CLAT - Past Year Paper 2014


200 Questions MCQ Test CLAT Past Year Papers (2008-2020) | CLAT - Past Year Paper 2014


Description
This mock test of CLAT - Past Year Paper 2014 for CLAT helps you for every CLAT entrance exam. This contains 200 Multiple Choice Questions for CLAT CLAT - Past Year Paper 2014 (mcq) to study with solutions a complete question bank. The solved questions answers in this CLAT - Past Year Paper 2014 quiz give you a good mix of easy questions and tough questions. CLAT students definitely take this CLAT - Past Year Paper 2014 exercise for a better result in the exam. You can find other CLAT - Past Year Paper 2014 extra questions, long questions & short questions for CLAT on EduRev as well by searching above.
QUESTION: 1

Directions : Fill in the blank by choosing the most appropriate option.

A vote of .............. proposed at the end of the meeting.   

Solution:
QUESTION: 2

Directions : Fill in the blank by choosing the most appropriate option.

During the recession many companies will ......... lay off workers.   

Solution: The answer is A because the sentence is talking of future so B and C cannot be the answer also we would use forced to , because its an action and not forced into because we are not sending the companies anywhere 
QUESTION: 3

Directions : Fill in the blank by choosing the most appropriate option.

She has good ........... over the famous foreign languages.   

Solution:

“Command” Is the most suitable word for the sentence as the senntence says that she speaks the language fluently.

QUESTION: 4

Directions : Fill in the blank by choosing the most appropriate option.

The Chairman pointed out in favour of the manager that the profitability of the industrial plant had ...... since he took over the administration.

Solution:

The correct option is D.
The profitability of the industrial plant had increased since he took over.... is the correct tense and appropriate option.

QUESTION: 5

Directions : Fill in the blank by choosing the most appropriate option.

When the examinations were over............ went to Paris.  

Solution:
QUESTION: 6

Directions : Fill in the blank by choosing the most appropriate option.

Let's go for a walk...............?  

Solution:
QUESTION: 7

Directions : Fill in the blank by choosing the most appropriate option.

Had Anil been on time he ............ missed the train.   

Solution:
QUESTION: 8

Directions : Fill in the blank by choosing the most appropriate option.

The most alarming fact is that infection is spreading ....... the state and reaching villages and small towns.

Solution:

The correct answer is B as it is grammatically correct and The most alarming fact is that infection is spreading across  the state and reaching villages and small towns.

QUESTION: 9

Directions : Fill in the blank by choosing the most appropriate option.

In big cities people are cut ......... from nature.

Solution:
QUESTION: 10

Directions : Fill in the blank by choosing the most appropriate option.

The dissidents .......... a great problem in every political party.  

Solution:
QUESTION: 11

Directions : The sentences given in each question, when properly sequenced, form a coherent paragraph. Each sentence is labelled with a letter. Choose the most logical order of sentences from among the given choices to construct a coherent paragraph.

(a) Payment for imports and exports is made through a system called foreign exchange. The value of the money of one country in relation to the money of other countries is agreed upon.
(b) The rates of exchange vary from time to time.
(c) For example. an American dollar or a British pound sterling is worth certain amounts in the money of other countries.
(d) Sometimes a US dollar is worth 60 rupees in India.

Solution:

The correct option is C as reading the passage t gives a meaningful sound to the paragraph that the correct sequence is acbd.

QUESTION: 12

Directions : The sentences given in each question, when properly sequenced, form a coherent paragraph. Each sentence is labelled with a letter. Choose the most logical order of sentences from among the given choices to construct a coherent paragraph.

(a) When a dictionary is being edited, a lexicographer collects all the alphabetically arranged citation slips for a particular word.
(b) The moment a new word is coined, it usually enters the spoken language.
(c) The dictionary takes note of it and makes a note of it on a citation slip.
(d) The word then passes from the realm of hearing to the realm of writing.  

Solution:

The correct option is B as this is the correct series because sentence b is in order with the c while the b and d are both linked in correct sequence.

QUESTION: 13

Directions : The sentences given in each question, when properly sequenced, form a coherent paragraph. Each sentence is labelled with a letter. Choose the most logical order of sentences from among the given choices to construct a coherent paragraph.

(a) The impression that corruption is a universal phenomenon persists and the people do not co-operate in checking this evil.
(b) So there is hardly anything that the government can do about it now.
(c) It is regrettable that there is a widespread corruption in the country at all levels.
(d) Recently several offenders were brought to book. but they were not given deterrent punishment.

Solution:
QUESTION: 14

Directions : The sentences given in each question, when properly sequenced, form a coherent paragraph. Each sentence is labelled with a letter. Choose the most logical order of sentences from among the given choices to construct a coherent paragraph.

(a) In all social affairs convention prescribes more or less generally accepted rules of behaviour.
(b) Of course, there is nothing absolute about conventions.
(c) They vary from country to country, from age to age.
(d) Convention has a necessary part to play in the life of everyone.  

Solution:

The correct answer is D as  gives a intro at the first sentence ,and then it's publicity,then comes the sequential lines which absolutely gives the meaningful sound of the paragraph .

QUESTION: 15

Directions : The sentences given in each question, when properly sequenced, form a coherent paragraph. Each sentence is labelled with a letter. Choose the most logical order of sentences from among the given choices to construct a coherent paragraph.

(a) In fact, only recently there have been serious studies to find out how many of us actually have nightmares.
(b) Now that is changing.
(c) The study of nightmares has been curiously neglected.
(d) While results so far are inconclusive, it seems fair to say that at least half the population has occasional nightmares.

Solution:

The correct answer is D as this is the most logical arrangement as c sentence is re;ated to the b while a and d are related and linked.

QUESTION: 16

Directions : Given below are a few foreign language phrases which are commonly used. Choose the correct meaning for each of the phrases.

Ex officio  

Solution:
QUESTION: 17

Directions : Given below are a few foreign language phrases which are commonly used. Choose the correct meaning for each of the phrases.

Ultra Vires  

Solution:

The correct option is D as ultra vires means beyond powers.

QUESTION: 18

Directions : Given below are a few foreign language phrases which are commonly used. Choose the correct meaning for each of the phrases.

Quid pro quo  

Solution:

The correct answer is B as meaning of Quid pro quo  isSomething for something.

QUESTION: 19

Directions : Given below are a few foreign language phrases which are commonly used. Choose the correct meaning for each of the phrases.

Inter vivos  

Solution:

The correct answer is A as the correct meaning of inter vivos  is between the living.

QUESTION: 20

Directions : Given below are a few foreign language phrases which are commonly used. Choose the correct meaning for each of the phrases.

Corpus juris  

Solution:

The correct option is C.
 Latin for "the body of law," meaning a compendium of all laws. There are several encyclopedias of the law which fit this definition, the most famous of which is Corpus Juris Secundum.

QUESTION: 21

Directions : Select the word that is spelt CORRECTLY.

Which of the following spellings is correct?  

Solution:
QUESTION: 22

Which of the following spellings is correct?  

Solution:

The correct answer is B as correct spelling is Proceed.

QUESTION: 23

Which of the following spellings is correct?  

Solution:

 Accommodate is the correct spelling out the other options.

QUESTION: 24

Which of the following spellings is correct "for a page at the beinning of a book"?  

Solution:

The correct answer is D as real meaning of foreword is to  a short introduction to the book

QUESTION: 25

Which of the following spellings is correct?  

Solution:

The correct answer is B as correct spelling is Argument.

QUESTION: 26

Directions : Choose the explanation that best reflects the spirit of the idiom/proverb/phrase given in question.

To make clean breast of 

Solution:

The correct answer is A as To make clean breast means)To tell the truth about something.

QUESTION: 27

Directions : Choose the explanation that best reflects the spirit of the idiom/proverb/phrase given in question.

A man of straw 

Solution:
This idiom means a weak or cowardly person
QUESTION: 28

Directions : Choose the explanation that best reflects the spirit of the idiom/proverb/phrase given in question.

A wild-goose chase 

Solution:
QUESTION: 29

Directions : Choose the explanation that best reflects the spirit of the idiom/proverb/phrase given in question.

Put on the market 

Solution:

The correct option is A as Put on market is an idiom which means to make something available for purchase , therefore option A  is correct..

QUESTION: 30

Directions : Choose the explanation that best reflects the spirit of the idiom/proverb/phrase given in question.

To meet someone halfway  

Solution:

The correct answer is B as they settled the argument by agreeing to meet each other halfway.

QUESTION: 31

Directions : The questions in this section are based on a single passage. The questions are to be answered on the basis of what is stated or implied in the passage. Kindly note that more than one of the choices may conceivably answer some of the questions. However, you are to choose the most appropriate answer; that is, the response that most accurately and completely answers the question.

The spread of education in society is at the foundation of success in countries that are latecomers to development. In the quest for development, primary education is absolutely essential because it creates the base. But higher education is just as important, for it provides the cutting edge. And universities are the life-blood of higher education. Islands of excellence in professional education, such as Indian Institutes of Technology (IITs) and Indian Institutes of Management (IIMs), are valuable complements but-cannot be substitutes for universities which provide educational opportunities for people at large.

There can be no doubt that higher education has made a significant contribution to economic development, social progress and political democracy in independent India. It is a source of dynamism for the economy. It has created social opportunities for people. It has fostered the vibrant democracy in our polity. It has provided a beginning for the creation of a knowledge society. But it would be a mistake to focus on its strengths alone. It has weaknesses that are a cause for serious concern.

There is, in fact, a quiet crisis in higher education in India that runs deep. It is not yet discernible simply because there are pockets of excellence, an enormous reservoir of talented young people and an intense competition in the admissions process. And, in some important spheres, we continue to reap the benefits of what was sown in higher education 50 years ago by the founding fathers of the Republic. The reality is that we have miles to go. The proportion of our population, in the age group 18-24, that enters the world of higher education is around 7 per cent, which is only one-half the average for Asia. The opportunities for higher education, in terms of the number of places in universities, are simply not enough in relation to our needs. What is more, the quality of higher education in most of our universities requires substantial improvement.

It is clear that the system of higher education in India faces serious challenges. It needs a systematic overhaul, so that we can educate much larger numbers without diluting academic standards. This is imperative because the transformation of economy and society in the 21st century would depend, in significant part, on the spread and the quality of education among our people, particularly in the sphere of higher education. It is only an inclusive society that can provide the foundations for a knowledge society.

The challenges that confront higher education in India are clear. It needs a massive expansion of opportunities for higher education, to 1500 universities nationwide, that would enable India to attain a gross enrolment ratio of at least 15 per cent by 2015. It is just as important to raise the average quality of higher education in every sphere. At the same time, it is essential to create institutions that are exemplars of excellence at par with the best in the world. In the pursuit of these objectives, providing people with access to higher education in a socially inclusive manner is imperative. The realisation of these objectives, combined with access, would not only develop the skills and capabilities we need for the economy but would also help transform India into a knowledge economy and society.

Q.

The principal focus of the passage is  

Solution:

The correct answer is C as the author in this passage directly talks about quality and higher education

QUESTION: 32

Directions : The questions in this section are based on a single passage. The questions are to be answered on the basis of what is stated or implied in the passage. Kindly note that more than one of the choices may conceivably answer some of the questions. However, you are to choose the most appropriate answer; that is, the response that most accurately and completely answers the question.

The spread of education in society is at the foundation of success in countries that are latecomers to development. In the quest for development, primary education is absolutely essential because it creates the base. But higher education is just as important, for it provides the cutting edge. And universities are the life-blood of higher education. Islands of excellence in professional education, such as Indian Institutes of Technology (IITs) and Indian Institutes of Management (IIMs), are valuable complements but-cannot be substitutes for universities which provide educational opportunities for people at large.

There can be no doubt that higher education has made a significant contribution to economic development, social progress and political democracy in independent India. It is a source of dynamism for the economy. It has created social opportunities for people. It has fostered the vibrant democracy in our polity. It has provided a beginning for the creation of a knowledge society. But it would be a mistake to focus on its strengths alone. It has weaknesses that are a cause for serious concern.

There is, in fact, a quiet crisis in higher education in India that runs deep. It is not yet discernible simply because there are pockets of excellence, an enormous reservoir of talented young people and an intense competition in the admissions process. And, in some important spheres, we continue to reap the benefits of what was sown in higher education 50 years ago by the founding fathers of the Republic. The reality is that we have miles to go. The proportion of our population, in the age group 18-24, that enters the world of higher education is around 7 per cent, which is only one-half the average for Asia. The opportunities for higher education, in terms of the number of places in universities, are simply not enough in relation to our needs. What is more, the quality of higher education in most of our universities requires substantial improvement.

It is clear that the system of higher education in India faces serious challenges. It needs a systematic overhaul, so that we can educate much larger numbers without diluting academic standards. This is imperative because the transformation of economy and society in the 21st century would depend, in significant part, on the spread and the quality of education among our people, particularly in the sphere of higher education. It is only an inclusive society that can provide the foundations for a knowledge society.

The challenges that confront higher education in India are clear. It needs a massive expansion of opportunities for higher education, to 1500 universities nationwide, that would enable India to attain a gross enrolment ratio of at least 15 per cent by 2015. It is just as important to raise the average quality of higher education in every sphere. At the same time, it is essential to create institutions that are exemplars of excellence at par with the best in the world. In the pursuit of these objectives, providing people with access to higher education in a socially inclusive manner is imperative. The realisation of these objectives, combined with access, would not only develop the skills and capabilities we need for the economy but would also help transform India into a knowledge economy and society.

Q.

The style of the passage can be best described as

Solution:
QUESTION: 33

Directions : The questions in this section are based on a single passage. The questions are to be answered on the basis of what is stated or implied in the passage. Kindly note that more than one of the choices may conceivably answer some of the questions. However, you are to choose the most appropriate answer; that is, the response that most accurately and completely answers the question.

The spread of education in society is at the foundation of success in countries that are latecomers to development. In the quest for development, primary education is absolutely essential because it creates the base. But higher education is just as important, for it provides the cutting edge. And universities are the life-blood of higher education. Islands of excellence in professional education, such as Indian Institutes of Technology (IITs) and Indian Institutes of Management (IIMs), are valuable complements but-cannot be substitutes for universities which provide educational opportunities for people at large.

There can be no doubt that higher education has made a significant contribution to economic development, social progress and political democracy in independent India. It is a source of dynamism for the economy. It has created social opportunities for people. It has fostered the vibrant democracy in our polity. It has provided a beginning for the creation of a knowledge society. But it would be a mistake to focus on its strengths alone. It has weaknesses that are a cause for serious concern.

There is, in fact, a quiet crisis in higher education in India that runs deep. It is not yet discernible simply because there are pockets of excellence, an enormous reservoir of talented young people and an intense competition in the admissions process. And, in some important spheres, we continue to reap the benefits of what was sown in higher education 50 years ago by the founding fathers of the Republic. The reality is that we have miles to go. The proportion of our population, in the age group 18-24, that enters the world of higher education is around 7 per cent, which is only one-half the average for Asia. The opportunities for higher education, in terms of the number of places in universities, are simply not enough in relation to our needs. What is more, the quality of higher education in most of our universities requires substantial improvement.

It is clear that the system of higher education in India faces serious challenges. It needs a systematic overhaul, so that we can educate much larger numbers without diluting academic standards. This is imperative because the transformation of economy and society in the 21st century would depend, in significant part, on the spread and the quality of education among our people, particularly in the sphere of higher education. It is only an inclusive society that can provide the foundations for a knowledge society.

The challenges that confront higher education in India are clear. It needs a massive expansion of opportunities for higher education, to 1500 universities nationwide, that would enable India to attain a gross enrolment ratio of at least 15 per cent by 2015. It is just as important to raise the average quality of higher education in every sphere. At the same time, it is essential to create institutions that are exemplars of excellence at par with the best in the world. In the pursuit of these objectives, providing people with access to higher education in a socially inclusive manner is imperative. The realisation of these objectives, combined with access, would not only develop the skills and capabilities we need for the economy but would also help transform India into a knowledge economy and society.

Q.

What kind of society can provide the foundation for a knowledge society?  

Solution:

The correct option is D as inclusive society is that  society aims at empowering and promoting the social, economic, and political inclusion of all, irrespective of age, sex, disability, race, ethnicity, origin, religion, economic, or other status

QUESTION: 34

Directions : The questions in this section are based on a single passage. The questions are to be answered on the basis of what is stated or implied in the passage. Kindly note that more than one of the choices may conceivably answer some of the questions. However, you are to choose the most appropriate answer; that is, the response that most accurately and completely answers the question.

The spread of education in society is at the foundation of success in countries that are latecomers to development. In the quest for development, primary education is absolutely essential because it creates the base. But higher education is just as important, for it provides the cutting edge. And universities are the life-blood of higher education. Islands of excellence in professional education, such as Indian Institutes of Technology (IITs) and Indian Institutes of Management (IIMs), are valuable complements but-cannot be substitutes for universities which provide educational opportunities for people at large.

There can be no doubt that higher education has made a significant contribution to economic development, social progress and political democracy in independent India. It is a source of dynamism for the economy. It has created social opportunities for people. It has fostered the vibrant democracy in our polity. It has provided a beginning for the creation of a knowledge society. But it would be a mistake to focus on its strengths alone. It has weaknesses that are a cause for serious concern.

There is, in fact, a quiet crisis in higher education in India that runs deep. It is not yet discernible simply because there are pockets of excellence, an enormous reservoir of talented young people and an intense competition in the admissions process. And, in some important spheres, we continue to reap the benefits of what was sown in higher education 50 years ago by the founding fathers of the Republic. The reality is that we have miles to go. The proportion of our population, in the age group 18-24, that enters the world of higher education is around 7 per cent, which is only one-half the average for Asia. The opportunities for higher education, in terms of the number of places in universities, are simply not enough in relation to our needs. What is more, the quality of higher education in most of our universities requires substantial improvement.

It is clear that the system of higher education in India faces serious challenges. It needs a systematic overhaul, so that we can educate much larger numbers without diluting academic standards. This is imperative because the transformation of economy and society in the 21st century would depend, in significant part, on the spread and the quality of education among our people, particularly in the sphere of higher education. It is only an inclusive society that can provide the foundations for a knowledge society.

The challenges that confront higher education in India are clear. It needs a massive expansion of opportunities for higher education, to 1500 universities nationwide, that would enable India to attain a gross enrolment ratio of at least 15 per cent by 2015. It is just as important to raise the average quality of higher education in every sphere. At the same time, it is essential to create institutions that are exemplars of excellence at par with the best in the world. In the pursuit of these objectives, providing people with access to higher education in a socially inclusive manner is imperative. The realisation of these objectives, combined with access, would not only develop the skills and capabilities we need for the economy but would also help transform India into a knowledge economy and society.

Q.

According to the passage, which one of the following is INCORRECT?

Solution:

The correct option is A.
From the following lines it is clear as this option is mentioned in the passage thus the option is incorrect. ‘And universities are the life-blood of higher education. Islands of excellence in professional education, such as Indian Institutes of Technology (IITs) and Indian Institutes of Management (IIMs), are valuable complements but-cannot be substitutes for universities which provide educational opportunities for people at large.’

QUESTION: 35

Directions : The questions in this section are based on a single passage. The questions are to be answered on the basis of what is stated or implied in the passage. Kindly note that more than one of the choices may conceivably answer some of the questions. However, you are to choose the most appropriate answer; that is, the response that most accurately and completely answers the question.

The spread of education in society is at the foundation of success in countries that are latecomers to development. In the quest for development, primary education is absolutely essential because it creates the base. But higher education is just as important, for it provides the cutting edge. And universities are the life-blood of higher education. Islands of excellence in professional education, such as Indian Institutes of Technology (IITs) and Indian Institutes of Management (IIMs), are valuable complements but-cannot be substitutes for universities which provide educational opportunities for people at large.

There can be no doubt that higher education has made a significant contribution to economic development, social progress and political democracy in independent India. It is a source of dynamism for the economy. It has created social opportunities for people. It has fostered the vibrant democracy in our polity. It has provided a beginning for the creation of a knowledge society. But it would be a mistake to focus on its strengths alone. It has weaknesses that are a cause for serious concern.

There is, in fact, a quiet crisis in higher education in India that runs deep. It is not yet discernible simply because there are pockets of excellence, an enormous reservoir of talented young people and an intense competition in the admissions process. And, in some important spheres, we continue to reap the benefits of what was sown in higher education 50 years ago by the founding fathers of the Republic. The reality is that we have miles to go. The proportion of our population, in the age group 18-24, that enters the world of higher education is around 7 per cent, which is only one-half the average for Asia. The opportunities for higher education, in terms of the number of places in universities, are simply not enough in relation to our needs. What is more, the quality of higher education in most of our universities requires substantial improvement.

It is clear that the system of higher education in India faces serious challenges. It needs a systematic overhaul, so that we can educate much larger numbers without diluting academic standards. This is imperative because the transformation of economy and society in the 21st century would depend, in significant part, on the spread and the quality of education among our people, particularly in the sphere of higher education. It is only an inclusive society that can provide the foundations for a knowledge society.

The challenges that confront higher education in India are clear. It needs a massive expansion of opportunities for higher education, to 1500 universities nationwide, that would enable India to attain a gross enrolment ratio of at least 15 per cent by 2015. It is just as important to raise the average quality of higher education in every sphere. At the same time, it is essential to create institutions that are exemplars of excellence at par with the best in the world. In the pursuit of these objectives, providing people with access to higher education in a socially inclusive manner is imperative. The realisation of these objectives, combined with access, would not only develop the skills and capabilities we need for the economy but would also help transform India into a knowledge economy and society.

Q.

According to the passage, the current state of affairs of higher education in India is  

Solution:

The correct answer is C as it is true that our education is  Not good enough, and there is a need of expansion of opportunities for higher education. besides creating institutions and universities that are models of excellence.

QUESTION: 36

Directions : The questions in this section are based on a single passage. The questions are to be answered on the basis of what is stated or implied in the passage. Kindly note that more than one of the choices may conceivably answer some of the questions. However, you are to choose the most appropriate answer; that is, the response that most accurately and completely answers the question.

The spread of education in society is at the foundation of success in countries that are latecomers to development. In the quest for development, primary education is absolutely essential because it creates the base. But higher education is just as important, for it provides the cutting edge. And universities are the life-blood of higher education. Islands of excellence in professional education, such as Indian Institutes of Technology (IITs) and Indian Institutes of Management (IIMs), are valuable complements but-cannot be substitutes for universities which provide educational opportunities for people at large.

There can be no doubt that higher education has made a significant contribution to economic development, social progress and political democracy in independent India. It is a source of dynamism for the economy. It has created social opportunities for people. It has fostered the vibrant democracy in our polity. It has provided a beginning for the creation of a knowledge society. But it would be a mistake to focus on its strengths alone. It has weaknesses that are a cause for serious concern.

There is, in fact, a quiet crisis in higher education in India that runs deep. It is not yet discernible simply because there are pockets of excellence, an enormous reservoir of talented young people and an intense competition in the admissions process. And, in some important spheres, we continue to reap the benefits of what was sown in higher education 50 years ago by the founding fathers of the Republic. The reality is that we have miles to go. The proportion of our population, in the age group 18-24, that enters the world of higher education is around 7 per cent, which is only one-half the average for Asia. The opportunities for higher education, in terms of the number of places in universities, are simply not enough in relation to our needs. What is more, the quality of higher education in most of our universities requires substantial improvement.

It is clear that the system of higher education in India faces serious challenges. It needs a systematic overhaul, so that we can educate much larger numbers without diluting academic standards. This is imperative because the transformation of economy and society in the 21st century would depend, in significant part, on the spread and the quality of education among our people, particularly in the sphere of higher education. It is only an inclusive society that can provide the foundations for a knowledge society.

The challenges that confront higher education in India are clear. It needs a massive expansion of opportunities for higher education, to 1500 universities nationwide, that would enable India to attain a gross enrolment ratio of at least 15 per cent by 2015. It is just as important to raise the average quality of higher education in every sphere. At the same time, it is essential to create institutions that are exemplars of excellence at par with the best in the world. In the pursuit of these objectives, providing people with access to higher education in a socially inclusive manner is imperative. The realisation of these objectives, combined with access, would not only develop the skills and capabilities we need for the economy but would also help transform India into a knowledge economy and society.

Q.

According to the passage, which of the following is NOT a challenge that confronts higher education in lndia?  

Solution:

The correct answer is D as Getting into World University Rankings is NOT a challenge that confronts higher education in india.according to the passage there are various other  challenges .

QUESTION: 37

Directions : The questions in this section are based on a single passage. The questions are to be answered on the basis of what is stated or implied in the passage. Kindly note that more than one of the choices may conceivably answer some of the questions. However, you are to choose the most appropriate answer; that is, the response that most accurately and completely answers the question.

The spread of education in society is at the foundation of success in countries that are latecomers to development. In the quest for development, primary education is absolutely essential because it creates the base. But higher education is just as important, for it provides the cutting edge. And universities are the life-blood of higher education. Islands of excellence in professional education, such as Indian Institutes of Technology (IITs) and Indian Institutes of Management (IIMs), are valuable complements but-cannot be substitutes for universities which provide educational opportunities for people at large.

There can be no doubt that higher education has made a significant contribution to economic development, social progress and political democracy in independent India. It is a source of dynamism for the economy. It has created social opportunities for people. It has fostered the vibrant democracy in our polity. It has provided a beginning for the creation of a knowledge society. But it would be a mistake to focus on its strengths alone. It has weaknesses that are a cause for serious concern.

There is, in fact, a quiet crisis in higher education in India that runs deep. It is not yet discernible simply because there are pockets of excellence, an enormous reservoir of talented young people and an intense competition in the admissions process. And, in some important spheres, we continue to reap the benefits of what was sown in higher education 50 years ago by the founding fathers of the Republic. The reality is that we have miles to go. The proportion of our population, in the age group 18-24, that enters the world of higher education is around 7 per cent, which is only one-half the average for Asia. The opportunities for higher education, in terms of the number of places in universities, are simply not enough in relation to our needs. What is more, the quality of higher education in most of our universities requires substantial improvement.

It is clear that the system of higher education in India faces serious challenges. It needs a systematic overhaul, so that we can educate much larger numbers without diluting academic standards. This is imperative because the transformation of economy and society in the 21st century would depend, in significant part, on the spread and the quality of education among our people, particularly in the sphere of higher education. It is only an inclusive society that can provide the foundations for a knowledge society.

The challenges that confront higher education in India are clear. It needs a massive expansion of opportunities for higher education, to 1500 universities nationwide, that would enable India to attain a gross enrolment ratio of at least 15 per cent by 2015. It is just as important to raise the average quality of higher education in every sphere. At the same time, it is essential to create institutions that are exemplars of excellence at par with the best in the world. In the pursuit of these objectives, providing people with access to higher education in a socially inclusive manner is imperative. The realisation of these objectives, combined with access, would not only develop the skills and capabilities we need for the economy but would also help transform India into a knowledge economy and society.

Q.

According to the passage, which of the following is CORRECT?  

Solution:

The correct answer is D as all the mentioned options are correct and being made in passage.

QUESTION: 38

Directions : The questions in this section are based on a single passage. The questions are to be answered on the basis of what is stated or implied in the passage. Kindly note that more than one of the choices may conceivably answer some of the questions. However, you are to choose the most appropriate answer; that is, the response that most accurately and completely answers the question.

The spread of education in society is at the foundation of success in countries that are latecomers to development. In the quest for development, primary education is absolutely essential because it creates the base. But higher education is just as important, for it provides the cutting edge. And universities are the life-blood of higher education. Islands of excellence in professional education, such as Indian Institutes of Technology (IITs) and Indian Institutes of Management (IIMs), are valuable complements but-cannot be substitutes for universities which provide educational opportunities for people at large.

There can be no doubt that higher education has made a significant contribution to economic development, social progress and political democracy in independent India. It is a source of dynamism for the economy. It has created social opportunities for people. It has fostered the vibrant democracy in our polity. It has provided a beginning for the creation of a knowledge society. But it would be a mistake to focus on its strengths alone. It has weaknesses that are a cause for serious concern.

There is, in fact, a quiet crisis in higher education in India that runs deep. It is not yet discernible simply because there are pockets of excellence, an enormous reservoir of talented young people and an intense competition in the admissions process. And, in some important spheres, we continue to reap the benefits of what was sown in higher education 50 years ago by the founding fathers of the Republic. The reality is that we have miles to go. The proportion of our population, in the age group 18-24, that enters the world of higher education is around 7 per cent, which is only one-half the average for Asia. The opportunities for higher education, in terms of the number of places in universities, are simply not enough in relation to our needs. What is more, the quality of higher education in most of our universities requires substantial improvement.

It is clear that the system of higher education in India faces serious challenges. It needs a systematic overhaul, so that we can educate much larger numbers without diluting academic standards. This is imperative because the transformation of economy and society in the 21st century would depend, in significant part, on the spread and the quality of education among our people, particularly in the sphere of higher education. It is only an inclusive society that can provide the foundations for a knowledge society.

The challenges that confront higher education in India are clear. It needs a massive expansion of opportunities for higher education, to 1500 universities nationwide, that would enable India to attain a gross enrolment ratio of at least 15 per cent by 2015. It is just as important to raise the average quality of higher education in every sphere. At the same time, it is essential to create institutions that are exemplars of excellence at par with the best in the world. In the pursuit of these objectives, providing people with access to higher education in a socially inclusive manner is imperative. The realisation of these objectives, combined with access, would not only develop the skills and capabilities we need for the economy but would also help transform India into a knowledge economy and society.

Q.

Should the entire university system in India be modelled on premier institutes, such as, IITs and IIMs. providing professional education? 

Solution:

The correct answer is C as it is directly mentioned in the passage that ‘’ Indian Institutes of Technology (IITs) and Indian Institutes of Management (IIMs), are valuable complements but-cannot be substitutes for universities which provide educational opportunities for people at large’’.
 

QUESTION: 39

Directions : The questions in this section are based on a single passage. The questions are to be answered on the basis of what is stated or implied in the passage. Kindly note that more than one of the choices may conceivably answer some of the questions. However, you are to choose the most appropriate answer; that is, the response that most accurately and completely answers the question.

The spread of education in society is at the foundation of success in countries that are latecomers to development. In the quest for development, primary education is absolutely essential because it creates the base. But higher education is just as important, for it provides the cutting edge. And universities are the life-blood of higher education. Islands of excellence in professional education, such as Indian Institutes of Technology (IITs) and Indian Institutes of Management (IIMs), are valuable complements but-cannot be substitutes for universities which provide educational opportunities for people at large.

There can be no doubt that higher education has made a significant contribution to economic development, social progress and political democracy in independent India. It is a source of dynamism for the economy. It has created social opportunities for people. It has fostered the vibrant democracy in our polity. It has provided a beginning for the creation of a knowledge society. But it would be a mistake to focus on its strengths alone. It has weaknesses that are a cause for serious concern.

There is, in fact, a quiet crisis in higher education in India that runs deep. It is not yet discernible simply because there are pockets of excellence, an enormous reservoir of talented young people and an intense competition in the admissions process. And, in some important spheres, we continue to reap the benefits of what was sown in higher education 50 years ago by the founding fathers of the Republic. The reality is that we have miles to go. The proportion of our population, in the age group 18-24, that enters the world of higher education is around 7 per cent, which is only one-half the average for Asia. The opportunities for higher education, in terms of the number of places in universities, are simply not enough in relation to our needs. What is more, the quality of higher education in most of our universities requires substantial improvement.

It is clear that the system of higher education in India faces serious challenges. It needs a systematic overhaul, so that we can educate much larger numbers without diluting academic standards. This is imperative because the transformation of economy and society in the 21st century would depend, in significant part, on the spread and the quality of education among our people, particularly in the sphere of higher education. It is only an inclusive society that can provide the foundations for a knowledge society.

The challenges that confront higher education in India are clear. It needs a massive expansion of opportunities for higher education, to 1500 universities nationwide, that would enable India to attain a gross enrolment ratio of at least 15 per cent by 2015. It is just as important to raise the average quality of higher education in every sphere. At the same time, it is essential to create institutions that are exemplars of excellence at par with the best in the world. In the pursuit of these objectives, providing people with access to higher education in a socially inclusive manner is imperative. The realisation of these objectives, combined with access, would not only develop the skills and capabilities we need for the economy but would also help transform India into a knowledge economy and society.

Q.

What is the antonym of the expression "cutting edge" ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 40

Directions : The questions in this section are based on a single passage. The questions are to be answered on the basis of what is stated or implied in the passage. Kindly note that more than one of the choices may conceivably answer some of the questions. However, you are to choose the most appropriate answer; that is, the response that most accurately and completely answers the question.

The spread of education in society is at the foundation of success in countries that are latecomers to development. In the quest for development, primary education is absolutely essential because it creates the base. But higher education is just as important, for it provides the cutting edge. And universities are the life-blood of higher education. Islands of excellence in professional education, such as Indian Institutes of Technology (IITs) and Indian Institutes of Management (IIMs), are valuable complements but-cannot be substitutes for universities which provide educational opportunities for people at large.

There can be no doubt that higher education has made a significant contribution to economic development, social progress and political democracy in independent India. It is a source of dynamism for the economy. It has created social opportunities for people. It has fostered the vibrant democracy in our polity. It has provided a beginning for the creation of a knowledge society. But it would be a mistake to focus on its strengths alone. It has weaknesses that are a cause for serious concern.

There is, in fact, a quiet crisis in higher education in India that runs deep. It is not yet discernible simply because there are pockets of excellence, an enormous reservoir of talented young people and an intense competition in the admissions process. And, in some important spheres, we continue to reap the benefits of what was sown in higher education 50 years ago by the founding fathers of the Republic. The reality is that we have miles to go. The proportion of our population, in the age group 18-24, that enters the world of higher education is around 7 per cent, which is only one-half the average for Asia. The opportunities for higher education, in terms of the number of places in universities, are simply not enough in relation to our needs. What is more, the quality of higher education in most of our universities requires substantial improvement.

It is clear that the system of higher education in India faces serious challenges. It needs a systematic overhaul, so that we can educate much larger numbers without diluting academic standards. This is imperative because the transformation of economy and society in the 21st century would depend, in significant part, on the spread and the quality of education among our people, particularly in the sphere of higher education. It is only an inclusive society that can provide the foundations for a knowledge society.

The challenges that confront higher education in India are clear. It needs a massive expansion of opportunities for higher education, to 1500 universities nationwide, that would enable India to attain a gross enrolment ratio of at least 15 per cent by 2015. It is just as important to raise the average quality of higher education in every sphere. At the same time, it is essential to create institutions that are exemplars of excellence at par with the best in the world. In the pursuit of these objectives, providing people with access to higher education in a socially inclusive manner is imperative. The realisation of these objectives, combined with access, would not only develop the skills and capabilities we need for the economy but would also help transform India into a knowledge economy and society.

Q.

What is the meaning of the word "discemible" ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 41

If 80% of A = 20% of B and B = 5x% of A, then the value of x is   

Solution:

x = 400/5 = 80

QUESTION: 42

The next number in the sequence is: 19, 29, 37, 43........   

Solution:
19+10=29
29+8=37
37+6=43
43+4=47

So the next term is 47

QUESTION: 43

An unknown man is found murdered. The corpse has one gold plated tooth, right ear is pierced and a healed fracture of left hand thumb. A man with these characteristics is reported missing. What are the chances (probability) of the corpse being the missing man? (Given the occurrence of the gold-plated teeth in the area, 1 in 5000, left hand thumb fractures 1 in 20000 and of right ear pierces 1 in 100).  

Solution: Corpse has 1 gold plated tooth which occurred 1 in 5000 right ear pierced i.e 1 in 100 left hand thumb i.e 1 in 20000 therefore his probability is 1 in 5000×100×20000 =1 in 10000000000
QUESTION: 44

Value of 'A' in the expression, 
5+12x10/(120/240) = Ax10 is 

Solution: First simplify it and then solve it by using Bodmas it's so easy.5+120/1/2 = 5+240 = 245245=A×10[24.5=A]
QUESTION: 45

The Least Common Multiple (L.C.M.) of 0.12, 9.60 and 0.60 is   

Solution:

The correct answer is A as by applying the formula LCM = LCM of numerator/HCF of denominator we will get the A option.

QUESTION: 46

There are 30 boys and 40 girls in a class. If the average age of boys is 10 yr and average age of girls is 8 yr. Then the average age of the whole class is 

Solution:

The correct answer is B as’
Average of 30 boys and 40 girls
=30×10+40×8/30+40

=300+320/70=8.86 yr approx.

QUESTION: 47

A person spends 1/3 part of his income on food, 1/4 part on house rent and remaining Rs. 630 on other items. The house rent is  

Solution:

The correct answer is A as Let the income be x/3+x/4+630= x
7x+7560=12x
7560/5= x
1512=x
so the house rent will be 1512/4 = 378

QUESTION: 48

A person covers a certain distance by car at a speed of 30 km/h and comes back at a speed of 40 km/h. The average speed during the travel is  

Solution:

The correct answer is A as 
Average Speed =x+y/2xy
⇒2×30×40 / 30+40
=240/7
=34.3km/h
 

QUESTION: 49

An employer reduces the number of employees in the ratio 8:5 and increases their wages in the ratio 7:9. Therefore, the overall wages bill is  

Solution:

The correct answer is B as
 New Ratio of number of employees  = 8 : 5
and ratio in their wages = 7 : 9
Overall wage bill is decreased  in the ratio 7 x 8 : 5 x 9 = 56 : 45

QUESTION: 50

Father is 3 yr. older than the mother and the mother's age is now twice the daughter's age. If the daughter is 20 yr. old now, then the father's age when the daughter was born is  

Solution:

The correct answer is D as Let father's age is F,
Mother's age is M
Given, Daughter's age=20years
According to question
M=2(daughter's age)
=2*20=40
And, F = M+3 = 40+3 = 43
When daughter was born (i.e. 20 years ago)
Father's age = 43-20 = 23

QUESTION: 51

A mixture of 40 L of alcohol and water contains 10% water. How much water should he added to this mixture so that the new mixture contains 20% water ?  

Solution:

The correct option is B
FOLLOWING IS THE SOLUTION

QUESTION: 52

'A' can do a piece of work in 20 days and 'B' can do the same work in 15 days. How long will they take to finish the work, if both work together ?  

Solution: A in 20 and B in 15 so, we get LCM = 60 Which is 20 × 3 and 15 × 4 by adding these two rates we get 3+4 = 7 and they both are able to do the work in 60 / 7 = 8(7/4)
QUESTION: 53

A man can row 5 km/h in still water. If the speed of the current is 1 km/h. it takes 3 h more in upstream than in the downstream for the same distance. The distance is   

Solution:

The correct answer is A AS  man speed in downstream =(5+1) km/hr=6km/hr
A man speed in upstream=(5-1) km/hr=4km/hr
Let the reqd.dist be x km
According to question,
x/4 - x/6 =3
6x-4x/24=3
x=36 km

QUESTION: 54

A starts a business with Rs 5000 and B joins the business 5 months later with an investment of Rs 6000. After a year, they earn a profit of RS 34000. Find the shares of A and B in the profit amount depending on their individual investment.   

Solution:

The correct answer is A as following is the calculation for the solution Let A gets Rs x as profit then B will get (34000-x).
A had invested for 12 months while B had invested for 12-5 = 7months
(5000*12)/(6000*7) = x/(34000-x)
60/42 = x/(34000-x)
10/7 = x/(34000-x)
340000-10x = 7x
17x = 340000
x = 20000 (profit of A)
profit of B = 34000-20000 = 14000
Correct option is a) 20000,14000

QUESTION: 55

A farmer has some hens and some goats. If the total number of animal heads is 80 and the total number of animal feet is 200. What is the total number of goats?  

Solution:
QUESTION: 56

A square field has its area equal to 324 m2. The perimeter of the field is   

Solution:
Area of square field=SXS
SXS=324
S2=324
S=18m
Perimeter of square field=4XS
=4X18
=72m
Perimeter of square field is 72m or 7200cm
QUESTION: 57

A closed metal box measure 30 cm x 20 cm x 10 cm. Thickness of the metal is 1 cm. The volume of the metal required to make the box is   

Solution:
QUESTION: 58

The difference between the simple interest and the compound interest (compounded annually) on Rs. 2000 for 2 yr at 8% per annum will be 

Solution: Formula to calculate the difference between compound interest and simple interest when the duration is two years is (Principal ×rate×rate)/(100×100)putting the values (2000×8×8)/(100×100) it will approximately be equal to 13. 
QUESTION: 59

A dealer marked his goods 20% above the cost price and allows a discount of l0%. Then the gain percent is 

Solution: Assume the selling price of the product to be 100
now 20% hike means 100+20= 120 rupees
again 10% discount on 120 means 120-12=108
Therefore the gain amount is 108-100(original price)=8
8 is 8% of 100 therefore the gain percent is 100 :-)
QUESTION: 60

A man went to the Reserve Bank of India with Rs 2000. He asked the cashier to give him Rs 10 and Rs 20 notes only in return. The man got 150 notes in all. How many notes of Rs 10 did he receive?  

Solution:
QUESTION: 61

Which of the following Judges of the Supreme Court of India is famously known as the 'Green Judge' ?  

Solution: Kuldip Singh. Kuldip Singh (born 1 January 1932) is an Indian attorney and a former judge of the Supreme Court of India.
QUESTION: 62

Law Day is observed on    

Solution: The Government of India declared 26 November as Constitution Day on 19 November 2015 by a gazette notification.Previously this day was celebrated as Law Day. 26 November was chosen to spread the importance of the constitution and to spread thoughts and ideas of Ambedkar.
QUESTION: 63

In which year, Defence Research & Development Organisation (DRDO) was formed by the amalgamation of the Technical Development Establishment (TDE) of the Indian Army and the Directorate of Technical Development & Production (DTDP) with the Defence Science Organisation (DSO)  

Solution:

The correct option is B as DRDO was formed in 1958 from the amalgamation of the then already functioning Technical Development Establishment (TDEs) of the Indian Army and the Directorate of Technical Development & Production (DTDP) with the Defence Science Organisation (DSO).

QUESTION: 64

The Reserve Bank of India was established in the year   

Solution:
QUESTION: 65

Lord Buddha's image is sometimes shown with the hand gesture, called 'Bhumisparsha Mudra'. It signifies 

Solution:

The hand gesture of Lord Buddha called 'Bhumisparsha Mudra' signifies Buddha's calling of the Earth to watch over Mara and to prevent Mara from disturbing his meditation and his calling of the Earth to witness his purity and chastity despite the temptations of  Mara.

QUESTION: 66

Which of the following statements is INCORRECT about Fundamental Duties under the Constitution of India? It shall be the duty of every citizen of India   

Solution:

The correct option is D as vote in public elections is not a fundamental duty as it is upon the citizen whether to vote or not.

QUESTION: 67

Which one of the following scripts of ancient India was mostly written from right to left?  

Solution: The Kharosthi script, also spelled Kharoshthi or Kharoṣṭhī, was an ancient Indian script used in ancient Gandhara (now Pakistan and eastern Afghanistan), a Mahajanapada of ancient India, to write Gandhari Prakrit and Sanskrit. It was popular in Central Asia as well.
QUESTION: 68

During the time of which Mughal Emperor did the East India Company establish its first factory in India?  

Solution: The Company's ships first arrived in India, at the port of Surat, in 1608. Sir Thomas Roe reached the court of the Mughal Emperor, Jahangir, as the emissary of King James I in 1615, and gained for the British the right to establish a factory at Surat.
QUESTION: 69

Who, among the following, first translated the Bhagwat Gita into English?  

Solution:

In 1785, the Bhagavad Gita was first translated into English by Charles Wilkins and published as “Bhagvat-geeta or Dialogues of Kreeshna and Arjoon” by the British East India Company with an introduction by Lord Warren Hastings, the first British Governor-General of India.

QUESTION: 70

Match List I with List II and select the correct answer using the codes given below the lists

Solution:

The correct option is D.
Chandrakanta. by Devaki Nandan Khatri. Devaki Nandan Khatri (1861 - 1913) originally wrote his novel Chandrakanta for serial publication.Bankim Chandra Chatterjee's first Bengali novel Durgesh Nandini revolutionised Bengali prose writing.  Sevasadan is one of the most iconic novels by 'Upanyas Samrat' Munshi Premchand
Nil Darpan is a Bengali play written by Dinabandhu Mitra in 1858–1859.

QUESTION: 71

Match List I with List 11 and select the correct answer using the codes given below the lists

Solution:

The correct answer is D as it matches the correct form.

QUESTION: 72

Who was not a Chief Justice of India?   

Solution: Hans Raj Khanna (3 July 1912 – 25 February 2008) was an Indian advocate, jurist and judge. He entered the Indian judiciary in 1952 and subsequently was elevated as a judge to the Supreme Court of India in 1971 where he continued till his resignation in 1977. Two of his judgements form the basis of modern constitutional law in India, even decades after those were delivered.
QUESTION: 73

Who was the first Attomey-General for India?

Solution: Setalvad. Motilal Chimanlal Setalvad (c. 1884 – 1974) was an eminent Indian jurist, who became the first and longest serving Attorney General for India (1950–1963). He also remained the Chairman of the First Law Commission of India (1955–1958), which is mandated for legal reform in the country by Government of India.
QUESTION: 74

Under the leadership of Mahatma Gandhi, the Civil Disobedience Movement. launched in 1930, started from?

Solution: On March 12, 1930, Indian independence leader Mohandas Gandhi begins a defiant march to the sea in protest of the British monopoly on salt, his boldest act of civil disobedience yet against British rule in India.
QUESTION: 75

Match List I with List II and select the correct answer using the codes given below the lists

Solution:
QUESTION: 76

Which of the following planets has the maximum number of natural satellites?   

Solution: Eight of Jupiter's moons are regular satellites, with 4 large, spherical moons, and 4 smaller moons that orbit closer to Jupiter. Jupiter has an additional 55 tiny irregular satellites. The planet with the second highest number of moons is Saturn, with 61 moons.
QUESTION: 77

In India, the interest rate on savings accounts in all the nationalised commercial banks is fixed by?  

Solution:

The correct answer is D as Interest rate on saving bank account is fixed by the RBI.

QUESTION: 78

Solvents are the substances used to dissolve other substances. Consider the following substances

(1) Water
(2) Ether
(3) Toluene
(4) Chloroform
(5) Ethanol

Which of the above can be used as solvents?  

Solution:

The correct option is D as all the given substances are solvents .therefore all the given are correct.

QUESTION: 79

Viruses are parasitic, having DNA/RNA  but, they can be crystallised and lack respiration. Therefore, they are treated as   

Solution:

The correct answer is C as Viruses don't have any genetic material of its own (RNA).It get it when it invades another living cell say human cell which makes it living entity.

QUESTION: 80

Who is the winner of the coveted Dadasaheb Phalke Award for the year 2013?   

Solution:

The correct answer is B  as gulzar  the winner of the coveted Dadasaheb Phalke Award for the year 2013

QUESTION: 81

Who among the following has been recently appointed as brand ambassador for Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF)  

Solution:

The correct answer is C as Mary kom has been announced as ambassador of the force, it is because of her achievements and courage.

QUESTION: 82

Till date (2014), how many people have been awarded the Bharat Ratna Award?  

Solution:

The correct answer is C as he Bharat Ratna is the highest civilian award of the Republic of India. Instituted in 1954, and ha been 43 

QUESTION: 83

Which country Malala Yousafzai belongs to?  

Solution: Pakistani Malala Yousafzai was born in Mingora, Pakistan, located in the country's Swat Valley, on July 12, 1997. For the first few years of her life, her hometown remained a popular tourist spot that was known for its summer festivals. However, the area began to change as the Taliban tried to take control.
QUESTION: 84

Who recently became the first woman chief of the State Bank of India?  

Solution:
Arundhati Bhattacharya
Arundhati Bhattacharya is a retired Indian banker and former Chairman of the State Bank of India. She is the first woman to be the Chairman of State Bank of India . In 2016, she was listed as the 25th most powerful woman in the world by Forbes.
QUESTION: 85

Who is the Chairman of the 14th Finance Commission?

Solution:
Y V Reddy
The 14th Finance Commission was constituted in January 2014. Commissions chairman was former RBI governor Y V Reddy and its members were Sushma Nath, M. Govinda Rao, Abhijit Sen, Sudipto Mundle. In December 2014, Commission had submitted its report to the President Pranab Mukherjee.
QUESTION: 86

The Chairperson of the Seventh Pay Commission is   

Solution:  Recently, Seventh Central Pay Commission, headed by Justice A K Mathur has submitted its report to Finance Minister Arun Jaitley.
QUESTION: 87

Which one of the following is NOT correctly matched?

Solution:

The correct answer is C as United Nations Industrial Development Organization in vienna.

QUESTION: 88

The First Five Year Plan of India was based on   

Solution: The First Five-year Plan was launched in 1951 which mainly focused in development of the primary sector. The First Five-Year Plan was based on the Harrod–Domar model with few modifications.
QUESTION: 89

Which one of the following measures is NOT likely to aid in improving lndia's balance of payment position?

Solution:

The correct answer is D as it will directly affect yours import export ratio thereby in balancing your Balance of payment position(BOP).

QUESTION: 90

Find out the correct chronological sequence of the following 'persons' visit to India at one time or another

(1) Fa-Hien
(2) I-Tsing (Yijing)
(3) Megasthanese
(4) Hiuen-Tsang  

Solution:

The correct answer is C as 
Fa-Hien cimes to india in 399 A.D.
Hiuen-Tsang comes to india in 629 A.D.
after that I-Ysing (Yijing) comes to india.
so the sequence is 3,1,4,2.

QUESTION: 91

Which was the first newspaper to be published in India?  

Solution:
Bengal Gazette
Hickey's Bengal Gazette was an English newspaper published from Kolkata (then Calcutta), India. It was the first major newspaper in India, started in 1780. It was published for two years. Founded by James Augustus Hicky, a highly eccentric Irishman who had previously spent two years in Jail for debt.
QUESTION: 92

The change in the colour of stars is linked to

Solution: The other major factor effecting a star's color is its temperature. As stars increase in heat, the overall radiated energy increases, and the peak of the curve moves to shorter wavelengths. In other words, as a star becomes hotter, the light it emits is pushed further and further towards the blue end of the spectrum.
QUESTION: 93

Which one of the following does NOT remain to be a planet now? 

Solution:

The correct option is C as pluto is demoted and reclassified as a dwarf planet

QUESTION: 94

Who was appointed as the 23rd Governor of the Reserve Bank of India?   

Solution:

On 11 January 2013, Urjit Patel was appointed as Deputy Governor of RBI for a period of three years.He took over charge of the vital Monetary Policy Department, succeeding Subir Gokarn to the post.On 20 August 2016, he was appointed as the governor of Reserve Bank Of India(RBI) succeeding Raghuram Rajan.

QUESTION: 95

Which one of following offices is held during the pleasure of the President of India?  

Solution: Governors of the states, Attorney General of India, Civil Sevices Personal, Council of Ministers and Prime Minister hold the office during pleasure of President.The chairman and members of UPSC do not hold office during pleasure of President, infact they hold a fixed tenure.CAG is appointed by President and removed.
QUESTION: 96

Who was the first winner of the prestigious Jnanpith Award?  

Solution:
First Jnanpith: The first award for Jnanpith was given in 1965 to G. Sankara Kurup for Malayali Literature

QUESTION: 97

Match List I with List II and choose the correct answer

Solution:

The correct answer is C  as it is correct match for the given columns.

QUESTION: 98

Who was among the following honoured with Arjun Award in Chess for the year 2013?  

Solution:

The correct answer is D as he arjuna ward is given by the Ministry Of Youth Affairs & Sports,GOI to recognize the outstanding achievement in National Sports. And In the year 2013 it was won by Abhijeet Gupta.

QUESTION: 99

Economic growth rate projected by the IMF for India in the fiscal year 2014-15 is 

Solution:  5.4 per cent in 2014, supported by slightly stronger global growth, improving export competitiveness and implementation of recently approved investment projects,” the latest edition of the World Economic Outlook released by the International Monetary Fund (IMF) said.
QUESTION: 100

Who was sworn in as the Prime Minister of Italy on 22nd February 2014?  

Solution:
Matteo Renzi
On 22 February 2014, after tensions in the Democratic Party the PD's Secretary Matteo Renzi was sworn in as the new Prime Minister.
QUESTION: 101

Which one of following is the highest peacetime gallantry award of India?  

Solution:
Ashok Chakra Award
Ashok Chakra Award – An Indian military decoration awarded for valour, courageous action or self-sacrifice away from the battlefield. It is the peacetime equivalent of the Param Vir Chakra. Kirti Chakra – Second in order of precedence of peacetime gallantry awards.
QUESTION: 102

Which one of the following gases is lighter than air?   

Solution: The common gases that are lighter than air are hydrogen, helium, neon, nitrogen, ammonia, methane and carbon monoxide . Oxygen, fluorine, chlorine, hydrogen chloride, carbon dioxide, sulphur dioxide and hydrogen sulphide are heavier than air.
QUESTION: 103

Name the scientist who is known as the father of modern genetics   

Solution: Gregor Mendel, the father of modern genetics, presents his research on experiments in plant hybridization. Gregor Mendel, a 19th century Augustinian monk, is called the father of modern genetics.
QUESTION: 104

Which year was designated by the United Nations as International Women's Year?   

Solution:
1975
International Women's Year (IWY) was the name given to 1975 by the United Nations. Since that year March 8 has been celebrated as International Women's Day, and the United Nations Decade for Women, from 1976 to 1985, was also established.
QUESTION: 105

Mention the correct abbreviation for ATM   

Solution: The automated teller machine (ATM) is an automatic banking machine (ABM) which allows customer to complete basic transactions without any help of bank representatives. There are two types of automated teller machine (ATMs). The basic one allows the customer to only draw cash and receive a report of the account balance.
QUESTION: 106

General Election is being held in India from 7 April to 12 May 2014 to constitute   

Solution: Jitesh Jha. Election Commission of India on 5 March 2014 announced that the 16th Lok Sabha elections will be held from 7 April 2014 to 12 May 2014 and the counting will take place on 16 May 2014. The Lok Sabha elections spread over nine phases.
QUESTION: 107

Mention the name of the current Chief Justice of India   

Solution: Its all wrong , Answer is CJ RANJAN GOGOI . JOINED OFFICE 2ND OCTOBER 2018
QUESTION: 108

The 9th Ministerial Conference of the WTO, held during 3 December - 6 December 2013, was concluded at  

Solution: The 9th WTO Ministerial Conference was concluded on 6 December 2013 at Bali, Indonesia. The Ministerial Conference has agreed on the revised draft of Bali Package.
QUESTION: 109

Nobel Prize in Literature for the year 2013 was awarded to  

Solution: Alice Munro, the renowned Canadian short-story writer whose visceral work explores the tangled relationships between men and women, small-town existence and the fallibility of memory, won the 2013 Nobel Prize in Literature on Thursday.
QUESTION: 110

Which one of the following satellites was successfully launched by the ISRO's Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV-C24) on 4th April 2014?   

Solution:

The correct answer is A IRNSS-1B as one of the following satellites was successfully launched by the ISRO's Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV-C24) on 4th April 2014

QUESTION: 111

Directions : Read the following information carefully and answer the questions given below

Five friends Satish, Rajesh, Rehman, Rakesh, and Vineet. Each presents one paper to their class on Physics, Zoology, Botany, English, or Geology one day a week, Monday through Friday.

(i) Vineet does not present English and does not give his presentation on Tuesday.
(ii) Rajesh makes the Geology presentation, and does not do it on Monday or Friday.
(iii) The Physics presentation is made on Thursday.
(iv) Rehman makes his presentation, which is not on English, on Wednesday.
(v) The Botany presentation is on Friday, and not by Rakesh.
(vi) Satish makes his presentation on Monday.

Q.

What day is the English presentation made? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 112

Directions : Read the following information carefully and answer the questions given below

Five friends Satish, Rajesh, Rehman, Rakesh, and Vineet. Each presents one paper to their class on Physics, Zoology, Botany, English, or Geology one day a week, Monday through Friday.

(i) Vineet does not present English and does not give his presentation on Tuesday.
(ii) Rajesh makes the Geology presentation, and does not do it on Monday or Friday.
(iii) The Physics presentation is made on Thursday.
(iv) Rehman makes his presentation, which is not on English, on Wednesday.
(v) The Botany presentation is on Friday, and not by Rakesh.
(vi) Satish makes his presentation on Monday.

Q.

What presentation does Vineet do? 

Solution:

The correct option is D.
Name        paper       day   
Rajesh      geology   tuesday
Rakesh     physics   thursday
Vineet       botany     friday
Satish       english     monday
Rehman   zoology    wednesday

QUESTION: 113

Directions : Read the following information carefully and answer the questions given below

Five friends Satish, Rajesh, Rehman, Rakesh, and Vineet. Each presents one paper to their class on Physics, Zoology, Botany, English, or Geology one day a week, Monday through Friday.
(i) Vineet does not present English and does not give his presentation on Tuesday.
(ii) Rajesh makes the Geology presentation, and does not do it on Monday or Friday.
(iii) The Physics presentation is made on Thursday.
(iv) Rehman makes his presentation, which is not on English, on Wednesday.
(v) The Botany presentation is on Friday, and not by Rakesh.
(vi) Satish makes his presentation on Monday.
Q.

What day does Rakesh make his presentation on?

Solution:

The correct option is D as following is the table for the reference.

QUESTION: 114

Directions : Each question contains a statement on relationship and a question regarding relationship based on the statement. Choose the correct option.

Q.

Pointing to a photograph, a man said, "I have no brother or sister but that man's father is my father's son". Whose photograph was that?  

Solution:
QUESTION: 115

Directions : Each question contains a statement on relationship and a question regarding relationship based on the statement. Choose the correct option.

Q.

Ranjan introduces Abhay as the son of the only brother of his father's wife. How is Abhay related to Ranjan?

Solution:

The correct answer is C as ranjan introduced abhay as the son of his only brother of his father's wife here fathers wife means mother. ranjan father is also father of abhay father so ranjan is abhay's father brother so abhay is the cousin of ranjan and ranjan is the uncle for abhay here the question says how abhay related to ranjan soo cousin is the correct answer.

QUESTION: 116

Directions : Each question contains a statement on relationship and a question regarding relationship based on the statement. Choose the correct option.

Q.

Pointing to a lady on the stage, Bhumika said. "She is the sister of the son of the wife of my husband". How is the lady related to Bhumika?   

Solution:

The correct answer is D as bhomika intro her that wife of her husband's and her son's sister

QUESTION: 117

Directions : Each question contains a statement on relationship and a question regarding relationship based on the statement. Choose the correct option.

Q.

Pinky, who is Victor's daughter, says to Lucy, "Your mother Rosy is the younger sister of my father, who is the third child of Joseph". How is Joseph related to Lucy? 

Solution:

The correct option is D.

According to the given information, the relation diagram is as follows:
So, Joseph is grandfather to Lucy.

QUESTION: 118

Directions : Each question contains a statement on relationship and a question regarding relationship based on the statement. Choose the correct option.

Q.

Pramod told Vinod, “Yesterday I defeated the only brother of the daughter of my grandmother”. Whom did Promod defeat?  

Solution: Pramod's grandmother's daughter's brother is Pramod 's father 
QUESTION: 119

Directions : Read the information given below to answer the questions.

(i) In a family of six persons. there are people from three generations. Each person has separate profession and also each one likes different colours. There are two couples in the family.
(ii) Charan is a CA and his wife neither is a doctor nor likes green colour.
(iii) Engineer likes red colour and his wife is a teacher.
(iv) Vanita is mother-in-law of Namita and she likes orange colour.
(v) Mohan is grandfather of Raman and Raman, who is a principal, likes black colour.
(vi) Sarita is granddaughter of Vanita and she likes blue colour. Sarita's mother likes white colour.

Q.
Who is an Engineer?

Solution:

The correct answer is D as
 Sarita likes blue colour...so she can't be the engineer ..
Vanita likes orange colour so she can't be an engineer..
Namita likes white colour sooo she can't be an engineer..
lastly engineer likes red colour ....so MOhan is engineer because there is no any option of none of these or can't be determined
 

QUESTION: 120

Directions : Read the information given below to answer the questions.

Five friends Satish. Rajesh, Rehman. Rakesh. and Vineet. – each presents one paper to their class on Physics. Zoology, Botany, English, or Geology – one day a week. Monday through Friday.

(i) Vineet does not present English and does not give his presentation on Tuesday.

(ii) Rajesh makes the Geology presentation, and does not do it on Monday or Friday.

(iii) The Physics presentation is made on Thursday.

(iv) Rehman makes his presentation, which is not on English, on Wednesday.

(v) The Botany presentation is on Friday, and not by Rakesh.

(vi) Satish makes his presentation on Monday.


What presentation does Vineet do„?

Solution:


Hence Vineet does Botany Presentation.

QUESTION: 121

Directions : Read the information given below to answer the questions.

Five friends Satish, Rajesh, Rehman, Rakesh, and Vineet. Each presents one paper to their class on Physics, Zoology, Botany, English, or Geology one day a week, Monday through Friday.

(i) Vineet does not present English and does not give his presentation on Tuesday.
(ii) Rajesh makes the Geology presentation, and does not do it on Monday or Friday.
(iii) The Physics presentation is made on Thursday.
(iv) Rehman makes his presentation, which is not on English, on Wednesday.
(v) The Botany presentation is on Friday, and not by Rakesh.
(vi) Satish makes his presentation on Monday.

Q.
Which of the following is the correct pair of two couples?

Solution:
QUESTION: 122

Directions : Read the information given below to answer the questions.

Five friends Satish, Rajesh, Rehman, Rakesh, and Vineet. Each presents one paper to their class on Physics, Zoology, Botany, English, or Geology one day a week, Monday through Friday.
(i) Vineet does not present English and does not give his presentation on Tuesday.
(ii) Rajesh makes the Geology presentation, and does not do it on Monday or Friday.
(iii) The Physics presentation is made on Thursday.
(iv) Rehman makes his presentation, which is not on English, on Wednesday.
(v) The Botany presentation is on Friday, and not by Rakesh.
(vi) Satish makes his presentation on Monday.

Q.
How many ladies are there in the family?  

Solution:
QUESTION: 123

Directions : Read the information given below to answer the questions.

Five friends Satish, Rajesh, Rehman, Rakesh, and Vineet. Each presents one paper to their class on Physics, Zoology, Botany, English, or Geology one day a week, Monday through Friday.

(i) Vineet does not present English and does not give his presentation on Tuesday.
(ii) Rajesh makes the Geology presentation, and does not do it on Monday or Friday.
(iii) The Physics presentation is made on Thursday.
(iv) Rehman makes his presentation, which is not on English, on Wednesday.
(v) The Botany presentation is on Friday, and not by Rakesh.
(vi) Satish makes his presentation on Monday.

Q.
Which colour is liked by CA?

Solution:
QUESTION: 124

Directions : Read the information given below to answer the questions.

Two buses start from the opposite points of a main road, 150 kms apart. The first bus runs for 25 kms and takes a right turn and then runs for 15 kms. It then turns left and runs for another 25 kms and takes the direction back to reach the main road. In the meantime. due to a minor breakdown, the other bus has run only 35 kms along the main road. What would be the distance between the two buses at this point?

Solution:
QUESTION: 125

Directions : Read the information given below to answer the questions.

'G', 'H', 'I', 'J', 'K', 'L', 'M', 'N' are sitting around a round table in the same order for group discussion at equal distances. Their positions are clock wise. If 'M' sits in the north, then what will be the position of 'J'?

Solution:
QUESTION: 126

Directions : Read the information given below to answer the questions.

Roshan, Vaibhav, Vinay and Sumit are playing cards. Roshan and Vaibhav are partners. Sumit faces towards North. If Roshan faces towards West. then who faces towards South?  

Solution:
QUESTION: 127

Directions : Read the information given below to answer the questions.

Five boys are standing in a row facing East. Pavan is to the left of Tavan, Vipin, Chavan. Tavan, Vipin, Chavan are to the left of Nakul. Chavan is between Tavan and Vipin. If Vipin is fourth from the left, then how far is Tavan from the right?  

Solution:
QUESTION: 128

Directions : Read the information given below to answer the questions.

One morning after sunrise, Suraj was standing facing a pole. The shadow of the pole fell exactly to his right. Which direction was Suraj facing?   

Solution:

The correct option is B.
Since the shadow of Suresh falls to his right. So he is facing the South.
 

QUESTION: 129

Directions : Read the information given below to answer the questions.

Diana is three times older than Jackson; Edward is half the age of Stephen, Jackson is older than Edward.

Q.

Which one of the following can be inferred?  

Solution:
QUESTION: 130

Directions : Read the information given below to answer the questions.

Diana is three times older than Jackson; Edward is half the age of Stephen, Jackson is older than Edward.

Q.

Which one of the following information will be sufficient to estimate Diana's age?   

Solution:
QUESTION: 131

Directions : Study the sequence/pattern of letters or numbers carefully to work out the pattern on which it is based, and answer what the next item in the sequence must be. For example, the sequence 'A, C, E, G, ?' has odd numbered letters of alphabet; therefore, the next item must be 'I'.

Q.
0, 3,  8, 15, ?.

Solution:
QUESTION: 132

Directions : Study the sequence/pattern of letters or numbers carefully to work out the pattern on which it is based, and answer what the next item in the sequence must be. For example, the sequence 'A, C, E, G, ?' has odd numbered letters of alphabet; therefore, the next item must be 'I'.

Q.

8,16, 28, 44, ?.   

Solution: The series follows the following sequence:-8 + 8 = 1616 +12= 2828 + 16 = 44 and hence,44 + 20 = 64Therefore option 'B'is correct
QUESTION: 133

Directions : Study the sequence/pattern of letters or numbers carefully to work out the pattern on which it is based, and answer what the next item in the sequence must be. For example, the sequence 'A, C, E, G, ?' has odd numbered letters of alphabet; therefore, the next item must be 'I'.

Q.

0, 6, 24, 60, 120, 210, ?.

Solution:
QUESTION: 134

Directions : Study the sequence/pattern of letters or numbers carefully to work out the pattern on which it is based, and answer what the next item in the sequence must be. For example, the sequence 'A, C, E, G, ?' has odd numbered letters of alphabet; therefore, the next item must be 'I'.

Q.
POQ, SRT, VUW, ?.   

Solution:

There is a gap of two letters before the next one. So the next in the sequence should be YXZ.

QUESTION: 135

Directions : Study the sequence/pattern of letters or numbers carefully to work out the pattern on which it is based, and answer what the next item in the sequence must be. For example, the sequence 'A, C, E, G, ?' has odd numbered letters of alphabet; therefore, the next item must be 'I'.

Q.

A1, C3, F6, J10, O15, ?.

Solution:
QUESTION: 136

Directions : Two words, which have a certain relation, are paired. Select a correct option to substitute the question mark so as to make a similar relational pair with the word given after double colon

Q.

Bow : Arrow :: Pistol   

Solution:

Bow shoots the arrow and in the same analogy the pistol shoots the bullet.

QUESTION: 137

Directions : Two words, which have a certain relation, are paired. Select a correct option to substitute the question mark so as to make a similar relational pair with the word given after double colon

Q.

Eye : Wink :: Heart:  

Solution:
QUESTION: 138

Directions : Two words, which have a certain relation, are paired. Select a correct option to substitute the question mark so as to make a similar relational pair with the word given after double colon

Q.

Ocean : Water :: Glacier : ?  

Solution:

“Glaciers” are made up of Ice in the same way as the  Ocean is filled with water.

QUESTION: 139

Directions : Two words, which have a certain relation, are paired. Select a correct option to substitute the question mark so as to make a similar relational pair with the word given after double colon

Q.

Prima facie : On the first view :: In pari delicto : ?  

Solution:

The meaning of  Prima facie is On the first view. So, In pari delicto means “both parties equally at fault.”

QUESTION: 140

Directions : Two words, which have a certain relation, are paired. Select a correct option to substitute the question mark so as to make a similar relational pair with the word given after double colon

Q.

Delusion : hallucination :: Chagrin : ?

Solution:

The correct option is D.
The words are synonyms of each other. So, chagrin' s synonym is annoyance.

QUESTION: 141

Directions : Question comprises two statements (numbered as I and II). You have to take the statements as true even if they seem to be at variance with commonly known facts. Read all the conclusions and then decide which of the given conclusions logically follow from the given statements, disregarding commonly known facts.

(I) All contracts are agreements.

(II) All agreements are accepted offers.

Q.
Which of the following derivations is correct?

Solution:

Given that all ‘contracts’ are agreements and if all agreements are ‘accepted offers’. So, All contracts are accepted offers.

QUESTION: 142

Directions : Question comprises two statements (numbered as I and II). You have to take the statements as true even if they seem to be at variance with commonly known facts. Read all the conclusions and then decide which of the given conclusions logically follow from the given statements, disregarding commonly known facts.

(I) Some beautiful women are actresses.
(lI) All actresses are good dancers.

Q.
Which of the following derivations is correct?

Solution:
QUESTION: 143

Directions : Two statements are given below followed by two conclusions (I and II). You have to consider the two statements to be true even if they seem to be at variance with commonly known facts. You have to decide which of the conclusions, if any, follow from the given statements.

Statements:

Some books are magazines.
Some magazines are novels.

Conclusions:

(I) Some books are novels.
(II) Some novels are magazines.  

Solution:
QUESTION: 144

Directions : Two statements are given below followed by two conclusions (I and II). You have to consider the two statements to be true even if they seem to be at variance with commonly known facts. You have to decide which of the conclusions, if any, follow from the given statements.

Statements:

All students like excursions.
Some students go for higher education.

Conclusions:

(I) Students who go for higher education also like excursions.
(II) Some students do not go for higher education, but like excursions.  

Solution:
QUESTION: 145

Directions : Two statements are given below followed by two conclusions (I and II). You have to consider the two statements to be true even if they seem to be at variance with commonly known facts. You have to decide which of the conclusions, if any, follow from the given statements.

Statements:

All good hockey players are in the Indian Hockey team.
'X' is not a good hockey player.

Conclusions:

(I) 'X' is not in the Indian Hockey team.
(II) 'X' wants to be in the Indian Hockey team.

Solution:
QUESTION: 146

Directions : In the following question, a related pair of words is followed by four pairs of words or phrases. Select the pair that best expresses a relationship similar to the one expressed in the question pair.

Q.

India : Tricolour

Solution:

The term "tricolour" refers to the Indian national flag and in the same analogy stars and stripes is the name of the USA's flag.

QUESTION: 147

Directions : In the following question, a related pair of words is followed by four pairs of words or phrases. Select the pair that best expresses a relationship similar to the one expressed in the question pair.

Q.

Statute : Law   

Solution:

The correct option is A.
A statute is a law passed by a legislature; and statutory law is the body of law resulting from statutes. A statute—or the statutory law—may also be referred to as legislation. Similarly, a proviso is a clause in a deed or statute, beginn- ing with "provided that" and operating as a condition or qualification, frequently inserted to save or except, from the effect of the preceding words, some rights, instances or cases.

QUESTION: 148

Directions : In the following question, a related pair of words is followed by four pairs of words or phrases. Select the pair that best expresses a relationship similar to the one expressed in the question pair.

Q.

Buddhists : Pagoda   

Solution:
QUESTION: 149

Directions : question consists of five statements (a-e) followed by options consisting of three statements put together in a specific order. Choose the option which indicates a valid argument; that is, where the third statement is a conclusion drawn from the preceding two statements.

a. Law graduates are in great demand.
b. Rajesh and Krishna are in great demand.
c. Rajesh is in great demand.
d. Krishna is in great demand.
e. Rajesh and Krishna are law graduates.

Choose the correct option   

Solution:

option a) law graduates are in great demand and option b) Rajesh and Krishna are in great demand that means both Rajesh and Krishna are law graduates.

QUESTION: 150

Directions : question consists of five statements (a-e) followed by options consisting of three statements put together in a specific order. Choose the option which indicates a valid argument; that is, where the third statement is a conclusion drawn from the preceding two statements.

a. All captains are great players.
b. Some captains are successful sports administrators.
c. Ritwik is a great player.
d. Ritwik is a captain and successful sports administrator.
e. Some successful sports administrators are great players.

Choose the correct option

Solution:

The correct option is B.
if we have statement (a) and (b) ....we can conclude (e)

QUESTION: 151

Directions : This section consists of legal propositions/principles (here in after referred to as 'principle') and facts. These principles have to be applied to the given facts to arrive at the most reasonable conclusion. Such principles may or may not be true in the real sense, yet you have to conclusively assume them to be true for the purposes of this section. In other words, in answering the following questions, you must not rely on any principles except the principles that are given herein below for every question. Further, you must not assume any facts other than those stated in the question. The objective of this section is to test your interest towards study of law, research aptitude and problem solving ability even if the 'most reasonable conclusion' arrived at may be unacceptable for any other reason. It is not the object of this section to test your knowledge of law.

Principle: When one person signifies to another his willingness to do or to abstain from doing anything, with a view to obtaining the assent of that other to such act or abstinence, he is said to make a proposal. The expression of willingness/desire results in a valid proposal only when it is made/addressed to some person(s).

Facts: 'X' makes the following statement in an uninhabited hall: 'I wish to sell my mobile phone for Rs 1,000'.

Q.
Which of the following, derivations is CORRECT?   

Solution:
QUESTION: 152

Principle: A proposal (offer) should be made with an intention that after its valid acceptance, a legally binding promise or agreement will be created. The test for the determination of such intention is not subjective, rather it is objective. The intention of the parties is to be ascertained from the terms of the agreement and the surrounding circumstances under which such an agreement is entered into. As a general rule, in the case of arrangements regulating social relations, it follows as a matter of course that the parties do not intend legal consequences to follow. On the contrary, as a general rule, in the case of arrangements regulating business affairs, it follows as a matter of course that the parties intend legal consequences to follow. However, the above rules are just presumptive in nature, and hence, can be rebutted.

Facts: One morning while having breakfast, 'X' , the father, says to 'Y' (X's son), in a casual manner, 'I shall buy a motorbike for you if you get through the CLAT.'

Q. Which of the following derivations is CORRECT?

Solution:
QUESTION: 153

Principle: Acceptance (of offer) must be communicated by the offeree to the offeror so as to give rise to a binding obligation. The expression 'by the offeree to the offeror' includes communication between their authorised agents.

Facts: 'X' made an offer to buy Y's property for a stipulated price. 'Y' accepted it and communicated his acceptance to 'Z' a stranger.

Q. Which of the following derivations is CORRECT?

Solution:
QUESTION: 154

Principle: Acceptance should be made while the offer is still subsisting. The offeror is free to retract his offer at any time before his offer gets accepted by the offeree. Once the offer is withdrawn or is lapsed, it is not open to be accepted so as to give rise to a contract. Similarly, if a time is prescribed within which the offer is to be accepted, then, the offer must be accepted within the prescribed time. And, if no time is prescribed, then, the acceptance must be made within a reasonable time. 'What is a reasonable time'  is a question of fact which is to be determined by taking into account all the relevant facts and surrounding circumstances.

Facts: 'X' makes an offer to 'Y' to sell his equipment for Rs.1,000.00. No time is specified for the acceptance. 'Y' sends his reply two years after receiving the offer.

Q. Which of the following derivations is CORRECT?

Solution:
QUESTION: 155

Principle: Minor's agreement is void from the very beginning. It can never be validated. It cannot be enforced in the court of law.

Facts: 'A', a boy of 16 years of age, agrees to buy a camera from 'B' , who is a girl of 21 years of age.

Q. Which of the following derivations is CORRECT? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 156

Principle: A contract which is duly supported by real and lawful consideration is valid notwithstanding the fact that the consideration is inadequate. The quantum of consideration is for the parties to decide at the time of making a contract, and not for the courts (to decide) when the contract is sought to be enforced. An agreement to which the consent of the promisor is freely given is not void merely because the consideration is inadequate; but the inadequacy of the consideration may be taken into account by the Court in determining the question whether the consent of the promisor was freely given.

Facts: 'A' agrees to sell his mobile phone worth Rs.20,000/- for 100/- only to 'B'. A's consent is freely given.

Q. Which of the following derivations is CORRECT?  

Solution:
QUESTION: 157

Principle: The consideration or object of an agreement is unlawful if it is forbidden by law. Every agreement of which the object or consideration is unlawful is void.

Facts: 'X', promises to pay 'Y' Rs.50,000, if he ('Y') commits a crime. 'X' further promises to indemnify him ('Y') against any liability arising thereof. 'Y' agrees to act as per X's promise.

Q. Which of the following derivations is CORRECT?  

Solution:
QUESTION: 158

Principle: The consideration or object of an agreement is unlawful if the Court regards it as opposed to public policy. Every agreement of which the object or consideration is unlawful is void.

Facts: 'X' promises to obtain for 'Y' an employment in the public service; and 'Y' promises to pay Rs.5,00,000/- to 'X'.

Q. Which of the following derivations is CORRECT?

Solution: The answer is D because any agreement with the object or consideration which is opposed to public policy is void 
QUESTION: 159

Principle: Two or more persons are said to consent if they agree upon the same thing in the same sense. Consent is said to be free when it is not caused by coercion, or undue influence, or fraud, or misrepresentation, or mistake. When consent to an agreement is caused by coercion, undue influence, fraud or misrepresentation, the agreement is a contract voidable (rescindable or terminable) at the option of the party whose consent was so caused. However, when consent to an agreement is caused by mistake as to a matter of fact essential to the agreement, the agreement is void.

Facts: 'X' threatens to gun down 'Y', if he ('Y') does not sell his property worth Rs. 20,00,000/- for Rs 1,00,000/- only. As a consequence, 'Y' agrees to sell it as demanded by 'X'.

Q. Which of the following derivations is CORRECT?

Solution:
QUESTION: 160

Principle: Agreements in restraint of marriage are void.

Facts: 'X' enters into an agreement with 'Y' whereunder he agrees not to many anybody else other than a person whose name starts with the letter and promises to pay Rs. 1,00,000/- to 'Y' if he ('X') breaks this agreement.

Q. Which of the following derivations is CORRECT?

Solution:
QUESTION: 161

Principle: Vicarious liability is the liability of the Master or Principal for the tort committed by his servant or agent, provided the tort is committed in the course of employment. The Master or Principal is not liable for private wrongs of the servant/ agent.

Facts: 'X' hands over some cash money at his house to 'Y', who is his (X's) neighbour and is also, cashier in a bank, to be deposited in A's account in the bank. Instead of depositing the money, 'Y' misappropriates it.

Q. Which of the following statements depicts correct legal position in this given situation?