CLAT - Past Year Paper 2008


190 Questions MCQ Test CLAT Past Year Papers (2008-2019) | CLAT - Past Year Paper 2008


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This mock test of CLAT - Past Year Paper 2008 for CLAT helps you for every CLAT entrance exam. This contains 190 Multiple Choice Questions for CLAT CLAT - Past Year Paper 2008 (mcq) to study with solutions a complete question bank. The solved questions answers in this CLAT - Past Year Paper 2008 quiz give you a good mix of easy questions and tough questions. CLAT students definitely take this CLAT - Past Year Paper 2008 exercise for a better result in the exam. You can find other CLAT - Past Year Paper 2008 extra questions, long questions & short questions for CLAT on EduRev as well by searching above.
QUESTION: 1

Direction : (Q. No. 1 - 10) Read the given passage carefully and attempt the questions  Marks: Each question carries 1 (one) mark. 

MY LOVE OF NATURE, goes right back to my childhood, to the times when I stayed on,  my grandparents' farm in  Suffolk. My father  was in the  armed forces, so we were always moving and didn't have a home base for any length of time, but I loved going there. I think it was my grandmother who encouraged me more than anyone:  she taught  me the names of wild  flowers and got me interested  in looking  at the countryside,  so it seemed  obvious  to go  on to do Zoology at University.

I didn't get  my first camera until after I'd graduated, when I was due to go diving in Norway and needed a method of recording the sea creatures I would find there. My father didn't know anything about photography, but he bought me an Exacta, which was really quite a good camera for the time, and I went off to take my first pictures of sea anemones and starfish. I became keen very quickly, and learned how to develop and print; obviously I didn't have much money in those days, so I did more black and white photography than colour, but it was all still using the camera very much as a tool to record what I found both by diving and on the shore. I had no ambition at all to be a photographer then, or even for some years afterwards.
Unlike many of the wildlife photographers of the time, I trained as a scientist and therefore my way of expressing myself is very different. I've tried from the beginning to produce pictures which are -always biologically correct. There are people who will alter things deliberately: you don't pick up sea creatures from the middle of the shore and take them down to attractive pools at the bottom of the shore without knowing you're doing it. In so doing you're actually falsifying the sort of seaweeds they live on and so on, which may seem unimportant, but it is actually  changing the natural surroundings to make   them   prettier. Unfortunately, many of the people who select pictures are looking for attractive images  and,  at the end  of the day, whether it's truthful or  not doesn't really matter to them.

It's important to think about the animal first, and there are many occasions when I've  not taken a picture because  it would have been too  disturbing. Nothing is so important that you have to get that shot; of course, there are cases when it would be very sad if you didn't, but it's not the end of the world. There can be a lot of ignorance in people's behaviour towards wild animals and it's a problem that more and more people are going to wild  places: while some animals may get used to cars, they won't get used to people suddenly rushing up to them. The sheer pressure of people, coupled with the fact that there are increasingly fewer places where no-one else has photographed, means that over the years, life has become much more difficult for the professional wildlife photographer. 
Nevertheless, wildlife photographs play a very important  part in educating people   about what is   out there   and what needs conserving.   Although photography can be an enjoyable pastime, as it is to many people, it is also something that plays a very important part in educating young and old alike. Of the qualities it takes to make a good wildlife photographer, patience is perhaps the most obvious - you just have to be prepared to sit it out. I'm actually more patient now because I write more than ever before, and as long as I've got a bit of paper and a pencil, I don't feel I'm wasting my  time.  And because I photograph such a wide range of things, even if the main target doesn't appear I can probably find something else to concentrate on instead.

Q. The writer decided to go to university and study Zoology because

Solution:
QUESTION: 2

MY LOVE OF NATURE, goes right back to my childhood, to the times when I stayed on,  my grandparents' farm in  Suffolk. My father  was in the  armed forces, so we were always moving and didn't have a home base for any length of time, but I loved going there. I think it was my grandmother who encouraged me more than anyone:  she taught  me the names of wild  flowers and got me interested  in looking  at the countryside,  so it seemed  obvious  to go  on to do Zoology at University.

I didn't get  my first camera until after I'd graduated, when I was due to go diving in Norway and needed a method of recording the sea creatures I would find there. My father didn't know anything about photography, but he bought me an Exacta, which was really quite a good camera for the time, and I went off to take my first pictures of sea anemones and starfish. I became keen very quickly, and learned how to develop and print; obviously I didn't have much money in those days, so I did more black and white photography than colour, but it was all still using the camera very much as a tool to record what I found both by diving and on the shore. I had no ambition at all to be a photographer then, or even for some years afterwards. Unlike many of the wildlife photographers of the time, I trained as a scientist and therefore my way of expressing myself is very different. I've tried from the beginning to produce pictures which are -always biologically correct. There are people who will alter things deliberately: you don't pick up sea creatures from the middle of the shore and take them down to attractive pools at the bottom of the shore without knowing you're doing it. In so doing you're actually falsifying the sort of seaweeds they live on and so on, which may seem unimportant, but it is actually  changing the natural surroundings to make   them   prettier. Unfortunately, many of the people who select pictures are looking for attractive images  and,  at the end  of the day, whether it's truthful or  not doesn't really matter to them.

It's important to think about the animal first, and there are many occasions when I've  not taken a picture because  it would have been too  disturbing. Nothing is so important that you have to get that shot; of course, there are cases when it would be very sad if you didn't, but it's not the end of the world. There can be a lot of ignorance in people's behaviour towards wild animals and it's a problem that more and more people are going to wild  places: while some animals may get used to cars, they won't get used to people suddenly rushing up to them. The sheer pressure of people, coupled with the fact that there are increasingly fewer places where no-one else has photographed, means that over the years, life has become much more difficult for the professional wildlife photographer. 
Nevertheless, wildlife photographs play a very important  part in educating people   about what is   out there   and what needs conserving.   Although photography can be an enjoyable pastime, as it is to many people, it is also something that plays a very important part in educating young and old alike. Of the qualities it takes to make a good wildlife photographer, patience is perhaps the most obvious - you just have to be prepared to sit it out. I'm actually more patient now because I write more than ever before, and as long as I've got a bit of paper and a pencil, I don't feel I'm wasting my  time.  And because I photograph such a wide range of things, even if the main target doesn't appear I can probably find something else to concentrate on instead.

Q. Why did she get her first camera ?  

Solution:
QUESTION: 3

MY LOVE OF NATURE, goes right back to my childhood, to the times when I stayed on,  my grandparents' farm in  Suffolk. My father  was in the  armed forces, so we were always moving and didn't have a home base for any length of time, but I loved going there. I think it was my grandmother who encouraged me more than anyone:  she taught  me the names of wild  flowers and got me interested  in looking  at the countryside,  so it seemed  obvious  to go  on to do Zoology at University.

I didn't get  my first camera until after I'd graduated, when I was due to go diving in Norway and needed a method of recording the sea creatures I would find there. My father didn't know anything about photography, but he bought me an Exacta, which was really quite a good camera for the time, and I went off to take my first pictures of sea anemones and starfish. I became keen very quickly, and learned how to develop and print; obviously I didn't have much money in those days, so I did more black and white photography than colour, but it was all still using the camera very much as a tool to record what I found both by diving and on the shore. I had no ambition at all to be a photographer then, or even for some years afterwards. Unlike many of the wildlife photographers of the time, I trained as a scientist and therefore my way of expressing myself is very different. I've tried from the beginning to produce pictures which are -always biologically correct. There are people who will alter things deliberately: you don't pick up sea creatures from the middle of the shore and take them down to attractive pools at the bottom of the shore without knowing you're doing it. In so doing you're actually falsifying the sort of seaweeds they live on and so on, which may seem unimportant, but it is actually  changing the natural surroundings to make   them   prettier. Unfortunately, many of the people who select pictures are looking for attractive images  and,  at the end  of the day, whether it's truthful or  not doesn't really matter to them.

It's important to think about the animal first, and there are many occasions when I've  not taken a picture because  it would have been too  disturbing. Nothing is so important that you have to get that shot; of course, there are cases when it would be very sad if you didn't, but it's not the end of the world. There can be a lot of ignorance in people's behaviour towards wild animals and it's a problem that more and more people are going to wild  places: while some animals may get used to cars, they won't get used to people suddenly rushing up to them. The sheer pressure of people, coupled with the fact that there are increasingly fewer places where no-one else has photographed, means that over the years, life has become much more difficult for the professional wildlife photographer. 
Nevertheless, wildlife photographs play a very important  part in educating people   about what is   out there   and what needs conserving.   Although photography can be an enjoyable pastime, as it is to many people, it is also something that plays a very important part in educating young and old alike. Of the qualities it takes to make a good wildlife photographer, patience is perhaps the most obvious - you just have to be prepared to sit it out. I'm actually more patient now because I write more than ever before, and as long as I've got a bit of paper and a pencil, I don't feel I'm wasting my  time.  And because I photograph such a wide range of things, even if the main target doesn't appear I can probably find something else to concentrate on instead.

Q. She did more black and white photography than colour because 

Solution:
QUESTION: 4

MY LOVE OF NATURE, goes right back to my childhood, to the times when I stayed on,  my grandparents' farm in  Suffolk. My father  was in the  armed forces, so we were always moving and didn't have a home base for any length of time, but I loved going there. I think it was my grandmother who encouraged me more than anyone:  she taught  me the names of wild  flowers and got me interested  in looking  at the countryside,  so it seemed  obvious  to go  on to do Zoology at University.

I didn't get  my first camera until after I'd graduated, when I was due to go diving in Norway and needed a method of recording the sea creatures I would find there. My father didn't know anything about photography, but he bought me an Exacta, which was really quite a good camera for the time, and I went off to take my first pictures of sea anemones and starfish. I became keen very quickly, and learned how to develop and print; obviously I didn't have much money in those days, so I did more black and white photography than colour, but it was all still using the camera very much as a tool to record what I found both by diving and on the shore. I had no ambition at all to be a photographer then, or even for some years afterwards. Unlike many of the wildlife photographers of the time, I trained as a scientist and therefore my way of expressing myself is very different. I've tried from the beginning to produce pictures which are -always biologically correct. There are people who will alter things deliberately: you don't pick up sea creatures from the middle of the shore and take them down to attractive pools at the bottom of the shore without knowing you're doing it. In so doing you're actually falsifying the sort of seaweeds they live on and so on, which may seem unimportant, but it is actually  changing the natural surroundings to make   them   prettier. Unfortunately, many of the people who select pictures are looking for attractive images  and,  at the end  of the day, whether it's truthful or  not doesn't really matter to them.

It's important to think about the animal first, and there are many occasions when I've  not taken a picture because  it would have been too  disturbing. Nothing is so important that you have to get that shot; of course, there are cases when it would be very sad if you didn't, but it's not the end of the world. There can be a lot of ignorance in people's behaviour towards wild animals and it's a problem that more and more people are going to wild  places: while some animals may get used to cars, they won't get used to people suddenly rushing up to them. The sheer pressure of people, coupled with the fact that there are increasingly fewer places where no-one else has photographed, means that over the years, life has become much more difficult for the professional wildlife photographer. 
Nevertheless, wildlife photographs play a very important  part in educating people   about what is   out there   and what needs conserving.   Although photography can be an enjoyable pastime, as it is to many people, it is also something that plays a very important part in educating young and old alike. Of the qualities it takes to make a good wildlife photographer, patience is perhaps the most obvious - you just have to be prepared to sit it out. I'm actually more patient now because I write more than ever before, and as long as I've got a bit of paper and a pencil, I don't feel I'm wasting my  time.  And because I photograph such a wide range of things, even if the main target doesn't appear I can probably find something else to concentrate on instead.

Q. How is she different from some of the other wildlife photographers she meets ? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 5

MY LOVE OF NATURE, goes right back to my childhood, to the times when I stayed on,  my grandparents' farm in  Suffolk. My father  was in the  armed forces, so we were always moving and didn't have a home base for any length of time, but I loved going there. I think it was my grandmother who encouraged me more than anyone:  she taught  me the names of wild  flowers and got me interested  in looking  at the countryside,  so it seemed  obvious  to go  on to do Zoology at University.

I didn't get  my first camera until after I'd graduated, when I was due to go diving in Norway and needed a method of recording the sea creatures I would find there. My father didn't know anything about photography, but he bought me an Exacta, which was really quite a good camera for the time, and I went off to take my first pictures of sea anemones and starfish. I became keen very quickly, and learned how to develop and print; obviously I didn't have much money in those days, so I did more black and white photography than colour, but it was all still using the camera very much as a tool to record what I found both by diving and on the shore. I had no ambition at all to be a photographer then, or even for some years afterwards. Unlike many of the wildlife photographers of the time, I trained as a scientist and therefore my way of expressing myself is very different. I've tried from the beginning to produce pictures which are -always biologically correct. There are people who will alter things deliberately: you don't pick up sea creatures from the middle of the shore and take them down to attractive pools at the bottom of the shore without knowing you're doing it. In so doing you're actually falsifying the sort of seaweeds they live on and so on, which may seem unimportant, but it is actually  changing the natural surroundings to make   them   prettier. Unfortunately, many of the people who select pictures are looking for attractive images  and,  at the end  of the day, whether it's truthful or  not doesn't really matter to them.

It's important to think about the animal first, and there are many occasions when I've  not taken a picture because  it would have been too  disturbing. Nothing is so important that you have to get that shot; of course, there are cases when it would be very sad if you didn't, but it's not the end of the world. There can be a lot of ignorance in people's behaviour towards wild animals and it's a problem that more and more people are going to wild  places: while some animals may get used to cars, they won't get used to people suddenly rushing up to them. The sheer pressure of people, coupled with the fact that there are increasingly fewer places where no-one else has photographed, means that over the years, life has become much more difficult for the professional wildlife photographer. 
Nevertheless, wildlife photographs play a very important  part in educating people   about what is   out there   and what needs conserving.   Although photography can be an enjoyable pastime, as it is to many people, it is also something that plays a very important part in educating young and old alike. Of the qualities it takes to make a good wildlife photographer, patience is perhaps the most obvious - you just have to be prepared to sit it out. I'm actually more patient now because I write more than ever before, and as long as I've got a bit of paper and a pencil, I don't feel I'm wasting my  time.  And because I photograph such a wide range of things, even if the main target doesn't appear I can probably find something else to concentrate on instead.
Q. Which does 'them' refer to in the 7"' line in paragraph 3?

Solution:
QUESTION: 6

MY LOVE OF NATURE, goes right back to my childhood, to the times when I stayed on,  my grandparents' farm in  Suffolk. My father  was in the  armed forces, so we were always moving and didn't have a home base for any length of time, but I loved going there. I think it was my grandmother who encouraged me more than anyone:  she taught  me the names of wild  flowers and got me interested  in looking  at the countryside,  so it seemed  obvious  to go  on to do Zoology at University.

I didn't get  my first camera until after I'd graduated, when I was due to go diving in Norway and needed a method of recording the sea creatures I would find there. My father didn't know anything about photography, but he bought me an Exacta, which was really quite a good camera for the time, and I went off to take my first pictures of sea anemones and starfish. I became keen very quickly, and learned how to develop and print; obviously I didn't have much money in those days, so I did more black and white photography than colour, but it was all still using the camera very much as a tool to record what I found both by diving and on the shore. I had no ambition at all to be a photographer then, or even for some years afterwards. Unlike many of the wildlife photographers of the time, I trained as a scientist and therefore my way of expressing myself is very different. I've tried from the beginning to produce pictures which are -always biologically correct. There are people who will alter things deliberately: you don't pick up sea creatures from the middle of the shore and take them down to attractive pools at the bottom of the shore without knowing you're doing it. In so doing you're actually falsifying the sort of seaweeds they live on and so on, which may seem unimportant, but it is actually  changing the natural surroundings to make   them   prettier. Unfortunately, many of the people who select pictures are looking for attractive images  and,  at the end  of the day, whether it's truthful or  not doesn't really matter to them.

It's important to think about the animal first, and there are many occasions when I've  not taken a picture because  it would have been too  disturbing. Nothing is so important that you have to get that shot; of course, there are cases when it would be very sad if you didn't, but it's not the end of the world. There can be a lot of ignorance in people's behaviour towards wild animals and it's a problem that more and more people are going to wild  places: while some animals may get used to cars, they won't get used to people suddenly rushing up to them. The sheer pressure of people, coupled with the fact that there are increasingly fewer places where no-one else has photographed, means that over the years, life has become much more difficult for the professional wildlife photographer. 
Nevertheless, wildlife photographs play a very important  part in educating people   about what is   out there   and what needs conserving.   Although photography can be an enjoyable pastime, as it is to many people, it is also something that plays a very important part in educating young and old alike. Of the qualities it takes to make a good wildlife photographer, patience is perhaps the most obvious - you just have to be prepared to sit it out. I'm actually more patient now because I write more than ever before, and as long as I've got a bit of paper and a pencil, I don't feel I'm wasting my  time.  And because I photograph such a wide range of things, even if the main target doesn't appear I can probably find something else to concentrate on instead.

Q. What the writer means by 'ignorance in people's behaviour' is 

Solution:
QUESTION: 7

MY LOVE OF NATURE, goes right back to my childhood, to the times when I stayed on,  my grandparents' farm in  Suffolk. My father  was in the  armed forces, so we were always moving and didn't have a home base for any length of time, but I loved going there. I think it was my grandmother who encouraged me more than anyone:  she taught  me the names of wild  flowers and got me interested  in looking  at the countryside,  so it seemed  obvious  to go  on to do Zoology at University.

I didn't get  my first camera until after I'd graduated, when I was due to go diving in Norway and needed a method of recording the sea creatures I would find there. My father didn't know anything about photography, but he bought me an Exacta, which was really quite a good camera for the time, and I went off to take my first pictures of sea anemones and starfish. I became keen very quickly, and learned how to develop and print; obviously I didn't have much money in those days, so I did more black and white photography than colour, but it was all still using the camera very much as a tool to record what I found both by diving and on the shore. I had no ambition at all to be a photographer then, or even for some years afterwards. Unlike many of the wildlife photographers of the time, I trained as a scientist and therefore my way of expressing myself is very different. I've tried from the beginning to produce pictures which are -always biologically correct. There are people who will alter things deliberately: you don't pick up sea creatures from the middle of the shore and take them down to attractive pools at the bottom of the shore without knowing you're doing it. In so doing you're actually falsifying the sort of seaweeds they live on and so on, which may seem unimportant, but it is actually  changing the natural surroundings to make   them   prettier. Unfortunately, many of the people who select pictures are looking for attractive images  and,  at the end  of the day, whether it's truthful or  not doesn't really matter to them.

It's important to think about the animal first, and there are many occasions when I've  not taken a picture because  it would have been too  disturbing. Nothing is so important that you have to get that shot; of course, there are cases when it would be very sad if you didn't, but it's not the end of the world. There can be a lot of ignorance in people's behaviour towards wild animals and it's a problem that more and more people are going to wild  places: while some animals may get used to cars, they won't get used to people suddenly rushing up to them. The sheer pressure of people, coupled with the fact that there are increasingly fewer places where no-one else has photographed, means that over the years, life has become much more difficult for the professional wildlife photographer. 
Nevertheless, wildlife photographs play a very important  part in educating people   about what is   out there   and what needs conserving.   Although photography can be an enjoyable pastime, as it is to many people, it is also something that plays a very important part in educating young and old alike. Of the qualities it takes to make a good wildlife photographer, patience is perhaps the most obvious - you just have to be prepared to sit it out. I'm actually more patient now because I write more than ever before, and as long as I've got a bit of paper and a pencil, I don't feel I'm wasting my  time.  And because I photograph such a wide range of things, even if the main target doesn't appear I can probably find something else to concentrate on instead.
Q. The writer now finds it more difficult to photograph wild animals because

Solution:
QUESTION: 8

MY LOVE OF NATURE, goes right back to my childhood, to the times when I stayed on,  my grandparents' farm in  Suffolk. My father  was in the  armed forces, so we were always moving and didn't have a home base for any length of time, but I loved going there. I think it was my grandmother who encouraged me more than anyone:  she taught  me the names of wild  flowers and got me interested  in looking  at the countryside,  so it seemed  obvious  to go  on to do Zoology at University.

I didn't get  my first camera until after I'd graduated, when I was due to go diving in Norway and needed a method of recording the sea creatures I would find there. My father didn't know anything about photography, but he bought me an Exacta, which was really quite a good camera for the time, and I went off to take my first pictures of sea anemones and starfish. I became keen very quickly, and learned how to develop and print; obviously I didn't have much money in those days, so I did more black and white photography than colour, but it was all still using the camera very much as a tool to record what I found both by diving and on the shore. I had no ambition at all to be a photographer then, or even for some years afterwards. Unlike many of the wildlife photographers of the time, I trained as a scientist and therefore my way of expressing myself is very different. I've tried from the beginning to produce pictures which are -always biologically correct. There are people who will alter things deliberately: you don't pick up sea creatures from the middle of the shore and take them down to attractive pools at the bottom of the shore without knowing you're doing it. In so doing you're actually falsifying the sort of seaweeds they live on and so on, which may seem unimportant, but it is actually  changing the natural surroundings to make   them   prettier. Unfortunately, many of the people who select pictures are looking for attractive images  and,  at the end  of the day, whether it's truthful or  not doesn't really matter to them.

t's important to think about the animal first, and there are many occasions when I've  not taken a picture because  it would have been too  disturbing. Nothing is so important that you have to get that shot; of course, there are cases when it would be very sad if you didn't, but it's not the end of the world. There can be a lot of ignorance in people's behaviour towards wild animals and it's a problem that more and more people are going to wild  places: while some animals may get used to cars, they won't get used to people suddenly rushing up to them. The sheer pressure of people, coupled with the fact that there are increasingly fewer places where no-one else has photographed, means that over the years, life has become much more difficult for the professional wildlife photographer. 
Nevertheless, wildlife photographs play a very important  part in educating people   about what is   out there   and what needs conserving.   Although photography can be an enjoyable pastime, as it is to many people, it is also something that plays a very important part in educating young and old alike. Of the qualities it takes to make a good wildlife photographer, patience is perhaps the most obvious - you just have to be prepared to sit it out. I'm actually more patient now because I write more than ever before, and as long as I've got a bit of paper and a pencil, I don't feel I'm wasting my  time.  And because I photograph such a wide range of things, even if the main target doesn't appear I can probably find something else to concentrate on instead.

Q. Wildlife  photography  is important because  it  can  make people realise that 

Solution:
QUESTION: 9

MY LOVE OF NATURE, goes right back to my childhood, to the times when I stayed on,  my grandparents' farm in  Suffolk. My father  was in the  armed forces, so we were always moving and didn't have a home base for any length of time, but I loved going there. I think it was my grandmother who encouraged me more than anyone:  she taught  me the names of wild  flowers and got me interested  in looking  at the countryside,  so it seemed  obvious  to go  on to do Zoology at University.

I didn't get  my first camera until after I'd graduated, when I was due to go diving in Norway and needed a method of recording the sea creatures I would find there. My father didn't know anything about photography, but he bought me an Exacta, which was really quite a good camera for the time, and I went off to take my first pictures of sea anemones and starfish. I became keen very quickly, and learned how to develop and print; obviously I didn't have much money in those days, so I did more black and white photography than colour, but it was all still using the camera very much as a tool to record what I found both by diving and on the shore. I had no ambition at all to be a photographer then, or even for some years afterwards. Unlike many of the wildlife photographers of the time, I trained as a scientist and therefore my way of expressing myself is very different. I've tried from the beginning to produce pictures which are -always biologically correct. There are people who will alter things deliberately: you don't pick up sea creatures from the middle of the shore and take them down to attractive pools at the bottom of the shore without knowing you're doing it. In so doing you're actually falsifying the sort of seaweeds they live on and so on, which may seem unimportant, but it is actually  changing the natural surroundings to make   them   prettier. Unfortunately, many of the people who select pictures are looking for attractive images  and,  at the end  of the day, whether it's truthful or  not doesn't really matter to them.

It's important to think about the animal first, and there are many occasions when I've  not taken a picture because  it would have been too  disturbing. Nothing is so important that you have to get that shot; of course, there are cases when it would be very sad if you didn't, but it's not the end of the world. There can be a lot of ignorance in people's behaviour towards wild animals and it's a problem that more and more people are going to wild  places: while some animals may get used to cars, they won't get used to people suddenly rushing up to them. The sheer pressure of people, coupled with the fact that there are increasingly fewer places where no-one else has photographed, means that over the years, life has become much more difficult for the professional wildlife photographer. 
Nevertheless, wildlife photographs play a very important  part in educating people   about what is   out there   and what needs conserving.  Although photography can be an enjoyable pastime, as it is to many people, it is also something that plays a very important part in educating young and old alike. Of the qualities it takes to make a good wildlife photographer, patience is perhaps the most obvious - you just have to be prepared to sit it out. I'm actually more patient now because I write more than ever before, and as long as I've got a bit of paper and a pencil, I don't feel I'm wasting my  time.  And because I photograph such a wide range of things, even if the main target doesn't appear I can probably find something else to concentrate on instead.

Q. Why is she more patient now ?   

Solution:
QUESTION: 10

MY LOVE OF NATURE, goes right back to my childhood, to the times when I stayed on,  my grandparents' farm in  Suffolk. My father  was in the  armed forces, so we were always moving and didn't have a home base for any length of time, but I loved going there. I think it was my grandmother who encouraged me more than anyone:  she taught  me the names of wild  flowers and got me interested  in looking  at the countryside,  so it seemed  obvious  to go  on to do Zoology at University.

I didn't get  my first camera until after I'd graduated, when I was due to go diving in Norway and needed a method of recording the sea creatures I would find there. My father didn't know anything about photography, but he bought me an Exacta, which was really quite a good camera for the time, and I went off to take my first pictures of sea anemones and starfish. I became keen very quickly, and learned how to develop and print; obviously I didn't have much money in those days, so I did more black and white photography than colour, but it was all still using the camera very much as a tool to record what I found both by diving and on the shore. I had no ambition at all to be a photographer then, or even for some years afterwards. Unlike many of the wildlife photographers of the time, I trained as a scientist and therefore my way of expressing myself is very different. I've tried from the beginning to produce pictures which are -always biologically correct. There are people who will alter things deliberately: you don't pick up sea creatures from the middle of the shore and take them down to attractive pools at the bottom of the shore without knowing you're doing it. In so doing you're actually falsifying the sort of seaweeds they live on and so on, which may seem unimportant, but it is actually  changing the natural surroundings to make   them   prettier. Unfortunately, many of the people who select pictures are looking for attractive images  and,  at the end  of the day, whether it's truthful or  not doesn't really matter to them.

It's important to think about the animal first, and there are many occasions when I've  not taken a picture because  it would have been too  disturbing. Nothing is so important that you have to get that shot; of course, there are cases when it would be very sad if you didn't, but it's not the end of the world. There can be a lot of ignorance in people's behaviour towards wild animals and it's a problem that more and more people are going to wild  places: while some animals may get used to cars, they won't get used to people suddenly rushing up to them. The sheer pressure of people, coupled with the fact that there are increasingly fewer places where no-one else has photographed, means that over the years, life has become much more difficult for the professional wildlife photographer. 
Nevertheless, wildlife photographs play a very important  part in educating people   about what is   out there   and what needs conserving.   Although photography can be an enjoyable pastime, as it is to many people, it is also something that plays a very important part in educating young and old alike. Of the qualities it takes to make a good wildlife photographer, patience is perhaps the most obvious - you just have to be prepared to sit it out. I'm actually more patient now because I write more than ever before, and as long as I've got a bit of paper and a pencil, I don't feel I'm wasting my  time.  And because I photograph such a wide range of things, even if the main target doesn't appear I can probably find something else to concentrate on instead.

 

Q. which of the following describes the writer?   

Solution:
QUESTION: 11

Three of the four words given below are spelt wrongly. Select the word that is spelt correctly

Solution:
QUESTION: 12

Three of the four words given below are spelt wrongly. Select the word that is spelt correctly.

Solution:
QUESTION: 13

Three of the four words given below are spelt wrongly. Select the word that is spelt correctly.

Solution:
QUESTION: 14

Three of the four words given below are spelt wrongly. Select the word that is spelt correctly.

Solution:
QUESTION: 15

Three of the four words given below are spelt wrongly. Select the word that is spelt correctly.

Solution:
QUESTION: 16

Select the best option from the four alternatives given.  (For Question 16 to 25)

They live on a busy road……………….. a lot of noise from the traffic. 

Solution: We would use 'There must be' because we are talking of a place and it talks of an inanimate object.
QUESTION: 17

The more electricity you use,………………………… 

Solution:
QUESTION: 18

Ben likes walking…………………………..

Solution:
QUESTION: 19

It's two years……………Sophy 

Solution:
QUESTION: 20

What was the problem ? Why………………..leave early ?  

Solution:
QUESTION: 21

Nobody believed Arun at first, but he…………. to be right. 

Solution:
QUESTION: 22

We can't……………     making a decision. We have to decide now.  

Solution:
QUESTION: 23

The accident was my fault, so I had to pay for the damage…...the other bar. 

Solution:
QUESTION: 24

I really object people smoking in my house. 

Solution:
QUESTION: 25

 contract  may  be…………if  the  court   finds  there   has   been misinterpretation of the facts.'   

Solution:
QUESTION: 26

(For Question 26 to 30)

The five paragraphs given below have all had their constituent sentences jumbled.

UNIT I
i) The Supertag scanner could revolutionise the way people  shop, virtually eradicating supermarket queues;
ii) The face of retailing will change even more rapidly when the fibre optic networks being built by cable TV companies begin to be more widely used;
iii) The  scanner would  have  a double benefit  for  supermarkets   - removing   the bottleneck   which   causes   frustration  to most customers and reducing the number of checkout staff;
iv) An  electronic scanner which  can  read the  entire  contents  of a supermarket trolley at a glance has just been developed.
The best sequence is: 

Solution:
QUESTION: 27

UNIT II
i) Of   course,   modern   postal  services  now   are   much   more sophisticated and faster, relying as they do on motor vehicles and planes for delivery.
ii) Indeed,  the ancient  Egyptians  had a system  for sending  letters from about 2000 BC, as did the Zhou dynasty in China a thousand years later.
iii) Letters,  were,  and  are, sent by some form of postal  service,  the history of which goes back a long way.
iv) For centuries,  the only form of written correspondence was the letter.
The best sequence is: 

Solution:
QUESTION: 28

UNIT III

i) Converting  money into several currencies in the course  of one trip can also be quite expensive, given that banks and bureaux de change charge commission on the transaction. 
ii) Trying to work out the value of the various notes and .coins can be quite a strain, particularly if you are visiting more than one country.
iii) Travel can be very exciting, but it can also be rather complicated.
iv) One of these complications is, undoubtedly, foreign currency.
The best sequence is:   

Solution:
QUESTION: 29

UNIT IV
i) She  was  right  about  three-curiosity, freckles,   and   doubt-but wrong about love.

ii) "Four of the things I'd be better without: Love, curiosity, freckles,and doubt".

iii) Love is indispensable in life.

iv) So wrote Dorothy Parker, the American writer.
The best sequence is: 

Solution:
QUESTION: 30

UNIT V
i) This  clearly  indicates  that the brains of  men  and  women  are organised differently in the way they process speech.

ii) Difference  in  the way men and women process  language  is  of special interest to brain researchers.

iii) However,  women  are  more likely than men  to  suffer  aphasia when the front part of the brain is damaged.
iv) It has been known that aphasia  - a kind of speech  disorder  -  is more common in men than in women when the left side of the brain is damaged in an accident or after a stroke. The best sequence is: 

Solution:
QUESTION: 31

(For Question 31 to 35)

Given below are the list of words followed by some choices. choose the alternative that you can combine with every word in that list to form a familiar word pharase

Down, aside, about, forth 

Solution:
QUESTION: 32

Given below are the list of words followed by some choices. choose the alternative that you can combine with every word in that list to form a familiar word pharase
Over, about, after, at 

Solution:
QUESTION: 33

Given below are the list of words followed by some choices. choose the alternative that you can combine with every word in that list to form a familiar word pharase

Forward, across, around, upon 

Solution:
QUESTION: 34

Given below are the list of words followed by some choices. choose the alternative that you can combine with every word in that list to form a familiar word pharase

In, down, for, out 

Solution:
QUESTION: 35

Given below are the list of words followed by some choices. choose the alternative that you can combine with every word in that list to form a familiar word pharase

Away, through, up, down 

Solution:
QUESTION: 36

(For Question 36 to 40).

Given below are a few  foreign language phrases that  are commonly used.

Prima facie

Solution:
QUESTION: 37

 Sine die

Solution:
QUESTION: 38

Bona fide

Solution:
QUESTION: 39

Status quo

Solution:
QUESTION: 40

De jure 

Solution:
QUESTION: 41

Garampani sanctuary is located at

Solution:

Famous for Hot water springs and homeland for Hoolock Gibbons and Golden Langurs, The Garampani Wildlife Sanctuary is situated in Karbi Anglong of Diphu area. One of the oldest Sanctuary containing Hot water spring and waterfalls and surrounded by Nambour Sanctuary having 51 rare species of Orchid. It has a total area of 6 sq. Km.

QUESTION: 42

Hegde fund is a fund 

Solution:
QUESTION: 43

What does strong Rupee as against the dollar mean to India ? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 44

Name the latest State which declared independence in 2008 

Solution:
QUESTION: 45

Name the Finance Minister who presented the highest number of Budgets in the parliament so far        

Solution:
QUESTION: 46

Who is the Chairman of 13th Finance Commission constituted in 2007?

Solution:
QUESTION: 47

Indo-U.S. nuclear deal was opposed in Parliament mainly because

Solution:
QUESTION: 48

The Indian industrialist who bought Tippu Sultan's sword in an auction in London was 

Solution:
QUESTION: 49

The contentious Baglihar dam is built on the river 

Solution:
QUESTION: 50

Which country has its richest man as the head of the Government ?   

Solution:
QUESTION: 51

Who is the person known as the Father of Modern Indian Retail Trade ? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 52

 The largest software service company in Asia is 

Solution:
QUESTION: 53

Taikonaut means

Solution:
QUESTION: 54

The CEO of Microsoft Corporation is 

Solution:
QUESTION: 55

The country which stands for Gross National Happiness in contradistinction to Gross National Product 

Solution:
QUESTION: 56

The highest paid head of the government in the world at present is in 

Solution:
QUESTION: 57

The current impasse in Doha Round of Negotiations is centered around:

Solution:
QUESTION: 58

The phenomenon called "Equinox" is due to the

Solution:
QUESTION: 59

The Director-General of the World Trade Organization is  

Solution:
QUESTION: 60

Capital account convertibility signifies 

Solution:
QUESTION: 61

The purpose of Kyoto Protocol is

Solution:
QUESTION: 62

What do carbon credits signify ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 63

The practice of selling goods in a foreign country at a price below their domestic selling price is called

Solution:
QUESTION: 64

Which of the following is considered as bulwark of personal freedom ?

Solution: Yes,becoz Habeus Corpus is a prerogative writ used to challenge the validity of a person's detention,either in official custody(e.g. when held pending deportation or extradition) or in private hands.
QUESTION: 65

Vande Mataram is composed by

Solution:
QUESTION: 66

How many minutes for each degree of longitude does the local time of any place vary from the Greenwich time ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 67

Article 1 of Indian Constitution defines India as

Solution:
QUESTION: 68

Which is the highest body that approves Five Year Plans in India ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 69

The economist who for the first time scientifically determined national income in India:

Solution:
QUESTION: 70

Which of the following is the largest peninsula in the world?

Solution:
QUESTION: 71

The person responsible for economic model for Indian Planning:

Solution:
QUESTION: 72

Social Forestry aims at

Solution:
QUESTION: 73

The Great Barrier Reef refers to

Solution:
QUESTION: 74

A nautical mile is equal to

Solution:
QUESTION: 75

Which of the following is concerned with land forms?

Solution:
QUESTION: 76

The country known, as the Land of Midnight Sun

Solution:
QUESTION: 77

The monk who spread Buddhism in Tibet and Far-East:

Solution:
QUESTION: 78

TRIPS, forming part of the World Trade Organization is intended

Solution:
QUESTION: 79

Carbon dating method is used to determine the age of

Solution:
QUESTION: 80

The Managing Director of Delhi Metropolitan Railway Corporation

Solution:
QUESTION: 81

18 carat gold signifies,

Solution:
QUESTION: 82

Bali Road map adopted in December 2007 provides for

Solution:
QUESTION: 83

Enriched uranium, used in a nuclear reactor, is

Solution:
QUESTION: 84

The scientist responsible for developing atomic energy in India

Solution:
QUESTION: 85

Salwa Judum practised in certain places in India refers to

Solution:
QUESTION: 86

Indian who won Raman Magasaysay award in 2007:

Solution:
QUESTION: 87

The person who won Jawaharlal Nehru award in 2007:

Solution:
QUESTION: 88

Free Trade Area means:

Solution:
QUESTION: 89

Affirmative action in Indian context signifies :

Solution:
QUESTION: 90

Special Economic zones are

Solution:
QUESTION: 91

The space shuttle which successfully carried Sunita Williams to space:

Solution:
QUESTION: 92

The leader who led the country in atoning for the past wrongs:

Solution:
QUESTION: 93

Gandhiji expounded his economic ideas in

Solution:
QUESTION: 94

Bio-fuels have become controversial because,

Solution:
QUESTION: 95

Ever greening of patents means

Solution:
QUESTION: 96

By signing which pact with Gandhiji did Ambedkar give up his demand for separate electorates:

Solution:
QUESTION: 97

India earns maximum foreign exchange from the export of

Solution:
QUESTION: 98

Sunita Williams, renowned astronaut of Indian origin, spent a record of days in space

Solution:
QUESTION: 99

The second biggest greenhouse gas emitter (after the USA) in the world is :

Solution:
QUESTION: 100

The author of the management principle - In a hierarchy, every employee tends to rise to his level of incompetence

Solution:
QUESTION: 101

The World Trade Organization was earlier known as

Solution:
QUESTION: 102

The "wailing wall" is associated with

Solution:
QUESTION: 103

An Education Minister who got Bharata Ratna in India

Solution:
QUESTION: 104

Why is Ozone Layer important ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 105

The World's largest river is

Solution:
QUESTION: 106

Tsunami is caused by

Solution:
QUESTION: 107

The Chipko movement is associated with

Solution:
QUESTION: 108

The first Great Indian Empire was

Solution:
QUESTION: 109

The first President of Indian National Congress

Solution:
QUESTION: 110

The King who gave permission to establish East India Company in India

Solution:
QUESTION: 111

The person who conceptualized the idea of Pakistan

Solution:
QUESTION: 112

Khilafat movement was organized

Solution:
QUESTION: 113

The pattern of Centre-State relations in India can be traced back to

Solution:
QUESTION: 114

Indian who played a very important role in World Communist Movement?

Solution:
QUESTION: 115

Who was the first recipient of Jnanapith award?

Solution:
QUESTION: 116

Name the winner of 2007 Nobel Prize for Literature

Solution:
QUESTION: 117

Plea bargaining is

Solution:
QUESTION: 118

The person appointed by two parties to settle a dispute is known as:

Solution:
QUESTION: 119

Right to travel is a fundamental right under

Solution:
QUESTION: 120

Genetically modified seeds have become controversial mainly because of

Solution:
QUESTION: 121

Legal aid for an accused is

Solution:
QUESTION: 122

The members of Constituent Assembly who framed the Constitution were:

Solution:
QUESTION: 123

Ambedkar acted in Constituent Assembly as:

Solution:
QUESTION: 124

In India, international treaties are ratified by

Solution:
QUESTION: 125

It is a constitutional requirement that the Parliament shall meet at least

Solution:
QUESTION: 126

Governor of a State can be removed by

Solution:
QUESTION: 127

Sovereignty under the Constitution belongs to

Solution:
QUESTION: 128

The Supreme Court upheld Mandal Commission Report in

Solution:
QUESTION: 129

Under our Constitution, right to property is

Solution:
QUESTION: 130

The Chairman of Sixth Pay Commission

Solution:
QUESTION: 131

Right to education emanates from:

Solution:
QUESTION: 132

International Court of Justice is:

Solution:
QUESTION: 133

The Liberhan Commission which received repeated extensions has been inquiring into:

Solution:
QUESTION: 134

The Monopolies and Restrictive Trade Practices Act was repealed by:

Solution:
QUESTION: 135

Only Judge against whom a motion of impeachment was introduced into Parliament

Solution:
QUESTION: 136

The Mallimath Committee Report deals with:

Solution:
QUESTION: 137

The first Woman Chief Justice of High Court in India

Solution:

Leila Seth (20 October 1930 – 5 May 2017) was the first woman judge on the Delhi High Court and she became the first woman to become Chief Justice of a state High Court on 5 August 1991.

QUESTION: 138

Lok Adalats have been created under:

Solution:
QUESTION: 139

Recent Nepal elections are globally significant because

Solution:
QUESTION: 140

The Third World leader who has been defying the U.S. A:

Solution:
QUESTION: 141

Raju earns twice as much in March as in each of the other months of the year. What part of his annual earnings he earns in that month?

Solution: Raju earns x in each month of the year, so the total earning in all months except march would be 11xnow its told that he earns twice in Marchas compared to normal month so he earns 2x in Marchtotal= 11x+2x= 13xif we find what part is the march of the total, it would be = 2x/13x=2/13
QUESTION: 142

Sanjay sold his watch for Rs. 1140 and thereby loses 5%. In order to gain 5% he has to sell the watch for

Solution:
QUESTION: 143

A mixture of 40 litres of milk and water contains 10% of water. How much water is to be added to the mixture so that the water may be 20% in the new mixture.

Solution: The quantity of water to be added=40(20-10)/(100-20)=5
QUESTION: 144

A train 100 meters long running at 54 km/hr takes 20 seconds to pass a bridge. The length of the bridge is

Solution:
QUESTION: 145

Sameer is as much younger to Mohan as he is older to Arun. If the sum of the ages of Mohan and Arun is 48, the age of Sameer is

Solution: Sameer's age= S
Mohan's age=M
Arun's age=A

M-S = S-A
M+A = 2S
48/2 = S
24 years
QUESTION: 146

A tank can be filled up by two pipes A and B in 2 hours and 3 hours respectively. A third pipe C can empty the full tank in 6 hours. If all the taps can be turned on at the same time, the tank will be full in

Solution: A=2hr
B=3hr
c=6,hr (empty)
time taken to fill the tank=2×3×6/3×6+2×6-2×3
=3/2=1.5hr.
QUESTION: 147

Of the three numbers, the first is one third of the second and twice the third. The average of these numbers is 27. The largest of these numbers is

Solution:
QUESTION: 148

The length of a square is increased by 15% and breadth decreased by 15%. The area of the rectangle so formed is

Solution:
QUESTION: 149

The ratio of milk and water in 60 Litres of adulterated milk is 2: 1. If the ratio of milk and water is to be 1 : 2, then the amount of water to be added further is

Solution:
Quantity of milk =
60 x
2/3
litres = 40 litres.
                                               
Quantity of water in it = (60- 40) litres = 20 litres.

New ratio = 1 : 2

Let quantity of water to be added further be x litres.

Then, milk : water = 40/20 + x
Now,
40/ 20 + x=1/2
                                
 20 + x = 80

 x = 60.

 The quantity of water to be added = 60 litres.
QUESTION: 150

A piece of cloth costs Rs. 70. If the piece is 4 metre longer and each metre costs Rs. 2 less, the cost remains unchanged. The length of the piece is

Solution: Let x be the length of cloth
x m cost ₹70
1m cost ₹70/x
now,new length=x+4
new rate=70/x+4
as per given in question difference in both the rate is of 2
:- (70/x)-(70/x+4)=2
x=10,-14
as length can't b negative so length of cloth will be 10 mt.
QUESTION: 151

A college received fifty applications fora certain course. In the qualifying examination, one-tenth of them secured marks in 90-95% range. Within remaining segment, three- fifths of them secured marks in 75-90% range. The rest secured below 75%. To get admission, the following restrictions hold good

i) No student who has scored below 75% can seek admission to Physics course.

ii) No student is allowed to opt Physics without opting Mathematics.

iii) No student is allowed to opt Physics and Astrophysics simultaneously.

iv) To opt Mathematics or Astrophysics, a student should have scored at least 70% in the qualifying examination. Which one of the following alternatives is possible ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 152

A tourist can tour utmost four places out of A, B, C, D, E, F and G. Out of four, not more than two can come under holiday tour and at least two must come under business trip. The break up is as follows : A, B C and D - Business tour E, F and G - Holiday tour. The following restrictions hold good.

A) If A is included, then both C and G are excluded.

B) If neither E nor F is included, then B or G or both of them can be included.

C) If G is included, then D cannot be included. W

which one of the following combinations is possible ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 153

Under the same fact situation as above, suppose that the following restrictions hold good:

A) A can be included provided C is included.

B) E is included provided B or G is included but not both.

C) C can be included provided at least D or F is excluded.

Which one of the following is a certainty ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 154

Four members have to be nominated to a Committee and there are six candidates: A, B, C, D, E and F. The following restrictions hold good :

A) If A is nominated, then D does not find any place.
B) If B is nominated, then either E or F has to be nominated, but not both.
C) If C is nominated, then both D and E have to be nominated.

Which one of the following is an acceptable combination ?

Solution: Option A is wrong because to select C both D and E have to be selected and also D and A cannot be together 
Option B wrong as to select B we need either E or F in the committee and also A cannot go with D
Option D is wrong as to select C in the committee we need both D and E also in the committee 
Hence C is the only combination possible.
QUESTION: 155

Political turmoil in a country is mainly caused by widespread violence and flawed economic policies of successive governments. If at all this has to be crushed, it can be achieved only by a dictatorial government which rules with iron hand. Therefore, the need of the hour is to elect a government which imposes fresh set of stringent legislations.

The alternatives suggested (not necessarily all), if true, considerably weaken the argument. However, one of them is most forceful. Identify the same.

Solution:
QUESTION: 156

Under the same fact situation as above, the alternatives suggested (not necessarily all), if true, significantly strengthen the argument. However, one of them is most forceful. Identify the same.

Solution:
QUESTION: 157

Exploitation of poor by rich can be stemmed only if the state exercises complete control over agriculture and industrial production. But state control is beset by two evils ; corruption and delay. The net result is that if man tries to escape from one evil, then he is trapped by another. Suffering, hence, is inescapable.

The argument presented above seems to imply the following conclusions. Identify the one which is least dubious. Apply common sense.

Solution:
QUESTION: 158

That the human soul is immaterial is an undisputed fact. Significantly, what is not matter is not spatial and consequently, it is not vulnerable to motion. Evidently, no motion no dissolution. What escapes from dissolution is also free from corruptibility.

Therefore, the human soul is immortal. In this argument, one premiss is missing. Complete the argument by choosing from the following :

Solution:
QUESTION: 159

Under the same fact situation as above, which one of the following, if true, affects seriously the argument presented above ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 160

Protagonists of human rights vehemently oppose capital punishment. Their opposition stems mainly from three reasons. Firstly, man cannot terminate what he cannot generate. Secondly, the function of punishment is to reform the culprit. Thirdly, a culprit should be given an opportunity to repent. Admittedly, death penalty fails on all three counts. However, the defenders argue that a person is punished because he has to pay for his deeds. Reformation or repentance, according to them, is peripheral. Hence, death penalty is admissible. For more files visit www.educationobserver.com/forum

Which one of the following is the focus of this debate ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 161

Since Venus rotates slowly, Fred Whipple thought that like Mercury, Venus keeps one face always towards the Sun. If so, he said that the dark side would be very cold. However, he knew with the help of earlier study carried out by Petit and Nicholson that it was not the case. So, he concluded that the planet must rotate fairly often to keep the darker side warmer.

Which of the following is the original premiss ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 162

Before formulating the laws of motion, Galileo distinguished between mathematical study and empirical study. He, first, theoretically derived the relation between distances and times for uniformly accelerating motion by letting the ball roll a quarter, then half, then two-thirds and so on of the length of the groove and then measured the times on each occasion, which he repeated hundred times. He calculated, based on this study, that the distance travelled equalled the

Which one of the following characterizes Galileo's method?

Solution:
QUESTION: 163

Read carefully a brief summary of one of the investigations of Sherlock Holmes : "While investigating the murders of Stangerson and Enoch Drebber he got into conversation with fellow detectives which runs as follows : "The last link My case is complete.... Could you lay your hands upon those pills". After he got those pills, Holmes cut one of them, dissolved it in water and placed it in front of the terrier. Contrary to his expectations, the animal survived. Though disappointed a bit, he thought fora while and then cut the other pill, dissolved it, added milk and placed before the animal. The moment it licked, the animal died. Those were the pills present at the scenes of crime.

Which one of the following aptly describes the method which this passage indicates ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 164

There has been much speculation concerning the origin of lunar craters. One hypothesis is that they are the results of the impact of heavy meteors on the surface of the moon while still soft. The most probable explanation is that they were produced by the gases liberated from the rocky matter. 'While solidification was taking place these gases and water vapors steadily escaped through viscous surface, raising giant bubbles. The reader can easily visualize the process that took place by watching frying of pancakes and noticing the formation of bubbles and craters on their surface.

Which one of the following actually helps us to determine the origin of lunar craters ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 165

"Perhaps the earliest work of Archimedes that we have is that on 'Plane Equilibrium'. In this, some fundamental principles of mechanics are set forth as rigorous geometric propositions. The work opens with famous postulate 'Equal weights at equal distances are in equilibrium; equal weights at unequal distances are not in equilibrium, but incline toward the weight at the greater distance". According to this passage,

which factor or factors determine equilibrium ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 166

According to the above passage, which one of the following values can be assigned to the statement 'inequal weights at equal distances are in disequilibrium?

Solution:
QUESTION: 167

'Gregor Mendel in examining tea-plants found two sharply marked races, the tall and the short. He experimentally fertilized flowers of tall plants with pollen of short. The off spring were tall plants. He next let the flowers of this first generation be fertilized with their own pollen. In the following generation, shortness reappeared. Tallness and shortness were distributed not at random but in a definite, constant, and simple ratio: three dominant tails to one recessive short'. Which one of the following aptly describes the distribution of dominant and recessive characteristics ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 168

It is said that in his strongly worded reaction to quantum Physics,. Einstein remaxks, 'God does not play dice' to which Bohr, another great physicist, reacted saying 'Do not tell Godwhat to do'. Bohr, earlier had argued that we can never know what the properties of an isolated quantum system, though we can know theproperties of macrocosmic objects. Which one of the following is the focus of their debate ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 169

An efficient and diesel-independent public transport. system is essential to the economic development of nation. Suppose that the government adopts a policy to that effect then there is another favourable. result. The pollution of environment is reduced to -a greater extent. But, then it has two-pronged backlash. The sale and consequently the production of two and four wheelers reduce to the minimum which in turn render a large number of people j obless. For more files visit www.educationobserver.com/forum Cash flow to the treasury, also is adversely affected. Such a step, therefore, Js self-defeating unless the government evolves a counter-strategy to nullify the adverse effects.

Which one of the following accurately projects the opinion of an imaginary speaker or author as the case may be of this passage ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 170

It is said that in his strongly worded reaction to quantum Physics,. Einstein remaxks, 'God does not play dice' to which Bohr, another great physicist, reacted saying 'Do not tell Godwhat to do'. Bohr, earlier had argued that we can never know what the properties of an isolated quantum system, though we can know theproperties of macrocosmic objects. Which one of the following is the focus of their debate ?

Solution: Bohr believes that humans can never know the properties of isolated quantum system but Einstein is talking of the same topic as we can see in the given information. So Bohr is trying to say that our limit of knowledge can extend only upto microcosmic object but not to a quantum system. Hence, the debate is focused on what humans are capable of knowing. Therefore, the answer will be c
QUESTION: 171

A moot question to be considered is whether democratic form of government is a boon or bane, no matter what Lincoln might or might not have said. Rather his most (in ?) famous adage, 'by the people, for the people and of the people' misses the most pertinent question; which. attitude works behind when a person declares that heis a (or the right ?) candidate to serve the people, and does not hesitate to contest and fight tooth and nail the election, an euphemism for battle with or without bullets. Admittedly, the covert attitude is different from overt attitude. Hardly any one contests the election unwillingly. A contestant is not persuaded by any one, but driven by his own passions and dubious motives. Contrast this picture with Socrates' version ; no honest man willingly takes up the job of ruler. If at all he accepts, he does so for fear of being ruled by one made up of inferior mettle. It is beyond even the wildest imagination, to expect an honest person to contest the election.

Assuming that every statement is true, identify from among the given alternatives the one which strictly follows from the passage.

Solution:
QUESTION: 172

According to the above passage, which one of the following correctly differentiates L'incoin Is and Socrates' analyses ?