specialised agency of the United Nations and was established in 1948.
International health workers can be seen working in all kinds of surroundings in deserts, jungles, mountains, coconut groves, and rice fields. They help the sick to attain health and the healthy to maintain their health.
This global health team assists the local health workers in stopping the spread of what are called communicable diseases, like cholera. These diseases can spread from one country to another and so can be a threat to world health.
W.H.O. assists different national health authorities not only in controlling diseases but also in preventing them altogether. Total prevention of diseases is possible in a number of ways.
Everyone knows how people, particularly children, are vaccinated against one disease or another. Similarly, most people are familiar with the spraying of houses with poisonous substances which kill disease-carrying insects.              (SSC CGL 1st Sit. 2013)

Q. "It is a specialised agency of the United Nations and was established in 1948". Here specialised means : 

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 - Question 11

Since, WHO has been established with a specific purpose, therefore, it is a specialised agency.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 - Question 12

DIRECTIONS : In question number you have two passages with questions in each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
The World health Organisation is briefly called W.H.O. It is a specialised agency of the United Nations and was established in 1948.
International health workers can be seen working in all kinds of surroundings in deserts, jungles, mountains, coconut groves, and rice fields. They help the sick to attain health and the healthy to maintain their health.
This global health team assists the local health workers in stopping the spread of what are called communicable diseases, like cholera. These diseases can spread from one country to another and so can be a threat to world health.
W.H.O. assists different national health authorities not only in controlling diseases but also in preventing them altogether. Total prevention of diseases is possible in a number of ways.
Everyone knows how people, particularly children, are vaccinated against one disease or another. Similarly, most people are familiar with the spraying of houses with poisonous substances which kill disease-carrying insects.              (SSC CGL 1st Sit. 2013)

Q. "International health workers can be seen working in all kinds of surroundings: in deserts, jungles, mountains, coconout groves, and rice fields". Here International means: 

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 - Question 12

International means belonging to the whole world.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 - Question 13

DIRECTIONS : In question number you have two passages with questions in each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
The World health Organisation is briefly called W.H.O. It is a specialised agency of the United Nations and was established in 1948.
International health workers can be seen working in all kinds of surroundings in deserts, jungles, mountains, coconut groves, and rice fields. They help the sick to attain health and the healthy to maintain their health.
This global health team assists the local health workers in stopping the spread of what are called communicable diseases, like cholera. These diseases can spread from one country to another and so can be a threat to world health.
W.H.O. assists different national health authorities not only in controlling diseases but also in preventing them altogether. Total prevention of diseases is possible in a number of ways.
Everyone knows how people, particularly children, are vaccinated against one disease or another. Similarly, most people are familiar with the spraying of houses with poisonous substances which kill disease-carrying insects.              (SSC CGL 1st Sit. 2013)

Q. They help the sick to attain health and the healthy to maintain their health. here they stands for:

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 - Question 13

From the fourth line of the passage, it is evident that ‘they’ refers to the international health workers.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 - Question 14

DIRECTIONS : In question number you have two passages with questions in each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
The World health Organisation is briefly called W.H.O. It is a specialised agency of the United Nations and was established in 1948.
International health workers can be seen working in all kinds of surroundings in deserts, jungles, mountains, coconut groves, and rice fields. They help the sick to attain health and the healthy to maintain their health.
This global health team assists the local health workers in stopping the spread of what are called communicable diseases, like cholera. These diseases can spread from one country to another and so can be a threat to world health.
W.H.O. assists different national health authorities not only in controlling diseases but also in preventing them altogether. Total prevention of diseases is possible in a number of ways.
Everyone knows how people, particularly children, are vaccinated against one disease or another. Similarly, most people are familiar with the spraying of houses with poisonous substances which kill disease-carrying insects.              (SSC CGL 1st Sit. 2013)

Q. "WHO assists different national health authorities not only in controlling diseases but also in preventing them altogether". The above sentence implies that : 

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 - Question 14

This option best explains the meaning of the given sentence in the question.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 - Question 15

DIRECTIONS : In question number you have two passages with questions in each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
The World health Organisation is briefly called W.H.O. It is a specialised agency of the United Nations and was established in 1948.
International health workers can be seen working in all kinds of surroundings in deserts, jungles, mountains, coconut groves, and rice fields. They help the sick to attain health and the healthy to maintain their health.
This global health team assists the local health workers in stopping the spread of what are called communicable diseases, like cholera. These diseases can spread from one country to another and so can be a threat to world health.
W.H.O. assists different national health authorities not only in controlling diseases but also in preventing them altogether. Total prevention of diseases is possible in a number of ways.
Everyone knows how people, particularly children, are vaccinated against one disease or another. Similarly, most people are familiar with the spraying of houses with poisonous substances which kill disease-carrying insects.              (SSC CGL 1st Sit. 2013)

Q. "Total prevention of diseases is possible in a number of ways". The author has given illustrations of : 

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 - Question 15

The author has discussed two possible ways of preventing diseases viz. Vaccination and spraying of houses with poisonous substances.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 - Question 16

DIRECTIONS: In the following questions, you have two brief passages with 5 questions in each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
One may look at life, events, society, history, in another way. A way which might, at a stretch, be described as the Gandhian way, though it may be from times before Mahatma Gandhi came on the scene.
The Gandhian reaction to all grim poverty, squalor and degradation of the human being would approximate to effort at self-change and self-improvement, to a regime of living regulated by discipline from within. To change society, the individual must first change himself.
In this way of looking at life and society, words too begin to mean differently. Revolution, for instance,  is a term frequently used, but not always in the sense it has been in the lexicon of the militant. So also with words like peace and struggle. Even society may mean differently, being some kind of organic entity for the militant, and more or less a sum of individuals for the Gandhian. There is yet another way, which might, for want of a better description, be called the mystic. The mystic’s perspective measures these concerns that transcend political ambition and the dynamism of the reformer, whether he be militant or Gandhian. The mystic measures the terror of not knowing the remorseless march of time; he seeks to know what was before birth, what comes after death? The continuous presence of death, of the consciousness of death, sets his priorities and values: militants and Gandhians, kings and prophets, must leave all that they have built; all that they have unbuilt and depart when messengers of the buffalo-riding Yama come out of the shadows. Water will to water, dust to dust. Think of impermanence. Everything passes.

Q. The Gandhian reaction of poverty is 

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 - Question 17

DIRECTIONS: In the following questions, you have two brief passages with 5 questions in each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
One may look at life, events, society, history, in another way. A way which might, at a stretch, be described as the Gandhian way, though it may be from times before Mahatma Gandhi came on the scene.
The Gandhian reaction to all grim poverty, squalor and degradation of the human being would approximate to effort at self-change and self-improvement, to a regime of living regulated by discipline from within. To change society, the individual must first change himself.
In this way of looking at life and society, words too begin to mean differently. Revolution, for instance,  is a term frequently used, but not always in the sense it has been in the lexicon of the militant. So also with words like peace and struggle. Even society may mean differently, being some kind of organic entity for the militant, and more or less a sum of individuals for the Gandhian. There is yet another way, which might, for want of a better description, be called the mystic. The mystic’s perspective measures these concerns that transcend political ambition and the dynamism of the reformer, whether he be militant or Gandhian. The mystic measures the terror of not knowing the remorseless march of time; he seeks to know what was before birth, what comes after death? The continuous presence of death, of the consciousness of death, sets his priorities and values: militants and Gandhians, kings and prophets, must leave all that they have built; all that they have unbuilt and depart when messengers of the buffalo-riding Yama come out of the shadows. Water will to water, dust to dust. Think of impermanence. Everything passes.

Q. According to Gandianism, the individual who wants to change society

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 - Question 18

DIRECTIONS: In the following questions, you have two brief passages with 5 questions in each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
One may look at life, events, society, history, in another way. A way which might, at a stretch, be described as the Gandhian way, though it may be from times before Mahatma Gandhi came on the scene.
The Gandhian reaction to all grim poverty, squalor and degradation of the human being would approximate to effort at self-change and self-improvement, to a regime of living regulated by discipline from within. To change society, the individual must first change himself.
In this way of looking at life and society, words too begin to mean differently. Revolution, for instance,  is a term frequently used, but not always in the sense it has been in the lexicon of the militant. So also with words like peace and struggle. Even society may mean differently, being some kind of organic entity for the militant, and more or less a sum of individuals for the Gandhian. There is yet another way, which might, for want of a better description, be called the mystic. The mystic’s perspective measures these concerns that transcend political ambition and the dynamism of the reformer, whether he be militant or Gandhian. The mystic measures the terror of not knowing the remorseless march of time; he seeks to know what was before birth, what comes after death? The continuous presence of death, of the consciousness of death, sets his priorities and values: militants and Gandhians, kings and prophets, must leave all that they have built; all that they have unbuilt and depart when messengers of the buffalo-riding Yama come out of the shadows. Water will to water, dust to dust. Think of impermanence. Everything passes.

Q. Who, according to the  passage, finds new meaning for words like revolutions, peace and struggle?

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 - Question 19

DIRECTIONS: In the following questions, you have two brief passages with 5 questions in each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
One may look at life, events, society, history, in another way. A way which might, at a stretch, be described as the Gandhian way, though it may be from times before Mahatma Gandhi came on the scene.
The Gandhian reaction to all grim poverty, squalor and degradation of the human being would approximate to effort at self-change and self-improvement, to a regime of living regulated by discipline from within. To change society, the individual must first change himself.
In this way of looking at life and society, words too begin to mean differently. Revolution, for instance,  is a term frequently used, but not always in the sense it has been in the lexicon of the militant. So also with words like peace and struggle. Even society may mean differently, being some kind of organic entity for the militant, and more or less a sum of individuals for the Gandhian. There is yet another way, which might, for want of a better description, be called the mystic. The mystic’s perspective measures these concerns that transcend political ambition and the dynamism of the reformer, whether he be militant or Gandhian. The mystic measures the terror of not knowing the remorseless march of time; he seeks to know what was before birth, what comes after death? The continuous presence of death, of the consciousness of death, sets his priorities and values: militants and Gandhians, kings and prophets, must leave all that they have built; all that they have unbuilt and depart when messengers of the buffalo-riding Yama come out of the shadows. Water will to water, dust to dust. Think of impermanence. Everything passes.

Q. The expression ‘water will to water, dust to dust’ means

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 - Question 20

DIRECTIONS: In the following questions, you have two brief passages with 5 questions in each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
One may look at life, events, society, history, in another way. A way which might, at a stretch, be described as the Gandhian way, though it may be from times before Mahatma Gandhi came on the scene.
The Gandhian reaction to all grim poverty, squalor and degradation of the human being would approximate to effort at self-change and self-improvement, to a regime of living regulated by discipline from within. To change society, the individual must first change himself.
In this way of looking at life and society, words too begin to mean differently. Revolution, for instance,  is a term frequently used, but not always in the sense it has been in the lexicon of the militant. So also with words like peace and struggle. Even society may mean differently, being some kind of organic entity for the militant, and more or less a sum of individuals for the Gandhian. There is yet another way, which might, for want of a better description, be called the mystic. The mystic’s perspective measures these concerns that transcend political ambition and the dynamism of the reformer, whether he be militant or Gandhian. The mystic measures the terror of not knowing the remorseless march of time; he seeks to know what was before birth, what comes after death? The continuous presence of death, of the consciousness of death, sets his priorities and values: militants and Gandhians, kings and prophets, must leave all that they have built; all that they have unbuilt and depart when messengers of the buffalo-riding Yama come out of the shadows. Water will to water, dust to dust. Think of impermanence. Everything passes.

Q. What does society mean to a Gandhian?

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 - Question 21

DIRECTIONS: In the following questions, you have two brief passages with 5 questions in each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
Stuck with the development dilemma? Stay away from management courses. Seriously, one of the biggest complaints that organisations have about management courses is that they fail to impact the participants’ on-the-job behaviour. Some management trainers stress the need for follow-up and reinforcement on the job. Some go so far as briefing the participants’ managers on what behaviour they should be reinforcing back on the job. Other include a follow-up training day to review the progress of the participants. None of this is really going far enough.
The real problem is that course promoters view development as something which primarily, takes place in a classroom. A course is an event and events are, by definition limited in time. When you talk about follow-up after a course, it is seen as a nice idea, but not as an essential part of the participants’ development programme. Any rational, empowered individual should be able to take what has been learnt in a course and transfer it to the work place - or so the argument goes. Another negative aspect of the course mindset is that, primarily, development is thought to be about skill-acquisition.
So, it is felt that the distinction between taking the course and behaving differently in the work place parallels the distinction between skill-acquisition and skill-application. But can such a sharp distinction be maintained? Skills are really acquired only in the context of applying them on the job, finding them effective and, therefore, reinforcing them.
The problem with courses is that they are events, while development is an on-going process which, involves, within a complex environment, continual interaction, regular feedback and adjustment. As we tend to equate development with a one-off event, it is difficult to get seriously motivated about the followup. Anyone paying for a course tends to look at follow-up as an unnecessary and rather costly frill.      (SSC CGL 2nd Sit. 2012)

Q. What is the passage about? 

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 - Question 21

The passage is about development dilemma

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 - Question 22

DIRECTIONS: In the following questions, you have two brief passages with 5 questions in each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
Stuck with the development dilemma? Stay away from management courses. Seriously, one of the biggest complaints that organisations have about management courses is that they fail to impact the participants’ on-the-job behaviour. Some management trainers stress the need for follow-up and reinforcement on the job. Some go so far as briefing the participants’ managers on what behaviour they should be reinforcing back on the job. Other include a follow-up training day to review the progress of the participants. None of this is really going far enough.
The real problem is that course promoters view development as something which primarily, takes place in a classroom. A course is an event and events are, by definition limited in time. When you talk about follow-up after a course, it is seen as a nice idea, but not as an essential part of the participants’ development programme. Any rational, empowered individual should be able to take what has been learnt in a course and transfer it to the work place - or so the argument goes. Another negative aspect of the course mindset is that, primarily, development is thought to be about skill-acquisition.
So, it is felt that the distinction between taking the course and behaving differently in the work place parallels the distinction between skill-acquisition and skill-application. But can such a sharp distinction be maintained? Skills are really acquired only in the context of applying them on the job, finding them effective and, therefore, reinforcing them.
The problem with courses is that they are events, while development is an on-going process which, involves, within a complex environment, continual interaction, regular feedback and adjustment. As we tend to equate development with a one-off event, it is difficult to get seriously motivated about the followup. Anyone paying for a course tends to look at follow-up as an unnecessary and rather costly frill.      (SSC CGL 2nd Sit. 2012)

Q. Which of the following statements is false?

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 - Question 22

Look at the sentence : The real problem is that course promoters view development as something which primarily, takes place in a class room.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 - Question 23

DIRECTIONS: In the following questions, you have two brief passages with 5 questions in each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
Stuck with the development dilemma? Stay away from management courses. Seriously, one of the biggest complaints that organisations have about management courses is that they fail to impact the participants’ on-the-job behaviour. Some management trainers stress the need for follow-up and reinforcement on the job. Some go so far as briefing the participants’ managers on what behaviour they should be reinforcing back on the job. Other include a follow-up training day to review the progress of the participants. None of this is really going far enough.
The real problem is that course promoters view development as something which primarily, takes place in a classroom. A course is an event and events are, by definition limited in time. When you talk about follow-up after a course, it is seen as a nice idea, but not as an essential part of the participants’ development programme. Any rational, empowered individual should be able to take what has been learnt in a course and transfer it to the work place - or so the argument goes. Another negative aspect of the course mindset is that, primarily, development is thought to be about skill-acquisition.
So, it is felt that the distinction between taking the course and behaving differently in the work place parallels the distinction between skill-acquisition and skill-application. But can such a sharp distinction be maintained? Skills are really acquired only in the context of applying them on the job, finding them effective and, therefore, reinforcing them.
The problem with courses is that they are events, while development is an on-going process which, involves, within a complex environment, continual interaction, regular feedback and adjustment. As we tend to equate development with a one-off event, it is difficult to get seriously motivated about the followup. Anyone paying for a course tends to look at follow-up as an unnecessary and rather costly frill.      (SSC CGL 2nd Sit. 2012)

Q. The writer’s attitude, as reflected in the passage, is 

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 - Question 24

DIRECTIONS: In the following questions, you have two brief passages with 5 questions in each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
Stuck with the development dilemma? Stay away from management courses. Seriously, one of the biggest complaints that organisations have about management courses is that they fail to impact the participants’ on-the-job behaviour. Some management trainers stress the need for follow-up and reinforcement on the job. Some go so far as briefing the participants’ managers on what behaviour they should be reinforcing back on the job. Other include a follow-up training day to review the progress of the participants. None of this is really going far enough.
The real problem is that course promoters view development as something which primarily, takes place in a classroom. A course is an event and events are, by definition limited in time. When you talk about follow-up after a course, it is seen as a nice idea, but not as an essential part of the participants’ development programme. Any rational, empowered individual should be able to take what has been learnt in a course and transfer it to the work place - or so the argument goes. Another negative aspect of the course mindset is that, primarily, development is thought to be about skill-acquisition.
So, it is felt that the distinction between taking the course and behaving differently in the work place parallels the distinction between skill-acquisition and skill-application. But can such a sharp distinction be maintained? Skills are really acquired only in the context of applying them on the job, finding them effective and, therefore, reinforcing them.
The problem with courses is that they are events, while development is an on-going process which, involves, within a complex environment, continual interaction, regular feedback and adjustment. As we tend to equate development with a one-off event, it is difficult to get seriously motivated about the followup. Anyone paying for a course tends to look at follow-up as an unnecessary and rather costly frill.      (SSC CGL 2nd Sit. 2012)

Q. The course promoters’ attitude is

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 - Question 25

DIRECTIONS: In the following questions, you have two brief passages with 5 questions in each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
Stuck with the development dilemma? Stay away from management courses. Seriously, one of the biggest complaints that organisations have about management courses is that they fail to impact the participants’ on-the-job behaviour. Some management trainers stress the need for follow-up and reinforcement on the job. Some go so far as briefing the participants’ managers on what behaviour they should be reinforcing back on the job. Other include a follow-up training day to review the progress of the participants. None of this is really going far enough.
The real problem is that course promoters view development as something which primarily, takes place in a classroom. A course is an event and events are, by definition limited in time. When you talk about follow-up after a course, it is seen as a nice idea, but not as an essential part of the participants’ development programme. Any rational, empowered individual should be able to take what has been learnt in a course and transfer it to the work place - or so the argument goes. Another negative aspect of the course mindset is that, primarily, development is thought to be about skill-acquisition.
So, it is felt that the distinction between taking the course and behaving differently in the work place parallels the distinction between skill-acquisition and skill-application. But can such a sharp distinction be maintained? Skills are really acquired only in the context of applying them on the job, finding them effective and, therefore, reinforcing them.
The problem with courses is that they are events, while development is an on-going process which, involves, within a complex environment, continual interaction, regular feedback and adjustment. As we tend to equate development with a one-off event, it is difficult to get seriously motivated about the followup. Anyone paying for a course tends to look at follow-up as an unnecessary and rather costly frill.      (SSC CGL 2nd Sit. 2012)

Q. The word ‘mindset’ here means 

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 - Question 26

DIRECTIONS: In the following questions, you have two brief passages with questions in each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
To write well, you have to be able to write clearly and logically, and you cannot do this unless you can think clearly and logically. If you cannot do this yet you should train yourself to do it by taking particular problems and following them through, point by point, to a solution, without leaving anything out and without avoiding any difficulties that you meet. At first you find clear, step-by- step thought very difficult.
You may find that your mind is not able to concentrate. Several unconnected ideas may occur together. But practice will improve your ability to concentrate on a single idea and think about it clearly and logically. In order to increase your vocabulary and to improve your style, you should read widely and use a good dictionary to help you find the exact meanings and correct usages of words.
Always remember that regular and frequent practice is necessary if you want to learn to write well. It is no good waiting until you have an inspiration before you write. Even with the most famous writers, inspiration is rare. Someone said that writing is ninety-nine percent hard work and one percent inspiration, so the sooner you get into the habit of disciplining your-self to write, the better.

Q. To write well, a person must train himself in 

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 - Question 27

DIRECTIONS: In the following questions, you have two brief passages with questions in each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
To write well, you have to be able to write clearly and logically, and you cannot do this unless you can think clearly and logically. If you cannot do this yet you should train yourself to do it by taking particular problems and following them through, point by point, to a solution, without leaving anything out and without avoiding any difficulties that you meet. At first you find clear, step-by- step thought very difficult.
You may find that your mind is not able to concentrate. Several unconnected ideas may occur together. But practice will improve your ability to concentrate on a single idea and think about it clearly and logically. In order to increase your vocabulary and to improve your style, you should read widely and use a good dictionary to help you find the exact meanings and correct usages of words.
Always remember that regular and frequent practice is necessary if you want to learn to write well. It is no good waiting until you have an inspiration before you write. Even with the most famous writers, inspiration is rare. Someone said that writing is ninety-nine percent hard work and one percent inspiration, so the sooner you get into the habit of disciplining your-self to write, the better.

Q. Initially, it is difficult to write because 

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 - Question 28

DIRECTIONS: In the following questions, you have two brief passages with questions in each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
To write well, you have to be able to write clearly and logically, and you cannot do this unless you can think clearly and logically. If you cannot do this yet you should train yourself to do it by taking particular problems and following them through, point by point, to a solution, without leaving anything out and without avoiding any difficulties that you meet. At first you find clear, step-by- step thought very difficult.
You may find that your mind is not able to concentrate. Several unconnected ideas may occur together. But practice will improve your ability to concentrate on a single idea and think about it clearly and logically. In order to increase your vocabulary and to improve your style, you should read widely and use a good dictionary to help you find the exact meanings and correct usages of words.
Always remember that regular and frequent practice is necessary if you want to learn to write well. It is no good waiting until you have an inspiration before you write. Even with the most famous writers, inspiration is rare. Someone said that writing is ninety-nine percent hard work and one percent inspiration, so the sooner you get into the habit of disciplining your-self to write, the better.

Q. According to the passage, writing style can be improved by

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 - Question 29

DIRECTIONS: In the following questions, you have two brief passages with questions in each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
To write well, you have to be able to write clearly and logically, and you cannot do this unless you can think clearly and logically. If you cannot do this yet you should train yourself to do it by taking particular problems and following them through, point by point, to a solution, without leaving anything out and without avoiding any difficulties that you meet. At first you find clear, step-by- step thought very difficult.
You may find that your mind is not able to concentrate. Several unconnected ideas may occur together. But practice will improve your ability to concentrate on a single idea and think about it clearly and logically. In order to increase your vocabulary and to improve your style, you should read widely and use a good dictionary to help you find the exact meanings and correct usages of words.
Always remember that regular and frequent practice is necessary if you want to learn to write well. It is no good waiting until you have an inspiration before you write. Even with the most famous writers, inspiration is rare. Someone said that writing is ninety-nine percent hard work and one percent inspiration, so the sooner you get into the habit of disciplining your-self to write, the better.

Q. Famous writers have achieved success by 

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 8 - Question 30

DIRECTIONS: In the following questions, you have two brief passages with questions in each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
To write well, you have to be able to write clearly and logically, and you cannot do this unless you can think clearly and logically. If you cannot do this yet you should train yourself to do it by taking particular problems and following them through, point by point, to a solution, without leaving anything out and without avoiding any difficulties that you meet. At first you find clear, step-by- step thought very difficult.
You may find that your mind is not able to concentrate. Several unconnected ideas may occur together. But practice will improve your ability to concentrate on a single idea and think about it clearly and logically. In order to increase your vocabulary and to improve your style, you should read widely and use a good dictionary to help you find the exact meanings and correct usages of words.
Always remember that regular and frequent practice is necessary if you want to learn to write well. It is no good waiting until you have an inspiration before you write. Even with the most famous writers, inspiration is rare. Someone said that writing is ninety-nine percent hard work and one percent inspiration, so the sooner you get into the habit of disciplining your-self to write, the better.

Q. All the following words mean ‘exact’ except 

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