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SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - SSC CGL MCQ


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35 Questions MCQ Test SSC CGL (Tier - 1) - Previous Year Papers (Topic Wise) - SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 for SSC CGL 2024 is part of SSC CGL (Tier - 1) - Previous Year Papers (Topic Wise) preparation. The SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 questions and answers have been prepared according to the SSC CGL exam syllabus.The SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 MCQs are made for SSC CGL 2024 Exam. Find important definitions, questions, notes, meanings, examples, exercises, MCQs and online tests for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 below.
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SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 1

DIRECTIONS: In the following questions, you have two brief passages with questions in each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
“Nobody knows my name” is the title of one of James Baldwin’s celebrated books. Who knows the name of the old man sitting amidst ruins pondering over his hubble-bubble? We do not. It does not matter. He is there like the North Pole, the Everest and the Alps but with one difference. The North Pole, the Everest and the Alps will be there when he is not there any more. Can we really say this? “Dust thou act to dust returneth” was not spoken of the soul. We do not know whether the old man’s soul will go marching on like John Brown’s. While his body lies mouldering in the grave or becomes ash driven by the wind or is immersed in water, such speculation is hazardous. A soul’s trip can take one to the treacherous shoals of metaphysics where there is no “yes” or “no”. “Who am I?” asked Tagore of the rising sun in the first dawn of his life, he received no answer. “Who am I?” he asked the setting sun in the last twilight of his life. He received no answer.
We are no more on solid ground with dust which we can feel in our hands, scatter to the wind and wet with water to turn it into mud. For this much is sure, that in the end, when life’s ceaseless labour grinds to a halt and man meets death, the brother of sleep, his body buried or burnt, becomes dust. In the form of dust he lives, inanimate yet in contact with the animate. He settles on files in endless government almirahs, on manuscripts written and not published on all shelves, on faces and hands. He becomes ubiquitous all pervasive, sometimes sneaking even into hermetically sealed chambers.        (SSC CGL 1st Sit. 2012)

Q. What is the difference between the old man and the North Pole, the Everest and the Alps? 

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 2

DIRECTIONS: In the following questions, you have two brief passages with questions in each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
“Nobody knows my name” is the title of one of James Baldwin’s celebrated books. Who knows the name of the old man sitting amidst ruins pondering over his hubble-bubble? We do not. It does not matter. He is there like the North Pole, the Everest and the Alps but with one difference. The North Pole, the Everest and the Alps will be there when he is not there any more. Can we really say this? “Dust thou act to dust returneth” was not spoken of the soul. We do not know whether the old man’s soul will go marching on like John Brown’s. While his body lies mouldering in the grave or becomes ash driven by the wind or is immersed in water, such speculation is hazardous. A soul’s trip can take one to the treacherous shoals of metaphysics where there is no “yes” or “no”. “Who am I?” asked Tagore of the rising sun in the first dawn of his life, he received no answer. “Who am I?” he asked the setting sun in the last twilight of his life. He received no answer.
We are no more on solid ground with dust which we can feel in our hands, scatter to the wind and wet with water to turn it into mud. For this much is sure, that in the end, when life’s ceaseless labour grinds to a halt and man meets death, the brother of sleep, his body buried or burnt, becomes dust. In the form of dust he lives, inanimate yet in contact with the animate. He settles on files in endless government almirahs, on manuscripts written and not published on all shelves, on faces and hands. He becomes ubiquitous all pervasive, sometimes sneaking even into hermetically sealed chambers.        (SSC CGL 1st Sit. 2012)

Q. What, according to the passage, happens to a person’s soul after death? 

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 3

DIRECTIONS: In the following questions, you have two brief passages with questions in each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
“Nobody knows my name” is the title of one of James Baldwin’s celebrated books. Who knows the name of the old man sitting amidst ruins pondering over his hubble-bubble? We do not. It does not matter. He is there like the North Pole, the Everest and the Alps but with one difference. The North Pole, the Everest and the Alps will be there when he is not there any more. Can we really say this? “Dust thou act to dust returneth” was not spoken of the soul. We do not know whether the old man’s soul will go marching on like John Brown’s. While his body lies mouldering in the grave or becomes ash driven by the wind or is immersed in water, such speculation is hazardous. A soul’s trip can take one to the treacherous shoals of metaphysics where there is no “yes” or “no”. “Who am I?” asked Tagore of the rising sun in the first dawn of his life, he received no answer. “Who am I?” he asked the setting sun in the last twilight of his life. He received no answer.
We are no more on solid ground with dust which we can feel in our hands, scatter to the wind and wet with water to turn it into mud. For this much is sure, that in the end, when life’s ceaseless labour grinds to a halt and man meets death, the brother of sleep, his body buried or burnt, becomes dust. In the form of dust he lives, inanimate yet in contact with the animate. He settles on files in endless government almirahs, on manuscripts written and not published on all shelves, on faces and hands. He becomes ubiquitous all pervasive, sometimes sneaking even into hermetically sealed chambers.        (SSC CGL 1st Sit. 2012)

Q. Which of the following statement is true?

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 4

DIRECTIONS: In the following questions, you have two brief passages with questions in each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
“Nobody knows my name” is the title of one of James Baldwin’s celebrated books. Who knows the name of the old man sitting amidst ruins pondering over his hubble-bubble? We do not. It does not matter. He is there like the North Pole, the Everest and the Alps but with one difference. The North Pole, the Everest and the Alps will be there when he is not there any more. Can we really say this? “Dust thou act to dust returneth” was not spoken of the soul. We do not know whether the old man’s soul will go marching on like John Brown’s. While his body lies mouldering in the grave or becomes ash driven by the wind or is immersed in water, such speculation is hazardous. A soul’s trip can take one to the treacherous shoals of metaphysics where there is no “yes” or “no”. “Who am I?” asked Tagore of the rising sun in the first dawn of his life, he received no answer. “Who am I?” he asked the setting sun in the last twilight of his life. He received no answer.
We are no more on solid ground with dust which we can feel in our hands, scatter to the wind and wet with water to turn it into mud. For this much is sure, that in the end, when life’s ceaseless labour grinds to a halt and man meets death, the brother of sleep, his body buried or burnt, becomes dust. In the form of dust he lives, inanimate yet in contact with the animate. He settles on files in endless government almirahs, on manuscripts written and not published on all shelves, on faces and hands. He becomes ubiquitous all pervasive, sometimes sneaking even into hermetically sealed chambers.        (SSC CGL 1st Sit. 2012)

Q. What happens to man after he becomes dust? 

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 5

DIRECTIONS: In the following questions, you have two brief passages with questions in each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
“Nobody knows my name” is the title of one of James Baldwin’s celebrated books. Who knows the name of the old man sitting amidst ruins pondering over his hubble-bubble? We do not. It does not matter. He is there like the North Pole, the Everest and the Alps but with one difference. The North Pole, the Everest and the Alps will be there when he is not there any more. Can we really say this? “Dust thou act to dust returneth” was not spoken of the soul. We do not know whether the old man’s soul will go marching on like John Brown’s. While his body lies mouldering in the grave or becomes ash driven by the wind or is immersed in water, such speculation is hazardous. A soul’s trip can take one to the treacherous shoals of metaphysics where there is no “yes” or “no”. “Who am I?” asked Tagore of the rising sun in the first dawn of his life, he received no answer. “Who am I?” he asked the setting sun in the last twilight of his life. He received no answer.
We are no more on solid ground with dust which we can feel in our hands, scatter to the wind and wet with water to turn it into mud. For this much is sure, that in the end, when life’s ceaseless labour grinds to a halt and man meets death, the brother of sleep, his body buried or burnt, becomes dust. In the form of dust he lives, inanimate yet in contact with the animate. He settles on files in endless government almirahs, on manuscripts written and not published on all shelves, on faces and hands. He becomes ubiquitous all pervasive, sometimes sneaking even into hermetically sealed chambers.        (SSC CGL 1st Sit. 2012)

Q. What figure of speech is used in the expressi on ‘the brother of sleep’? 

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 6

DIRECTIONS : In question, you have two brief passages with questions following each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
“People very often complain that poverty is a great evil and that it is not possible to be happy unless one has a lot of money. Actually, this is not necessarily true. Even a poor man, living in a small hut with none of the comforts and luxuries of life, may be quite contented with his lot and achieve a measure of happiness. On the other hand, a very rich man, living in a palace and enjoying everything that money can buy, may still be miserable, if, for example, he does not enjoy good health or his only son has taken to evil ways. Apart from this, he may have a lot of business worries which keep him on tenterhooks most of the time. There is a limit to what money can buy and there are many things which are necessary for a man’s happiness and which money cannot procure.
Real happiness is a matter of the right attitude and the capacity of being contented with whatever you have is the most important ingredient of this attitude”.        (SSC CGL 2nd Sit. 2012)

Q. The phrase “on tenterhooks” means: 

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 6

The phrase ‘on tenterhooks’ means a state of suspense or agitation because of uncertainity about a future event.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 7

DIRECTIONS : In question, you have two brief passages with questions following each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
“People very often complain that poverty is a great evil and that it is not possible to be happy unless one has a lot of money. Actually, this is not necessarily true. Even a poor man, living in a small hut with none of the comforts and luxuries of life, may be quite contented with his lot and achieve a measure of happiness. On the other hand, a very rich man, living in a palace and enjoying everything that money can buy, may still be miserable, if, for example, he does not enjoy good health or his only son has taken to evil ways. Apart from this, he may have a lot of business worries which keep him on tenterhooks most of the time. There is a limit to what money can buy and there are many things which are necessary for a man’s happiness and which money cannot procure.
Real happiness is a matter of the right attitude and the capacity of being contented with whatever you have is the most important ingredient of this attitude”.        (SSC CGL 2nd Sit. 2012)

Q. It is true that: 

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 7

The passage clearly shows that money alone can’t give happiness.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 8

DIRECTIONS : In question, you have two brief passages with questions following each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
“People very often complain that poverty is a great evil and that it is not possible to be happy unless one has a lot of money. Actually, this is not necessarily true. Even a poor man, living in a small hut with none of the comforts and luxuries of life, may be quite contented with his lot and achieve a measure of happiness. On the other hand, a very rich man, living in a palace and enjoying everything that money can buy, may still be miserable, if, for example, he does not enjoy good health or his only son has taken to evil ways. Apart from this, he may have a lot of business worries which keep him on tenterhooks most of the time. There is a limit to what money can buy and there are many things which are necessary for a man’s happiness and which money cannot procure.
Real happiness is a matter of the right attitude and the capacity of being contented with whatever you have is the most important ingredient of this attitude”.        (SSC CGL 2nd Sit. 2012)

Q. A rich man’s life may become miserable if he: 

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 8

All these three points given in the option are discussed in the passage.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 9

DIRECTIONS : In question, you have two brief passages with questions following each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
“People very often complain that poverty is a great evil and that it is not possible to be happy unless one has a lot of money. Actually, this is not necessarily true. Even a poor man, living in a small hut with none of the comforts and luxuries of life, may be quite contented with his lot and achieve a measure of happiness. On the other hand, a very rich man, living in a palace and enjoying everything that money can buy, may still be miserable, if, for example, he does not enjoy good health or his only son has taken to evil ways. Apart from this, he may have a lot of business worries which keep him on tenterhooks most of the time. There is a limit to what money can buy and there are many things which are necessary for a man’s happiness and which money cannot procure.
Real happiness is a matter of the right attitude and the capacity of being contented with whatever you have is the most important ingredient of this attitude”.        (SSC CGL 2nd Sit. 2012)

Q. Which of the following is the most appropriate title to the passage? 

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 9

‘Contentment, the key of happiness’ suits the best as the title of the passage.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 10

DIRECTIONS : In question, you have two brief passages with questions following each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
“People very often complain that poverty is a great evil and that it is not possible to be happy unless one has a lot of money. Actually, this is not necessarily true. Even a poor man, living in a small hut with none of the comforts and luxuries of life, may be quite contented with his lot and achieve a measure of happiness. On the other hand, a very rich man, living in a palace and enjoying everything that money can buy, may still be miserable, if, for example, he does not enjoy good health or his only son has taken to evil ways. Apart from this, he may have a lot of business worries which keep him on tenterhooks most of the time. There is a limit to what money can buy and there are many things which are necessary for a man’s happiness and which money cannot procure.
Real happiness is a matter of the right attitude and the capacity of being contented with whatever you have is the most important ingredient of this attitude”.        (SSC CGL 2nd Sit. 2012)

Q. Which of the following statement is true? 

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 10

This fact is clearly mentioned in the passage.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 11

DIRECTIONS : In question, you have two brief passages with questions following each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
The problem of water pollution by pesticides can be understood only in context, as part of the whole to which it belongs - the pollution of the total environment of mankind. The pollution entering our waterways comes from many sources, radioactive wastes from reactors, laboratories and hospitals; fallout from nuclear explosions; domestic wastes from cities and towns; chemical wastes from factories. To these is a added a new kind of fallout - the chemical sprays applied to crop lands and gardens, forests and fields. Many of the chemical agents in this alarming melange initiate and augment the harmful effects of radiation, and within the groups of chemicals themselves there are sinister and little - understood interactions, transformations and summations of effect.
Ever since the chemists began to manufacture substances that nature never invented, the problem of water purification have become complex and the danger to users of water has increased. As we have seen, the production of these synthetic chemicals in large volume began in the 1940’s. It has now reached such proportion that an appalling deluge of chemical pollution is daily poured into the nation’s waterways. When inextricably mixed with domestic and other wastes discharged into the same water, these chemicals sometimes defy detection by the methods in ordinary use by purification plants. Most of them are so complex that they cannot be identified. In rivers, a really incredible variety of pollutants combine to produce deposits that sanitary engineers can only despairingly refer to as “gunk”.        (SSC CGL 2nd Sit. 2012)

Q. All the following words mean ‘chemicals’ except: 

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 12

DIRECTIONS : In question, you have two brief passages with questions following each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
The problem of water pollution by pesticides can be understood only in context, as part of the whole to which it belongs - the pollution of the total environment of mankind. The pollution entering our waterways comes from many sources, radioactive wastes from reactors, laboratories and hospitals; fallout from nuclear explosions; domestic wastes from cities and towns; chemical wastes from factories. To these is a added a new kind of fallout - the chemical sprays applied to crop lands and gardens, forests and fields. Many of the chemical agents in this alarming melange initiate and augment the harmful effects of radiation, and within the groups of chemicals themselves there are sinister and little - understood interactions, transformations and summations of effect.
Ever since the chemists began to manufacture substances that nature never invented, the problem of water purification have become complex and the danger to users of water has increased. As we have seen, the production of these synthetic chemicals in large volume began in the 1940’s. It has now reached such proportion that an appalling deluge of chemical pollution is daily poured into the nation’s waterways. When inextricably mixed with domestic and other wastes discharged into the same water, these chemicals sometimes defy detection by the methods in ordinary use by purification plants. Most of them are so complex that they cannot be identified. In rivers, a really incredible variety of pollutants combine to produce deposits that sanitary engineers can only despairingly refer to as “gunk”.        (SSC CGL 2nd Sit. 2012)

Q. The main argument of paragraph 1 is: 

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 13

DIRECTIONS : In question, you have two brief passages with questions following each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
The problem of water pollution by pesticides can be understood only in context, as part of the whole to which it belongs - the pollution of the total environment of mankind. The pollution entering our waterways comes from many sources, radioactive wastes from reactors, laboratories and hospitals; fallout from nuclear explosions; domestic wastes from cities and towns; chemical wastes from factories. To these is a added a new kind of fallout - the chemical sprays applied to crop lands and gardens, forests and fields. Many of the chemical agents in this alarming melange initiate and augment the harmful effects of radiation, and within the groups of chemicals themselves there are sinister and little - understood interactions, transformations and summations of effect.
Ever since the chemists began to manufacture substances that nature never invented, the problem of water purification have become complex and the danger to users of water has increased. As we have seen, the production of these synthetic chemicals in large volume began in the 1940’s. It has now reached such proportion that an appalling deluge of chemical pollution is daily poured into the nation’s waterways. When inextricably mixed with domestic and other wastes discharged into the same water, these chemicals sometimes defy detection by the methods in ordinary use by purification plants. Most of them are so complex that they cannot be identified. In rivers, a really incredible variety of pollutants combine to produce deposits that sanitary engineers can only despairingly refer to as “gunk”.        (SSC CGL 2nd Sit. 2012)

Q. The word ‘gunk’ in the last line refers:

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 14

DIRECTIONS : In question, you have two brief passages with questions following each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
The problem of water pollution by pesticides can be understood only in context, as part of the whole to which it belongs - the pollution of the total environment of mankind. The pollution entering our waterways comes from many sources, radioactive wastes from reactors, laboratories and hospitals; fallout from nuclear explosions; domestic wastes from cities and towns; chemical wastes from factories. To these is a added a new kind of fallout - the chemical sprays applied to crop lands and gardens, forests and fields. Many of the chemical agents in this alarming melange initiate and augment the harmful effects of radiation, and within the groups of chemicals themselves there are sinister and little - understood interactions, transformations and summations of effect.
Ever since the chemists began to manufacture substances that nature never invented, the problem of water purification have become complex and the danger to users of water has increased. As we have seen, the production of these synthetic chemicals in large volume began in the 1940’s. It has now reached such proportion that an appalling deluge of chemical pollution is daily poured into the nation’s waterways. When inextricably mixed with domestic and other wastes discharged into the same water, these chemicals sometimes defy detection by the methods in ordinary use by purification plants. Most of them are so complex that they cannot be identified. In rivers, a really incredible variety of pollutants combine to produce deposits that sanitary engineers can only despairingly refer to as “gunk”.        (SSC CGL 2nd Sit. 2012)

Q. Water pollution can only be understood: 

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 15

DIRECTIONS : In question, you have two brief passages with questions following each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
The problem of water pollution by pesticides can be understood only in context, as part of the whole to which it belongs - the pollution of the total environment of mankind. The pollution entering our waterways comes from many sources, radioactive wastes from reactors, laboratories and hospitals; fallout from nuclear explosions; domestic wastes from cities and towns; chemical wastes from factories. To these is a added a new kind of fallout - the chemical sprays applied to crop lands and gardens, forests and fields. Many of the chemical agents in this alarming melange initiate and augment the harmful effects of radiation, and within the groups of chemicals themselves there are sinister and little - understood interactions, transformations and summations of effect.
Ever since the chemists began to manufacture substances that nature never invented, the problem of water purification have become complex and the danger to users of water has increased. As we have seen, the production of these synthetic chemicals in large volume began in the 1940’s. It has now reached such proportion that an appalling deluge of chemical pollution is daily poured into the nation’s waterways. When inextricably mixed with domestic and other wastes discharged into the same water, these chemicals sometimes defy detection by the methods in ordinary use by purification plants. Most of them are so complex that they cannot be identified. In rivers, a really incredible variety of pollutants combine to produce deposits that sanitary engineers can only despairingly refer to as “gunk”.        (SSC CGL 2nd Sit. 2012)

Q. Water contamination has become serious:

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 16

DIRECTIONS: In questions, you have two brief passages with questions following each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
If an opinion contrary to your own makes you angry, that is a sign that you are subconsciously aware of having no good reason for thinking, as you do. If someone maintains that two and two are five, or that Iceland is on the Equator, you feel pity rather than anger, unless you know so little of arithmetic or geography that his opinion shakes your own contrary conviction.

Q. If someone else's opinion makes us angry, it means that 

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 16

The very first line of the passage reveals that we can become angry on someone’s opinion contrary to ours only when our own opinion is not based on good reason and we are aware of this subconsciously.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 17

DIRECTIONS: In questions, you have two brief passages with questions following each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
If an opinion contrary to your own makes you angry, that is a sign that you are subconsciously aware of having no good reason for thinking, as you do. If someone maintains that two and two are five, or that Iceland is on the Equator, you feel pity rather than anger, unless you know so little of arithmetic or geography that his opinion shakes your own contrary conviction.

Q. "Your own contrary conviction" refers to 

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 17

‘Your own contrary conviction’ refers to the fact that you feel pity rather than anger.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 18

DIRECTIONS: In questions, you have two brief passages with questions following each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
If an opinion contrary to your own makes you angry, that is a sign that you are subconsciously aware of having no good reason for thinking, as you do. If someone maintains that two and two are five, or that Iceland is on the Equator, you feel pity rather than anger, unless you know so little of arithmetic or geography that his opinion shakes your own contrary conviction.

Q. Conviction means 

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 18

Conviction means a firmly held belief or opinion.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 19

DIRECTIONS: In questions, you have two brief passages with questions following each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
If an opinion contrary to your own makes you angry, that is a sign that you are subconsciously aware of having no good reason for thinking, as you do. If someone maintains that two and two are five, or that Iceland is on the Equator, you feel pity rather than anger, unless you know so little of arithmetic or geography that his opinion shakes your own contrary conviction.

Q. The writer says if someone maintains that two and two are five you feel pity because you 

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 19

If someone maintains that two and two are five, you feel pity because you feel sorry for his ignorance of the subject i.e. Arithmetic.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 20

DIRECTIONS: In questions, you have two brief passages with questions following each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
If an opinion contrary to your own makes you angry, that is a sign that you are subconsciously aware of having no good reason for thinking, as you do. If someone maintains that two and two are five, or that Iceland is on the Equator, you feel pity rather than anger, unless you know so little of arithmetic or geography that his opinion shakes your own contrary conviction.

Q. The second sentence in the passage

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 20

The second sentence in the passage elaborates the hidden i.e. the main point in the first sentence.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 21

DIRECTIONS: In questions, you have two brief passages with questions following each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
Two years later, in November 1895, he signed his final will. He left the bulk of his fortune, amounting to about £1,75,000 to a trust fund administered by Swedish and Norwegian trustees. The annual interest shall be awarded as prizes to those persons who during the previous year have rendered the greatest services to mankind.
The interest shall be divided into five equal parts– now amounting to about £8,000 each– one of which shall be awarded to the person who has made the most important discovery or invention in the realm of physics, one to the person who has made the most important chemical discovery or improvement, one to the person who has made the most important physiological or medical discovery, one to the person who has produced the most outstanding work of literature, idealistic in character, and one to the person who has done the best work for the brotherhood of nations, the abolition or reduction of standing armies, as well as for the formation or popularization of peace congress.        (SSC CGL 1st Sit. 2012)

Q. The said prize is awarded

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 21

The prize being discussed in awarded every year. The third line of the passage clearly exhibits this fact.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 22

DIRECTIONS: In questions, you have two brief passages with questions following each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
Two years later, in November 1895, he signed his final will. He left the bulk of his fortune, amounting to about £1,75,000 to a trust fund administered by Swedish and Norwegian trustees. The annual interest shall be awarded as prizes to those persons who during the previous year have rendered the greatest services to mankind.
The interest shall be divided into five equal parts– now amounting to about £8,000 each– one of which shall be awarded to the person who has made the most important discovery or invention in the realm of physics, one to the person who has made the most important chemical discovery or improvement, one to the person who has made the most important physiological or medical discovery, one to the person who has produced the most outstanding work of literature, idealistic in character, and one to the person who has done the best work for the brotherhood of nations, the abolition or reduction of standing armies, as well as for the formation or popularization of peace congress.        (SSC CGL 1st Sit. 2012)

Q. Which is the prize that is referred to in the passage? 

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 22

The passage discusses about the Nobel Prize because every year, it is given in six fields, namely, Physics, Chemistry, Literature, Medicine or Physiology, Peace and Economics.
Magsaysay Award is given for transformative leadership in Asia, Pulitzer Prize is given in the field of journalism and literature and Booker Prize is given to novelists i.e. it is a literary prize.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 23

DIRECTIONS: In questions, you have two brief passages with questions following each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
Two years later, in November 1895, he signed his final will. He left the bulk of his fortune, amounting to about £1,75,000 to a trust fund administered by Swedish and Norwegian trustees. The annual interest shall be awarded as prizes to those persons who during the previous year have rendered the greatest services to mankind.
The interest shall be divided into five equal parts– now amounting to about £8,000 each– one of which shall be awarded to the person who has made the most important discovery or invention in the realm of physics, one to the person who has made the most important chemical discovery or improvement, one to the person who has made the most important physiological or medical discovery, one to the person who has produced the most outstanding work of literature, idealistic in character, and one to the person who has done the best work for the brotherhood of nations, the abolition or reduction of standing armies, as well as for the formation or popularization of peace congress.        (SSC CGL 1st Sit. 2012)

Q. The number of prizes in the field of science are

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 23

Three fields of Science in which Nobel Prize is given are– Physics, Chemistry and Medicine or Physiology. Rest of the fields are non-Science.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 24

DIRECTIONS: In questions, you have two brief passages with questions following each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
Two years later, in November 1895, he signed his final will. He left the bulk of his fortune, amounting to about £1,75,000 to a trust fund administered by Swedish and Norwegian trustees. The annual interest shall be awarded as prizes to those persons who during the previous year have rendered the greatest services to mankind.
The interest shall be divided into five equal parts– now amounting to about £8,000 each– one of which shall be awarded to the person who has made the most important discovery or invention in the realm of physics, one to the person who has made the most important chemical discovery or improvement, one to the person who has made the most important physiological or medical discovery, one to the person who has produced the most outstanding work of literature, idealistic in character, and one to the person who has done the best work for the brotherhood of nations, the abolition or reduction of standing armies, as well as for the formation or popularization of peace congress.        (SSC CGL 1st Sit. 2012)

Q. Total annual prize money amounts to

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 24

The annual prize money amounts to £8000.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 25

DIRECTIONS: In questions, you have two brief passages with questions following each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
Two years later, in November 1895, he signed his final will. He left the bulk of his fortune, amounting to about £1,75,000 to a trust fund administered by Swedish and Norwegian trustees. The annual interest shall be awarded as prizes to those persons who during the previous year have rendered the greatest services to mankind.
The interest shall be divided into five equal parts– now amounting to about £8,000 each– one of which shall be awarded to the person who has made the most important discovery or invention in the realm of physics, one to the person who has made the most important chemical discovery or improvement, one to the person who has made the most important physiological or medical discovery, one to the person who has produced the most outstanding work of literature, idealistic in character, and one to the person who has done the best work for the brotherhood of nations, the abolition or reduction of standing armies, as well as for the formation or popularization of peace congress.        (SSC CGL 1st Sit. 2012)

Q. Prize is awarded for outstanding work in 

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 25

Nobel Prize is awarded in all of the mentioned fields given in the options.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 26

DIRECTIONS: In the following questions, you have one brief passage with questions following the passage. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
In May 1966, The World Health Organisation was authorised to initiate a global campaign to eradicate small pox. The goal was to eradicate the disease in one decade. Because similar projects for malaria and yellow fever had failed, few believed that smallpox could actually be eradicated, but eleven years after the initial organisation of the campaign, no cases were reported in the field.
The strategy was not only to provide mass vaccinations, but also to isolate patients with active small-pox in order to contain the spread of the disease and to break the chain of human transmission. Rewards for reporting small-pox assisted in motivating the public to aid health workers. One by one, each small-pox victim was sought out, removed from contact with others and treated. At the same time, the entire, village where the victim had lived was vaccinated.
Today small pox is no longer a threat to humanity. Routine vaccinations have been stopped worldwide.       (SSC CGL 2nd Sit. 2010)

Q. Which of the following is the best title for the passage? 

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 27

DIRECTIONS: In the following questions, you have one brief passage with questions following the passage. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
In May 1966, The World Health Organisation was authorised to initiate a global campaign to eradicate small pox. The goal was to eradicate the disease in one decade. Because similar projects for malaria and yellow fever had failed, few believed that smallpox could actually be eradicated, but eleven years after the initial organisation of the campaign, no cases were reported in the field.
The strategy was not only to provide mass vaccinations, but also to isolate patients with active small-pox in order to contain the spread of the disease and to break the chain of human transmission. Rewards for reporting small-pox assisted in motivating the public to aid health workers. One by one, each small-pox victim was sought out, removed from contact with others and treated. At the same time, the entire, village where the victim had lived was vaccinated.
Today small pox is no longer a threat to humanity. Routine vaccinations have been stopped worldwide.       (SSC CGL 2nd Sit. 2010)

Q. What was the goal of the campaign against small-pox?

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 28

DIRECTIONS: In the following questions, you have one brief passage with questions following the passage. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
In May 1966, The World Health Organisation was authorised to initiate a global campaign to eradicate small pox. The goal was to eradicate the disease in one decade. Because similar projects for malaria and yellow fever had failed, few believed that smallpox could actually be eradicated, but eleven years after the initial organisation of the campaign, no cases were reported in the field.
The strategy was not only to provide mass vaccinations, but also to isolate patients with active small-pox in order to contain the spread of the disease and to break the chain of human transmission. Rewards for reporting small-pox assisted in motivating the public to aid health workers. One by one, each small-pox victim was sought out, removed from contact with others and treated. At the same time, the entire, village where the victim had lived was vaccinated.
Today small pox is no longer a threat to humanity. Routine vaccinations have been stopped worldwide.       (SSC CGL 2nd Sit. 2010)

Q. According to the paragraph what was the strategy used to eliminate the spread of small-pox? 

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 29

DIRECTIONS: In the following questions, you have one brief passage with questions following the passage. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
In May 1966, The World Health Organisation was authorised to initiate a global campaign to eradicate small pox. The goal was to eradicate the disease in one decade. Because similar projects for malaria and yellow fever had failed, few believed that smallpox could actually be eradicated, but eleven years after the initial organisation of the campaign, no cases were reported in the field.
The strategy was not only to provide mass vaccinations, but also to isolate patients with active small-pox in order to contain the spread of the disease and to break the chain of human transmission. Rewards for reporting small-pox assisted in motivating the public to aid health workers. One by one, each small-pox victim was sought out, removed from contact with others and treated. At the same time, the entire, village where the victim had lived was vaccinated.
Today small pox is no longer a threat to humanity. Routine vaccinations have been stopped worldwide.       (SSC CGL 2nd Sit. 2010)

Q. Which statement doesn't refer to small-pox? 

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 30

DIRECTIONS: In the following questions, you have one brief passage with questions following the passage. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
In May 1966, The World Health Organisation was authorised to initiate a global campaign to eradicate small pox. The goal was to eradicate the disease in one decade. Because similar projects for malaria and yellow fever had failed, few believed that smallpox could actually be eradicated, but eleven years after the initial organisation of the campaign, no cases were reported in the field.
The strategy was not only to provide mass vaccinations, but also to isolate patients with active small-pox in order to contain the spread of the disease and to break the chain of human transmission. Rewards for reporting small-pox assisted in motivating the public to aid health workers. One by one, each small-pox victim was sought out, removed from contact with others and treated. At the same time, the entire, village where the victim had lived was vaccinated.
Today small pox is no longer a threat to humanity. Routine vaccinations have been stopped worldwide.       (SSC CGL 2nd Sit. 2010)

Q. It can be inferred that 

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 31

DIRECTIONS: In the following passage, you have questions following the passage. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
Every profession of trade, every art and every science has its technical vocabulary, the function of which is partly to designate things or processes which have no names in ordinary English and partly to secure greater exactness in nomenclature. Such special dialects or jargons are necessary in technical discussion of any kind. Being universally understood by the devotees of the particular science or art, they have the precision of a mathematical formula.
Besides, they save time, for it is much more economical to name a process than to describe it. Thousands of these technical terms are very properly included in every large dictionary, yet, as a whole, they are rather on the outskirts of the English language than actually within its borders.
Different occupations, however, differ widely in the character of their special vocabularies. In trades and handicrafts and other vocations like farming and fishing that have occupied great numbers of men from remote times, the technical vocabulary is very old. An average man now uses these in his own vocabularly. The special dialects of law, medicine, divinity and philosophy have become familiar to cultivated persons.       (SSC CGL 1st Sit. 2010)

Q. Special words used in technical discussion 

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 31

Special words used in technical discussion have the chances of becoming part of common speech because thousands of such words are included in every large dictionary

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 32

DIRECTIONS: In the following passage, you have questions following the passage. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
Every profession of trade, every art and every science has its technical vocabulary, the function of which is partly to designate things or processes which have no names in ordinary English and partly to secure greater exactness in nomenclature. Such special dialects or jargons are necessary in technical discussion of any kind. Being universally understood by the devotees of the particular science or art, they have the precision of a mathematical formula.
Besides, they save time, for it is much more economical to name a process than to describe it. Thousands of these technical terms are very properly included in every large dictionary, yet, as a whole, they are rather on the outskirts of the English language than actually within its borders.
Different occupations, however, differ widely in the character of their special vocabularies. In trades and handicrafts and other vocations like farming and fishing that have occupied great numbers of men from remote times, the technical vocabulary is very old. An average man now uses these in his own vocabularly. The special dialects of law, medicine, divinity and philosophy have become familiar to cultivated persons.       (SSC CGL 1st Sit. 2010)

Q. The writer of this article is 

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 32

Since, the entire passage deals with words, technical vocabulary and dictionary etc. therefore, it can be concluded that the writer of this passage is a linguist.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 33

DIRECTIONS: In the following passage, you have questions following the passage. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
Every profession of trade, every art and every science has its technical vocabulary, the function of which is partly to designate things or processes which have no names in ordinary English and partly to secure greater exactness in nomenclature. Such special dialects or jargons are necessary in technical discussion of any kind. Being universally understood by the devotees of the particular science or art, they have the precision of a mathematical formula.
Besides, they save time, for it is much more economical to name a process than to describe it. Thousands of these technical terms are very properly included in every large dictionary, yet, as a whole, they are rather on the outskirts of the English language than actually within its borders.
Different occupations, however, differ widely in the character of their special vocabularies. In trades and handicrafts and other vocations like farming and fishing that have occupied great numbers of men from remote times, the technical vocabulary is very old. An average man now uses these in his own vocabularly. The special dialects of law, medicine, divinity and philosophy have become familiar to cultivated persons.       (SSC CGL 1st Sit. 2010)

Q. This passage is primarily concerned with

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 33

The passage primarily discusses technical terminology.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 34

DIRECTIONS: In the following passage, you have questions following the passage. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
Every profession of trade, every art and every science has its technical vocabulary, the function of which is partly to designate things or processes which have no names in ordinary English and partly to secure greater exactness in nomenclature. Such special dialects or jargons are necessary in technical discussion of any kind. Being universally understood by the devotees of the particular science or art, they have the precision of a mathematical formula.
Besides, they save time, for it is much more economical to name a process than to describe it. Thousands of these technical terms are very properly included in every large dictionary, yet, as a whole, they are rather on the outskirts of the English language than actually within its borders.
Different occupations, however, differ widely in the character of their special vocabularies. In trades and handicrafts and other vocations like farming and fishing that have occupied great numbers of men from remote times, the technical vocabulary is very old. An average man now uses these in his own vocabularly. The special dialects of law, medicine, divinity and philosophy have become familiar to cultivated persons.       (SSC CGL 1st Sit. 2010)

Q. It is true that 

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 34

The average man often uses in his own vocabulary what was once technical language not meant for him.

SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 35

DIRECTIONS: In the following passage, you have questions following the passage. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
Every profession of trade, every art and every science has its technical vocabulary, the function of which is partly to designate things or processes which have no names in ordinary English and partly to secure greater exactness in nomenclature. Such special dialects or jargons are necessary in technical discussion of any kind. Being universally understood by the devotees of the particular science or art, they have the precision of a mathematical formula.
Besides, they save time, for it is much more economical to name a process than to describe it. Thousands of these technical terms are very properly included in every large dictionary, yet, as a whole, they are rather on the outskirts of the English language than actually within its borders.
Different occupations, however, differ widely in the character of their special vocabularies. In trades and handicrafts and other vocations like farming and fishing that have occupied great numbers of men from remote times, the technical vocabulary is very old. An average man now uses these in his own vocabularly. The special dialects of law, medicine, divinity and philosophy have become familiar to cultivated persons.       (SSC CGL 1st Sit. 2010)

Q. In recent years, there has been a marked increase in the number of technical terms in the nomenclature of

Detailed Solution for SSC CGL Previous Year Questions: Reading Comprehension - 9 - Question 35

The last line of the passage reveals the increase in the number of technical terms in the nomenclature of government.

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